Cockroaches, Alligators & Other Weird Sources of New Drugs

Cockroaches, Alligators & Other Weird Sources of New Drugs


Antibiotics are one of humankind’s most amazing
discoveries. Ever since that fateful day in 1928 when Scottish physician Alexander Fleming
noticed a funny mold growing in one of his petri dishes, antibiotics have been kicking
bacterial butt. That famous mold, of course, was producing
penicillin, the founding antibiotic superstar, which has since extended the average human
life by at least a decade. It fundamentally changed the face of medicine. Antibiotics,
or antimicrobials, are basically selective poisons designed to either kill or slow the
growth of bacteria to the point where your body’s own immune system can clean up. These
drugs target a specific part of bacteria or some important stage in their development
without damaging the body’s host cells. And they’re really great their job. Until they
aren’t. Lately, antibiotic technology has been having
a hard time keeping pace with bacterial evolution. We’ve talked here on SciShow about how lots
of your die-hard, go-to favorite antibiotics are starting to lose their mojo in the face
of sneaky and rapidly evolving bacteria. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
estimates that at least 2,000,000 Americans became infected with drug-resistant bacteria
in 2012, and 23,000 of them died as a result. These superbugs are deadly serious and could
quickly unleash a global health crisis if we don’t find a way to keep them in check.
The problem is we’ve already hit up many of the most obvious sources of antibiotics, like
fungi, which includes penicillin, and synthetic molecules.
Fortunately, we humans have big, delicious brains, and some of the best of them are hard
at work trying to invent all-new ways to kill dangerous bacteria or find other organisms
on the planet that are better at it than we are so we can steal their secrets. And while
they’re finding some promising leads, I gotta say, they’re looking in some pretty weird
places. [Intro] You know how everyone jokes that after some
big global disaster, only cockroaches will survive? Well, we recently found what may
partially explain their famous, and infuriating, tenacity. Research from the University of
Nottingham suggests that certain insects, like roaches and locusts, have brain tissues
that are infused with super-powered antibiotic juju. The researchers found nine different
antibiotic molecules tucked into the roaches’ nervous systems that may be protecting them
from otherwise lethal bacteria. They’re all a type of molecule known as peptides, short
chains of amino acids that make up proteins, kinda like proto-proteins. And these peptides
are specific to the bugs’ brains. They seem to be chemicals that roaches” brain cells
use to communicate with each other, y’know, whenever a cockroach is sitting around thinking
about stuff, which I guess can happen, and although we’re not sure how these peptides
actually work, laboratory tests have shown that they’re incredibly effective at eliminating
some of our least favorite bacteria, like the most dangerous strains of e.coli, which
cause gastrointestinal infections. And even MRSA, a super-resistant type of staphylococcus
bacterium that can cause unstoppable deadly infections in humans, particularly in hospitals.
In lab trials, these roach brain molecules killed over 90% of MRSA bacteria, without
harming any host cells. So I can guess what you’re thinking: shut
up and take my money! Well, hold on a sec, because we’re a bit away from having cockroach
brains on the pharmacy shelves. There’s still loads of technical hurdles to overcome, tests
to conduct, basic things we need to figure out, like how exactly these molecules work.
But roaches aren’t the only hardy animals out there. Alligators are some of the Earth’s
most rugged beasts. They essentially live in cesspool swamps teeming with bacteria and
fungus and other microbes, and more than that, they’re known brawlers. Put just a few territorial
800 pound toothy reptiles together in a dirty swamp, and you will no doubt come out with
some serious bite marks and bloody wounds, even missing limbs. But amazingly, what you
probably won’t find are any infections. This got some bayou scientists to thinkin’!
Dr. Mark Merchant, a biochemist at McNeese State University in Louisiana, helped conduct
a decade long study that investigated what makes alligators so unusually resistant to
bacterial and fungal infection. Turns out, it’s in their blood. An alligator’s
immune system is largely innate, meaning it can fight off harmful micro-organisms without
having any prior exposure to them. They just pop right out of their eggs ready to do battle.
We humans also have some innate immunity, provided by things like our skin and white
blood cells, but a big part of our immunities are adaptive, meaning we often develop a resistance
to specific diseases only after being exposed to them. Which of course is not ideal all
the time, but alligators get to skip this step. Researchers examining blood samples from American
alligators isolated their infection fighting white blood cells and then extracted the active
proteins working in those cells. And these two included a special class of peptides which
seemed to have a knack for weakening the membranes of bacteria, causing them to die. When pitted
against a wide range of bacteria including drug-resistant MRSA, these tough little peptides
proved to be effective killers. They also wiped out 6 of 8 strains of candida albicans,
a type of yeast infection that’s particularly troublesome for AIDS and transplant patients
with weakened immune systems. Such compounds may also be found in similar animals, like
crocodiles, Komodo dragons, and the skins of some frogs and toads. So far, lab trials
have shown that gator blood can kill at least 23 different strains of bacteria including
salmonella, e.coli, staph, and strep infections AND even a strain of HIV. For now, scientists
are working to find the exact chemical structures at work in four of these promising chemicals
and pinpoint which types are best at killing which microbes. One problem so far: high concentrations
of gator blood serum have already been found to be so powerful that they are toxic to human
cells. So other biologists are taking a different approach in the search for the next generation
of antibiotics. Rather than looking at other animals, they’re
exploring strange, new places, like cave soils and deep-sea sediments. Researchers have recently
discovered evidence of promising new fungi strains living way down in hundred million
year old nutrient-starved sediments in the Pacific Ocean. Everyone thought this was a
near-dead zone for life, too harsh and remote an environment for something like fungi to
survive in. Just a decade ago, the only living things known to inhabit such deep sediment
layers were single-celled bacteria and archaea, organisms known to flourish in extreme environments.
But while examining dredged up sediments from as deep as 127 meters into the sea floor,
scientists found fungi of at least eight different types, four of which they successfully cultured
in the lab. Some of the fungi even belonged to the genus Penicillium, which we have to
thank for the development of penicillin. Now, we’re not exactly sure how old these fungi
are, but they are definitely quite old and maybe, more importantly, they appear to have
been living in isolation for eons. If that’s the case, they may have evolved specific and
unusual defenses against bacteria, which, just like their penicillin kin in that famous
petri dish, could end up being a new and powerful source of antibiotics.
And there’s one more strategy that scientists are using, one that works in espionage as
well as in medicine. And that is seeing what the enemy is up to.
While exploring life in strange new places around the world, some biologists are looking
for bacteria that have never been exposed to our drugs, but still appear to be naturally
resistant to them. Wherever we find the most naturally resistant
bacteria, we might also find natural antibiotics that we never knew about.
And here, one of the most promising leads is again in one of the hardest-to-reach places:
New Mexico’s Lechuguilla cave, a place that was isolated from all human contact until
it was discovered in the 1980’s. One of the many fascinating things that scientists
have discovered here is that the cave bacteria seem to be resistant to everything.
Even though they’ve never been exposed to us or our drugs, all of the bacteria have
proven to be resistant to at least one major antibiotic, and many tend to fend off more
than a dozen of the most powerful antimicrobials we have. This suggests to scientists that
the bacteria have evolved to be this way because they live in an environment that’s rich in
naturally occurring antibiotics, ones that the germs we live with up here on the surface
have never encountered. Now we just have to find out what exactly
those compounds are. So look, I’m not going to lie to you: we have
a lot of work to do. While we might discover a new super-drug lurking
in a cave or under the sea or in a cockroach’s head, there’s a big difference between finding
a substance that cleans house in a petri dish and actually putting a new antibiotic in the
vein of a human patient. So the bummer is, as promising as some of
these bold new discoveries may be, none of them has yet yielded an actual marketable
drug. Still, there’s a long list of successful antibiotics
that we’ve managed to derive from strange sources, starting with Dr. Fleming’s rogue
fungus. So if we keep exploring strange new places
and studying how other animals deal with the problems we’re facing, we just might find
the next penicillin before the superbugs get the best of us. Thanks for watching this SciShow Infusion,
especially to our Subbable subscribers. To learn how you can support us in exploring
the world, just go to Subbable.com. And as always, if you want to keep getting smarter
with us, you can go to YouTube.com/SciShow and subscribe.

Cockroaches, Alligators & Other Weird Sources of New Drugs


Antibiotics are one of humankind’s most amazing
discoveries. Ever since that fateful day in 1928 when Scottish physician Alexander Fleming
noticed a funny mold growing in one of his petri dishes, antibiotics have been kicking
bacterial butt. That famous mold, of course, was producing
penicillin, the founding antibiotic superstar, which has since extended the average human
life by at least a decade. It fundamentally changed the face of medicine. Antibiotics,
or antimicrobials, are basically selective poisons designed to either kill or slow the
growth of bacteria to the point where your body’s own immune system can clean up. These
drugs target a specific part of bacteria or some important stage in their development
without damaging the body’s host cells. And they’re really great their job. Until they
aren’t. Lately, antibiotic technology has been having
a hard time keeping pace with bacterial evolution. We’ve talked here on SciShow about how lots
of your die-hard, go-to favorite antibiotics are starting to lose their mojo in the face
of sneaky and rapidly evolving bacteria. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
estimates that at least 2,000,000 Americans became infected with drug-resistant bacteria
in 2012, and 23,000 of them died as a result. These superbugs are deadly serious and could
quickly unleash a global health crisis if we don’t find a way to keep them in check.
The problem is we’ve already hit up many of the most obvious sources of antibiotics, like
fungi, which includes penicillin, and synthetic molecules.
Fortunately, we humans have big, delicious brains, and some of the best of them are hard
at work trying to invent all-new ways to kill dangerous bacteria or find other organisms
on the planet that are better at it than we are so we can steal their secrets. And while
they’re finding some promising leads, I gotta say, they’re looking in some pretty weird
places. [Intro] You know how everyone jokes that after some
big global disaster, only cockroaches will survive? Well, we recently found what may
partially explain their famous, and infuriating, tenacity. Research from the University of
Nottingham suggests that certain insects, like roaches and locusts, have brain tissues
that are infused with super-powered antibiotic juju. The researchers found nine different
antibiotic molecules tucked into the roaches’ nervous systems that may be protecting them
from otherwise lethal bacteria. They’re all a type of molecule known as peptides, short
chains of amino acids that make up proteins, kinda like proto-proteins. And these peptides
are specific to the bugs’ brains. They seem to be chemicals that roaches” brain cells
use to communicate with each other, y’know, whenever a cockroach is sitting around thinking
about stuff, which I guess can happen, and although we’re not sure how these peptides
actually work, laboratory tests have shown that they’re incredibly effective at eliminating
some of our least favorite bacteria, like the most dangerous strains of e.coli, which
cause gastrointestinal infections. And even MRSA, a super-resistant type of staphylococcus
bacterium that can cause unstoppable deadly infections in humans, particularly in hospitals.
In lab trials, these roach brain molecules killed over 90% of MRSA bacteria, without
harming any host cells. So I can guess what you’re thinking: shut
up and take my money! Well, hold on a sec, because we’re a bit away from having cockroach
brains on the pharmacy shelves. There’s still loads of technical hurdles to overcome, tests
to conduct, basic things we need to figure out, like how exactly these molecules work.
But roaches aren’t the only hardy animals out there. Alligators are some of the Earth’s
most rugged beasts. They essentially live in cesspool swamps teeming with bacteria and
fungus and other microbes, and more than that, they’re known brawlers. Put just a few territorial
800 pound toothy reptiles together in a dirty swamp, and you will no doubt come out with
some serious bite marks and bloody wounds, even missing limbs. But amazingly, what you
probably won’t find are any infections. This got some bayou scientists to thinkin’!
Dr. Mark Merchant, a biochemist at McNeese State University in Louisiana, helped conduct
a decade long study that investigated what makes alligators so unusually resistant to
bacterial and fungal infection. Turns out, it’s in their blood. An alligator’s
immune system is largely innate, meaning it can fight off harmful micro-organisms without
having any prior exposure to them. They just pop right out of their eggs ready to do battle.
We humans also have some innate immunity, provided by things like our skin and white
blood cells, but a big part of our immunities are adaptive, meaning we often develop a resistance
to specific diseases only after being exposed to them. Which of course is not ideal all
the time, but alligators get to skip this step. Researchers examining blood samples from American
alligators isolated their infection fighting white blood cells and then extracted the active
proteins working in those cells. And these two included a special class of peptides which
seemed to have a knack for weakening the membranes of bacteria, causing them to die. When pitted
against a wide range of bacteria including drug-resistant MRSA, these tough little peptides
proved to be effective killers. They also wiped out 6 of 8 strains of candida albicans,
a type of yeast infection that’s particularly troublesome for AIDS and transplant patients
with weakened immune systems. Such compounds may also be found in similar animals, like
crocodiles, Komodo dragons, and the skins of some frogs and toads. So far, lab trials
have shown that gator blood can kill at least 23 different strains of bacteria including
salmonella, e.coli, staph, and strep infections AND even a strain of HIV. For now, scientists
are working to find the exact chemical structures at work in four of these promising chemicals
and pinpoint which types are best at killing which microbes. One problem so far: high concentrations
of gator blood serum have already been found to be so powerful that they are toxic to human
cells. So other biologists are taking a different approach in the search for the next generation
of antibiotics. Rather than looking at other animals, they’re
exploring strange, new places, like cave soils and deep-sea sediments. Researchers have recently
discovered evidence of promising new fungi strains living way down in hundred million
year old nutrient-starved sediments in the Pacific Ocean. Everyone thought this was a
near-dead zone for life, too harsh and remote an environment for something like fungi to
survive in. Just a decade ago, the only living things known to inhabit such deep sediment
layers were single-celled bacteria and archaea, organisms known to flourish in extreme environments.
But while examining dredged up sediments from as deep as 127 meters into the sea floor,
scientists found fungi of at least eight different types, four of which they successfully cultured
in the lab. Some of the fungi even belonged to the genus Penicillium, which we have to
thank for the development of penicillin. Now, we’re not exactly sure how old these fungi
are, but they are definitely quite old and maybe, more importantly, they appear to have
been living in isolation for eons. If that’s the case, they may have evolved specific and
unusual defenses against bacteria, which, just like their penicillin kin in that famous
petri dish, could end up being a new and powerful source of antibiotics.
And there’s one more strategy that scientists are using, one that works in espionage as
well as in medicine. And that is seeing what the enemy is up to.
While exploring life in strange new places around the world, some biologists are looking
for bacteria that have never been exposed to our drugs, but still appear to be naturally
resistant to them. Wherever we find the most naturally resistant
bacteria, we might also find natural antibiotics that we never knew about.
And here, one of the most promising leads is again in one of the hardest-to-reach places:
New Mexico’s Lechuguilla cave, a place that was isolated from all human contact until
it was discovered in the 1980’s. One of the many fascinating things that scientists
have discovered here is that the cave bacteria seem to be resistant to everything.
Even though they’ve never been exposed to us or our drugs, all of the bacteria have
proven to be resistant to at least one major antibiotic, and many tend to fend off more
than a dozen of the most powerful antimicrobials we have. This suggests to scientists that
the bacteria have evolved to be this way because they live in an environment that’s rich in
naturally occurring antibiotics, ones that the germs we live with up here on the surface
have never encountered. Now we just have to find out what exactly
those compounds are. So look, I’m not going to lie to you: we have
a lot of work to do. While we might discover a new super-drug lurking
in a cave or under the sea or in a cockroach’s head, there’s a big difference between finding
a substance that cleans house in a petri dish and actually putting a new antibiotic in the
vein of a human patient. So the bummer is, as promising as some of
these bold new discoveries may be, none of them has yet yielded an actual marketable
drug. Still, there’s a long list of successful antibiotics
that we’ve managed to derive from strange sources, starting with Dr. Fleming’s rogue
fungus. So if we keep exploring strange new places
and studying how other animals deal with the problems we’re facing, we just might find
the next penicillin before the superbugs get the best of us. Thanks for watching this SciShow Infusion,
especially to our Subbable subscribers. To learn how you can support us in exploring
the world, just go to Subbable.com. And as always, if you want to keep getting smarter
with us, you can go to YouTube.com/SciShow and subscribe.

Cockroaches, Alligators & Other Weird Sources of New Drugs


Antibiotics are one of humankind’s most amazing
discoveries. Ever since that fateful day in 1928 when Scottish physician Alexander Fleming
noticed a funny mold growing in one of his petri dishes, antibiotics have been kicking
bacterial butt. That famous mold, of course, was producing
penicillin, the founding antibiotic superstar, which has since extended the average human
life by at least a decade. It fundamentally changed the face of medicine. Antibiotics,
or antimicrobials, are basically selective poisons designed to either kill or slow the
growth of bacteria to the point where your body’s own immune system can clean up. These
drugs target a specific part of bacteria or some important stage in their development
without damaging the body’s host cells. And they’re really great their job. Until they
aren’t. Lately, antibiotic technology has been having
a hard time keeping pace with bacterial evolution. We’ve talked here on SciShow about how lots
of your die-hard, go-to favorite antibiotics are starting to lose their mojo in the face
of sneaky and rapidly evolving bacteria. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
estimates that at least 2,000,000 Americans became infected with drug-resistant bacteria
in 2012, and 23,000 of them died as a result. These superbugs are deadly serious and could
quickly unleash a global health crisis if we don’t find a way to keep them in check.
The problem is we’ve already hit up many of the most obvious sources of antibiotics, like
fungi, which includes penicillin, and synthetic molecules.
Fortunately, we humans have big, delicious brains, and some of the best of them are hard
at work trying to invent all-new ways to kill dangerous bacteria or find other organisms
on the planet that are better at it than we are so we can steal their secrets. And while
they’re finding some promising leads, I gotta say, they’re looking in some pretty weird
places. [Intro] You know how everyone jokes that after some
big global disaster, only cockroaches will survive? Well, we recently found what may
partially explain their famous, and infuriating, tenacity. Research from the University of
Nottingham suggests that certain insects, like roaches and locusts, have brain tissues
that are infused with super-powered antibiotic juju. The researchers found nine different
antibiotic molecules tucked into the roaches’ nervous systems that may be protecting them
from otherwise lethal bacteria. They’re all a type of molecule known as peptides, short
chains of amino acids that make up proteins, kinda like proto-proteins. And these peptides
are specific to the bugs’ brains. They seem to be chemicals that roaches” brain cells
use to communicate with each other, y’know, whenever a cockroach is sitting around thinking
about stuff, which I guess can happen, and although we’re not sure how these peptides
actually work, laboratory tests have shown that they’re incredibly effective at eliminating
some of our least favorite bacteria, like the most dangerous strains of e.coli, which
cause gastrointestinal infections. And even MRSA, a super-resistant type of staphylococcus
bacterium that can cause unstoppable deadly infections in humans, particularly in hospitals.
In lab trials, these roach brain molecules killed over 90% of MRSA bacteria, without
harming any host cells. So I can guess what you’re thinking: shut
up and take my money! Well, hold on a sec, because we’re a bit away from having cockroach
brains on the pharmacy shelves. There’s still loads of technical hurdles to overcome, tests
to conduct, basic things we need to figure out, like how exactly these molecules work.
But roaches aren’t the only hardy animals out there. Alligators are some of the Earth’s
most rugged beasts. They essentially live in cesspool swamps teeming with bacteria and
fungus and other microbes, and more than that, they’re known brawlers. Put just a few territorial
800 pound toothy reptiles together in a dirty swamp, and you will no doubt come out with
some serious bite marks and bloody wounds, even missing limbs. But amazingly, what you
probably won’t find are any infections. This got some bayou scientists to thinkin’!
Dr. Mark Merchant, a biochemist at McNeese State University in Louisiana, helped conduct
a decade long study that investigated what makes alligators so unusually resistant to
bacterial and fungal infection. Turns out, it’s in their blood. An alligator’s
immune system is largely innate, meaning it can fight off harmful micro-organisms without
having any prior exposure to them. They just pop right out of their eggs ready to do battle.
We humans also have some innate immunity, provided by things like our skin and white
blood cells, but a big part of our immunities are adaptive, meaning we often develop a resistance
to specific diseases only after being exposed to them. Which of course is not ideal all
the time, but alligators get to skip this step. Researchers examining blood samples from American
alligators isolated their infection fighting white blood cells and then extracted the active
proteins working in those cells. And these two included a special class of peptides which
seemed to have a knack for weakening the membranes of bacteria, causing them to die. When pitted
against a wide range of bacteria including drug-resistant MRSA, these tough little peptides
proved to be effective killers. They also wiped out 6 of 8 strains of candida albicans,
a type of yeast infection that’s particularly troublesome for AIDS and transplant patients
with weakened immune systems. Such compounds may also be found in similar animals, like
crocodiles, Komodo dragons, and the skins of some frogs and toads. So far, lab trials
have shown that gator blood can kill at least 23 different strains of bacteria including
salmonella, e.coli, staph, and strep infections AND even a strain of HIV. For now, scientists
are working to find the exact chemical structures at work in four of these promising chemicals
and pinpoint which types are best at killing which microbes. One problem so far: high concentrations
of gator blood serum have already been found to be so powerful that they are toxic to human
cells. So other biologists are taking a different approach in the search for the next generation
of antibiotics. Rather than looking at other animals, they’re
exploring strange, new places, like cave soils and deep-sea sediments. Researchers have recently
discovered evidence of promising new fungi strains living way down in hundred million
year old nutrient-starved sediments in the Pacific Ocean. Everyone thought this was a
near-dead zone for life, too harsh and remote an environment for something like fungi to
survive in. Just a decade ago, the only living things known to inhabit such deep sediment
layers were single-celled bacteria and archaea, organisms known to flourish in extreme environments.
But while examining dredged up sediments from as deep as 127 meters into the sea floor,
scientists found fungi of at least eight different types, four of which they successfully cultured
in the lab. Some of the fungi even belonged to the genus Penicillium, which we have to
thank for the development of penicillin. Now, we’re not exactly sure how old these fungi
are, but they are definitely quite old and maybe, more importantly, they appear to have
been living in isolation for eons. If that’s the case, they may have evolved specific and
unusual defenses against bacteria, which, just like their penicillin kin in that famous
petri dish, could end up being a new and powerful source of antibiotics.
And there’s one more strategy that scientists are using, one that works in espionage as
well as in medicine. And that is seeing what the enemy is up to.
While exploring life in strange new places around the world, some biologists are looking
for bacteria that have never been exposed to our drugs, but still appear to be naturally
resistant to them. Wherever we find the most naturally resistant
bacteria, we might also find natural antibiotics that we never knew about.
And here, one of the most promising leads is again in one of the hardest-to-reach places:
New Mexico’s Lechuguilla cave, a place that was isolated from all human contact until
it was discovered in the 1980’s. One of the many fascinating things that scientists
have discovered here is that the cave bacteria seem to be resistant to everything.
Even though they’ve never been exposed to us or our drugs, all of the bacteria have
proven to be resistant to at least one major antibiotic, and many tend to fend off more
than a dozen of the most powerful antimicrobials we have. This suggests to scientists that
the bacteria have evolved to be this way because they live in an environment that’s rich in
naturally occurring antibiotics, ones that the germs we live with up here on the surface
have never encountered. Now we just have to find out what exactly
those compounds are. So look, I’m not going to lie to you: we have
a lot of work to do. While we might discover a new super-drug lurking
in a cave or under the sea or in a cockroach’s head, there’s a big difference between finding
a substance that cleans house in a petri dish and actually putting a new antibiotic in the
vein of a human patient. So the bummer is, as promising as some of
these bold new discoveries may be, none of them has yet yielded an actual marketable
drug. Still, there’s a long list of successful antibiotics
that we’ve managed to derive from strange sources, starting with Dr. Fleming’s rogue
fungus. So if we keep exploring strange new places
and studying how other animals deal with the problems we’re facing, we just might find
the next penicillin before the superbugs get the best of us. Thanks for watching this SciShow Infusion,
especially to our Subbable subscribers. To learn how you can support us in exploring
the world, just go to Subbable.com. And as always, if you want to keep getting smarter
with us, you can go to YouTube.com/SciShow and subscribe.

Cockroach Farming Is Booming In China


cockroach farming is a booming with
angina so in america we spent over $40 billion
dollars annually on pesticides to give a little creepy critters but in China the cold today millions of
cock tubes as part of a proper above them part a profitable Britain
business venture now the chinese government where there’s
a allowed to operate freely all until they become too high profile
and the reason why or you know the escape in knowing the
cockroaches Winfrey in the plane to China but the reason why
these packwood’s farms actually exist is because cockroaches have a lot love
purposes for example cosmetic companies use the
so you loath like substance arm on their way on the cockroach wings
to make cosmetic products on top of that the United Nations itself
is encourage more individuals to consume infects for food thing in the
end it like this in the inexpensive source a protein that could
be a viable solution for world hunger even in China Medical Research indicate
that you can use these cock looks to curing
treat everything from cancer HIV-aids even losing your hair so cockroaches are indeed a source all health and a source a business venture and you know you can
actually buy that you can go to you can buy you can invest when you ones and get a 150 yuan back in cockroach
raising its relatively inexpensive and it has
big returned everybody’s buying packard the entire all the rage here in America not that
much but in China or in that block that
you’re using right now or maybe maybe if that foundation that you have
on or maybe it’s the hairspray or maybe the anti aging cream there
might be cockroach wings in there to help you not age so either
way cockroaches aren’t necessarily a bad
thing in China at the multi-billion dollar
industry clearly their on power

Drugs: Wasp Junkies

Drugs: Wasp Junkies


My name is Chris Thorogood, I’m a botanist
and a fellow of the Linnean Society where I’m standing now in the vault below
London’s city streets. We often think of plants as inanimate because they don’t
necessarily move in real time but actually there are a number of plants
that dupe, drug and even kill other animals. We’re going to look at a really
fascinating orchid, the broad-leaved helleborine, Epipactis helleborine.
Now the Epipactis genus is a group of about 70 or 80 species of orchid that
grow in temperate and some subtropical areas. Like many plants this orchid
produces a sugary nectar which is attractive to insects but what’s unusual
about the helleborine is that when scientists observed wasps visiting the
flowers of this plant, they noticed that they behaved very strangely – they become
sluggish and almost act as if they’re drunk, and when scientists analysed the
nectar this plant produces they found that it contains substances called
alkaloids which have a narcotic or hallucinogenic effect. Scientists identified a compound called oxycodone, an addictive narcotic that is also used in pain medication. And this may be one of a cocktail of compounds that seems to be getting wasps drunk. And believe it or not, scientists have actually isolated alcohol from the nectar of these flowers
as well. Now it may be that wasps, after visiting ripening fruit, but
transferring microorganisms to the nectar of these flowers and these
microorganisms will then feed on the sugar in the nectar and produce alcohol
so it could actually be that the wasps through infecting these flowers with
microorganisms are actually unwittingly getting themselves drunk. The wasps
become sluggish, and this means they’ll spend longer on a given plant which increases
the probability that they’ll either pick up pollen or deliver it.
And secondly, like other orchids, Epipactis dispenses its pollen in
discrete packets. Now for a flying insect like a wasp, these could potentially be a
bit of a burden of which it will try to rid itself but a disoriented wasp is less
likely to be able to groom itself and free itself from these packets of pollen
and this means that it’s more likely to deliver these to another plant and bring
about cross-pollination. So how did such a strange relationship, in which an
orchid gets a wasp drunk, ever evolve? It may be that on the dingy forest floor in
late summer, which is when these plants flower, that wasps are the most reliable
pollinator but really scientists are only starting to scratch the surface of
this highly complex and unique interaction.

10-8 Florida’s Opioid Epidemic

10-8 Florida’s Opioid Epidemic


on this episode of ten eight we will
discuss the narcotics epidemic and how it impacts our community and our
families ten eight starts right now welcome to ten eight you’re inside view
of the st. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office I’m your host lieutenant Chris SEO
narcotics use continues to be an epidemic in our society and in the
nation last year in st. Lucie County alone fifty-three people died from
narcotics related overdoses here to talk to us about today is lieutenant brian
Hester from the Special Investigations Unit lieutenant welcome to the show
thank you tell us a little bit about yourself and
what you do here for the Sheriff’s Office well Chris I’ve been with the
Sheriff’s Office I’m actually working on my 21st year in
law enforcement now I am the unit commander for the Special Investigations
Unit and within the Special Investigation Unit I have the Narcotics
Unit for the Sheriff’s Office as well as the auto theft unit the warrants unit
and the agriculture unit and within those I have three sergeants that
supervise those units on a daily basis I don’t like a lot of work well it’s busy
what is the biggest challenge that you are facing right now right now from with
regards to narcotics in st. Lucie County we’re starting to see an increase in
opioid overdoses and and obviously related to those overdoses come deaths
and and and with that we’re starting to see labeling as an epidemic and there’s
a crisis and it is a crisis anytime that we have people done from the use of
illegal drugs then we start taking a harder look at what’s going on in our
community with those narcotics so I would say from our standpoint the opioid
crisis is really the the biggest thing on our doorstep right now now I remember
having worked in narcotics and we’re going back about 20 years ago that the
the majority of the assets of the sheriff’s office were placed in the
enforcement efforts and that has changed somewhat over the last several years
hasn’t it it has I mean we still continue we have to enforce and we have
to be out there on the streets but but we’re also from a from a Narcotics Unit
standpoint we’re taking proactive approach
as well – we’re taking intelligent elegance gathering approaches and trying
to get in front and trying to analyze just as an intelligence led policing
world we’re trying to start to predict things and track them and have hard data
for us as a unit – to take him maybe get ahead of of this problem and in the
midst of that we also have some recovery efforts along with rescue the narcan
program that we have here at the sheriff’s office as well knowing we do
each deputy in the st. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office is a sign narcan unless
they’re in an administrative position but most deputies have narcan and their
vehicles are on their person and now as the Sheriff’s Office were responding to
overdoses whereas in the past deputies would respond to an overdose but they
couldn’t do anything they had to wait on rescue many times our our deputies get
there before Fire Rescue does and now they’re able to administer narcan and
narcan is a substance that counteracts the opioid overdose and so we’re saving
lives and we’ve seen many uses of the narcan and we’ve seen lives saved from
the use of narcan however we’re starting to run out of narcan now as well now
what was the funding source behind the narcan was that a grant there was a
grant we were actually one of a couple of agencies that were given this grant
as a test and very easy training for our for our deputies it’s Amazo inhalants so
it’s sprayed in the nasal cavity and and the reactor the results from the use of
the narcan can be from anywhere from twenty seconds to two minutes and there
and our deputies are having to use more than one dose of narcan on some some of
these patients or some of these subjects that are overdosing and it depends on
what they’re overdosing on as well if there’s fentanyl involved or any other
synthetic opioids more more narcan’s needed and I think it’s important also
with the training that you guys provided to us with a narcan that when it is
administered all though it may keep that person from
dying right away they need to seek medical attention immediately because
there is a window of opportunity that narcan does wear off after a while
correct that’s correct and and we we are not there to to offset rescue or to stop
that process rescue still responders are still transported to the ER they still
go to the hospital and in many cases more narcan or nights alone is given to
them once they’re in rescues care in custody or at the hospital as well right
now you had some interesting statistics that we were talking about beforehand
and I mentioned at the beginning that we had 53 narcotics overdose related deaths
within st. Lucie County last year and we have surpassed that so far this year so
far this year we’re at 56 overdoses that’s not deaths that’s overdose cases
in the unincorporated st. Louis County now that’s not counting Fort Pierce our
municipality or port st. Lucie the municipality that is only the
unincorporated that we’ve responded to 56 overdose calls this year of those 56
37 of them have been since July 1st Wow out of those 37 since you are first 22
have been fentanyl and heroin related and that problem just continues to get
worse and worse as time moves forward it is and it’s it’s starting to become more
prevalent one of the things we’ve seen and I think as well we’re we have more
data on this problem now because we’re starting to as I was talking to you
about intelligence gathering if we have an overdose not only do deputies respond
but our unit responds to detectives to every overdose call that our deputies
respond to and doing so we try to we’re not going after that person who’s
overdosed we’re not showing charges on and on them we’re we’re actually there
to try to gather intelligence many times people have those life and death
experiences and they’ve just overdosed on on a narcotic that they’ve bought
from someone that’s almost killed them or
much more likely to give us a little information and our goal is not the the
user the person who’s addicted because that’s a physical and mental sickness
where we want the people that are bringing those drugs into st. Lucie
County and that are selling those drugs and that’s why that’s our goal is to
stop that inflow well that’s what I meant earlier when we’re talking about
twenty years ago it was just strictly enforcement make arrest make arrests now
you’re using intelligence you’re trying to find out the root source behind the
user who’s actually overdosed and it’s digging deeper into the problem and when
we come back in the next segment you’d be interested to know that we’ve
actually got some prevention programs here at the sheriff’s office which I’m
sure you already know about that we’re doing at the school level to educate
people about these drugs and about the dangers of them and about the reality
especially with death as one of those realities that come from it so thank you
for your time and I appreciate you coming on the show today thank you when
we come back we’re going to meet with Sergio Lopez one of our school resource
deputies and Aaron Guercio who is a parent who had lost her child due to a
narcotics related overdose and we’re gonna talk a little bit more about this
problem and what we’re doing here at the sheriff’s office to be able to stem it
off and work into the future for a brighter future for st. Lucie County
residents don’t go away you don’t want to miss it welcome back to ten eight in this
segment we’re going to continue our discussion about their narcotics
overdoses and the problems that we are having in st. Lucie County our next
guests are deputy Sergio Lopez from the school resource unit and Aaron Guercio
who are participants in our note program deputy Lopez miss Garcia welcome to the
show thank you thank you and deputy Lopez you are currently assigned to
school resource correct correct I worked for the Sheriff’s Office for the last
seven years I’ve been law enforcement for 11 years now for the last three
years I’ve been in the school resource unit and you in the process of working
in school resource you became involved in the nope program tell us a little bit
about that the no program basically nope it’s a nonprofit organization that was
founded in Palm Beach County they deliver presentations they do vigils and
our messages try to stop the drug use I mean our teens today they don’t know the
effects of narcotics use less like you mentioned earlier in the show
fifty three people in San Jose County alone died from drug drug overdose in
2015 this year the numbers are surpassing that now what does note mean
nope stands for narcotic overdose prevention and education and education
is the biggest part of the program where we deliver a presentation
it’s an hour-long presentation we talk about the drugs and the effects that
they have we provide stories about kids that had died using drugs some of them
starting earlier in middle school some of them as an adult but some of those
that started in middle school doing it survived for many years they’re
combining drugs and they don’t know the effects they think that because they
mixed it once it’s gonna be okay and then one day it doesn’t work out or they
mix them with alcohol so nope is trying to deliver information to these kids so
that they make good decisions within the presentation you also have parents that
come and talk to us about their personal stories they’ve lost a child during to a
drug overdose and that’s the part that really makes it really emotional and
delivers the message sometimes kids don’t want to look at someone in uniform
telling them a story they want to hear from somebody who’s lived
in Aaron’s case she delivers that story now what is the target audience age
group wise for the note program in st. Lucie County and across Florida actually
we have six seven counties in the state of Florida that are doing nope and about
four in Pennsylvania we deliver in Florida we do middle school so we try to
do seventh eighth graders and in high school we do anywhere from ninth grade
all the way through 12th grade the middle school presentation it’s a little
bit less graphic than the high school presentation just because we want to
make sure that we’re still sending the message but we don’t want to scare kids
too much with graphic pictures but but for the high school students we want to
make sure that we drill it hard and this crude as it can be yeah well in life is
cruel absolutely and when when something like this happens it has a very deep
impact the damage radius is just is major what does a no presentation look
like gonna walk us through if you will for the sake of our our viewers what a
no presentation looks like I’m the moderator for the presentation I
introduce myself I provide some statistics in our County then I talk
about one of our cases and present that story then we have a law enforcement
officer another deputy that talks about drugs and the effects that they have in
within the presentation then towards the end we talk about I ask questions about
how many people know or are involved or are currently using drugs and I have all
the kids stand up and so you can see then if you know someone stand up if you
don’t sit down and then they sit down then I asked him again well of those of
you who know or are currently using drugs how many of you have gone out
there and trying to get help or told someone to get help and then you see
half or 75% of those kids sit down so you just slept up with maybe 20 kids
out of a group of to 300 and what I like about that is you keep those kids
standing that have actually told somebody and you celebrate that they are
heroes yes they need to know that they’re here that they’re making it
and in that one phone call today one that standing up for that person can
save a life sometimes that’s all it takes you know one person caring and
doing something for them and I think among their peers you know to recognize
and celebrate the fact that they made a heroic decision by telling somebody to
try to get help for that individual you know I think that sends a very very
profound message to them that this is the right thing and we want to celebrate
you doing the right thing not for the sake of the the individual being
arrested because as we learn from lieutenant Hester the focus isn’t on
arresting the individual user who has been involved in an overdose the focus
is trying to dig deeper into this problem so we can actually get to the
root of it and and that’s something that you actually are supporting by having
those heroes stand up and celebrating them because I remember there was a big
round of applause for all of those heroes during the presentation we also
talked about that the part were you talking about enforcement we talked
about the good samaritan 9-1-1 law so we let them know that they can call nine
one and they’re not gonna be in trouble for calling that one their friends not
gonna be in trouble if they overdose we’re trying to make sure we save that
life and yes the the message is be they’re here and tell someone you know
just that one time can kill so whatever we can do that that’s what we want to
send that message so that they know what to do when they’re facing that situation
and we’re trying to prevent tragedies at that point and you know we’ve got
partnerships with parents who have who have lost loved ones such as yourself
that you know you used to drive that point home and what has been the impact
that you’ve seen on these students as a result of these programs I received a an
email two days ago from one of my teachers at Treasure Coast High School
and he said that his class it’s an English class and debate all the kids
after the presentation they were talking about it and they had a really good
discussion and how impactful it was for them to hear about what we’re doing and
and they were sharing how much they care and what they would do if they were in
that situation so it was really nice to see that two days ago I also received an
envelope folder with letters that were written to Aaron after she’d at one of
our presentations at Port st. Lucie high so we know that the message is getting
there and and I’m positive that at least if we save one life we’ve done our job
well thank you for being a hero yourself and bringing this program to our
Community Schools when we return we will be speaking directly with miss Erin
Guercio about her tragedy and what she endured in losing her daughter Sierra
Bradley last year to a narcotics overdose you don’t want to miss this
it’s gonna be a very touching segment go away welcome back to 10a we have been
talking about the note program the narcotics overdose prevention and
education program that our school resource deputy unit brings to our
Community Schools and in doing that deputy Sergio Lopez has been involved in
actually bringing that to our schools now you also work with parents in the
course of doing that and that is through our presentations that’s how you met
Aaron correct the core of program though the program was no it’s the parents that
that’s where we really drilled the the message I met Aaron last year during a
presentation at a renaissance charter school it was a parent presentation we
did a presentation during the day for the students and then those parents were
invited at night and Aaron was one of our guests and she saw the presentation
and even though it’s a different presentation that we deliver from the
parents to the kids it’s a little bit more informative to the parents we give
them tips and more more ideas of how to detect their drug use
we show them what kind of pills are gonna be looking for and in that
presentation after that we spoke a little bit about the program and she
showed interest and she wanted to be part of their program because she she
suffered through a loss to drug overdose well Aaron I want to thank you for being
here today I know you have a tragic and a touching story that you wanted to
share with us and this is the same story that you share with the students when
you meet with them so thank you for coming today tell us a little about what
you’ve what you’ve been through well last year my 20 year old daughter in
March of 2015 went off to a concert as 20 year old
still in Tallahassee and and she decided to participate with her
two friends and taking a drug called Molly and she was not really educated
and what drug overdose could what could happen to her and she was very naive
very naive and she took it and about an hour after she took Molly she collapsed
on a floor at a venue she was at and she went into cardiac arrest and had a
seizure from what I understand and she lost consciousness and never woke up
that is tragic and I can’t imagine what you’ve gone through how long after this
had happened did you become aware that narcotics were even involved well I got
a knock at my door at 4:30 in the morning by 2 st. Lucie County deputies
that came to deliver the news to myself and my family and when I opened the door
and they presented to me that my daughter had passed away they told me
what had happened and I was shocked because I wasn’t even aware of what
Molly was and I wasn’t aware of what would prompt her to even want to take
this drug and she was not a drug addict she had a job she loved her family she
was a normal girl and there was no signs that she was doing anything abnormal
that I should be concerned about except for the minor things that you know kids
do leading up to their adulthood and I wasn’t overly concerned and when he told
me what she had done it was quite shocking and I really had to research
and find out exactly what this narcotic was and what it what it had done to her
because I was very unaware and undereducated and
and it’s opened my eyes to a whole new world so something that you didn’t
anticipate at all with her behavior at home and with her behavior with you and
I imagine it was very devastating not only to hear of the news of her passing
but also why yes like I said you know all kids go through a transition of life
when they’re going into adulthood and they do minor things that you think you
know you don’t overthink you think okay you know she’s she’s trying to learn and
guide her way through life and making mistakes and we just have to help her
and guide her and I didn’t really think much of the minor things and then when
this happened I actually had to second guess where those clues for those things
I should have been more aware of not coming from a background of knowing and
being educated in narcotics I wasn’t always aware of what the clues
might be and I just didn’t really look for them now looking back I know that
maybe some some of those were clues and maybe she was experimenting and you know
living a different life than maybe I knew of and it really hit hard and hit
home when when I got that knock on the door it it was devastating yeah now what
aimed you towards the note program and and and getting in front of middle
school and high school kids to share this story that’s got to take some
tremendous strength to be able to do that yeah it it is hard but it’s very
important to me I have I still have teenagers at home and I have a lot of
teenagers that I know personally and when I heard about the note program and
when I went to one of their presentations and saw what their message
was it just touched my heart and made me think that I needed to get the message
across and on a personal standpoint let these kids know what the after-effects
of losing a child and the way that I lost her what it felt like and I try my
best to exude that that emotion to let them know that
this is what a mother goes through this is what is left behind and what can
happen to the loved ones and you know I want you to be aware that we suffer
every day and after having seen your presentation at one of the high schools
I can tell you that in the audience you can hear a pin drop when you tell
your story and the impact on some of the kids I’ve actually watched kids leave
the room crying don’t know what the reasons are behind it but you can only
imagine that they either know somebody who is currently using drugs or have
experienced a similar tragedy to what you’re talking about today and
unfortunately but also fortunately we’re able to use Sierra’s life and the
tragedy that she went through to be able to keep other people from making that
same mistake and that takes a tremendous amount of bravery on your part
thank you that’s that’s exactly what my message is well I want to thank you so
much for sharing this I know this is hard and you do this multiple times over
in a public format with the Sheriff’s Office and it’s your story and the other
stories of the other parents just like you that are actually driving this point
home that it’s not so much about enforcement but it’s about education and
prevention and if we can get that message out we’re doing a good job so
thank you so much for coming today thank you we will be right back don’t go away on behalf of Sheriff Ken mascara and the
700 men and women of the st. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office we thank you for
watching until next time stay safe

GHB: The Party Drug Killing Ravers

GHB: The Party Drug Killing Ravers


Imagine if you were an alcoholic
and you drank every day and woke up feeling like shit
and somebody gave you something where you could get the same
sensation of getting fucked up and you wake up the next morning
feeling fresh and you’ve actually slept well. That’s the danger of G, it’s almost too good. GHB, or its precursor chemical, the industrial cleaning product GBL, is a deadly drug that has been
sneaking into dance floors across Europe. It’s previously been known
as a date rape drug and for its use in the gay chemsex
scene, but we’ve discovered that under
the radar it’s been spreading into mainstream nightlife. One milliliter too much can land you
in a coma or kill you. Anybody who raves knows someone
who takes G and anyone who takes G seems to know of somebody who’s died. We wanted to know how popular GHB
really is but the problem is that there’s no reliable statistics
on how many people are taking it. So we decided to do a call out
asking people for their experiences taking the drug and pretty much immediately we were inundated with voicemails
and videos from all across Europe. Music sounds a lot better, sex feels a lot better. I’ve always had good positive effects
from it. Recently my mate passed away on it. He was on G and then he fell asleep.
Just didn’t wake up. Some of my friends have been
hospitalized and died, some of them have even tried
to commit suicide off it. It makes you feel horny if you like,
or fruity. G makes you feel really active. It was like, a pretty dramatic uptake
in the Berlin scene. GHB was my favorite drug experience
that I’ve ever had. When you have GHB, you blackout, you are not in control
of whatever you do. Some people claim that
the Netherlands is one of the places where GHB began its new
relationship with dance culture. In the last five years, Amsterdam’s
OLVG hospital has seen a 266% increase
in GHB overdose admissions. We’ve just come to Groningen which
is in the northern Netherlands. We’re here to meet a dealer
who sells GHB and according to him, this area
is going through a bit of a GHB epidemic especially amongst the
hardcore music scene and the police have started
to make it a priority. Hey man I’m at the address you
gave me. “OK, I’ll come out, just a sec.” OK, cool. Is this the G? This is it, yeah, absolutely. And what’s this over here? – Coke.
– OK. Do you sell Coke as well? Yeah, anything. Out of all the stuff that you sell,
which sells the most? GHB, for sure. So why did you start selling GHB? People are getting more and
more into GHB. It would be stupid to not
take advantage of that, also because it’s so easy to get. It’s so easy to produce. It’s low effort, high price,
high profit. It’s a perfect business to be honest. How do you usually measure it out? I just put it in a big bowl. Let’s see. So how many milliliters is that
or are you still going? That’s 10. So this has to be 50 in total. How much is this 50 ml bottle
going to go for? 50 euros. So it’s about 1 euro per milliliter. That’s incredibly cheap. Yeah absolutely. Is that one of the appeals
of this drug? Yeah, absolutely. Most people I sell to are pretty
heavy users. OK. And they’ll f**king use it in church,
anywhere. So they’re using it every day?
They’re addicted? Yeah, absolutely. How aware are you of
the dangers of GHB? Pretty aware, I’ve seen a lot
of people going to s**t who were using it. Do you know people
who have died from it? Yeah, maybe around five or six people
I know have died from it, from overdosing on it, on the party itself,
so it will happen. There’s nothing people can do
about it. How popular is G in the Netherlands? It’s absolutely an epidemic. So many people using it nowadays
compared to a few years back. Well my mates are actually up there. I see the cool masks so I assume
you guys always hang out like this. For a pre-party, I feel like
it’s quite a lot of cocaine. – Yeah.
– It is. Do you guys do G as well? Yeah I like the feeling but I don’t
want to do it too often. – So what are you doing now?
– Taking the GHB. So I just poured it in
from the little tube. So what does that taste like? Oh s**t. Well it’s a bit thick so you really feel it
gliding through your throat. So do you just take GHB as like,
a chill one? Yeah absolutely. I really like it for just
a casual setting When you go to these hardcore parties do you see people on G often? At a festival people often use a lot like all day and all night. They get really active and energetic
and they start making weird noises and doing weird things
with their hands and at the end of the festival
they’re just f**ked. Bright and early the next day,
I was with Dirk and his friend on a five hour road trip to Europe’s
biggest hardstyle festival. So it’s 7 AM and we’re
on the party bus to this hardcore festival and as soon as we got on the bus, they started playing hardcore
very loud and everyone started doing
very large amounts of drugs. And meanwhile the whole time these two guys are pipetting out doses of GHB for the bus ride and it’s still not even 9 AM. On the bus stop, some people
asked me to make these so just making them
on custom order. The guys took a break from their
mobile drug laboratory to sell capsules of G to people
at the petrol station. They then took their first dose and for some reason set an alarm. So we’ve just arrived at the festival after a gruelling four hour bus ride and I noticed you putting
an alarm on your phone. Yeah. What was that for? I do that because otherwise
I will take a shot earlier than I should be. Basically keep yourself
from overdosing. That’s the point of it. The combination of speed, cocaine, G, alcohol and 200 BPM music might seem like a recipe
for disaster, but for the veteran drug users
of Holland’s hardcore scene, G has simply become another drug
on the narcotic menu that makes violently punching the air
more enjoyable. But it’s not just the Dutch gabber
scene where GHB is taking hold. The drug is quickly spreading. Especially to Europe’s
Disneyland of drugs, Ibiza. We’ve heard that GHB is bigger here
than anywhere else. It’s sort of a strange world with no
rules or ramifications, where it’s kind of like an arms race
to see who can do the most and the most intense drugs. Yeah, GHB is getting quite popular. Slowly everyone is knowing about it
and people are taking it. The younger generation is trying
their hand at it and with something that’s really
quite dangerous and heavy. Well, when I first came out here last
year I was like, “That’s f**king
weird as f**k, why the f**k would I ever take that?
That’s weird.” But then I took it because I was like
“Oh why not.” It’s actually quite cheap in
comparison to like, cocaine or something like that. We’re all f**ked up on the Gs people are going to be horny as f**k,
do you know what I mean? Now we’re even talking about it now,
it makes me actually want to do it. Give me some f**king Geebs. You see people getting carried out
of clubs all the time in Ibiza. I know of people who have died
from taking Geebs or things that are related
to taking Geebs. I went under and I was taken to an ambulance,
had to be resuscitated because I nearly died. At the first party we went to, we immediately saw a girl being taken
away on a stretcher by paramedics. It can’t be verified but we were
told by her friends that she had taken too much GHB. If we saw a potential G overdose,
known as ‘Going under’, after two hours of landing in Ibiza, we could only begin to imagine
how many similar tragedies were happening on this island
at any given time. It’s not just your health that’s
a problem when partying on G. It can dramatically affect
your behaviour with users reporting
an almost feral libido. For example, it took several police
officers to subdue this Dutch man after he lost control on G. People have done things that are
probably out of character. They’ve acted, not within
their own headspace. At the time it made my friend
so horny that she had to go back to our
apartment and use one of our friend’s dildos. If you dose too high and you take
too much you act irrationally, and you’re super horny
and kind of touchy but in a way that could
offend people. In 2018 the Ibiza resident DJ,
Jackmaster was accused of touching people
inappropriately during a G session and it heavily impacted his career. So much so, that he hasn’t spoken
to the press until now. I first started using GBL
four or five years ago. I started to like it and I got to the stage where
I was really relying on it to do gigs like if I didn’t have it before a gig
and during a gig I would feel pretty anxious. My use of it just started to spiral
out of control, you know. I was buying it in liters. I would have a liter under my sink
in the house. I’ve woken up at festivals before in a pool of my own sweat but freezing cold and I’ve not even known
what festival I was at. Would you call it an addiction? I would probably call it
an addiction, yeah. I mean at my 30th birthday, I overdosed on G
and I collapsed on stage. That was probably as close as I’ve
ever had in my life to dying you know and I probably was close and I did promise that I would stop and you know, I just fell into the
same bad patterns months after because the drug had such
a hold on me, you know. Since then, worse things
have happened, you know. There was a situation at a festival
last year and I’ve been told that I had acted
inappropriately to a number of women at the festival. I was bouncing around
from girl to girl just being inappropriate,
grabbing them, trying to kiss them. You don’t want to blame the drug
and make it an excuse. It’s absolutely not an excuse man, but it does go some way to explaining
why I acted out of character. I chose to pick up that bottle
and drink it. It’s my fault. I’m just so sorry and upset that,
you know, I hurt these women, I hurt the spirit of these women
and it’s just, it’s just really been heartbreaking
for me to know that. And you know, there’s a lot of people
in the dance music scene who are addicted to G and who are
using it far too much. So do you know many DJs
who are using GHB? I know a lot, not just DJs. I know a lot of people in the scene
who are doing it, you know, at after parties and stuff. It’s the number one drug that
people use to stay awake and hop from after party
to after party and it’s just that’s a really
dangerous culture considering the severity
of the effects that that drug can have on you. The growing popularity of G, combined with the lack of awareness
about its dangers, is inevitably going to lead
to more and more overdoses. I wondered how frequently
British doctors were dealing with GHB casualties and what you can do to
help people who have gone under. How dangerous is GHB compared
to other drugs? It’s a very dangerous drug
if used in overdose. If you had to estimate how many
people per week come in here with a GHB overdose? I guess it’s about two to three
a week, maybe more. But it’s pretty regular. It’s a fairly common thing. – Really?
– Yeah, absolutely. So one of the problems with it
is that it’s not just the overdose, it’s also that people can also
withdraw from it and if somebody stops GHB suddenly, they can have quite severe
withdrawal symptoms, much as you would if you were
a dependent heroin user and you suddenly stopped using it. So is GHB particularly addictive? Yeah, it has got addictive
tendencies, yes. Is there a way to take GHB safely? I guess the only way to be taking it
safely would be in an incredibly regulated fashion where there is no danger of you
overdosing, in an environment where everybody
knows exactly what to do if you do overdose. That sounds like a pretty
unlikely environment. I think it is. What can someone do if they see
someone who is passed out from GHB? Certainly if someone starts snoring
or they become really unrousable, then you’ve got to be worried. If somebody has passed out and you’re worried that they’re going
to lose their airway, they might suffocate, you need to get them to hospital. You can just simply put the person
in the recovery position, keep an eye on them try and keep them awake and get help. How can you tell if someone’s
passed out from GHB? Most of the deaths are pre-hospital so there isn’t a specific test that
we do in the emergency department to look for GHB or in any other emergency department. So there’s not really any way of us knowing the scale of the GHB problem? There are toxicology testing
that you can do for GHB which can be done in
a post-mortem setting. One of the things with it is that
the results aren’t instantaneous so within an emergency department
you need to do tests that are going to give you
results right now so you can act on them
to care for your patient. but we certainly don’t do a full,
complete toxicological drug screen that would take a few days to come
back for every single patient who comes through our doors. Emergency departments in the UK
aren’t testing for GHB or GBL in situ, and post-mortem toxicology reports
rarely are either, despite searching for over 300
other drugs. The dilemma is that public health
bodies across Europe won’t acknowledge there’s a problem
unless there are statistics, but will only gather
comprehensive statistics when they know there’s a problem. Because of this, the reports
that have been published are merely the tip of the iceberg. From everything we’ve seen, G does seem to be spreading rapidly and that increase in popularity
is being matched by a dangerous lack of awareness. I don’t know what the f**king
recommended amount is and young people aren’t going to know
what the recommended amount is, so the information is not there
for people. There should be a lot more education
on GHB and recommended dosages as well so that people know how much to take. Part of the danger of it
is how good it is and that’s why I think
there needs to be education. The stigma that surrounds drugs
isn’t helping which is especially amplified when it comes to the date rape
rust remover drug, GHB. The comas and deaths will continue
to happen until we accept that a ton of people are taking these dangerous drugs, and open up the conversation to spread awareness.

The Dark Side Of Britain: Spice | UNILAD Original Documentary

The Dark Side Of Britain: Spice | UNILAD Original Documentary


So I bought this this morning, I made 1 spliff
out of this and it was a really big spliff because it was my morning one and it knocked
me out, but that’s it, that’s it there. It’s not much but thats ranging round about
5 pound but you’re only going to need about probably that little tiny bit there to knock
you out. He couldn’t sleep one night and someone offered
him a bit of a joint and that got him to sleep one night. The next night he thought it was a good idea,
you know what I mean, and that’s how these addictions start. I get a couple of joints out of it, 3 or 4
joints out of it and that does me, that’ll do me until about 6 in the morning. Every morning my stomach hurts, sometimes
I can be sick, depends on what stuff I’ve been smoking. So sometimes after 2 drags I can wake up with
burns in my jacket, because I passed out with a joint. I put that in a joint and I’ll probably take
a knock on that. That little tiny bit, but that does it, that
stops the stomach cramps, it stops everything. It’s like it’s just taken over, seriously
took over. People will see it as an easy answer to living
life easy on the streets. You don’t feel nothing, you don’t see nothing,
you don’t feel nothing. You know what yeah… Do you think that’s why people take it? Yeah because it blocks everything on these
streets out, everything. If I blew it in your face, it’ll probably
knock you out, like get you stoned. It’s lethal really. You’re awake, you’re aware but you’re not
in control something takes over you and you’re just stuck, you can’t move. Makes everything go away, you’re just floating,
you know what I mean, you just shut your eyes, just calm, you feel relaxed, you feel comfortable. I like it, because it gets you proper stoned. I think it is, it’s horrible the way it’s
made but every drug is horrible. I think people just are very judgmental, no one goes
I want belly ache in the morning, I want to throw up in the morning. No human wants that, they don’t want to be
in pain but when they smoke it and are comfy, time flies absolutely flies. It seems like this place is very hectic as
well. It is very hectic and I’ve just been speaking
to the guys then, the reason why it’s so hectic is because we don’t close the door on anyone. You know if somebody comes, we’re a crisis
led service, somebody comes to the front door and they need help because you can’t, we have
a drop in Tuesday, Friday 2 until 4 but you can’t say to somebody “have a crisis at 2
o’clock on Tuesday and we’ll help you.” Has the situation in Manchester got worse
since it’s been criminalised? Yep, a lot worse because now you’re not getting
sealed packets so you don’t know what’s in them, some spice that you buy on Deansgate
is different to what you might buy on Piccadilly Gardens It’s now kind of, every man for himself, it
can be tampered with a lot more because it’s now being sold in the snap bags, and it’s
turned a sort of community of people against each other now because one may not smoke spice
anymore but they’ll sell it and they’re getting people to go out and beg for it and they’re
actually making people, “I’ll give you some spice but you need to go out and beg for it
and then give me the money that you get from begging” so it’s a hundred, million times
worse than it was before the ban. So why, why do they need to get themselves
into such a state that they’re on a different planet and not being able to deal with their
day to day life, if we can get to the root cause of that problem and the reason why they
feel that way, then we can tackle it. Criminalising it makes absolutely no difference
whatsoever. I’d pay double for a packet of it if I can
get it in a packet rather than what I showed you last night in a bag off the street, I’d
rather get it in a packet.When it says it on a packet, it says what’s in it, exactly
what’s in it on the back of it. Do you know when I first smoked spice? In Strangeways there, that’s where I first
smoked spice. In cell 21 on the fours, me and Sitch it was,
we bought a joint on the yard for a fiver. This is Bury New Road, this is where the legalised
shop was in the first place, I guarantee if we walked on that side, and yous didn’t have
them cameras out we would get offered spice. I was buying packets from the shop and it
was like you could get a gram for a fiver, you could get half an ounce for £15. It was a lot cheaper and it had on the packets
what was in it. You could get black chronic, green chronic,
erm, clockwork orange. When you were getting it in the packets from
the shop behind us, right, if you were getting it in the packets from there you knew what
was in it. It said everything that was in it and it also
said not for human consumption, and believe me I don’t know what’s in it, nobody knows
what’s in spice right now. The other day I smoked a joint, and when I
came round I’ve got 2 paramedics with me and I didn’t even know and they were saying to
me, “come on shaun, get in the ambulance” and I was saying “what are you on about, I
don’t need an ambulance” and they’re saying “you do, you’re out cold on the floor near
the road” and I don’t know anything about it and that’s because I don’t know what’s
in spice, the spice that’s about now because you just don’t know what’s in it. I don’t care how much spice I’ve got to smoke,
I’ll smoke as much as it takes, that way I don’t feel it, I don’t feel like my baby died
last year, I don’t feel like my mum’s dying, I don’t remember any of it, I don’t want to
remember any of it, that’s why I do it, that’s why I won’t go home, that’s why I’m carrying
it on and I will carry it on until my mum’s gone because I can’t sit there watching it,
I’m not like my brothers and my sisters I can’t sit there and watch her die, I can’t
do that, so I’ve put myself on the street, I’ll stay on the street and be out here rather
than watching my mum die. People smoke it because it’s cheap and easy,
when they smoke spice it makes you forget about your problems, like if you smoke that
you’re not going to think where am I staying tonight, where am I gonna have a wash, where
am I gonna get food from, you don’t think nothing. You wake up, you have a drag, spiced out of
your head, all you’re thinking now is where am I going to get my next bag? Where am I going to get my next bag? Kids are just getting origami or like chopped
up marshmallows plants, soaking it in acetone, nail varnish remover, liquid cleaner for your
alloys, soaking it and because it’s got chemicals soaked into it, smoking it’s dangerous. It’s stronger now than it ever was before,
so it’s more of a dangerous situation now than it was back then, do you know what I
mean. The way that spice is generally manufactured
is that the chemical is purchased, usually through the dark web, and it’s imported illegally
and then what will happen is is it’s a powder which is then dissolved up in an appropriate
solvent something like nail varnish remover, something like that, it’s them mixed within
a plant material and then dried and then separated into the small bags that we see on the street. I was smoking upwards of 58 gram a day to
try and kill myself, to get rid of the pain of losing my sister, my nan and so many friends. I ended up, there is no other way to describe
it other than drug induced psychosis, I was seeing things that weren’t really there, police
officers approached me one morning and I’ve lashed out because I didn’t see a police officer,
I’ve just seen a shape coming at me and I’ve ended up in prison for 6 months for ABH, which
after my release, I started smoking spice again, it was about 3 weeks after my release
I smoked a large spliff of spice, and I ended up vomiting uncontrollably and I ended up
rupturing my stomach to the point where I was vomiting blood, I threw up a pint and
a half of my own blood and ended up in a 14 day coma in St Thomas’ hospital. Absolutely destroyed me, I ruined my life
with it, I ended up homeless, I ended up walking away from my friends, my job, my home, everything
all because of spice. It’s like I’d never go near it again and I’d
warn any one of my friends to stay away from it, because it kills people and it ruins your
life. They’ll typically say you know, “I know it
sounds daft but when you smoke it on the streets, it makes you feel warm, it’s like you’ve got
a warm blanket around you” that is exactly how a heroin user would talk about using heroin,
feeling warm, feeling enclosed, or again they say it’s the only thing that gets me to sleep,
you’ve been trying to get to sleep in a car park, you’re worried about being attacked,
feeling very vulnerable, if I smoke a joint of spice, it gets me to sleep. So it seems to have this ability to condense
time whether it’s to make 3, 4,5 hours pass, make a long period of time feel shorter, so
again you speak to homeless people and they’ll say “I’ve been on the streets for 2 years,
it feels like 2 months.” How bad is spice when it come to addictiveness? Horrific, it’s you know, we’ve had people
that we know of sort of anecdotally that they’ve swapped from heroin onto spice because it’s
cheaper and then they’ve found it’s harder to get off spice than it is to get off heroin. How long would it be until I can pick up spice,
if I wanted too? 10 minutes, and 7 minutes of that is walking
up the street, so it’s very, it’s easy and if you see people in a certain way, you’d
approach them and ask them where they get it from, or if you’re around the city centre
long enough somebody will probably ask you if you want to buy some. I could take you right now to the centre of
Piccadilly Gardens and just stand there on 1 spot like this and you’ll watch people coming
to me saying “do you want to buy spice?” that’s the worse thing, that’s how horrible
it is in Manchester now, spice is too easy to get hold of, you can stand in 1 spot like
this, and someone will say do you want something, do you want weed? Do you want spice? Do you want crack? Do you want heroin? It’s flooded,
the town is horrible. Every homeless person around the city centre
are all spice heads. Manchester’s fucked through spice, spice has
fucked it. When the police made it illegal, that’s when
they made it worse, if they had kept it legal and drive everybody off it properly there
wouldn’t be half the crime there is now, there wouldn’t be half the people on it now, because
obviously these police have just snapped it off, shut the shops down, people are still
addicted to it. It’s that bad that they’re killing each other
for it, someone’s gone in someones pocket and because he’s gone in someones pocket they’ve
then said you’re coming picking an ounce up with me, so when he were going for spice,
there weren’t no fucking spice it was a stitch up, they were just taking him to the canal
to kill him. They battered him, and then they’ve gone too
far and they’ve killed him, now he’s been killed, all through spice, that’s the second
one, out of my mates that I know have been killed over spice, 1 of them got burnt in
his tent, it was because he had spice and the rest of them didn’t, so they battered
him for his spice, that kid was only 19, 19 and he got killed, in a tent because of spice,
just because he had a few spliffs and they didn’t have a spliff, but because they wanted
a spliff and he had a spliff they killed that poor kid for that spice. So post ban, we’ve been seeing spice in this
sort of form here, so it’s a very nondescript green plant material, now if you actually
bought the cannabinoid on the market and then manufactured that you’d probably be spending
a couple of pounds to actually import the cannabinoids so a gram of that, that would
produce 500 bags of half a gram in weight and you’d probably get a markup of about £2500. You’ve sort of got a catch 22 there, all the
drug dealers now like the people who used to deal cocaine, heroin, crack, all the big
time drug dealers now have sort of moved away from that, they still do that on the sidelines
but now they’ve got spice as a main avenue because it’s such a moneymaker. It’s quite basic and quite easy to do, you
can go online now and you can search how to make spice, how to make synthetic cannabinoids
and there’s been a step-by-step set of instructions about how you would actually do that. So if you think how many homeless people are
in Manchester city centre, say as a rough number, say 5000, as a rough number, 5000
people get 10 or 20 pound a day, 5000 times 10 or 20, that’s 50 grand, that’s a lot of
money, that’s a lot of income to be getting, just from people begging off others on the
streets, never mind people have got jobs, who get a wage and pay for it like that, it’s
such stupidly easy money that people, they just think they’re stupid to turn away from
it. People that are on it, it’s hard for them
to get off though, you know it’s hard to actually realise I want to stop and I need help, we
can’t tell them to stop smoking it, they’ve got to want the change themselves. You know there’s death involved but you still
take that chance, 50-50 chance, every drag is a 50-50 chance if you’re gonna live or
die. Basically is, because 1 drag could kill somebody. It’s kind of like a heroin withdrawal in a
way because you start, your stomach starts cramping, you start sweating when you’re freezing,
you know you’re cold, so you’re wrapped up in a big coat but you start sweating and sweating,
you start shaking, physically shaking like that, you’d be sick, I had blood coming out
of me, here there and everywhere. How easy is it to get addicted too? It’s like that. I know people that have been on the streets
for 30, 40 years, they’ve been heavy heroin and crack users for those 30 or 40 years and
even they won’t go anywhere near spice. I mean I’ve physically seen it with my own
eyes, people who have woken up thinking that they’re gonna have the sweats and the runs
from a heroin withdrawal and really they’re shaking from a spice withdrawal and they haven’t
even noticed that they haven’t done gear for like 4 weeks and they’ve just been smoking
spice. The spice yeah, when it used to be in the
packets they never knocked you out like that, it would knock you out yeah, but not like
that, like now you can take 2 or 3 pulls of it, out. I thought I’d go from heroin to spice but
I haven’t, I’ve ended up still having a heroin habit, a spice habit and a crack habit, so
instead of getting rid of a smack habit and getting a spice habit I’ve ended up commandeering
all 3. So every morning, I do go for 3 bits, a bag
of spice, a bag of smack and a piece of crack and that’s breakfast, that’s my breakfast,
I won’t eat or anything until I’ve done that, when I’ve done that, that’s me good to go,
I’m good for everything then when I’ve had that, so until I’ve had that, I’m just the
nastiest bastard under the sun. Spice to me it’s a whole new class, you get
your class B, C, A, I think spice is another class above A anything man made with chemicals
now they’re calling it a new form of spice, like crystallised MDMA they’re saying it’s
crystallised spice, because it’s the new man made chemical drug. It can kill you instantly, instantly man,
1 little dab of that can end you. The concentrations have, the potencies have
been around 2 to 7% prior to the ban, post ban we saw a massive spike specifically in
Manchester and that was associated with a significant rise in potency by about 10 times
the normal dose, so we’re looking at between about 17 to 20% and that was directly linked
to about 53 emergency call outs that were received one weekend. Originally we’d say compared to cannabis,
you could buy a gram for £10 and you could get 30 to 40 joints from 1 gram so people
talk about just needing a tiny pin head or like the equivalent to a grain of rice and
put that in a joint, then people would talk about in a matter of months the tolerance
builds up to such a degree that they’re then smoking 5, 6, 7, 8 grams a day and it’s quite
common when we’ve been doing the research to see somebody put a half gram pack into
1 joint. So they go from getting 30 to 40 joints out
of 1 gram to just getting 1 or 2 joints out of a pack. Not even a gram… How long will that last you? About 2 hours, I’ll get a couple of joints
out of it, about 3 or 4 joints out of it and that does me, that will do me until about
6 in the morning. Have you ever seen anything like this? Never, never, and I’m old school, I remember
the Hacienda days of pills and MDMA and all those kind of things, I’d call it an epidemic,
I’ve never seen anything like it. Just because you’re in a shit place and you’ve
got nowhere else to go and you’ve got nothing else to do, does not mean that you have to
sit there and smoke spice and obliterate yourself, I reckon if you put any one of the politicians
that sit in the Houses of Parliament now, put them on the streets, go here you are, here’s
a spliff of spice I’m going to come back to you in a months time and see how bad you are,
I guarantee they’ll be sat there with no fucking shoes on in a foil blanket begging for spice. That’s what it does to everyone, it just strips
you of your humanity, everything you are as a person. If anything it’s just a thousand times more
dangerous, because when it was still legal it was being made by companies that were being
regulated, there was a certain amount of regulation in the actual product itself, certain chemicals
weren’t added, they were measured properly but now people are buying the formulas online,
making it at home so people are making their own mixtures up and editing the recipes in
different ways and that’s why people are dying so quickly now. So you don’t know where the products come
from, you don’t know how powerful it is, you don’t know what’s been added to it, what’s
been taken away from it, basically it’s a game of roulette, if you go and buy spice
from a dealer in the city now you’re playing a game of roulette because 1 drag could kill
you. 1 drag will drop you dead, because it could
have been laced. They could kill you for a fiver, just for
a £5 bag of spice, they could take your life and they’re not bothered because they’ve made
the money off it, now it’s your family that deals with everything after your spice use. It needs to stop doesn’t it, spice is just
killing people, if the government carried on selling it in the shop you wouldn’t have
half of the problems you have now, I promise you, it’s a billion of pounds industry when
it was legal, so what’s it going to be like now it’s illegal. It’s a bad game man, bad. Now whether it’s legal, class A, B or C it’s
not really going to have any impact on people’s decision making, whether to use it or not
and I think the focus as always should be targeting the dealers and in terms of the
users it’s about trying to engage them in treatment. What we need to look at is reducing the onset,
most people that you speak too, they’ll say they were first introduced to spice in the
prison system so we need to do more work in the prison system to stop people using it,
because the prison system is basically churning out spice users into the community, so if
you criminalise uses, you put them into prison, then you know that’s just self-perpetuating
this kind of cycle. Same place it is, smack and crack, a phone
call and it’s fucking there, within 5, 10 minutes. If you don’t want to do that, you walk to
Piccadilly Gardens or walk to fucking Deansgate and you get it straight away, walk to Chinatown
you’ll get it. Manchester city centre is full of spice. I’m a little bit stoned now, I feel alright. *inaudible*

WHY DRUG Epidemic Was Engineered by Deep State – Tentacles of the Deep State [2018] PART 2

WHY DRUG Epidemic Was Engineered by Deep State – Tentacles of the Deep State [2018] PART 2


In our previous episode we covered the Committee
of 300 and what role they play, today we are going to expose how they
are controlling the drug epidemic. Here’s part 2 of the deep state on the
Edge of Wonder. Since our last Qanon videos we have been getting
a lot of comments from you guys asking us for more. But we didn’t want to make them just for
the sake of making them since there are a lot of other great
channels already doing this already. So we decided we wanted to really dive deep
and start breaking down what exactly makes the Deep State,
who they are, and what their goal is. In our last episode we went into detail on
who the committee of 300 is and all the methods they are using to
depopulate the human race by way of Eugenics and for what reason. In this episode we are going to get way more
in depth on the drug epidemic and how this directly relates to our modern culture, especially with music. So if you haven’t watched our previous one,
it’d probably be better since we already talked about the committee of 300. We explained Eugenics and why they use it. We also introduced the book called Conspirator’s Hierarchy:
The Story of the Committee of 300, by Dr. John Coleman, which
we found on the CIA website. But since we went into detail
about it on our last one we won’t really go into the background of it, But in a nutshell, he worked for the
British intelligence in the 1980’s and had access to very top secret documents
and wrote an entire series on this. It’s mind blowing, read it. It takes forever but well worth it. We’ll put the link below for sure. So Qanon has been leaving a lot of crumbs
or clues on a lot of conspiracies that are really starting to fall in place once you start really diving deep on this… And boy have we dived deep. Just when we thought we’re at the
end of the rabbit hole, we realize how much deeper
and deeper it goes The scariest part that we found was how
perfectly everything ties in together and it can all relate back to the committee of 300 and the bloodlines of the 13 families. But that is going to be on our next episode
so keep watching for those episodes. Right, because we thought we would just do
a couple of episodes on this but now this is turning into an entire series. But since many of of Qanon’s posts
are hard to decipher, if you are not following it all the time, we thought we would start breaking
some of this stuff down for you guys. So half of Coleman’s book talks about the
drug trade, how it all works, who is behind it, and how they are all doing this. Of course we all know that Britain got all
of China hooked on Opium. China had the tea so they started to
trade opium with tea and soon the British took over
Hong Kong harbor to make it easier to trade But what most people don’t know is that
this wasn’t to trade tea, it was for trading opium. Soon China had very strict drug rules and
then started to produce it themselves. The 300 then saw what a lucrative business
it was and started to sell it to other countries, and make deals with others. Fast forward about 100 years the Rothschilds
developed a super elaborate system in which they controlled all
banks including the IMF, the Federal Reserve, which is what our Titanic Video was about, and started to make deals with
other world banks. And get this you guys, here is a Q post that lists all the 167 world banks that the Rothschilds own including the IRS. They are in charge of the Fed too
aren’t they. They own the money. But Hong Kong was the place where the
trades were happening and they have been trading gold for opium, which was priceless to the 300. There were some disagreements that broke out but soon everyone realized
how much money could be made. After a few decades and now you have a global
operation with multiple countries all taking part according to Coleman, mainstream companies are the ones
which were set up to help distribute, collect the funds, and to help make transaction
easier from country to country Coleman mentions that a major credit card
company was and possibly still is handing all of the laundering drug
money coming in to the 300 but we are choosing not to name it here. Now this was in the 90’s but Coleman
really was questioning how a company could produce
their own travelers checks that wasn’t through a government. Also what happened in the 70’s was that
the gold standard was eliminated so gold was no longer backing the
paper money anymore. This devalued the money even more. But according to Coleman, most drugs are being
traded with and especially in Hong Kong through gold which is why to this day gold is so important to China. Coleman even stated in that the 90’s that the
price of gold per kilo was on par with the price of heroin. However, now it is even more insane, a price of gold per kilo is about $40,000
the price of heroin or Fentanyl which is coming out of China is about $50,000-100,000 according to drugwarfacts.org. I mean that means Heroin is worth
more than gold! It’s just insane. So you guys might be wondering how they are
sending it here to the US which is the largest market of heroin? So according to Coleman and some other insiders
such as William Cooper, who wrote “Behold a pale horse,” you have the same person who is managing the heroin trade also make the laws against it. Tom Cruise’s movie American Made If you haven’t seen it, you should probably
check it out. was about how the CIA was bringing drugs into
the country and distributing it on a massive scale. So after Reagan, William Cooper said the Bush
family “perfected” the mass distribution behind the drug trade. Coleman said that Bush was just a servant
for the 300 to fulfill their desires. On the surface the FDA and border police were
trying to crack down on this. But everything they were doing wasn’t even
making a dent in the overall situation. Coleman hinted that the wars in the middle
east were over big oil and the opium fields. QAnon also had a very long post
which related a lot of stuff but linked Saudi Arabia to the Bush family, to 911, to oil fields Iraq, and Halliburton. Also the FBI and the DEA cracked down
on a small scale, but most are either over their heads, or paid off when it comes to the big
stuff, or just end up being out of their jurisdiction which is why none of the drugs are grown
here for mass distribution. According to Coleman though, to get this much
Heroin through on cargo ships and trucks you need an international company that can disguise
as a legitimate business, so according to Coleman this is where Triangle Internationale Routier company comes in, and I butchered that I’m sure, and I’m sure you can guess where this company is from … Geneva. When I was with the Texas border
patrol reporting last year they were saying they were really
overwhelmed by all of this. In 2014 the border patrol arrested over
700,000 illegal aliens but that’s just the number they caught, they said the number was probably even
twice as much who actually came through. And they only confiscated 5
million dollars in drugs. 5 Million? Dude that is such a joke, that’s
a drop in the ocean, it’s nothing … Also in today’s world many people are now saying
that the committee of 300 wants the MS 13 gang to create chaos here in our country with
killings, satanic worshiping, and drugs. Some say they are doing the hands on dirty
work for the cabal. So we know there is a ton of
controversy around this, but this is one of the main reason
why Trump wants to build a wall, it is actually cutting the source of
the main flow of funds to the deep state along with the MS13 gang and now child prostitution and child trafficking. In fact when girls come over the border no
matter what age they are, they will all get rapped at least 5 times by the cartels who control the Mexican side of the borders. I actually saw one of their compounds
while we were there. Yea so this is why the cabal hates Trump, they
wanted to keep their inflow coming. Coleman talks about how all of the recent
wars were over drugs and that China, Mexico, Afghanistan,
and Lisbon, has been supplying heroin with the
300 getting a huge cut. He said that the Rockefellers had or still
have a facility in Switzerland in which they were making LSD in the 70’s for 3$ a kilo and selling it for 20,000$. Do you know how much money that is? That’s like trillions, when you think
about a whole year How to market illegal drugs to
the mainstream So a lot of the police chiefs I have personally
spoken with while in the media couldn’t figure out why the dealers are
killing their users. But now after doing the show, Rob and I finally understand, it is all
about eugenics and depopulation while at the same time they are
getting filthy rich. So for the Cabal this is a win win
situation for them. Make trillions of dollars while depopulating
the “useless eaters,” to pave the way for their so
called “One World Government,” where everyone is serving them. So let’s digress a bit. The culture in the 50’s and 60’s
were so different. Back then most Americans values
were very high and drug abuse was very much
looked down upon in society. There was a huge focus on family values and
sexual freedom was definitely not part of the culture. So how do you get an entire society thinking
dealing drugs is “cool,” rebel against their parents,
and make sex a cultural acceptance? So Tavistock came along and realized that
the youth is the place to start. So they started to devise a plan in which,
using Colemans words here: turn them into mindless drug zombies who will be easier
to control than people who don’t need drugs.” Now this is the part in the plan that seems
really hard to grasp but according to Coleman, the committee realized how much the entertainment
industry can influence and re-shape our culture. So Tavisock started to devise a sinister plot
to get everyone doing drugs, rebelling against society, having wild crazy sex, also destroying the family at the same time. Now because the Committee already
owned all the media companies they realized they could promote this
everywhere on radio and TV stations everyday non stop forcing people to love it. All they needed now is something to promote. So they found 4 guys who were
already playing in Liverpool and decided to use them for their agenda. And thus the Beatlemania was born. Tavistock used them from the start with the
intention of degenerating society even further, however, Coleman mentions that the Fab Four might have never known they were
even being used for this purpose. But Tavistock also needed an
entire culture change. So Coleman claims Tavistock coined words which
seemingly came out of nowhere to go along with their new found plot: such as “beatniks,” “hippies,” “flower children” and popularized the word “Teenager,” which all became
part of the American vocabulary. It became “cool” to wear baggy clothes,
dirty jeans, go about with long unwashed hair. Everything they say about hippy basically So now that the stage was set, they just needed
to have a hidden meaning in the lyrics that “teenagers” would get but
parents might not. So “with a little help from their friends,” Coleman said that Tavistock
hired Theodor Adorno, who went to the Frankfurt School and
studied Western Marxism, to secretly write almost all of the
lyrics for the Beatles to promote the degeneration of our culture and mixed drug references in the lyrics to make
it cool now to use drugs. The excuse became the older generation
was now old fashioned and not keeping up with the
changing times of the new era. This later became a part of the culture as
other acts were then added such as the Rolling Stones and
the rest of the British Invasion leading up to even the music today. I know, it’s hard to swallow, we are just
telling you what we read. Yeah, that’s very true. Also some of the people on the cover of Beatles
St. Pepper’s album include Karl Marx , Aleister Crowley, who was
the precursor to the church of Satan and wrote the book on how to
summon demons, and Aldous Huxley who wrote
“A Brave New World” and is said by Coleman to be
the Committee’s high-priest who helped make
LSD popular in society. Soon a radical revolution was born as millions
upon millions of people all started to do drugs,  wear
baggy clothes, trendy clothes, rebelling against their parents, all while mainstream media were promoting this cultural phenomena in our society non-stop. So the committee was now making a killing
on selling LSD on a massive scale, making a ton through promoting the bands, and soon realized they can replicate this movement through other forums and mediums . So do y’all see how we are their monkeys? So you guys we know this is super intense and of course this is only Coleman’s account but if you really look into what
is happening today and who is controlling the music industry and Hollywood, it’s shocking. We did a video on the Illuminati
controlling Hollywood, but since we did that video so much more has now been coming to the surface. Also we have been told by someone who played
with some very famous people that everyone in the industry who
wants to make it is forced to go to these high end parties and they have to engage in lots of sex and drugs and then promote this in their persona in public. We are trying to work on getting
one of these people on our show, but this is stuff gets very sensitive so
we are not sure if this will ever happen. But in any case, you can for sure find a lot
more of these stories coming out especially with the pedo stuff
now hitting the surface. Also each era had a new drug, like in the 70’s in was LSD,
in the 80’s it was cocaine, in the 90’s it was ecstasy
and the rave scene which oh man I’m not even
going to be getting into and then in the 2000’s it was heroin
and now it is fentanyl. Haha I wanna hear
Ben’s stories about rave Oh man, I am sure my old friends would be
more than willing to share those stories, but I’m not gonna go there, Hello? To me that was like a lifetime ago. So getting back to fentanyl what is crazy is that oxycontin is
what’s getting everyone addicted which are both made from the opium plant. Oxycontin is highly addictive
and when people run out…. They resort to the street drugs since they
need a prescription for it. Many organizations are
trying to get it banned and the insurance company
Cigna actually stopped covering it. Big pharma is another huge beast that
Trump is fighting against. Man that’s a whole other
episode on its own. In our next episode, we’re gonna get into
who these 13 families are, what they control and what their ultimate goal is … and let me tell you guys, it
is gonna get nuts as nuts can get For sure Also the more we research the more we found
everything seems to be connected which is super frightening, because once you start seeing patterns and connections, this just makes it more real. Like you research something over here and
see how it connects with something over there, and then it has a connection to that person
you are researching, and this entire web starts to take shape. Yep exactly. Well guys we’ll be making a few more of these because this was just a tiny part
of this centuries year old plan. But please hit like and subscribe
for more great content. Also don’t forget to
hit the notification bell So until next time we’ll see you guys on
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