Chicago Adventure, Part Eight: How to be an Insect

Chicago Adventure, Part Eight: How to be an Insect


The Chicago Field Museum is one of the largest and most respected natural history museums in the world. Join me as we go behind the scenes! Dun dun dun! These are huge. They’re bigger than birds. They’re katydids from Papua New Guinea. It’s like a grasshopper in the order Orthoptera. In this order there are katydids, grasshoppers, and crickets. And katydids…
– So what abou- what’s a locust, then? Are they… A locust is a grasshopper, it’s-
– Okay. It’s a large grasshopper.
– I’m just trying to like put ’em all in the same thing. It’s a common name.
– So these are- Alright, yeah, yeah. Most people call cidadas locusts too, but they’re not.
– Okay, alright. It’s just the- the grasshoppers that are locusts.
– Mmkay. So, these are probably the largest katydids you’re gonna find. I mean, they’re gigantic! Yeah, ours are probably this big. The katydids in- in North America?
– Okay? Yeah, so this is over twice as long.
– Wow. With a huge wing. And they have a shield that looks like a leaf. So the whole thing is to mimic a leaf. I-d- it definitely looks like a giant leaf. Well, we have the mantids that- so these are clear mantids
– What? that look like leaves. And when an insect is going to copy a leaf, it’s usually a green leaf so it looks live, But…
– Exceptions to the rule. Yes.
– Whaaa- gluuuh- This is the top side, right?
– Yeah. And then when they’re at rest, they fold their wings and they look like a dead leaf. Now these guys took it to a whole new level. Not only do they have the vein of the leaf and the little minor veins, they have rust spots and diseases like a dead life.
– Wow. So they- they copied their host plant.
– How- How do you find these in the wild? Like, ho- what do you- how do you even know where to look for them? You wait till they fly.
-You- Really? Yeah, ’cause you’re not gonna notice that if it’s on a twig.
– No way. I would never, I mean you had to- I looked at these in here and I was like, well, you put some leaves in here for comparison, but obviously not. So this is the underside. Woaaahh!
– Isn’t that amazing? And lookit! Even the tails look like a stem.
– Yeah! Looking like a leaf is a good camouflage,
– Mmhmm. Bu- looking like sticks too.
– *Gasps* So this is the largest, this is the longest insect on the planet.
– This is huge! The giant walking stick. This one I think is from Malaysia. That is- huge!
– And we joke around a little bit here… In-s- yeah, it says “more than seven feet.” I’m like, even I think that’s a little implausible. A lot of people don’t catch that, they’re like “what?”
– Really? Th-These things can be bigger than seven feet?! You can- you have the credentials being in a museum, you could say anything and people would believe you.
– Yes, exactly. And, are these insects too? I can’t even see what’s in here. They look like tiny, tiny dots.
– Yeah, those are probably some of the smallest beetles you’re gonna find. They’re beetles?
– They’re called feather-winged beetles because their wing- This is their wing. It looks like a feather. We have a huge collection of these that Hank Dybas, he was one of our curators here, Mmhmm.
– um , he collected. How do you collect these? We use traps.
– Oh. And we get a lot- we get a bunch of everything.
– Mmhmm. And then we sort out what we call the target taxa, things that we want to study. That’s a death’s head moth over there! Sorry, I just saw that, too. Yeah, the Silence of the Lamb moth. It has a skull on the back of it. So why does it have a skull, like, impression? No, the actual thing that it’s supposed to be looking like
– Mmhmm. is a giant bumblebee.
– Ohhhhh. Because they go into the hives and they’re able to either give off a smell or make a sound that, um, the other bees are like, “Oh, okay, you’re- you’re a friend. Doo doo doo doo.”
– Okay. And then it starts eating the honey and it’s takes it out.
– Wow. The way to collect moths is you hang a sheet and you put a light behind it,
– Yeahh. And the moths come to the sheet. And they run into it and you photograph it. These guys, certain parts of the year, they like cover your sheets, like “go away, I want other stuff!” Ohh, they’re so cool.
– And they- they run into the sheet and they knock the little stuff off. Bullies. These are the tarantula hawks. So, some people are afraid of tarantulas, but they should really be afraid of Tarantula hawks. Yeah.
– the tarantula hawks. See the stinger? So that’s where the venom comes through.
*gasps*But he- but it doesn’t kill them right away. It paralyzes them, and they stay alive? Yeah, and then they’ll l- lay an egg inside.
– What!? And then the egg hatches, and then the larvae start eating the spider inside out. Kinda weird and gross and awesome. I mean I wouldn’t have my children that way,
– Well that’s one thing… but you know. To each his own.
– Insects are found everywhere, and they’re found in other insects too. We have a huge ectoparasite collection, so. Okay, ectoparasite meaning what for- If Bill collected a mammal, he can comb the fur and he’ll find fleas, and lice, and mites.
– Oh yeah! There’s a fly that lives on bats, called a- a bat fly. And many of them are wingless and they move like little crabs through the fur of the bats.
– Weird. And we collect them because, uh, Jim and his colleagues can identify them, and you can actually find how two different species of bats are related to each other based on the relationship of their ectoparasites. Weird!
– So as the ectoparasites evolve, and the relationships among different ectoparasites, reflects the relationship among the different hosts. So it’s a- it’s a- very, very
– It’s like networking, like social networking. Totally like networking.
– It’s like Facebook. Yeah.
– For parasites. Exactly.
– That’s great.

[Fabre’s Book of Insects]  Ep 23 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics

[Fabre’s Book of Insects] Ep 23 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics


It is neither a stream nor a sandy beach. The place where the cabbage butterfly that looked for the place to lay eggs is different It was a ‘cabbage farm’ nearby.
And ~! Other kids besides you are here
You’ve got a lot! These butterflies are in my field
Go away! This guy!
Go somewhere else! old lady! What are you doing now? Do not you see? I’m chasing butterflies. Ah! I know that.
Why are you chasing a butterfly without any guilt? There is no fault! What do you know? Their larvae eat my crops
It makes you tattered. Then I cannot sell it at the right price and I’ve got nothing left!
Do you understand? She is not wrong.
huh! It is a ‘cabbage worm’ They do nothing but eat crops. She can be angry, too. .
Go away!
Go away! What? What are you doing there? The egg is placed on the back of the cabbage leaf, just like a line. Hey! What are you doing there? Ah! No. nothing… . If you leave this egg here She will take it all away. So that’s the only way. Alley-oop! No! Hey! Why are you picking on someone else’s cabbage? Madame! This cabbage … . How much? Take this to your house and put it in a pot! Hopefully I can figure out the process from eggs to butterflies! I ended up planting cabbages in pots.
I do not think so. Anyway! I’ll check to see if the eggs are safe. The number of eggs attached to cabbage leaves is about 200
It seemed to be lined with yellowish elongated rice grains. You! I’ll take good care of you.
You must grow up to be a butterfly. OK? I carefully observed the eggs of cabbage butterfly.
I took care of them. And in case the larvae are born
To be a fresh food I also took care of cabbage. A few days after that … . Oh~! Today is a refreshing morning! Well, I am happy today
Let’s observe the eggs of cabbage butterfly! What? What is that flying over cabbage? Is it the fly bugs? I made the biggest mistake that day.
Wait a moment ~. The guys who I thought they were fly bugs are.
I’ll move on to the sunshine.
It was nothing other than the egg parasitoids. Egg parasitoids are small insects of about 0.4mm in size, and lay eggs where the eggs of cabbage butterflies are gathered.
It was the guy who parasitized his caterpillar. I did not know it at all, but I found out after the caterpillar had woken up in the eggs of cabbage butterfly. Because of egg parasitoid.
More than half of the dead eggs are not even born as larvae. I’m sorry, guys. If I had known beforehand
It could have been born more than this. Newborn larvae eat the shells of their eggs. After eating the eggshells, the larvae start to eat cabbage leaves in earnest. There’s a guy eating from the edge of the leaf.
There is a guy who eats from the center. It looks like eating food according to eating habits … Because they come from a close place to eat a lot. So let’s find out what they look like.

The Nearsightedness Epidemic

The Nearsightedness Epidemic


When you hear about epidemics, it usually
has to do with some frightening virus like HIV or Ebola. So when scientists in the know start talking
about an epidemic of nearsightedness, it probably sounds … strange. I mean, how can something that isn’t infectious
or contagious become an epidemic? And yet: The prevalence of nearsightedness
in the US is pushing 40 to 50% among young people. And that’s nothing compared to parts of
East Asia — particularly Singapore, China, Japan, and Korea — where nearsightedness
among high-school-age children is at 80% or more. Is it because kids these days have too much
homework? Or is technology to blame? Are iPads ruining our children?! New research suggests the cause of nearsightedness
might not be peering too closely at your homework … but neither is it all up to genetics. And that might be a good thing, because there’s
a potential prevention out there that’s universal, and free. The antidote to nearsightedness might be good
old-fashioned sunlight. Nearsightedness, or myopia, is a condition
in which your eyeball is elongated. When light enters an eyeball that’s too
long, the lens focuses light in front of the retina instead of right on its surface. This creates an image that’s blurry if you’re
looking at anything farther away than your outstretched arm. Myopia is easily corrected with glasses, contacts,
or surgery. But in extreme cases, what eye doctors call high myopia, it carries a risk
of severe eye problems, like glaucoma, retinal detachment, and cataracts. Nearsightedness has always been around to
some extent. Astronomer Johannes Kepler blamed his near-sightedness
on all of the writing and calculations he did up close, and for centuries that’s been
the conventional wisdom. For a long time, peering too closely at written
material, termed near work, has been blamed as the cause of nearsightedness. Near work typically includes things like reading
and writing. Watching TV doesn’t count, because it’s far enough away, and even using
a computer isn’t as hard on your eyes. Things like smartphones and tablets are new
enough that it’s hard to say whether they should be included in the definition, but
nearsightedness has been on the rise since before they became mainstream, so they’re
probably not at fault either way. But while extensive studies have had a hard
time ruling out near work entirely, they also have a hard time establishing a firm link. So, most scientists no longer think near work
is directly responsible for nearsightedness. But In the 20th century, we learned that there’s
a certain amount of genetic influence on nearsightedness. If your parents are nearsighted, you might
be, too. But that genetic influence isn’t really
straightforward. It involves a few dozen genes, each of which only contributes a fraction
of the overall story. Plus, a study of an Inuit community in Alaska
back in 1969 showed that nearsightedness can spread way too fast for genetics to explain. At one point, only 2 out of 131 people in
that community were nearsighted — that’s one and a half percent. But the prevalence rose to nearly fifty percent
in their children and grandchildren! Genetics couldn’t possibly be responsible
for such a rapid spread. This led scientists to conclude that, while genes have some influence,
the main cause of nearsightedness must be something in our environments. And it must be something that’s dramatically
increased in recent times. While near work itself doesn’t seem to be
the culprit, there does seem to be a link between nearsightedness and education. One study, published in October 2015 by researchers
from Cardiff University in Wales, found that firstborns are more likely to be nearsighted
than later children. About 10% more likely, to be specific, which
certainly doesn’t account for the skyrocketing prevalence, but it might provide a clue. When the researchers adjusted the data to
account for how much education the participants had had, the effect diminished, which means
that it was the education of the subjects that made the difference. The scientists suggested it was a result of
so-called “parental investment.” First-time parents who make their oldest kid hit the
books might be a little more relaxed by the third one. As a result, firstborns who spent
more time studying ended up being more likely to be nearsighted. Another study, by researchers from Sun Yat-sen
University in China, compared the rates of nearsightedness in two neighboring Chinese
provinces. They looked at schoolchildren in Shaanxi,
a middle-income province, and comparatively poor Gansu province. The prevalence of myopia among kids from the
wealthy province was roughly twice that of the poor province. The researchers couldn’t
fully explain this difference, but higher math scores were associated with higher rates
of nearsightedness. So it certainly looks like education correlates
with nearsightedness, but how is this happening? And if it’s so easy to correct, why worry? Well the fact is, about 20% of people with
nearsightedness end up having high myopia. For example, more than 90% of 19-year-old
men in Seoul, South Korea have myopia. So that means nearly 20% of that population is
at risk for those serious complications we mentioned, which can lead to blindness. Having this many people at risk of serious
eye problems is a major public health concern. And eyeglasses will certainly help, so getting
glasses to kids who need them is a big priority — or, at least, should be — in these countries. But still that’s not going to address the
underlying problem. Why are so many people throughout the industrialized world nearsighted,
when our ancestors didn’t have this problem? And why is the situation especially dire in
Asia? The best guess anyone has is that it’s related
to the particular emphasis placed on education by many East Asian cultures. China has a do-or-die college entrance exam
that makes the SAT look like a walk in the park. Kids as young as 10 spend hours every
day doing homework. If education is a factor in nearsightedness,
that’s where it’s going to show up. To tease out the effect of cultural environment,
Australian researchers from the University of Sydney looked at 6 and 7 year old ethnic
Chinese children living in Sydney and Singapore. The kids’ parents had similar rates of nearsightedness–around
70%–in both study groups. But in the kids themselves, the difference
was stark. Only 3.3% of kids in the Australian group were nearsighted, compared to 29.1%
in Singapore. And the children in Sydney actually did more
near-work activities, like reading and homework, than the kids in Singapore, so that couldn’t
possibly be the cause. The only difference between the two groups
of children that could account for the difference in myopia was how much time they spent outside. The kids in Sydney spent more than 13 hours
a week outside, the kids in Singapore only 3. This seems almost hard to believe. Can sunlight
really prevent you from becoming nearsighted? Scientists and public health officials would
really like to know. But, nothing in epidemiology is ever simple. In order to figure out if natural light can
treat myopia, we need two things: Rigorous evidence that sunlight really works, and a
scientific reason–a mechanism–for it to have that effect. Fortunately, within the last few years, researchers
have made progress toward both. Experiments in animals, including chicks and
rhesus monkeys, have shown that light can protect against myopia. Researchers in Germany first tried to induce
myopia in a set of chicks using special goggles, so that all the other variables could be controlled.
Then they exposed two groups to different lighting conditions, with one group being
raised under bright light that was meant to simulate sunlight, and others under normal
laboratory lighting. Turns out, the onset of myopia was slowed
in the group raised under bright lights, by around 60%. Then the researchers focused their attention
on a substance produced by your own brain that’s known to influence proper eye development:
the neurotransmitter dopamine. In another experiment, the researchers injected
the chicks with a chemical that blocked dopamine. Without the dopamine, the protective effect
of sunlight disappeared. So it’s believed that dopamine is released
into your eyes as a result of bright light. This chemical is at least partly related to
your body’s day/night rhythm — it’s involved in the switch body undergoes from from low-light
nighttime vision to daytime vision. And it’s what lets bright, natural light signal to
your body that it’s daytime. So, researchers now think that this dopamine
cycle is needed for healthy eye development throughout childhood. If it’s disrupted, like by spending all
your time indoors in dim light, your eyeball starts to become elongated, and myopia results. This light-dopamine hypothesis is currently
the best theory for how sunlight can help your eyes develop. Best part is, sunlight is free, and it’s
an easy thing to try to see if it keeps kids from becoming nearsighted. A few studies have even looked into using
sunlight as preventive medicine. One of the biggest studies looked at primary
school children at 12 schools in Guangzhou, China. They were divided into two groups of
six schools each, with about 950 children in each bunch. The control schools didn’t change their
daily routine, but the other schools added a 40-minute outdoor activity period. Then
the researchers tracked the kids for three years. By the end of the trial, the incidence rate
of myopia in the group that spent more time outside was 30%, compared to 39.5% in the
control group. The reduction was actually less than what
the researchers expected. But still, preventing myopia in young kids is worthwhile, they say,
because the longer it progresses, the worse it gets. The most difficult thing about using sunlight
as medicine might just be convincing parents to send their kids outside more. In the Chinese study, the schools sent the
kids outside for an extra 40 minutes, but parents were also asked to send their kids
outside even more on their own time. But as far as the researchers could tell,
the parents kind of…didn’t do that. And they think more than 40 minutes is needed
to achieve the most beneficial effect. So, it seems like a victory for sunlight.
I mean, it isn’t established for sure — many studies have shown that vision quality benefits
simply from going outside, rather than bright light per se. So it could be that the effect comes from,
say, playing more sports rather than sunlight. But researchers are calling for more studies
to better establish the link, and the data so far look promising. In the meantime, fresh air and sunlight as
a clinical intervention is a pretty appealing idea. In the end, it doesn’t seem like video games
or smartphones are to blame for the nearsightedness epidemic. But neither are books and homework.
And, thankfully, it’s not a terrifying virus that’s causing the epidemic of nearsightedness. Rather, it might be an overwhelming cultural
tendency to stay indoors. So if you want to keep your kids from becoming
nearsighted, maybe sign them up for soccer. Sports: they’re good for you. Who knew? Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow,
which was brought to you by our patrons on Patreon, like Carsten Steckel and Glen Knowles!
Thank you both! If you want to help us make more content like this, just go to patreon.com/scishow.
And don’t forget to go to youtube.com/scishow and subscribe!

Viewer Mail! – How Do Bugs Hang Upside-Down?


♪Intro♪ One of the best parts of our day here at the
Fort is checking our email. We get so many awesome science questions! Even though we can’t answer them all, today
Squeaks and I wanted to answer some of them! Okay, our first question is from Kelsey. Kelsey wants to know, “Why is it harder
to run uphill and easier to run downhill?” Interesting question, Kelsey! It’s easier to run down a hill than up a
hill because of gravity, which is a force that pulls you — and everything else on
the planet — toward the ground. Forces are the pushes and pulls that happen
to us and all around us every day. When you push a block along the floor or roll
a ball, you’re putting a force on it! Gravity is a force, too, and it’s pulling
on us all the time, even though we can’t see it. But we sure can feel what gravity does! Like, when I jump into the air … like that … I don’t stay up for very long because gravity
pulls me right back down to the ground. The reason I was able to be in the air for
even a little bit is because of another force: the push I made against the floor with my
legs. I pushed down with my legs hard enough to
overcome gravity, but only for a second. Now, if I push down harder … I can jump higher … But it takes more work. The same kind of thing happens when we run
up a hill. Our legs are trying to push our bodies up,
while gravity is pulling us /down/. We have to work hard to fight the pull of
gravity, and more work means we get tired faster! The opposite happens when we run down the
hill. This time, we get a little help from gravity,
since gravity is pulling us down — the same direction that we want to go. We’re not fighting against the gravity,
so it doesn’t feel like we’re working as hard. Thanks for your question, Kelsey! Our second question today is from Matty. Matty asked us, “How can insects climb walls
and be upside down?” That’s an awesome question! If I tried to climb a wall, gravity would
pull me right back down! So how do flies and other insects do it? Gravity pulls on everything — even the tiniest
fly! Well, some insects have special body parts
that help them to climb up walls and across ceilings. Because a wall or ceiling that looks or even
feels pretty smooth to us, really isn’t. If we could look at a wall really closely,
we’d see that they have lots of little bumps, cracks, and pits. And what seems like a tiny bump to us can
look like a comfortable place to stand for a tiny fly! Some insects have little claws or hairs on
the ends of their legs, which they use to help them grab onto the bumps in the wall
or ceiling. There are also some insects that make an oily
liquid that helps them to stick to a wall or ceiling. It’s sticky enough to keep their bodies
from falling down, but not sticky enough that they get stuck in one place! Thanks for your awesome question, Matty! We love getting comments and mail! So if /you/ have a question for us, ask a
grownup to help you leave a comment below, or to send us an email at [email protected]! We’ll see you next time, here at the Fort! ♪Outro♪

Behind the Opioid Epidemic: The Real Cause + Natural Solutions

Behind the Opioid Epidemic: The Real Cause + Natural Solutions


Hello everyone. This is Dr. Bill Rawls with an opinion on
the opioid crisis. I think everybody’s aware that we’ve got
an opioid problem going on in the United States, Europe, and really worldwide. Opioids are the same as narcotics. On the street, that’s heroin. In the hospital, it’s morphine injections. In doctors’ offices, it’s drugs like Percocet,
an orally stable form of the narcotic that’s typically mixed with Tylenol or aspirin. These drugs are really excellent for acute
pain, for acute trauma, for use in the operating room and post-operative pain — in these
cases they’re really essential. But opioids are really terrible for chronic
pain, and that’s what they’re being used very widely for. Percocet prescriptions are very widespread
across the country in primary care offices. They have been for 30 years. They just don’t work for chronic pain. The problem is in the way that these drugs
work. Any time you have a drug that has an effect
like pain relief or anxiety relief, it’s typically hitting the receptors of some other
chemical messenger in the body. In this case, it’s endorphins. We all hear about endorphins. That’s what you get with a runner’s high. It’s what our body produces to keep us from
being a bundle of pain all the time. If we didn’t have endorphins, we wouldn’t
be able to get up out of the chair. We would hurt so badly. Endorphins just keep down that normal level
of pain with movement. Narcotics, morphine, heroin, all of these
drugs basically act the same way as endorphins in our body. If you take it acutely for several days to
a week, it’s okay. If you take opioids chronically, you start
suppressing endorphins more, and more, and more, and more. You lower the person’s pain threshold until
any amount of pain is excruciating. They really end up working against you if
you use them chronically, because you suppress the endorphins so much. That’s why they’re habituating: If you
suppress endorphins, and then you take the narcotic away, people go through withdrawal
symptoms and have terrible pain. It can be really disruptive to someone’s
entire system. There’s good evidence that for chronic pain,
for conditions like fibromyalgia, opioids in the long run make people’s pain worse. That really makes sense, because if you use
them on a regular chronic basis and suppress natural endorphins in the body, you need more,
and more, and more of these drugs to work. Of course, you can only take so much. When somebody becomes habituated to these
things, it’s a real problem. They not only have chronic pain, but then
they also have this habituation with the drug to deal with, and if they don’t get the
drug, they’re in really bad shape. It’s really widespread. We see it all across the country. And once people get going, once they are habituated,
they look for higher and higher doses, so they go to stronger and stronger drugs. There’s a higher and higher risk of overdose. These drugs can suppress respiration. When you start looking for solutions, you
have to ask the question, why do people want these drugs in the first place, especially
in such a high demand? It has to do with the fact that we have, in
addition to an opioid epidemic, we’ve got an inflammation epidemic in our country, and
worldwide for that matter. People are in inflamed. They hurt. The foods they’re eating, the way they go
about life, chronic stress, and all the daily things that come with modern living, cause
us to have more pain than average. We don’t like to hurt so we seek out solutions,
and the easiest solution is a narcotic. All it takes is one prescription for Percocet
to last a month, and somebody will be habituated for a lifetime. It’s really, really hard to get off these
drugs. It has become a monumental problem. When we come back around to addressing the
problem, the solution isn’t just taking drugs away from people and keeping doctors
from prescribing these drugs. The solution is recognizing that people are
in pain because of chronic inflammation. We have to change their diet; we have to address
stress and other factors that drive inflammation. Herbal therapy is really wonderful for that. And as far as looking for alternatives to
narcotics, CBD (cannabidiol from hemp) and possibly different forms of medical marijuana
are a much better solution because they’re much less addicting. In fact, CBD has no habituating tendencies
at all. It doesn’t cause respiratory depressions,
so you can’t die from it. It will not kill you. When we look towards solutions to this really
bad epidemic problem, we’ve got to do more than just talk to doctors about not prescribing
the drugs. We’ve got to, as a society, look at the
problem and say, “Yes, we have a bigger problem here that people are inflamed.” They’re in pain and we have to reduce the
inflammation and look for better solutions to the problem, rather than just the knee-jerk
response of writing prescriptions for narcotics.

What is an Epidemic?

What is an Epidemic?


Epidemics and pandemics, are when you get a sudden burst of an infection. It can be a relatively small outbreak. It can be a fairly severe one in a localized area. For example, the Ebola epidemic that hit West Africa a few years ago or it can be massive like the flu pandemic of 1918 This is the centenary year of that epidemic which actually killed somewhere between 50 and 100 million people. Some epidemics are passed on by insects like mosquitoes or fleas. Some are passed on by airborne methods some are passed on by food and water. Some are passed on sexually and some are passed on by touch and depending which of these it is we can do different things to try and control them.

Sexual Attraction Is Shaped by Gut Bacteria, Infectious Diseases, and Parasites | Kathleen McAuliffe


There’s a few ways in which infectious disease
may impact who we find sexually attractive. So for example, in cultures where infectious
disease is highly prevalent people tend to place more emphasis on beauty. So skin free of any kind of pockmarks, and
also more symmetrical features. Because what happens is that if you have an
infectious disease when you’re young it can derail development and that’s part of the
reason why people’s features may be a little bit more asymmetric if they’re more vulnerable
to infectious disease. There’s also evidence that we’re more attractive
to people whose odors signify that they have very different immune systems from ourselves. And the way it works is this that believe
it or not odor correlates with how your immune system functions. And we all vary individually in how susceptible
we are to different kinds of infection and basically the research suggests that we’re
most attracted to people who are most different from us in terms of how their immune system
functions. So if we mate and have children our children
are going to have very varied genes and as a result if say a terrible infection is spreading
around you might lose one child but you’re not going to lose all your children because
they’re going to have very varied immune systems in terms of what could make them sick and
walk they’re more resistant to. I view gut bacteria as an extension of parasitic
manipulation. Even though I don’t think that most gut bacteria
are parasites, in fact I would call them symbiotic manipulators. And the reason I’m so interested in them is
because they do manipulate behavior in a fashion not totally unlike parasitic manipulators. And the way they’re able to do this is there’s
over a thousand different species of bacteria that inhabit our guts. And there are species that turn out basically
every single neurotransmitter that you have in your brain and they turn out hormones,
so stress hormones and hormones that regulate our appetite and energy levels. So the research suggests that the bacteria
in our gut influence everything from whether you’re energetic or sluggish, happy or sad,
anxious and calm, maybe even whether you’re fat or thin. And there is some research now exploring what
fecal implants, if you transplant feces from one person to another they’re looking to see
what some of the effects are. Some examples would be there have been efforts
to show that by transplanting feces from one person to another that you may even be able
to influence their appetite. So far I don’t think they’ve had too much
success. There are one or two examples though of, for
example, a woman who had was getting the fecal transplant actually to treat a digestive disease. It’s called Clostridium dufficile. They have shown, by the way, the fecal transplant
is very effective in treating some of these digestive disorders. And this particular woman wanted to get the
fecal donor her she wanted it to be her donor daughter who was there in around 15 or 16
years of age and within a short period of time after getting the fecal transplant the
mother suddenly for the first time in her life was starting to become overweight and
she actually eventually became obese and she was convinced it was related to the transplant. And within just a year or two of her daughter
being the donor the daughter became obese. So findings like that make scientists wonder
if fecal transplant might actually, in the future, just as it can cause obesity maybe
if you get the donor from a thin person maybe you can prevent obesity. It’s not very appetizing to contemplate it. You may be happy to hear that scientists are
hoping to just purify the useful strains of bacteria and then concentrate them in a capsule. They call them crapsules. And so they’re hoping that they’ll be able
to use these capsules instead of getting an actual fecal transplant, which they do it
using that instrument that they use to do a colonoscopy. That’s how they insert feces up your intestinal
tract.

[Fabre’s Book of Insects]  Ep 26 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics

[Fabre’s Book of Insects] Ep 26 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics


It’s raining When the wind blows, You can fall somewhere, or you can float in the water.
Oh, it’s terrible. So where is the right place to make a pupa? A crease of wood The point where branches come out. The lower part of the leaf is fine, The crack of cabbage here is also a good place. So where are you going to go?
Secret! The larvae of cabbage butterfly (cabbage worms) go to a suitable place to make a pupa.
I think this is the right place. Then, weave thread in the place to make thread bundles to hold the pupa. I can sleep now. When I wake up, I become a butterfly! Two days after a day passes
It is already a week.
But you should not wake up now.
I still have to wait a week more to become a butterfly. As the week goes by, the caterpillar in a pupa go through the process of ‘fable’. The ‘fable’ process is the process by which the larvae in the pupa turn into butterflies. Early morning, 14 days after the pupa. Smile! stuffy.
Where is this place? Ah! I turned into a pupa to become a butterfly. I was sleeping all the time … . I think I have changed my body a bit.
The number of legs is reduced a lot, and there is something on the back … . What was changed in the dark
I cannot tell. Hmm. The light is coming in.
Is it the door that goes out? As the back side of the pupa opens, the butterfly first comes out of the head and body.
Yo-ho! Because the wings are wrinkled. But do not worry. Dry their wings in warm sunshine The body fluid flows into the blood vessels in the wings and the wings of the butterfly are straightened. Finally the wi … The wings are all dry!
What should I do now? What should you do! Now it can fly the sky freely! Yo-ho! Wow ~! I… I’m a big butterfly now!
Butterfly!

Ladybug Ladybug | Plus Lots More Nursery Rhymes | 69 Minutes Compilation from LittleBabyBum!

Ladybug Ladybug | Plus Lots More Nursery Rhymes | 69 Minutes Compilation from LittleBabyBum!


(soft tinkling) (“Ladybug Ladybug”) ♫ One little ladybug he fly fly flies ♫ Two little ladybugs they roll roll roll ♫ Three little ladybugs
they jump jump jump ♫ Four little ladybugs go slow slow slow ♫ Five little ladybugs, shh ♫ Zzz ♫ One little ladybug he fly fly flies ♫ Two little ladybugs they roll roll roll ♫ Three little ladybugs
they jump jump jump ♫ Four little ladybugs go slow slow slow ♫ Five little ladybugs, shh ♫ Zzz ♫ One little lady bug he fly fly flies ♫ Two little ladybugs they roll roll roll ♫ Three little ladybugs
they jump jump jump ♫ Four little ladybugs go slow slow slow ♫ Five little ladybugs, shh ♫ Zzz (“Counting Five Little Ducks”) ♫ Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack ♫ Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack ♫ One little duck says quack ♫ Two little ducks say quack, quack ♫ Three little ducks
say quack, quack, quack ♫ Four little ducks say
quack, quack, quack, quack ♫ And five little ducks say ♫ Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack ♫ One little duck says quack ♫ Two little ducks say quack, quack ♫ Three little ducks
say quack, quack, quack ♫ Four little ducks say
quack, quack, quack, quack ♫ And five little ducks say ♫ Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack ♫ Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack ♫ Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack (“Song About Planes”) ♫ I’m going on a plane ♫ I think I’ll try ♫ To find a rainbow so bright ♫ I’m going on a plane ♫ To touch the clouds ♫ So big, so fluffy and white ♫ Soaring through the sky so high, so high ♫ Spreading our wings, we fly fly fly ♫ I’m going on a plane ♫ I think I’ll try ♫ To find a rainbow so bright ♫ I’m going on a plane ♫ To touch the clouds ♫ So big, so fluffy and white ♫ Soaring through the sky so high, so high ♫ Spreading our wings, we fly fly fly (“The Little Blue Whale”) ♫ The little blue whale
with the little blue tail ♫ With the blue tail, with the blue tail ♫ Can you see the blue
whale in the big blue sea ♫ Swimming so merrily ♫ The little blue bird
flies high in the blue sky ♫ In the blue sky, in the blue sky ♫ Can you see the blue
bird flying in the breeze ♫ Flying so merrily ♫ The little blue frog
hops with the blue flea ♫ From the tree, from the tree ♫ Can you see the blue friends
hopping one, two, three ♫ Hopping so merrily (“Down By the Bay”) ♫ Down by the bay ♫ Where the watermelons grow ♫ Back to my home ♫ I dare not go ♫ For if I do ♫ My mother will say ♫ Did you ever see an ant climbing a plant ♫ Down by the bay ♫ Down by the bay ♫ Where the watermelons grow ♫ Back to my home ♫ I dare not go ♫ For if I do ♫ My mother will say ♫ Did you ever see a
duck in a pickup truck ♫ Down by the bay ♫ Down by the bay ♫ Where the watermelons grow ♫ Back to my home ♫ I dare not go ♫ For if I do ♫ My mother will say ♫ Did you ever see a fly wearing a tie ♫ Down by the bay ♫ Down by the bay ♫ Where the watermelons grow ♫ Back to my home ♫ I dare not go ♫ For if I do ♫ My mother will say ♫ Did you ever see a cat wearing a hat ♫ Down by the bay (“Number 1 Song”) ♫ Let’s sing a song about the number one ♫ It’s very easy and lots of fun ♫ Let’s sing a song about the number one ♫ And here we go ♫ One fast car so blue and bright ♫ One jet aeroplane taking flight ♫ One big tugboat on the lake ♫ And one long train, train, train ♫ Let’s sing a song about the number one ♫ It’s very easy and lots of fun ♫ Let’s sing a song about the number one ♫ And here we go ♫ One juicy orange that tastes so great ♫ One yellow banana on my plate ♫ One sweet apple I love to eat ♫ And one ripe strawberry (“A Wise Old Owl”) ♫ A wise old owl lived in an oak ♫ The more he saw the less he spoke ♫ The less he spoke the more he heard ♫ Why can’t we all ♫ Be like that wise old bird ♫ Why can’t we all be
like that wise old bird ♫ Why can’t we all be
like that wise old bird ♫ A wise old owl lived in an oak ♫ The more he saw the less he spoke ♫ The less he spoke the more he heard ♫ Why can’t we all ♫ Be like that wise old bird ♫ Why can’t we all be
like that wise old bird ♫ Why can’t we all be
like that wise old bird ♫ Why can’t we all be
like that wise old bird ♫ Why can’t we all be
like that wise old bird (“There Was a Crooked Man”) ♫ There was a crooked man
and he walked a crooked mile ♫ He found a crooked
sixpence upon a crooked stile ♫ He bought a crooked cat,
which caught a crooked mouse ♫ And they all lived together
in a little crooked house ♫ There was a crooked man
and he walked a crooked mile ♫ He found a crooked
sixpence upon a crooked stile ♫ He bought a crooked cat,
which caught a crooked mouse ♫ And they all lived together
in a little crooked house ♫ They ate a crooked dinner
on a very crooked table ♫ In came a crooked horse
from a crooked stable ♫ They all had crooked
dishes in many crooked styles ♫ And after every bite,
each had crooked smile ♫ Day ♫ Night ♫ Day ♫ Night ♫ The sun comes up to start the day ♫ There’s time to learn and time to play ♫ We eat our meals and do our chores ♫ There’s family time and so much more ♫ At night the moon comes out to shine ♫ It’s nice to get ready for bedtime ♫ We rest our heads and close our eyes ♫ The stars, they twinkle in the sky ♫ The sun comes up to start the day ♫ There’s time to learn and time to play ♫ We eat our meals and do our chores ♫ There’s family time and so much more ♫ At night the moon comes out to shine ♫ It’s nice to get ready for bedtime ♫ We rest our heads and close our eyes ♫ The stars, they twinkle in the sky (“Cock A Doodle Doo”) ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ My dame has lost her shoe ♫ My master’s lost his fiddlestick ♫ And knows not what to do ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ What is my dame to do ♫ Till master’s found his fiddling stick ♫ She’ll dance without her shoe ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ My dame has found her shoe ♫ And master’s found his fiddling stick ♫ Sing cock a doodle do ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ My dame will dance with you ♫ While master fiddles his fiddling stick ♫ And knows not what to do ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ My dame has lost her shoe ♫ My master’s lost his fiddlestick ♫ And knows not what to do ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ What is my dame to do ♫ Till master’s found his fiddling stick ♫ She’ll dance without her shoe ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ My dame has found her shoe ♫ And master’s found his fiddling stick ♫ Sing cock a doodle do ♫ Cock a doodle do ♫ My dame will dance with you ♫ While master fiddles his fiddling stick ♫ And knows not what to do (“The Moon Song”) ♫ At night the moon comes out to play ♫ The sun has finished for the day ♫ Now it’s late and very dark ♫ The moon shines bright across the park ♫ It’s the moon moon moon ♫ It’s the moon moon moon ♫ Sometimes the moon is a crescent ♫ And sometimes it is round ♫ It grows bigger and then smaller ♫ Every month we have found ♫ It’s the moon, moon, moon ♫ It’s the moon, moon, moon ♫ It’s the moon, moon, moon ♫ It’s the moon (“To Market to Market”) ♫ To market, to market to buy a big cake ♫ Mm ♫ Walk around, shop around jiggety-bake ♫ To market, to market to buy a cute dog (dog barking) ♫ Walk around, shop around jiggety-jog ♫ To market, to market to buy a big drum ♫ Home again, home again market is done ♫ To market, to market to buy a big cake ♫ Mm ♫ Walk around, shop around jiggety-bake ♫ To market, to market to buy a cute dog (dog barking) ♫ Walk around, shop around jiggety-jog ♫ To market, to market to buy a big drum ♫ Home again, home again market is done (“Being Kind to Each Other Song”) ♫ You’re my friend so
I will always be there ♫ Being kind and helpful is to really care ♫ If you need my help just ask ♫ You come first and never last ♫ You’re my friend so
I will always be there ♫ If you fall then I
will pick you right up ♫ If you cry then I
will try to cheer you up ♫ Friends help each other out ♫ That’s what friends are all about ♫ If you fall then I
will pick you right up ♫ When you’re sick in bed
and feeling oh so blue ♫ I will help you get
to feeling better soon ♫ I will bring you things you need ♫ Make you comfortable indeed ♫ When you’re sick I’ll
help you feel better soon ♫ When you need someone
to talk to I’ll be here ♫ If you need someone
to talk to never fear ♫ I will listen any day ♫ To the things you want to say ♫ When you need someone
to talk to I’ll be here ♫ You’re my friend so
I will always be there ♫ Being kind and helpful is to really care ♫ If you need my help just ask ♫ You come first and never last ♫ You’re my friend so
I will always be there (“Where Did You Go?”) ♫ One, two, three, four ♫ Five, six, seven, eight ♫ Nine, ten, coming ♫ Ready or not ♫ Count one to ten ♫ Without a peek ♫ You go hide and then I seek ♫ Where’d you go ♫ Where’d you hide ♫ You’re not in the places I tried ♫ I looked over here ♫ I looked over there ♫ I looked up and down and everywhere ♫ You’re good at this ♫ Where did you go ♫ Are you here ♫ Yes, yes, yes, no ♫ One, two, three, four ♫ Five, six, seven, eight ♫ Nine, ten, coming ♫ Ready or not ♫ Count one to ten ♫ Without a peek ♫ You go hide and then I seek ♫ Where’d you go ♫ Where’d you hide ♫ You’re not in the places I tried ♫ I looked over here ♫ I looked over there ♫ I looked up and down and everywhere ♫ You’re good at this ♫ Where did you go ♫ Are you here ♫ Yes, yes, yes, no (“Number 2 Song”) ♫ I have two gloves for my two hands ♫ Two socks that warm my feet ♫ I have two shoes I love so much ♫ Two bows I tie so neat ♫ Can you sing a song about the number two ♫ Will you count one, two with me ♫ There’s so many nice
things about the number two ♫ So many nice things you see ♫ I have two ears that help me hear ♫ Two headphones play a beat ♫ I have two eyes that help me see ♫ I close when I’m asleep ♫ Can you sing a song about the number two ♫ Will you count one, two with me ♫ There’s so many nice
things about the number two ♫ So many nice things you see (“Two Little Dickie Birds”) ♫ Two little dickie
birds sitting on a wall ♫ One named Peter, one named Paul ♫ Fly away Peter, fly away Paul ♫ Come back Peter, come back Paul ♫ Into the garden the little birds go ♫ Looking for worms that hide down low ♫ Peter can’t catch one, neither can Paul ♫ Back home Peter, back home Paul ♫ Two little dickie
birds sitting on a wall ♫ One named Peter, one named Paul ♫ Fly away Peter, fly away Paul ♫ Come back Peter, come back Paul (“Seasons Song, 4 Seasons”) ♫ We really, really love Spring ♫ Spring brings lots of new things ♫ New flowers, cute baby lambs ♫ Bees a-buzzing, clap your hands ♫ Summertime means ice creams ♫ Beaches, holidays, lovely things ♫ Blue skies, smiling sun ♫ Swimming in the pool, lots of fun ♫ In autumn the leaves turn brown ♫ Then they fall down to the ground ♫ Lots of birds then fly away ♫ But they’ll come back another day ♫ In wintertime it’s very cold ♫ Build a snowman, grab some coal ♫ Snowball fights and sledding too ♫ Wintertime is fun for you (“Wheels On the Bus- Part 10”) ♫ The wheels on the bus go round and round ♫ Round and round, round and round ♫ The wheels on the bus go round and round ♫ All through the town ♫ The boy on the street
says there’s the bus ♫ There’s the bus, there’s the bus ♫ The boy on the street
says there’s the bus ♫ All through the town ♫ The bus on the road
says what a long queue ♫ What a long queue, what a long queue ♫ The bus on the road
says what a long queue ♫ All through the town ♫ The police vehicle has come along ♫ Come along, come along ♫ The police vehicle has come along ♫ All through the town ♫ The little ducks they run around ♫ Run around, run around ♫ The little ducks they run around ♫ All through the town ♫ The people on the bus
then catch the ducks ♫ Catch the ducks, catch the ducks ♫ The people on the bus
then catch the ducks ♫ All through the town ♫ The vehicles can move again ♫ Move again, move again ♫ The vehicles can move again ♫ All through the town (“Number 3 Song”) ♫ Three, three, you and me ♫ Let’s all count from one to three ♫ Take your time, for this rhyme ♫ Let’s find three so easily ♫ Count to three over and over ♫ Let’s find the little green clover ♫ There it is, can you believe ♫ One and two and yes, three leaves ♫ Up next, it’s the triangle ♫ With three sides and three angles ♫ Some sides are short, some are long ♫ If you count three,
you’re right not wrong ♫ Three, three, you and me ♫ Let’s all count from one to three ♫ Take your time, for this rhyme ♫ Let’s find three so easily ♫ Have you ever seen a tricycle ♫ It’s like a three-wheeled bicycle ♫ One wheel at the front
and two at the back ♫ If you count them all,
you’ve got the knack ♫ Now don’t forget the
three little kittens ♫ The naughty cats who lost their mittens ♫ Here they are, can you see ♫ Count them with me, one, two, three ♫ Three, three, you and me ♫ Let’s all count from one to three ♫ Take your time, for this rhyme ♫ Let’s find three so easily (“Where is Thumbkin?) – Hello, I’m Thumbkin. – I’m Pointer. ♫ Where is Thumbkin, where is Thumbkin ♫ Here I am, here I am ♫ How are you, Mia ♫ Very well, I thank you ♫ Let’s all play, let’s all play ♫ Where is Pointer, where is Pointer ♫ Here I am, here I am ♫ How are you, Jacus ♫ Very well, I thank you ♫ Run and hide, run and hide ♫ Where is Thumbkin, where is Thumbkin ♫ Here I am, here I am ♫ How are you, Polly ♫ Very well, I thank you ♫ Run away, run away ♫ Where is Pointer, where is Pointer ♫ Here I am, here I am ♫ How are you, Johnny ♫ Very well, I thank you ♫ Let’s all play, let’s all play – Hi there. I’m going to count to 1,000 by hundreds. Are you with me? Let’s go! ♫ 100 ♫ 200 ♫ 300 ♫ 400 ♫ 500 ♫ 600 ♫ 700 ♫ 800 ♫ 900 ♫ 1000 You did a great job! Let’s try it again! ♫ 100 ♫ 200 ♫ 300 ♫ 400 ♫ 500 ♫ 600 ♫ 700 ♫ 800 ♫ 900 ♫ 1000 You’re doing awesome! Let’s sing it one more time. ♫ 100 ♫ 200 ♫ 300 ♫ 400 ♫ 500 ♫ 600 ♫ 700 ♫ 800 ♫ 900 ♫ 1000 Thanks for counting with me. You did excellent. (“Crocodile Song”) ♫ Can you see the bubbles ♫ Popping one, two, three ♫ Look out, there’s his snout ♫ Is that, could it be ♫ Yes, it’s a crocodile ♫ Look at his big smile ♫ He’s got lots of teeth ♫ He swims in the water ♫ Just like he ought to ♫ Sometimes hides underneath ♫ Can you see the rushes ♫ Bending one, two, three ♫ Look out, there’s his snout ♫ Is that, could it be ♫ Yes, it’s a crocodile ♫ Look at his big smile ♫ And short little legs ♫ His belly scrapes the floor ♫ As he walks on all four paws ♫ Stomping as he treads ♫ Can you see the bubbles ♫ Popping one, two, three ♫ Look out, there’s his snout ♫ Is that, could it be ♫ Yes, it’s a crocodile ♫ Look at his big smile ♫ He’s got a tail so long ♫ And thick scaly skin ♫ As sharp as pins ♫ He’s very strong (“1, 2 What Shall We Do?”) ♫ One, two what shall we do ♫ Three, four measure and pour ♫ Five, six whisk and mix ♫ Seven, eight bake the cake ♫ Nine, 10 in the oven ♫ One, two what shall we do ♫ Three, four measure and pour ♫ Five, six whisk and mix ♫ Seven, eight pipe the cake ♫ Nine, 10 do it again ♫ One, two what shall we do ♫ Three, four fill and pour ♫ Five, six spoon to lick ♫ Seven, eight eat the cake ♫ Nine, 10 yum mm mm (“Mia Had a Little Dog”) ♫ Mia had a little dog ♫ Little dog, little dog ♫ Mia had a little dog ♫ And his name was Bingo ♫ And everywhere that Mia went ♫ Mia went, Mia went ♫ And everywhere that Mia went ♫ Bingo was sure to go ♫ Mia had a little dog ♫ Little dog, little dog ♫ Mia had a little dog ♫ And his name was Bingo ♫ And everywhere that Mia went ♫ Mia went, Mia went ♫ And everywhere that Mia went ♫ Bingo was sure to go (“Wheels On the Bus- Part 11”) ♫ The wheels on the bus go round and round ♫ Round and round, round and round ♫ The wheels on the bus go round and round ♫ All though the town ♫ Daisy on the bus says what’s the sound ♫ What’s the sound, what’s the sound ♫ Daisy on the bus says what’s the sound ♫ All through the town ♫ The cars then let the fire truck through ♫ Fire truck through, fire truck through ♫ The cars then let the fire truck through ♫ All through the town ♫ The cat in the tree says meow meow meow ♫ Meow meow meow, meow meow meow ♫ The cat in the tree says meow meow meow ♫ All through the town ♫ The fireman says now please don’t move ♫ Please don’t move, please don’t move ♫ The fireman says now please don’t move ♫ All through the town ♫ The cat in the tree has been rescued ♫ Been rescued, been rescued ♫ The cat in the tree has been rescued ♫ All through the town ♫ The people gathered
round are now cheering ♫ Now cheering, now cheering ♫ The people gathered
round are now cheering ♫ All through the town (“I Had a Little Nut Tree”) ♫ I had a little nut tree ♫ Nothing would it bear ♫ But a silver nutmeg ♫ And a golden pear ♫ The King of Spain’s daughter ♫ Came to visit me ♫ And all for the sake ♫ Of my little nut tree ♫ Her dress was made of crimson ♫ Jet black was her hair ♫ She asked me for my nutmeg ♫ And my golden pear ♫ I said so fair a princess ♫ Never did I see ♫ I’ll give you all the fruit ♫ From my little nut tree ♫ I had a little nut tree ♫ Nothing would it bear ♫ But a silver nutmeg ♫ And a golden pear ♫ The King of Spain’s daughter ♫ Came to visit me ♫ And all for the sake ♫ Of my little nut tree ♫ Her dress was made of crimson ♫ Jet black was her hair ♫ She asked me for my nutmeg ♫ And my golden pear ♫ I said so fair a princess ♫ Never did I see ♫ I’ll give you all the fruit ♫ From my little nut tree (“Polly Put the Kettle On”) ♫ Polly put the kettle on,
Polly put the kettle on ♫ Polly put the kettle on ♫ We’ll all have tea ♫ Mia lay the table now,
Mia lay the table now ♫ Mia lay the table now ♫ We’ll all have tea ♫ Baa Baa brings out all the cakes ♫ Baa Baa brings out all the cakes ♫ Baa Baa brings out all the cakes ♫ We’ll all have tea ♫ Jacus takes the kettle off,
Jacus takes the kettle off ♫ Jacus takes the kettle off ♫ We’ll all have tea ♫ Incy pours the water out,
Incy pours the water out ♫ Incy pours the water out ♫ We’ll all have tea ♫ Spread the jam and cream on scones ♫ Spread the jam and cream on scones ♫ Spread the jam and cream on scones ♫ Let’s have our tea (“Number 4 Song”) ♫ Let’s all talk about the number four ♫ That’s one and two plus another two more ♫ Four, four sounds like a football score ♫ And the little panda has four paws ♫ Knock, knock on door number four ♫ Four coloured pencils so you can draw ♫ A rectangle, diamond, rhombus or more ♫ Shapes with sides one, two, three, four ♫ Four legs on a table,
four wheels on a car ♫ Without these four you wouldn’t go far ♫ Four sides to a yummy mm chocolate bar ♫ Four is everywhere, hip hip hoorah ♫ Now it’s your turn to find all the fours ♫ Hunt high and low,
check all your drawers ♫ ‘Cause everywhere
you’ll see more and more ♫ The fantastic and useful number four (“Three Blind Mice”) ♫ Three blind mice ♫ Three blind mice ♫ See how they run ♫ See how they run ♫ They all run away from the farmer’s wife ♫ Then into a spaceship to take a ride ♫ Did you ever see such
a sight in your life ♫ As three blind mice ♫ Three blind mice ♫ Three blind mice ♫ Crash on the moon ♫ Cash on the moon ♫ The moon was covered in cheese so high ♫ And nobody knew the reason why ♫ Did you ever see such
a sight in your life ♫ As three blind mice ♫ Three blind mice ♫ Three blind mice ♫ With full tummies ♫ With full tummies ♫ All of them ate too
much cheese that night ♫ With little moon left after every bite ♫ Did you ever see such
a sight in your life ♫ As three blind mice ♫ Three blind mice ♫ Three blind mice ♫ Return to the Earth ♫ Return to the Earth ♫ Their mommy asked them
where is the moonlight ♫ The moon has shrunk
to a crescent tonight ♫ Did you ever hear such
a thing in your life ♫ As three blind mice – [Child] One, two, three, four, square. ♫ I have a square song to share with you ♫ Squares have four equal sides, it’s true ♫ A square has four corners like my toast ♫ Squares are shapes I love the most ♫ Squares, they’re everywhere ♫ Like a window so clean ♫ A cushion on a chair ♫ Square, like a sandwich you eat ♫ Some chocolate treats for us to share ♫ That’s the song about squares (digital beeping) ♫ I have a square song to share with you ♫ Squares have four equal sides, it’s true ♫ A square has four corners like my toast ♫ Squares are shapes I love the most ♫ Squares, they’re everywhere ♫ Like a window so clean ♫ A cushion on a chair ♫ Square, like a sandwich you eat ♫ Some chocolate treats for us to share ♫ That’s the song about squares (“Apple Song”) ♫ An apple a day, an apple a day ♫ An apple a day, so yummy to eat ♫ An apple a day, an apple a day ♫ What a delicious crunchy treat ♫ An apple can help you
be healthy and strong ♫ Give you energy to help you along ♫ Apples have vitamins
and minerals you need ♫ They can even help you clean your teeth ♫ An apple a day, an apple a day ♫ An apple a day, so yummy to eat ♫ An apple a day, an apple a day ♫ What a delicious crunchy treat ♫ An apple can help you
be healthy and strong ♫ Give you energy to help you along ♫ Apples have vitamins
and minerals you need ♫ They can even help you clean your teeth (“Number 5 Song”) ♫ F-I-V-E, five ♫ One, two, three, four, next comes five ♫ Five fingers and five little toes ♫ Five ponytails with five silk bows ♫ Five monkeys jumping on five drums ♫ Five ducks swimming to find their mums ♫ F-I-V-E, five ♫ One, two, three, four, next comes five ♫ Five bees buzzing in a beehive ♫ Five loop de loops in a cool dive ♫ Five scoops of ice cream in a bowl ♫ Five great shots into the goal ♫ F-I-V-E, five ♫ One, two, three, four, next comes five ♫ Five very fast cars in a race ♫ Five storybooks on a bookcase ♫ Five children dancing to the beat ♫ Five coloured houses on a street ♫ F-I-V-E, five ♫ One, two, three, four, next comes five (“Animal Fair”) ♫ I went to the animal fair ♫ The birds and the beasts were there ♫ The old baboon by the light of the moon ♫ Was combing his auburn hair ♫ The monkey, he kerplunked ♫ And fell on the elephant’s trunk ♫ The elephant sneezed
and went down on his knees ♫ Oh what a time for the monkey ♫ Monkey, monkey, monkey,
monkey, monkey, monk ♫ I went to the animal fair ♫ The birds and the beasts were there ♫ The old baboon by the light of the moon ♫ Was combing his auburn hair ♫ The monkey, he kerplunked ♫ And fell on the elephant’s trunk ♫ The elephant sneezed
and went down on his knees ♫ Oh what a time for the monkey ♫ Monkey, monkey, monkey,
monkey, monkey, monk (“Daisy”) ♫ There was a farmer who had a cow ♫ And Daisy was her name, see ♫ D-A-I-S-Y ♫ D-A-I-S-Y ♫ D-A-I-S-Y ♫ And Daisy was her name, see Now, leave out the D and clap instead. ♫ There was a farmer who had a cow ♫ And Daisy was her name, see ♫ A-I-S-Y ♫ A-I-S-Y ♫ A-I-S-Y ♫ And Daisy was her name, see This time, leave out the D and the A. ♫ There was a farmer who had a cow ♫ And Daisy was her name, see ♫ I-S-Y ♫ I-S-Y ♫ I-S-Y ♫ And Daisy was her name, see Now, just say the S and the Y. ♫ There was a farmer who had a cow ♫ And Daisy was her name, see ♫ S-Y ♫ S-Y ♫ S-Y ♫ And Daisy was her name, see Next, just say the letter Y. ♫ There was a farmer who had a cow ♫ And Daisy was her name, see ♫ Y ♫ Y ♫ Y ♫ And Daisy was her name, see Now, just clap. ♫ There was a farmer who had a cow ♫ And Daisy was her name, see ♫ And Daisy was her name, see (“Five Little Kittens Jumping on the Bed”) ♫ Five little kittens jumping on the bed ♫ One fell off and bumped her head ♫ Mother called the
doctor and the doctor said ♫ No more jumping on the bed ♫ Four little kittens jumping on the bed ♫ One fell off and bumped her head ♫ Mother called the
doctor and the doctor said ♫ No more jumping on the bed ♫ Three little kittens jumping on the bed ♫ One fell off and bumped her head ♫ Mother called the
doctor and the doctor said ♫ No more jumping on the bed ♫ Two little kittens jumping on the bed ♫ One fell off and bumped her head ♫ Mother called the
doctor and the doctor said ♫ No more jumping on the bed ♫ One little kitten jumping on the bed ♫ She fell off and bumped her head ♫ Mother called the
doctor and the doctor said ♫ No more jumping on the bed (“The Muffin Man”) ♫ Do you know the muffin man ♫ The muffin man, the muffin man ♫ Do you know the muffin man ♫ Who lives on Drury Lane ♫ Yes, I know the muffin man ♫ The muffin man, the muffin man ♫ Yes, I know the muffin man ♫ Who lives on Drury Lane ♫ Do you know the muffin man ♫ The muffin man, the muffin man ♫ Do you know the muffin man ♫ Who lives on Drury Lane ♫ Yes, I know the muffin man ♫ The muffin man, the muffin man ♫ Yes, I know the muffin man ♫ Who lives on Drury Lane (“Diddle Diddle Dumpling, My Son John”) ♫ Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John ♫ Went to bed with his trousers on ♫ One shoe off and the other shoe on ♫ Diddle, diddle, dumpling,
diddle, diddle, dumpling ♫ Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John ♫ Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John ♫ Went to bed with his trousers on ♫ One shoe off and the other shoe on ♫ Diddle, diddle, dumpling,
diddle, diddle, dumpling ♫ Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John (“Ten Little Fingers”) – Hello. Do you know how many fingers you have? Let’s count them. ♫ One little, two little,
three little fingers ♫ Four little, five
little, six little fingers ♫ Seven little, eight
little, nine little fingers ♫ 10 little fingers ♫ One little, two little,
three little fingers ♫ Four little, five
little, six little fingers ♫ Seven little, eight
little, nine little fingers ♫ 10 little fingers ♫ One little, two little,
three little fingers ♫ Four little, five
little, six little fingers ♫ Seven little, eight
little, nine little fingers ♫ 10 little fingers (“Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe”) ♫ There was an old woman
who lived in a shoe ♫ She lived in a shoe, she lived in a shoe ♫ She had so many children ♫ And loved them all, too ♫ She loved them all, too ♫ When father got home,
he gave them all bread ♫ He gave them all bread,
he gave them all bread ♫ Then they kissed them all softly ♫ And sent them to bed ♫ They sent them to bed ♫ La la la la la ♫ La la la la ♫ La la la la la ♫ La la la la ♫ There was an old woman
who lived in a shoe ♫ She lived in a shoe, she lived in a shoe ♫ She had so many children ♫ And loved them all, too ♫ She loved them all, too ♫ When father got home,
he gave them all bread ♫ He gave them all bread,
he gave them all bread ♫ Then they kissed them all softly ♫ And sent them to bed ♫ They sent them to bed (“Five Little Birds”) – [Child] One, two, three, four. ♫ Five little birds went flying one day ♫ Over the hills and far away ♫ When Mother bird said
tweet, tweet, tweet ♫ Only four birds came to the tree One, two, three. ♫ Four little birds went flying one day ♫ Over the hills and far away ♫ When Mother bird said
tweet, tweet, tweet ♫ Only three birds came to the tree One, two. ♫ Three little birds went flying one day ♫ Over the hills and far away ♫ When Mother bird said
tweet, tweet, tweet ♫ Only two birds came to the tree One. ♫ Two little birds went flying one day ♫ Over the hills and far away ♫ When Mother bird said
tweet, tweet, tweet ♫ Only one bird came to the tree ♫ One little bird went flying one day ♫ Over the hills and far away ♫ When Mother bird said
tweet, tweet, tweet ♫ No little birds came to the tree ♫ Sad mother bird went flying one day ♫ Over the hills and far away ♫ When papa bird said tweet ♫ All the birds came flying to the tree (“Things That Go Slow”) ♫ The oak tree grows slowly ♫ The snail slithers slowly down the leaf ♫ The turtle below ♫ Is travelling quite slow ♫ And the sloth likes to take things easy ♫ Sometimes slow is the way to go ♫ Some things are better done slow ♫ The oak tree grows slowly ♫ The snail slithers slowly down the leaf ♫ The turtle below ♫ Is travelling quite slow ♫ And the sloth likes to take things easy ♫ Sometimes slow is the way to go ♫ Some things are better done slow

The Bug Hunting Game! | Science for Kids

The Bug Hunting Game! | Science for Kids


Hi, everybody! Where’s Squeaks? Haha, you got me! Squeaks, you blend right in! You know, there are lots of animals that blend
in, just like you do with lab equipment! These animals blend in with the natural things
around them, so that it’s harder for other animals to find them and eat them. Like this weird-looking bug! [Squeaks squeaks] I know, Squeaks! It looks just like a stick! But this is actually a kind of bug that’s
called a stick insect, since it looks so much like a stick. These insects live in places with lots of
trees and bushes, and they blend in really well. For lots of animals, like birds, a stick insect
would be a tasty snack. But it’s hard for them to spot a stick insect,
since it looks just like the real sticks around it. And if they can’t find the stick insect,
they can’t eat it. So blending in helps stick insects survive. Do you want to see how animals survive by
blending in? Let’s do an experiment! One of the reasons stick insects look so much
like the sticks around them is that they’re the same color. So for this experiment, you’re going to
pretend to be a bird looking through the grass for some nice, delicious bugs to have for
lunch. We’re going to see if you find more green
bugs, more red bugs, or the same amount of both kinds of bugs. All you’ll need is a friend to help you,
a timer, a green, grassy spot, and 10 green things and 10 red things to use as your pretend-bugs. We’ve made our pretend-bugs out of construction
paper, but your bugs can be anything: clothespins, paper clips, or even small toys, as long as
they’re all about the same size, and half of them are green and half of them are red. Once you have your pretend-bugs, go to your
grassy spot. When you’re surrounded by green grass, close
your eyes and then ask your friend to spread the red and green bugs around. Then, have them start a timer for 30 seconds
and say “go!” Open your eyes, pretend to be a hungry bird,
and grab as many bugs as you can! When your 30 seconds are up, stop and count
how many bugs of each color you caught. Then, repeat your experiment by letting your
friend take a turn searching for bugs. Are you ready?! Let’s try it! (music) Okay, time’s up! Let’s look at the bugs that we caught! Hmm, it looks like you got… 8 red ones… and 5 green bugs! Wow! We got way more red bugs than green ones! That makes sense, since the red bugs were
easier to see. The green ones blended in with the grass around
them, so they were much harder to find! Being green helped the bugs survive, just
like looking like a stick helps stick insects survive. If these bugs were real, then after the bird
had their lunch, there wouldn’t be many red bugs left to have red babies. But there would be lots of green bugs left
to have green babies. So there would be way more green bug babies
than red bug babies. And if you kept eating the red bugs, then
after a while, all of the babies being born might be green. So, since being green helped the bugs survive,
over time, there would be more green bugs! Try this experiment at home and let us know
how you do! And, once your experiment is over, make sure
to clean up the rest of your bugs. So what do you think, Squeaks? Aren’t disguises cool? (Squeaks shrieks) Ha! Just kidding! Do you have any questions about all the amazing
ways animals survive and change over time? Let us know, by asking a grown up to help
you leave a comment below or email us at [email protected] We’ll see you next time!