4K CC. Tarantula Hawk Swarm, Catching Amazing Pet Insects & Reptiles  CA NM AZ TX USA Herping HD.

4K CC. Tarantula Hawk Swarm, Catching Amazing Pet Insects & Reptiles CA NM AZ TX USA Herping HD.


Massive swarm Of Tarantula hawks that landed here This thing right here is gigantic and he’s lookin at me That thing is like 2 1/2 inches long wow Jeez that thing is huge That’s the biggest one so far he’s like 2 3/4 inches that last one Haha ha I hope I don’t get stung haha that’s gonna suck Buuzzzzz….Tarantula Hawk flies right past my head WOAH Oh my god That’s a giant Bumble Bee uh uh uh ah he he They are every where

The Smart Way Warthogs Keep Insects at Bay

The Smart Way Warthogs Keep Insects at Bay


NARRATOR: Meet the warthog. They love to roll
around in the mud. Known as wallowing,
it keeps their skin free from ticks and parasites. A mud bath might look messy. But pigs are actually
meticulously clean animals. The wallow also helps them cool
off in the heat of the day. But in the very hottest
months on the savanna, these warthogs face a dilemma. The intense African sun
dries out all the mud, leaving them exposed
to swarms of insects. It’s insufferable, even
with their tough hide. But a handful of smart warthogs
have figured out a solution. They enlist a helping hand– banded mongooses. They’re voracious insect eaters,
spending most of their day on the hunt for food. They patrol the savanna in
gangs of over 20 strong. And with so many mouths
to feed, mongooses need to find a lot of insects. As an insect magnet,
perhaps a warthog could provide a decent snack. Only, its long legs make this
dining table a little too high for a mongoose. So some clever warthogs
have learned to lie down when the gang is around. It sends a very clear message– the mongoose spa is
open for business. Now in range, the mongooses
clean the ticks and lice from all those hard-to-reach places. Pure bliss. It’s the perfect partnership. The warthogs are kept healthy. The mongooses get a
meal, eating their fill without nipping their patrons. Mutually beneficial
relationships like theirs are almost
unheard of between mammals. It’s a brilliant solution
for a nagging problem, one that hints pigs might well
be smarter than we realize.

Oklahoma’s Female Prison Population Is Reaching Epidemic Levels | NBC Left Field

Oklahoma’s Female Prison Population Is Reaching Epidemic Levels | NBC Left Field


My dad got me hooked on methamphetamines
by giving me an IV shot. We was at one of his friend’s house and
I walked in on him getting high, told him I wanted to try it,
and that’s how it started. I got pregnant when I was 19,
20, I had my daughter in prison. The last few days before I was released
from prison I had a lot of anxiety and dealing with the guilt and not relapsing.>>This is Aliea. She’s well acquainted with
Oklahoma’s criminal justice system. During her most recent interaction,
she spent one year in prison.>>Walking out of prison,
it was amazing, I felt free, you know? Being able to walk out those gates and
not have to look back. My case managers were there to pick me up. But you wanna walk out and your family
be there, especially your children, but it wasn’t happening like that.>>Branch 15 is a transitional living
house, this is where I will be living for the next year.>>This is going to be your room.>>I’m really nervous about everything, about the other people,
about messing up or not. I’m just nervous about everything.>>Since childhood, Aliea’s been
entangled in a cycle of drug addiction, unstable family life, and incarceration. And now, she wants nothing
more than to break that cycle.>>When I first started getting in
trouble with the law was when I was 12, that’s when I started my addiction. My mother had left me,
my father was in and out of my life. My dad started me on drugs. I remember that day like it was yesterday,
I was 12 years old, you know? I was stripped from my childhood. It was one thing, one thing after
another just to get that drug.>>This ought to be
right here an easy job.>>My dad got sent to prison because
of drugs, he was cooking meth. I thought he was cool cuz he
went to prison, he was bad.>>And I know you have a lot of guilt too. I have a lot of guilt, but
I don’t judge you for it. I don’t hold it against you at all.>>My life, it went downhill. I was in and out of lockup. And then when I turned 17,
I was put in Oklahoma County Jail. I stayed there for a year,
and started all over again, started my addiction all over again.>>Pregnant by age 20,
Aliea was high when she found out, and once again she was in trouble for drugs. The cycle starts again, but
this time she ended up in prison, terrified about what might
happen to her unborn child.>>It was embarrassing,
it was real embarrassing. Here I am, young, pregnant with my
first child, I’m a drug addict. They race me to the hospital. I was there going
through labor for 18 hours. I was shackled to the bed, and
we were pushing her out, and I just started crying, like I was bawling. I don’t know it was tears of joy or tears of fixing to have my
daughter stripped from me. They put her in my arms in the bed for
a couple hours, and then they took her. I was in prison for two years.>>During that time, Aliea’s
grandmother took care of her child. But when she was finally released.>>I tried to bond with her, but
every time I would pick her up, she would scream and cry, and
want my grandmother, so I felt rejected. It was hard, it was real hard.>>Unable to be the mother she never had,
Aliea went back to what she knew, drugs. When her grandmother eventually died, she found herself ill prepared
to raise her own daughter.>>My daughter told me she hated me and
I just let go.>>The fact is Aliea’s story
isn’t unique in Oklahoma. The state has the highest rate of
female incarceration in the country and there’s no signs of it
slowing down any time soon. In 2015, 64 out of every 100,000
women in the US were in prison. Oklahoma more than doubled that
with 151 women for every 100,000. Experts point to the state’s harsh
drug laws and longer prison terms, which are some of the most
aggressive in the country. Oklahoma uses prison over alternatives
more often than other states, with female incarceration projected to
grow by 60% over the next ten years. Similar to Aliea, 61% of female offenders
that entered prison in 2013 were assessed with the need for
substance abuse treatment. The cycle starts yet again.>>In 2012, I was arrested,
my daughter was put in foster care.>>For years, she tried to get her
daughter back, but was denied. A year ago, she caught her latest
charge and ended up behind bars. Aliea has since found out
that her daughter doesn’t want a relationship with her. I worry about my daughter following
in my footsteps a lot because I followed my dad’s footsteps. September 12th, she’ll be 12, and
that’s when my life went out of control. I want to do whatever
I can to prevent that. If I could break the cycle with her,
it would be amazing. I get scared because I couldn’t
imagine my daughter being in prison. This time is different because I
know what I need to do to break that cycle with my daughter. I wanna be a family.

Escaping Oklahoma’s Female Prison Epidemic: NBC Left Field

Escaping Oklahoma’s Female Prison Epidemic: NBC Left Field


My dad got me hooked on methamphetamines
by giving me an IV shot. We was at one of his friend’s house and
I walked in on him getting high, told him I wanted to try it,
and that’s how it started. I got pregnant when I was 19,
20, I had my daughter in prison. The last few days before I was released
from prison I had a lot of anxiety and dealing with the guilt and not relapsing.>>This is Aliea. She’s well acquainted with
Oklahoma’s criminal justice system. During her most recent interaction,
she spent one year in prison.>>Walking out of prison,
it was amazing, I felt free, you know? Being able to walk out those gates and
not have to look back. My case managers were there to pick me up. But you wanna walk out and your family
be there, especially your children, but it wasn’t happening like that.>>Branch 15 is a transitional living
house, this is where I will be living for the next year.>>This is going to be your room.>>I’m really nervous about everything, about the other people,
about messing up or not. I’m just nervous about everything.>>Since childhood, Aliea’s been
entangled in a cycle of drug addiction, unstable family life, and incarceration. And now, she wants nothing
more than to break that cycle.>>When I first started getting in
trouble with the law was when I was 12, that’s when I started my addiction. My mother had left me,
my father was in and out of my life. My dad started me on drugs. I remember that day like it was yesterday,
I was 12 years old, you know? I was stripped from my childhood. It was one thing, one thing after
another just to get that drug.>>This ought to be
right here an easy job.>>My dad got sent to prison because
of drugs, he was cooking meth. I thought he was cool cuz he
went to prison, he was bad.>>And I know you have a lot of guilt too. I have a lot of guilt, but
I don’t judge you for it. I don’t hold it against you at all.>>My life, it went downhill. I was in and out of lockup. And then when I turned 17,
I was put in Oklahoma County Jail. I stayed there for a year,
and started all over again, started my addiction all over again.>>Pregnant by age 20,
Aliea was high when she found out, and once again she was in trouble for drugs. The cycle starts again, but
this time she ended up in prison, terrified about what might
happen to her unborn child.>>It was embarrassing,
it was real embarrassing. Here I am, young, pregnant with my
first child, I’m a drug addict. They race me to the hospital. I was there going
through labor for 18 hours. I was shackled to the bed, and
we were pushing her out, and I just started crying, like I was bawling. I don’t know it was tears of joy or tears of fixing to have my
daughter stripped from me. They put her in my arms in the bed for
a couple hours, and then they took her. I was in prison for two years.>>During that time, Aliea’s
grandmother took care of her child. But when she was finally released.>>I tried to bond with her, but
every time I would pick her up, she would scream and cry, and
want my grandmother, so I felt rejected. It was hard, it was real hard.>>Unable to be the mother she never had,
Aliea went back to what she knew, drugs. When her grandmother eventually died, she found herself ill prepared
to raise her own daughter.>>My daughter told me she hated me and
I just let go.>>The fact is Aliea’s story
isn’t unique in Oklahoma. The state has the highest rate of
female incarceration in the country and there’s no signs of it
slowing down any time soon. In 2015, 64 out of every 100,000
women in the US were in prison. Oklahoma more than doubled that
with 151 women for every 100,000. Experts point to the state’s harsh
drug laws and longer prison terms, which are some of the most
aggressive in the country. Oklahoma uses prison over alternatives
more often than other states, with female incarceration projected to
grow by 60% over the next ten years. Similar to Aliea, 61% of female offenders
that entered prison in 2013 were assessed with the need for
substance abuse treatment. The cycle starts yet again.>>In 2012, I was arrested,
my daughter was put in foster care.>>For years, she tried to get her
daughter back, but was denied. A year ago, she caught her latest
charge and ended up behind bars. Aliea has since found out
that her daughter doesn’t want a relationship with her. I worry about my daughter following
in my footsteps a lot because I followed my dad’s footsteps. September 12th, she’ll be 12, and
that’s when my life went out of control. I want to do whatever
I can to prevent that. If I could break the cycle with her,
it would be amazing. I get scared because I couldn’t
imagine my daughter being in prison. This time is different because I
know what I need to do to break that cycle with my daughter. I wanna be a family.

AIDS: From Ryan White to Today’s Silent Epidemic | Retro Report on PBS

AIDS: From Ryan White to Today’s Silent Epidemic | Retro Report on PBS


♪♪ Jupiter Adams is part
of a silent epidemic. -My very first HIV test
came back positive. It was hell. Like, the first two months, I couldn’t talk to nobody. I couldn’t do anything. I didn’t hear about HIV. First time I heard about it
was in a history class where they were talking
about the ACT UP movement, so I told everybody I thought
it was like the Bubonic Plague. I thought it came, it left,
so I didn’t worry about it. -“Public awareness
about HIV has faded, and that’s contributing
to a health crisis today,” says Dr. Larry Mass, an AIDS activist
for nearly four decades. -I wish they could go on
indefinitely, thinking, “Oh, those old guys
and then all that old stuff, we don’t have to deal
with that.” This history
is not just history. It’s them, and it’s situations
that they’re facing today. -That history goes back to
the early days of the epidemic in the 1980s, when the public often
reacted with prejudice, if they acknowledged
the disease at all. -The setup was that this
disease was something striking almost totally undesirables. -It appeared a year ago
in New York’s gay community. -Investigators have examined
the habits of homosexuals for clues. -To some traditionalists,
AIDS is a gay plague. -Gays, drug addicts, injection,
heroin addicts… -At the very least,
there should be a quarantine of all homosexuals,
drug abusers, and prostitutes. -This is their disease. Ordinary, everyday
heterosexuals, normal people, have nothing to worry about. -Scientists believe AIDS
is not likely to spread beyond these groups, but it is still
a deadly epidemic. -It was the dark years.
It was terrible. People were dying
at a very high rate. The hospice facilities
were filled with people. We had no therapy at all,
so it was, like, unfortunately, putting Band-Aids
on hemorrhages. -More than 1,500 cases
have been discovered so far, and most experts believe
there will be more than 3,000 by the end of the year. -People were very secretive because it was
extremely stigmatizing. -I’ve had friends tell me
to go and die, “Just get away and go and die.” -Although federal health
authorities found no evidence
of transmission through casual contact, public concern remained high. And as the epidemic spread,
so did the fear. -40,000 Americans will get AIDS
this year and next. -One out of seven people
polled said they would favor
tattooing all AIDS victims, better than half said
they should be quarantined, and nearly as many would require
anyone who tests positive for AIDS antibodies
to carry an ID card. -Then in 1985, AIDS came to a small
Indiana town. -It was last Christmas
that Ryan White, a hemophiliac, learned that because
of a blood transfusion, he had contracted AIDS. -Ryan was just playful,
silly, loved skateboarding
and pretty carefree, and he was very well aware that his life was going
to be cut short. He just wanted to attend school
and be with his friends like everybody else does. -But local school officials
barred the 13-year-old from returning to middle school, and some concerned parents
fought to keep him out. Lawyer David Rosselot
represented them. -People were very panicked. We don’t know anything
about this disease. The only thing we know
that if you have it, you’re gonna die.
-I think we have to prove that there’s beyond a shadow
of a doubt that my child is not gonna be
infected with this. -Ryan had no control
over getting AIDS, and we’ve just had to fight
for it seems like everything, and now we’ll just have
to keep on fighting. -When a court eventually ruled
in Ryan’s favor, some protests turned ugly. -There were, like,
a picket line at school — It’s the only way
I can describe it — of people in scrubs and Halloween masks and signs, like, telling him to die. Just hurling insults, screaming at him and his family. -But the coverage of his story
turned Ryan White into a symbol of resilience. -And finally this evening,
our Person of the Week — the young boy who learned,
when he was 13, that he had a terminal illness. -Ryan was singled out
by the governor of the state as a model of courage
and inner strength. -Every time you’d turn
on the TV, you turn the news on,
there’s a picture Ryan. It just seemed like everywhere
you looked, there were celebrities
that were speaking out. -I don’t think he wanted
the role that he was put in, but at the same time that he saw how much people
needed to be educated. -Ryan’s success at reaching
the public highlighted how much
other voices had been ignored. -Ryan White was a figure who,
in fairly short order, began to elicit public sympathy. It was difficult to just say,
“Those nasty faggots.” Ryan White was
the innocent victim. Well, does that imply that
the others were the guilty, deserving recipients? -Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Ronald Reagan’s got to go!
Hey, hey! -Activists from the gay
community, including members
of the ACT UP movement, had been pressing
the Reagan administration to help those
with the disease. -The fact that it has taken
the president five years to begin to even address this
problem publicly demonstrates that this
administration hasn’t given it the level of commitment
that it deserves. -As more people went public
with their stories of contracting AIDS, Americans’ understanding
of the crisis was broadening, a door Ryan White
had helped open. -You know, people just
aren’t listening, and we have to make them listen. -You had a young boy
who turned the knob a bit to get people to say,
“The enemy here is the virus. The enemy is not the person
who has been infected.” -When Ryan died in 1990, more than 1,500 mourners
attended his funeral, including David Rosselot, the lawyer who had fought
to keep him out of school. -I knew I had to say goodbye, if for no other reason than to be able to say,
you know, “This wasn’t about you.
I hope you forgive me.” -The story of AIDS
began to change. Congress pushed through
the Ryan White Care Act, bipartisan legislation aimed
at providing care for people with HIV and AIDS, and soon, new drug regimens
offered a sense of hope. -It was when we got
the effective drugs that it was really
a transformation — I mean, completely
a transformation in how we looked at HIV. -People are gonna live
longer, healthier, more productive lives and be able to live with HIV. -As the years went by, we had better and better drugs. We have now drugs
which will bring the virus down to below detectable level, which not only saves
the life of the person, but makes it
essentially impossible for that person to transmit
the virus to a sexual partner. -And for those at risk
of getting HIV, there’s a daily medication
called “Pre-exposure Prophylaxis,” or “PrEP.” -PrEP has been clearly shown, if you take a single pill
once a day, you decrease the likelihood that
you would acquire HIV infection. So if you put those two things
together, you could theoretically essentially end
the epidemic quickly. -But despite these
medical advances, HIV infections have
continued to spread. -The fact is that HIV is not
an equal-opportunity virus. Everyone can get infected, but everyone
is not getting infected. -Just like in the early days
of the epidemic, it’s striking populations
who are often overlooked, this time —
communities of color, particularly across
the Deep South. “And once again,” Dr. Mass says, “the public
isn’t paying attention.” -There’s a tendency to look
at these Black and Hispanic rural communities
in the South as marginal. It’s the same kind of thinking
that we had early on. The thing is when you don’t deal with marginalized communities
or issues, they have a way
of becoming forefront. -The places where the epidemic
is growing are in those communities where people of color
typically have not had access to resources,
where poverty sits. -Cindy Watson works
with LBGTQ Youth in Jacksonville, Florida, which has one of the highest
rates of new HIV diagnoses in the country. -We have these pills, but if people can’t get
access to them, if their lives are not stable
and in a place where they can continue
to take them over time, they don’t have the benefit
of the medication and of living
with a chronic illness. And they’re also infectious. -Watson and colleagues
help young people navigate the medical system and get access to costly drugs for HIV treatment
and prevention. -Given my own identity
as a queer person of color, I know the turbulence
that comes with people trying to navigate systems,
so many systems. -While access the testing
and medication is vital, Jackson says continued education
is also needed to counteract deep-seated stigma
and misinformation. -I just think what’s passed
down for generations what’s passed down from,
like, stereotypes and myths. That has a more
lasting effect, unfortunately. But the more education
that we push, the more that we’re able
to flip the script and change the narrative. -We have the tools to do things that we never imagined
we could do before. Are we implementing
these tools to the maximum? We’ve gone from being
in the dark and a terrible,
terrible disease to now being
able to not only save lives, but to actually end
this terrible scourge. -Like it’s never really
a wrong time to have the conversation…
-“Ending the epidemic,” Dr. Fauci says,
“will also require a new generation of activists.” People like Jupiter Adams. -I was once inside of that
position, where I didn’t know — where I didn’t know
it was an epidemic. The only thing I can do
is do what I would have wanted someone to do with me. I want to save as many people
as I can. Me and my status, we have
an understanding that we are going
to go very far together. ♪♪

Krokodil: Russia’s Deadliest Drug (NSFW)

Krokodil: Russia’s Deadliest Drug (NSFW)


[MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 1:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [SOVIET ANTHEM PLAYING] ALISON SEVERS: In 1979, the
Soviet army entered Afghanistan, engaging in a
brutal 10-year conflict which kick-started the Afghan
opium trade. It was sold all over the world
to help fund the fight against the Soviets, but the main
customers of the opium were the Russians themselves. After the fall of the Soviet
union in 1991, Russia’s heroin problem continued to grow. So much so, that in 2011, the
country has become the world’s biggest consumer of heroin. [MUSIC CONTINUES] ALISON SEVERS: With a southern
border more than 4,000 miles long, we’re talking about a
patrol area greater than the distance from New
York to London. It’s no wonder the drug trade
is out of control. We travelled to the small
Siberian city of Novokuznetsk, which lies just over the
Russian border with Kazakhstan, and is
on the front line of this heroin epidemic. Once a Siberian industrial
powerhouse, now this city has fallen into decline, with 20%
of its population allegedly addicted to heroin. We’d heard stories about
ex-addicts building coffins to bury their friends, and
religious cults disguised as rehab clinics. Worst of all though were rumors
of a new moonshine drug called krokodil that has some
terrifying consequences. Nowhere are Russia’s
drug problems more evident than here. We’ve come to an area where
there’s a lot of derelict building that are being squatted
by addicts as a place to use and to live. Everywhere I look around
me, there are syringes. There’s more syringes here
than I’ve ever seen in my entire life. MALE SPEAKER 2:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Why are
you hanging out here? MALE SPEAKER 2:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: This area is
called Zavodskoy and was once the purpose-built
housing estates of the Soviet workforce. Now, these imposing tower blocks
are just empty shells. These young men have been
living in this abandoned building for two months. MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 5:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 5:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKERS:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKERS:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 4:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE INTERVIEWER: When was the
last time you went to see a doctor or a hospital? MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 6:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MALE SPEAKER 3:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [MUSIC PLAYING] ALISON SEVERS: Sasha Pelikhov
works for an organization called Regenerate Russia,
which helps rehabilitate heroin addicts in
Novokuznetsk. Sasha explained to us that there
might be more to the drug trade than just
making money. SASHA PELIKHOV:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: There’s a widely
held belief that a phenomenon called
narcoterrorism fuels the drug trade. It’s said that Afghan terror
groups help expediate the supply of heroin to Russia in
order to both profit from their former invaders and also
weaken the population by poisoning them with heroin. This is what’s known as
the Golden Crescent. It’s the route that heroin
takes from northern Afghanistan, throughout Central
Asia, and into Russia. Sasha told us that the center of
the local trade was at the food markets just outside
the city center. It’s where trucks from
Kazakhstan are offloaded with heroin for distribution
around Novokuznetsk and the wider areas. We were told to approach this
place with extreme caution, and not to get out of the car. As we drove slowly through the
market, we noticed gangs of men doing business next
to their trucks. Many of them bore Kazakhstan
license plates. It didn’t take long
to get us noticed. All of a sudden, someone spotted
our cameras, and people started beeping their
horns and yelling. MALE SPEAKER 7: Why are
people beeping? MALE SPEAKER 7: Yeah,
everyone’s checking us out now. MALE SPEAKER 8: Yeah, let’s
just get the fuck out. MALE SPEAKER 7: Let’s get
the fuck out of there. Let’s go. Let’s go. Let’s go. ALISON SEVERS: There’s two
pretty snazzy cars behind us. Those are the first snazzy
cars I’ve seen since we’ve been here. Probably going to follow
us and kill us now. The vans have got along the
right-hand side of the number plate, had KZ, which means,
obviously, the cars have been trucked in from Kazakhstan. MALE SPEAKER 9: It doesn’t
mean Kool Zines? ALISON SEVERS: No. It doesn’t mean kool zines. It means fucking naughty
heroin trafficker from Kazakhstan. That’s what it fucking means. Well, there’s still a car
that looks the same. Or maybe all the cars
just look the same. OK. We lost the cars and headed back
to meet Sasha somewhere safe, or so we thought. MALE SPEAKER 10:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: It kind of just
feels like walking into a forest in the middle of Siberia,
plus a lot of very angry dogs. That one actually did that
whole, like, err, I’m going to fucking kill you thing. After about five minutes of
walking through Vorstadt, we met this guy. Sasha told us he was salvaging
scrap metal, which is the most common way for heroin users
to fund their addiction. MALE SPEAKER 11:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 11:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [DOG GROWLING AND BARKING] MALE SPEAKER 9: What is it? ALISON SEVERS: Because I can’t
see where the syringes are. They’re fucking everywhere. Opposite the rehabilitation
center, there’s just a deserted building where there’s
syringes all over the floor, and, like, empty
bottles of this stuff. ALISON SEVERS: What’s this? Sasha. MALE SPEAKER 12:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SASHA PELIKHOV: What
is in Tropikamid? [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Sasha explained
that the eyedrops were one of the main ingredients of a new
drug called krokodil, a kind of moonshine heroin. Krokodil is so called because it
turns the user’s skin scaly and eats them from
the inside out. SASHA PELIKHOV:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: That woman walked
past us earlier when we were on our way out
to the brothel. And Sasha told me the she’s on
the road, which mean she’s a working prostitute. She’s just walked past now. She’s met up with a guy, and
she’s going to go have sex with him down there. Brilliant. That’s completely depressing. Fucking hell. With high volumes of drug
addicts comes high volumes of prostitution. And Novokuznetsk is
no exception. What was worrying here was
how young the girls were. So over there, I can
see two girls. One of them looks about 14, and
they’ve been talking to a succession of men who are
stopping in cars at the side of the street. And in fact there’s so much
going on here with crime and drug use, you’d expect to see
police cars and ambulances, but I haven’t seen
any of them. [MUSIC PLAYING] NATASHA: [SINGING IN RUSSIAN] [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: The Russian
government offers very little support for addicts. There are no local state-funded
rehab centers, and so the void has been
filled by private organizations. They range from centers like
this one, where the addicts provide volunteer work to pay
for their treatment, to evangelical churches that
have been accused of running like cults. OLEYSA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: I heard
a lot of people died. OLEYSA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] NATASHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Oh. NATASHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] NATASHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [CHOIR SINGING] ALISON SEVERS: After we left
the girls, we went to visit the priest of the main
orthodox church in Novokuznetsk. I had to wear a head scarf
in order to be able to talk to him. Spasibo. MINISTER VASILY:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: So this is the
bit that we bought in the shop in your church. And it says, Christian sects,
how they’re servants of the anti-Christ. Is this relevant in this city? MINISTER VASILY:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] YEVGENY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: This
is Yevgeny. By day, he’s a funeral director,
and by night, he run the Novokuznetsk branch of Teen
Challenge, which is an American Christian charity that
now has missionaries and centers in over 70 countries
around the world, and it’s growing rapidly. He told us to come along to
meet his congregation in a remote part of the city which
was an hour drive up a very steep hill. And when we arrived,
we found this. [RUSSIAN ROCK MUSIC PLAYING] ALISON SEVERS: This is the
sleeping room for the brotherhood here at Teen
Challenge, which is Yevgeny’s church group [SINGING IN RUSSIAN[ ALISON SEVERS: This is a
rehabilitation center for people involved in Teen
Challenge, which is an American church that’s
come to Russia. And now Yevgeny practices
their doctrine. I think that Teen Challenge
is a cult, to be honest. MALE SPEAKER 13: Today, I
live here six months. Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Jesus Christ help me. [SINGING CONTINUES] MINISTER VASILY:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] [SINGING CONTINUES] [APPLAUSE] WORSHIP LEADER:
[SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: This is Sergey. We met him begging outside on
the street, and he said most of the people he knew
have been affected by heroin and krokodil. SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SEREZHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Later that night,
Sergey took us on a tour of local pharmacies to show
us how easy it is to pick up the ingredients
for krokodil. So these are 24-hour pharmacies that we’re going to. You can do this any
time of the day. SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Sergey said he
knew someone who could cook the krokodil for us. He promised to meet us again. That was the last
time we saw him. ALEXEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Alexey is the
pastor of an independent church that reforms heroin
and krokodil addicts. ALEXEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: Alexey took us
to meet his friend, whose family has been destroyed
by krokodil. With a drug that can kill it
users so quickly, it’s very rare to meet survivors. LYUDMILA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: And you
been taking krokodil? SERGEY: We have, yeah. MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: When did
you start taking it? MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] SERGEY: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] MISHA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] LYUDMILA: [SPEAKING RUSSIAN] ALISON SEVERS: I felt quite
helpless leaving Lyudmila’s house, but nowhere near as
helpless as she must feel. Her health, home, and family
life have been totally destroyed by krokodil, a drug
you can just work out how to make with the help of
internet forums. President Medvedev has talked
about closing down the websites that are providing
this information, but the internet seems harder to
police than the border. I can’t see any way out for
these people if they’re relying on that. Drug users are developing new,
terrifying ways of consuming opiates faster than the
government can decide on any form of policy. The church and the sects aren’t
the answer, but sadly, they seem to be the best hope
these young people have in a city that really does feel
like it’s been forgotten.

This Killer Fungus Turns Flies into Zombies | Deep Look


We like to think we’re in control … that
our minds are our own. But that’s not true for this fruit fly. Its brain has been hijacked by another organism
and it’s not going to end well. It all starts when the fly is innocently walking
around, sipping on overripe fruit. It picks up an invisible fungus spore, which
bores under its skin. For a few days, everything seems normal. But inside, the fungus is growing, feeding
on the fly’s fat … and infiltrating its mind. At dusk on the fourth or fifth day, the fly
gets a little erratic, wandering around. It climbs to a high place. Scientists call this behavior “summiting.” Then it starts twitching. The fungus is in control. The fly sticks out its mouthpart and spits
out a tiny drop of sticky liquid. That glues the fly down, sealing its fate. A few minutes later, its wings shoot up. And it dies. Now that the fungus has forced the fly into
this death pose … wings out of the way … nothing can stop it. It emerges. Tiny spore launchers burst out of the fly’s
skin. Hundreds of spores shoot out at high speed,
catching a breeze if the fly climbed high enough. They’re the next generation of killer fungus. It continues for hours, spores flying out. These flies are in the wrong place at the
wrong time. And if spores land on a wing, which they can’t
bore into, they shoot out a secondary spore to increase their chances of spreading. So how does a fungus take control of a brain? At Harvard, Carolyn Elya is trying to understand
that. She thinks the fungus secretes chemicals to
manipulate the fly’s neurons, maybe stimulating the ones that make flies climb. But don’t worry: The fungus can’t hurt
humans. Scientists have tried to harness its power
for our benefit, to kill flies in our kitchens and farms. They haven’t had any luck though. The deadly spores are actually pretty fragile
and short-lived. It turns out, this lethal puppet master does
only what it needs to for its *own* survival. Hi, it’s Lauren again. If you love Deep Look, why not help us grow
on Patreon? We’re raising funds to go on a filming expedition
to Oaxaca, Mexico. And for a limited time, we’re sweetening the
deal with a special gift. Link is in the description. And if you’re craving more spooky videos,
here’s a playlist of our scariest episodes. Don’t watch ‘em after midnight. See you soon.

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 2)

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 2)


Hi, this is Jordan, updating you on my
Pheidole colony. I did a video on this colony about a month ago and since then they’ve doubled
in size. It’s been really hot here in Melbourne, Australia and so the colony has exploded in size. As you can see, they’ve started to produce soldier ants. They’re really young right now, you can see their heads are really pale and translucent. They’ve also started to produce alates as well, which kind of surprised me. They only have 300 or so workers at the moment. I was kind of expecting them to start
producing alates at the 1000 mark or something like
that. So, already producing some of those and
heaps of soldiers. I think there’s twenty or something
soldiers they’ve produced and that was just the space of a month or
so. Here’s one of the Queens. This colony actually has three queens. They started out with just one until they reached the 50 worker mark
or so and then I had a couple of Queens of this same species in a test tube set up that weren’t
really doing so well. They were in there for months and months and all they had to
show for it was a few eggs and weren’t developing very well. So I decided to
released the queens into this colony. The workers just found the Queens and
weren’t aggressive towards them, they just lured them into the nest and since then look to be doing fine and
laying lots of eggs. So here’s the outworld that’s attached to the nest. They really like this new space that I’ve set up for them. This is what I feed
this colony. Meal worms for protein and bits of fruit and tiny drops of honey for a source of sugary foods. I usually provide a test tube with water in it just in case the nest does get dry so they’ll always have a source water at all times, which is important. I’ve got a
fairly thick layer of sand there and they like to dig it up and move it around. They’ve actually built
an ant hill right where the tube connects to the outworld. So that’s it for this video. Let me know if you want to see more of these or different colonies I have. I’ve got a new Iridomyrmex colony I’ve just moved into a nest. So if you want to see that let me know. Thanks for watching.