5 Deadly Insects ft. Draw Curiosity! [CC]


The audio for that bit is gonna be great… three two one
action! Hi, welcome to SquidThink! Hi! this is Inés Dawson, she’s from draw curiosity
on YouTube and she has been so generous as to make the time to talk about
insects! Specifically the deadliest ones because you know insects are badass
– protect yourself. So insects are a class and they’re in the phylum Arthropoda.
Arthropoda comes from the greek words of arthron meaning joint and poda meaning
leg or foot so they are joint leg/ footed, up to you, up to your discretion
as to which one. There are many subclasses within insecta such as paleoptera which includes orders like odonata which has
dragonflies and mayflies, or paraneoptera which includes things like hemiptera which are the true bugs so don’t just go around calling insects
bugs because you’re wrong you idiot. So there are two reasons why the insects
that we’re going to be talking about today are deadly!
we’re gonna be talking about two types 1. vectors and 2. venomous. So if you’re a
vector you’re a disease carrying organism and that is bad,
we don’t like vectors, and there are a lot of insects that do that.
Yeah there’s… there’s a lot of them. and we’re gonna be talking about the venomous ones
– remember the difference between venomous and poisonous: poisonous is you munch on
them you die, venomous is they munch on you then you die…did I say that right?
you did! I was like: good, she knows it!
The vast majority of insects that we’re going to be looking at all
belong to Endopterygota because pretty much the vast majority of insects
can be found there and the reason why is because the larval form is different to
the adult form so they undergo metamorphosis
metamorphosis, yeah!
think your caterpillar that becomes a butterfly or your maggot that becomes a
fly or a beetle. There are many many many good things about having your youthful
form to be very different to your adult form which is your youngsters and your
adults don’t actually compete for the same niche, but it also means they can
get quite crazy life cycles where they heavily specialize on
particular animals which will play into the vector lifestyle
– how interesting don’t you want to learn more??
one of the orders that we’re gonna be talking about
today is siphenoptera so that includes the fleas they have 2,500 species within
them. They’re obligate ectoparasites which means they have to live on top of
a body in order to live they have to be drinking your blood because they suck
get it?? they have a lifespan of roughly a hundred days and they are ridiculously
fast breeders they lay about fifty eggs a day and they can lay up to 2,000
within their lifecycle. So why are these guys deadly? we all know about
fleas because we all know about the Black Plague, we all know about the Black
Death where about 25 million people died… the plague is quite rare nowadays but it
is still around symptoms of the plague can include things like diarrhea, extreme
vomiting, gangrene where your skin just turns black and necrosis and falls off
your body which you don’t want in case you didn’t know… I mean you might want a
necrotic black arm? if y’know that’s your thing?
– not sure if it’s in style or
not, but free costume?
– yeah free costume! yeah just get the plague
They are also vectors of Lyme disease this can cause skin rashes headaches
night sweats or heart and neurological problems. Lyme disease can cause a
cardiological symptom called heart block there were three reported deaths because
of this from 2012 to 2013 so it’s deadly it’s not good. I also did
not realize that fleas could be carriers of Lyme disease because I
always thought of them as you know the ticks, the famous ticks from the
fields or the lungs that carry it and I mean plenty of ticks do carry Lyme
disease unsurprising that there should be sucky bugs that would do that as well.
– They can also cause murine typhus which causes join and back pain and more
nausea and more vomiting and many more diseases as well! so many in fact we
don’t have time to talk about them so let’s move on to the next insect!
Fronting the next section are the hymenopteran which is the bees the
wasps and the ants and we’re going to talk about the fire ants
so fire ant bites apart from hurting a bit like fire can cause death nap to
around five percent of cases. This is because there’s a toxin which is an
alkaloid protein called solenopsin which can cause an allergic reaction in
around five percent of people or basically cause an anaphylactic shock so
whilst one or two bites is probably fine if you do find yourself caught up in a
fire ants nest and you happen to be allergic that could spell bad news for
you if you’re not able to get an EpiPen or to Hospital pretty soon.
– or if you’re like me and you can’t use an EpiPen in your anaphylactic reaction
you’re F**KED another notable mention from Hymenoptera
is the Africanized honeybees. They’re genetically modified to survive better
in tropical conditions and to provide more honey
Africanized honeybees are far more aggressive than traditional…
traditional bees?? *European. Approximately a thousand deaths per year are
attributed to Africanized honeybees and that’s because they sting ten times more
than European honeybees. They also have more aggressive behavior in
general and they’re higher on guards so honeybees have guards outside of their
nests so that other bees or intruders like wasps or other insects don’t steal
their hard-earned honey. There’s many theories as to how they differentiate
between conspecifics and allospecifics one of these theories is the odor
convergence hypothesis where different species or different hives will forage
on different plants, so one might forage on an orange blossom and take nectar
from the orange blossom tree and others might take it from the Jasmine bush or
something like that. However many experiments have been done which have
kind of disproven this one so the primary theory at the moment is pheromones
– and in fact it’s most likely almost certainly pheromones because hymenopterans have these CHCs or special compounds found on their cuticles which
is determined genetically and basically they’re more related all of the
individuals are inside the hive the more likely they are to have kind of a
unified hive smell where everyone smells the same and my guess because I don’t
actually know this but I think that Africanised
honey bees probably only have one drone and maybe the queen is monogamous which
means that all of them are highly related so there’s higher stakes for all
of the workers to try and protect the hive a lot more, which if I can be sneaky
and do a self-promo I do have a video on superorganisms which is about
how very strict monogamy in organisms causes the evolution of super-organisms
and quite possibly that might be what’s happening with these Africanized honey
bees. but also apparently with strict monogamy comes strict aggressiveness
against everyone who that’s not from the clan
– rad!
we have a prop for the next one
so the next one is the Asian… I almost said Asian giant African Hornet I was
like wait, no!
– Asian giant European African hornet
– they spread all over the world and change its name
– a symbol of diversity!
– next up is probably one you’ve been waiting for which is the
Asian giant Hornet, they caused around 30 to 50 deaths annually in Japan. They’re
pretty hefty in size – so this is NOT a deadly Hornet, it’s the
largest European wasp species and it’s actually pretty docile it just likes to
sting scarabs and not much else but it’s pretty big the Asian Hornet is
bigger than this. Not only do they sting you but when you kill one of them they
actually release an attack pheromone which calls out to all of the other ones
who go into essentially guarding mode and they’ll all go and sting you
together and it’s a similar situation as with maybe the fire ants or with
honeybees where one or two stings might be fine but when you’re pretty much
attacked by a swarm it’s a lot more likely to cause or trigger an
anaphylactic reaction and being so large and having such a dangerous sting
already makes them dangerous so if you ever see a Hornet be
careful like Asian Hornet to any kind of Hornet
just stay away from them appreciate their largeness from afar! They are big for a
reason you can see them just as well while maintaining a good distance. In
addition to squishing other Hornets as a way to trigger their pheromones
there are also c5 to c10 esters which you can do this such as certain food
scents i think apple flavors well one of the ones i read about, just watch out
when eating apples around in japan fortunately, apples are quite expensive
in Japan
– Oh yeah! the next order we’re gonna be talking about is hemiptera
otherwise known as the true bugs the ones that I mentioned in the beginning
that I got mad at you for calling other insects bugs for. The bug that we’re
going to be talking about from the Hemiptera order is the kissing bugs, these
are found in Asia Africa Australia and in some parts of America. They’re part of
the subfamily triatomine and there are also potential vectors for Chagas
disease.
– I had a bit of a scare with Chagas disease and by a bit of a scare
I mean I’ve got bitten by a kissing bug at the time I wasn’t too sure if I could
be at risk of Chagas or not. Basically kissing bugs poop as they eat and then
the parasite is found in the poop and it’s quite easy for it to get into the
wounds on your face
– *nature is beautiful* only about 20% of people get the acute
phase of Chagas disease so it’s usually characterized by what’s known as
romanya’s symptom where your face swells up or the site of the bite we might get
a fever and might get some form of malaise, however this usually happens in
people who are younger or elderly patients, maybe immunocompromised people.
It’s not unusual to develop it but just not know about it. And then it goes onto
the chronic phase so the parasite will lodge itself somewhere in your body
usually heart muscle and then it just goes dormant for a very long time until
it decides to resurface… what happens then?
– so it can do one of two things it
could either affect your nervous system so it can affect your motor skills which
can cause dementia and confusion or it can affect your digestive system and
cause enlargement of the tissues giving you a mega colon or a mega esophagus.
That being said there was some good news and it is that Chagas isn’t quite the
death sentence it used to be. Firstly detection methods
are a lot better so in my case I actually got an antibody test done and
it came back clear so pretty much it was just me being worried about bites
appearing on my face, but if it does come up positive there are special medicines
that are targeted to these parasites so you would have to take them I think for
a few months or however long your doctor says. The medication does come with side
effects so it won’t be pleasant but in most cases it completely gets rid of it
and of course the best thing to do is always to exercise caution if you’re
going somewhere that could be dangerous or contain dangerous insects then
obviously wear DEET, have mosquito repellent, have a mosquito net check your
mattress for bed bugs, bugs, fleas anything that could potentially prey on
you at night, and enjoy your stay! – Are you a Travelodge? We’re filming in a hotel
right now if you can’t tell, we walked into the lobby and we saw this giant crystal
chandelier of they’re both just kind of went “HOLY F*CK”. She found a jaguar in
the toilet I still don’t know if this is the car Jaguar or like a animal Jaguar
but it doesn’t matter it has the same level of opulence
– I’m just yeah I’m gonna leave that to your imagination, and I’ll
say one more thing: there were two of them Screams luxury, doesnt scream bed bugs
– so what have we learnt from today number one we’ve
learned that lots of tiny things can kill you we really should mention though
that all of the insects that we’ve talked about today and all of the
diseases that you can get the deaths that are associated with the insects
that we’ve been talking about are really rare in fact you’re much more likely to
have a far more common death though I don’t know being run over being in a
traffic accident or maybe having a tree fall on top of you I’m terrified of
trees in practice you know watch out for certain but for certain bugs of the true
and fake a variety but as you say we tend to glamorize fear and things that
are unusual but scary and out you know out of this world
we’re much more likely to talk about them and remember
they’re a lot less likely to happen as well what we’re trying to say is that
nature yes it can be dangerous and yes it can be scary but it’s also really
really important and insects as tiny as they are also vitally important to the
ecosystem as obviously much the time they’re probably a little bit more
scared of you well then vice versa I mean there is a reason that these bees
are attacking intruders in the first place they’re just trying to protect
their home yeah as long as you stay away from them give them their breathing
space there’s no reason they should come for you remember that we share the
planet with a bunch of things and some of those things have six legs it should
be nice of them and some of them bite some of them sting some of them are
vectors some of them are venomous but all of them are lovely as well here we
should have mentioned mosquitoes yeah we should another
hopefully you’ve learned something new from today’s video yeah and about a few
new insects hopefully you were someone who didn’t hate insects so I hope you
don’t hate them now after hearing about them the vast majority are good eggs
just doing their ecological nice job out there a lot of them are pollinators as
well so you know next time you bite into a juicy Apple not around wasps though
remember we talked about this you have the bees and the other pollinators and
all the lovely things with wings to thank for that
but yeah that’s all we have for you today guys I really really hope you
enjoyed this video if you did then hit the like button because it’s a free way
that you can support the channel please go and check out in aces Channel because
oh my goodness it’s just so good and she’s so professional so knowledgeable
it’s got PhD she’s so smart I will leave all of our information in the
description box below as well as on screen somewhere I don’t know where it’s
going to be but it’ll be on screen and yet thank you so much for watching us
yeah and we’ll see you in one of the next ones rad see you guys later bye I
mean go to an Oscar that’s what I normally do what I enjoy

Assassin Bugs Go For The Throat


This episode is sponsored
by Rachael Ray Nutrish natural food for cats. Hi, guys. I’m Amberly, and this
is “Animalist News.” Today we have a very
special guest on the show. You may have seen his creepy,
crawly videos trending on reddit. Please welcome EJ, AKA, buy boy. Hi, EJ. Hi. How are you? So, what’s your favorite insect? My favorite bug is, favorite
insect is the assassin bug, unlike other insects which
wait for other insects to wander into their
territory on accident and then they strike. Well, the assassin
bugs are different, and they go looking
for their prey. With insects, what they do is
they find it, and then grab it. And then dig their proboscis
into like right through where the bottom of its throat. They dig it right through
it, and then they pump venom into it, which also
does break down and the animal is juice inside. And it just sucks
up everything inside and just lays the
exoskeleton behind. That is totally brutal. They can find spiders
that are making webs. The ones that aren’t
looking at it, and then it just
plucks the strings, it just plucks the webbing. And then that gets the
spider’s attention. It mimics the sound of something
getting caught in its web. So it rushes over
thinking it’s got dinner, and it’s the dinner. And then that’s when, and done. So EJ most people think
insects are just annoying. What can we learn from them? Well I guess a good example
for that is the European honey bee, which is probably one
of the most important species of animal on the planet. They’re important
because they pollinate all the stuff we need to
eat, which provides us food. And, without them, all
the plants in the world would whither and die and
we’d have nothing to eat. They’re getting close to
endangered because people transport them away
from their homes and then force them
to migrate to places they’ve never been before. It’s like someone coming
in, robbing all your stuff, and then shipping
you to a random place you’ve never been before. You’re obviously really
interested in bugs. What do you want to
do when you grow up? Entomologist. An entomologist
is a scientist who studies insects and arachnids. I guess it just goes to
show that animals don’t have to be cute and fuzzy
in order to be awesome. Thanks for coming
on the show EJ. Bye. What your guys
favorite bug or insect? Let me know in the
comments down below. And, oh what’s that, you didn’t
know there was a difference? You’d better check out this
video right on over here. And while you’re
at it, check out bug boy’s channel right here for
more interesting insect facts. I’ll see you guys next time. Bye. Thanks again to
Rachael Ray Nutrish for sponsoring this episode.

Top 10 Deadliest Bugs

Top 10 Deadliest Bugs


Top 10 Deadliest Bugs It is estimated that there are about 10,000,000,000,000,000,000
insects living today. That’s right, a quintillion insects. In the world, there are about 900 thousand
different kinds of living insects, making up about 80% of all of the world’s species.
In the U.S. alone there are 91,000 known species and about 73,000 that have yet to be scientifically
described and classified. While the insects on this list are nowhere
near being the deadliest animals on earth, these bugs really do make their mark… sometimes
literally, sometimes remarkably- particularly for living things that are no bigger than
a human finger. 10. House Centipedes (Scutigera coleoptrata) Originating in the Mediterranean (or Mexico,
depending on the source), the house centipede has become a very common bug around the world.
You may think centipedes look unattractive but they are actually “good” bugs, as
they eat other pests and sometimes even spiders. Of course, if you have entomophobia (fear
of insects or bugs), then this argument isn’t going to help. In any case, centipedes are
more of a pest than they are a threat, but shockingly they can cause some damage. If
you are bitten by one of these insects, you’ll definitely feel it. Some who have experienced
it say that it is painful, but nothing that will send you off crying in the corner. What’s to Fear? While centipedes aren’t insects that are
responsible for tons and tons of deaths, you’d be surprised to find out that every two years
one person does die due to a centipede bite. This is usually due to an allergic reaction
to the venom that the bug can inject into your body when it bites you. However, it’s
rare that one is so allergic to this venom that it kills them. 9. Fire Ants (Solenopsis) While having a picnic with ants doesn’t
sound so bad, as most ants are harmless and miniscule compared to the human body, having
a picnic with fire ants definitely isn’t the wisest idea. There are over 280 different
species of ants that sting and one of the most widely known is the fire ant. Other ants
kill by stinging their prey and then spraying the wound with acid, but the fire ant is particularly
ruthless. They kill by stinging their prey and then injecting venom known as solenopsin.
And because of this, when a human is stung by the ant, it can be compared to the sensation
felt when being burned; however, the sting is usually minor and something that the body
can fight on its own. What’s to Fear? As you’d imagine, a little ant can’t do
much damage to a human. All we’d have to do is make a little use of our left shoe.
However, ants live in colonies and sometimes, with enough stings and enough bodily sensitivity,
the fire ants can kill. It is said that about 5% of those who report being bitten by a fire
ant die due to anaphylactic shock. Of course this is very far and in between, but there
are reports of deaths caused by an allergic reaction to the venom. 8. Siafu (Dorylus) Very similar to fire ants, Siafu are ants
that are mainly located in east and central Africa, but they can also be found in parts
of Asia. These ants are said to live in colonies of 20 million ants, notably 20 million blind
ants. They are able to travel through the use of pheromones. Out of these 20 million,
there is a group of ants known as the soldier ants. These ants are the ones that are able
to sting to fend off or kill prey. It is said that while the ants are able to sting, they
often use their jaws, made for shearing, to bite. The jaws of these ants are so strong
that in some locations in Africa, they are actually used as sutures which can hold for
up to four days, to allow wounds to heel properly. What’s to Fear? If one is stung by a Siafu, the bite is often
very minimal and nothing that requires a doctor. However, it is said that the young and elderly
are very susceptible to their bites, and some have died due to complications caused by the
ant bite. Around 20-50 people reportedly die each year from a Siafu bite. These ants are
often very aggressive and when you interrupt their colony, you just may be in a little
bit of trouble. 7. Wasps and Bees (Vespula germanica/Apis
mellifera) As pesky as they are, wherever you go, you’re
sure to find wasps and bees. On flowers, near something that smells sweet, or making a hive
in a very inconvenient place- wasps and bees are an everyday part of life when the weather
is warm enough to permit it. You’ve probably been stung at least once so you know what
it feels like. It’s usually not an event that requires medical attention – unless
you’re allergic. What’s to Fear? If you’re not allergic to a wasp or bee
sting, then you really have nothing to worry about. If you are allergic to wasp or bee
stings, then getting stung might be more of a problem. It is said that about 53 people
die each year because of an allergic reaction from being stung. Those who are allergic to
the venom let off after being stung can go into anaphylactic shock, which often brings
about hives, wheezing, confusion, pale skin, and sometimes unconsciousness and even death. 6. Asian Giant Hornet (Vespa mandarinia) You’ve probably seen a hornet once in your
life and you probably weren’t too fearful of it as they are usually pretty small and
pretty easy to rid of. However, imagine a hornet on steroids, and when you do, just
look to the Asian Giant Hornet. This hornet is said to be the biggest in the world, with
a length of 2 inches and a wing span of 3 inches. The hornet also sports a ¼ inch long
stinger, but being stung with by this hornet is definitely not like being stung like a
bee. While you won’t find these hornets anywhere near the U.S. or Europe, if you ever
make a trip to Eastern Asia, you’re sure to run into them a few times, especially if
you travel the mountainous places in Japan. What’s to Fear? Take it from someone who has experienced it.
According to Masato Ono, someone who has been stung by an Asian Giant Hornet, the sting
felt like a “like a hot nail being driven into his leg.” The venom that is released
by the stinger has about 8 different compounds, one that causes discomfort, one that can damage
soft tissue, and one that is able to create an odor that may attract even more hornets.
Those who are allergic to bees can die from the reaction, but some die because of a chemical
known as mandaratoxin which can be fatal if there is enough introduced into the body.
It is said that each year, about 70 people die from these stings. 5. Africanized Honey Bee (hybrid Apis mellifera
scutellata) While most of us can deal with normal bees,
the ones that we see all the time in our gardens, if you ever come into contact with an Africanized
Honey Bee, you’re definitely in for some trouble. Though normal bees do sting, being
stung by a honey bee is much different, as it’s unlikely that you’ll just be stung
once since they hang around in swarms. In 1956 these bees were brought to Brazil in
order to breed a more efficient honeybee. However, this failed and most of the bees
were able to escape. From Brazil the swarms of bees have reached Central America and have
even come as far up as the southwestern U.S. What’s to Fear? Because they are known to travel in swarms,
when a bee attacks a victim, many of the other bees will do so as well. It is said that one
swarm of these bees can take down a horse. The bees have killed about 1,000 people since
they’ve started coming up from Brazil. These bees definitely put a face to the name killer
bees. 4. Kissing bug (Triatomines) First discovered in the 19th century by Charles
Darwin, the kissing bug is an insect that you don’t ever want to come into close contact
with. There are 138 known species in existence. Most of them are within the U.S., with others
scattered throughout Asia, Australia, and Africa. All of the known species are said
to be able to transmit Trypanosoma cruzi, a very harmful parasite that can be fatal.
Most species of the insect are known to live off of vertebrate blood while some are able
to live off of invertebrates. What’s to Fear? The potentially lethal kissing bug is known
to live in the same dwellings as humans, often making their homes on the outside as well
as the inside of our houses. It is said that 45,000-50,000 people die each year from kissing
bug bites. This is because the parasite that the bug carries, Trypanosoma cruzi, is known
to cause Chagas disease, which seems very minute at first but is fatal over. At first
there is just swelling at the site of the bite, but then the disease can lead to intestinal
issues as well as cardiac problems. In fact most of those who die from Chagas disease
die from Chagasic cardiomyopathy. 3. Tsetse Fly (Glossina morsitans) While flies alone are annoying, imagine a
fly that lives by sucking blood from animals and humans. The tsetse fly is found in the
Kalahari and Saharan deserts. This insect is widely studied today due to the disease
that they transmit. The flies look very similar to the normal housefly we all love to swat
at, except for a proboscis on their head, which is the anatomical part that allows them
to suck blood. There are 34 different species of tsetse flies, all of them fitting into
one of the three categories: savannah fly, forest fly, or riverine fly. What’s to Fear? Though a little fly may seem pretty harmless,
the tsetse fly can kill, and do so each year. Most of the deaths are in Africa- it is said
that 250,000 to 300,000 die each year from something known as the sleeping disease (the
numbers are slowly decreasing). The tsetse fly carries protozoa known as trypanosomes,
but so do many other insects. However, when someone is bitten by the tsetse fly, the protozoa
are introduced to the body and cause a disease known as the Sleeping Sickness. If not treated
properly, the disease is able to shut down necessary bodily functions, such as the endocrine
and cardiac systems. Next, the disease enters the neurological system, causing confusion
and an abnormal sleep cycle due to insomnia and slumber. The most recent notable epidemic
of the disease was in Uganda in 2008. 2. Rat Fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) When thinking of fleas, you probably think
of a tiny insect that has landed on a household cat or dog that causes a lot of itching. Fleas
are often only 1/16 to 1/8 inch long, with a dark colored body and a mouth that is made
to be able to suck blood off of the helpless host it lands on. A flea bite, whether on
your pet or your own body, will often cause a red mark accompanied by a lot of itching.
Though there are different types of fleas that you’d find on a dog or cat, one of
the more deadly fleas is one you’d find on a rat. While rats are pretty scary to most
on their own, a flea-infested rat is even scarier, and is one that needs to be avoided. What’s to Fear? While fleas are often no bigger than the nail
on your pinky finger, they have been known to carry devastating diseases and germs, the
most notable b1eing the Yersinia pestis bacteria. This bacteria is known for causing the death
of nearly three-quarters of Europe’s population during the 14th century. Better known as the
Black Death, this plague killed between 350 and 375 million people and peaked during 1348-1350.
The rats that were often found on merchant ships are said to have spread the disease
and, due to lack of medical information and treatment, the disease spread and spread.
The plague was also never fully wiped out and for years there would be a reoccurrence
of deaths due to the deadly bacteria. While today dying from this bacteria would be rare
in the U.S. and in most places in Europe, in many third-world countries it is very possible. 1. Anopheles Mosquito (Anopheles quadrimaculatus) Once the temperature outside hits a steady
stream of temperatures above 50°F (10°C), you’ll surely start to see those pesky mosquitoes
flying around outside. You are even more likely to see them once the sun begins to go down.
As if dealing with bugs isn’t a nuisance in itself, mosquitoes are a bit more to deal
with, especially if one lands on you and decides to bite. While only female mosquitoes will
bite a human, some of them carry diseases that can be very harmful. There are about
3,500 species of mosquitoes, 200 of those living in North America, many carrying ailments
such as yellow fever, dengue, encephalitis, and even canine heartworm. What’s to Fear? A mosquito has probably bitten you at least
once before in your life, so you’re familiar with the little red bump that may swell and
really itches- nothing a little cortisone or anti-inflammatory skin cream won’t fix.
However, in some cases, a mosquito bite can lead to a lifetime of illness, or even lead
to death. One of the most widely known mosquito-borne diseases today is malaria. It is very prevalent
in tropical countries: there are about 350–500 million cases found each year and about 1-3
million people die from it each year. Malaria is said to affect at least 10% of the world’s
total population. These deaths are usually noted in sub-Saharan Africa where mosquitoes
are very prominent and proper care for malaria is scarce.

Top 10 Most DANGEROUS Insects in the world!

Top 10 Most DANGEROUS Insects in the world!


Bugs are a necessary evil in our world. They help pollinate our crops and ensure the
continuation of plant life for the Earth, but they can also be annoying to deal with
and sometimes creepy as hell. Even worse, some have a bite or sting that
can be painful or even lethal, which is obviously never fun. And the vast majority of insects are just
weird looking. From deadly venoms to nasty diseases, stay
tuned to number one to find out which insect carries a flesh eating toxin. Number 10: The Hemiptera Hemipteras, also known as “kissing bugs”,
are big fat bugs with huge tube mouths. They suck on tree bark to get nourishment,
but also suck on animals to get their blood, and that’s not creepy, right? Their tube-like mouth allows them to dig in
deep and get the enzymes and nutrients they need to keep living, so they can keep doing
this to other plants and animals. No one is really sure if these insects have
any use to the world and, based on what I can see, Im going to guess they don’t. More importantly, their sucking can spread
the deadly disease Chagas. Chagas is a nasty sickness, which develops
slowly, over the course of up to twenty years, leading to heart disease and malformation
of the intestines. You won’t die quickly, but you may not see
any symptoms of the disease for decades, when it’s unfortunately too late for treatment. Thanks, Hemiptera. Number 9: The Assassin Caterpillar This thing literally looks like a crawling
thorn bush. With the appearance of a caterpillar covered
with pine bows, the assassin has deadly venom in every branch. The worst of it is, the victim will barely
feel a thing as they brush up against it. You can bump this thing, not even know it,
and get infected. They look really cool, too, which is part
of their danger, as the enticing little devils make you want to pick them up. Unfortunately, the venom of the assassin caterpillar
causes internal bleeding and messes up your body’s ability to clot external wounds. Victims have been known to bleed from any
orifice, along with tons of internal bleeding. The victim’s body simply can’t stop bleeding,
causing an eventual death. Not a good way to go out: death by touching
a prickly pine tree caterpillar. Number 8: The Black Widow Spider Found mostly in the southwestern United States,
the black widow spider is one of the most famous dangerous insects known around the
country. It’s not the kind of fame you want, when you
think about it, though. The Black Widow’s bite can cause inflammation
of the bitten area, as well as respiratory problems. The bite also hurts like hell, not surprisingly. On the plus side, very few people die from
its bite, as the rate is only about one percent annually. The black widow is not very aggressive, and
is only know to attack when it feels threatened. Accidentally step too close, however, and
watch out! Another positive is the giant red hourglass
on its belly. If you see that shape on a spider, you know
it’s a black widow and you should avoid it. That makes things much easier than some other
bugs on this list. To be honest, if you see a spider of any kind,
it’s probably just best to stay away. Number 7: The Africanized Bee Famously known as “killer bees”, and for good
reason, Africanized bees are known for their painful sting and their gigantic appearance. These behemoth bees are known to be very aggressive
and will attack in swarms, basically guaranteeing your death. They will attack for any perceived threat
to their hive, so do what you can to avoid their near-invisible hives whenever you can. If you do piss off these deadly bees, strap
on your running shoes and get the hell out of there, as Africanized bees are known to
chase victims for up to a quarter mile. Although, if you’re with a slower friend,
you’ll be fine. To learn more about Africanized bees and their
impact, check out our video on the Most invasive Animal Species Introduced By Humans! Number 6: The Fire Ant Fire ants look similar to your typical ant,
except for a red appearance and a terrible bite. Their sharp teeth can dig deep into the flesh
and cause an awful pain that results in swelling and inflammation. You wouldn’t think that a tiny bug could pack
such a crazy bite, but unfortunately, these guys can. Some people are allergic to the bites and
can die from the allergic reaction, brought on from the bite of this tiny red ant. Fire ants are known to attack in swarms when
threatened, so don’t go provoking these tiny red monsters. As if avoiding these things isn’t tough enough,
flood waters can complicate things greatly. Fire ants are very skilled survivalists and
will literally form a floating boat of themselves when flooded out of their home. It’s creepy, to say the least but also strangely
cool looking at the same time. Number 5: The Bot Fly. This little bug looks pretty cute, actually. Nothing to worry about here, right? Unfortunately, this guy is known for its sneak
attack. The Bot Fly will lay eggs onto a mosquito. Then, the mosquito bites its victim. Then the eggs go into the victim. Then, a new baby Bot Fly emerges from the
victim. That is some ridiculously disgusting horror
movie crap, right there. The Bot Fly itself doesn’t typically bite
a person, but its process of procreation is just sort of terrifying. The victim becomes the host for a new Bot
Fly to be born, which I would hope is undesirable to most sane human beings. Just avoid all mosquitos in order to avoid
Bot Flies emerging out of your skin. Number 4: The Locust. Locusts may be famous from their starring
role in the Bible, but they are still around today. Related to the grasshopper, Locusts are long,
thin and creepy little bugs that can swarm around and generally look as menacing as any
other bug on the list. They have been known to appear in nearly any
area across the globe, so you’re never totally safe from these things. These little monsters don’t directly hurt
humans but can still be amazingly deadly due to how they attack plant life and crops. Locusts eat plants: lots of them. They swarm into an areas and decimate the
landscape, eating every green thing they can bite into. This can quickly lead to deforestation and
death of crops. And when this occurs, especially in poorer
nations with fewer resources, the food supply is killed off. No more plants means no more food, and starvation
overtakes the region. Without biting a single human, millions can
be killed, all because of a hungry little grasshopper. But hey, they generally don’t attack humans
directly, so that’s kind of a plus, I suppose! Before we move on, tell us what you think
of these insects in the comments below and take a moment to subscribe! Number 3: The Tse Tse Fly. Another fun little demon, the Tse Tse Fly
is not known for the vengeance of its bite or sting, but rather its aftermath. The Tse Tse Fly very commonly carries the
disease trypanosomiases. This illness, also called “Sleeping Sickness”
is known to mess with a person’s circadian rhythm and nervous system. Over time, the victim will have issues with
sleeping, develop neurological disorders and fell generally ill all the time. Tse Tse Flies are found in Africa more than
anywhere else, and trypanosomiases has been known to kill up to 250,000 people annually
throughout the continent. Of the twenty three types of Tse Tse Fly,
only six will transmit the disease. But still, that’s six too many to consider
this little bug a safe one to hang around. Symptoms can go unnoticed for months until
suddenly major health issues kick in. Nothing quite like having a deadly disease
just waiting for the right time to pounce on you, right? The Tse Tse Fly doesn’t offer a painful bite,
but it can be a deadly one, so do what you can to avoid it, obviously. Number 2: The Mosquito. Surprisingly, or maybe not, the mosquito is
one of the most dangerous insects on the planet. Just like a few others on the list, it’s not
the bite itself, but the spread of disease from the bite that can get you. Depending on the region, mosquitos are known
to carry all kinds of disease, most commonly Malaria and West Nile Virus and Lyme disease. One bite from a mosquito could cause a bit
of irritation but also the contraction of a deadly disease. Mosquitos breed by the millions. These guys stake out a warm spot in stagnant
water and lay as many eggs as they can, creating massive droves of blood-thirsty monster bugs. Couple this with the illnesses available in
the water itself, and you have the perfect recipe for cultivating disease. They spread throughout an area, biting every
warm-blooded creature they can find in order to stay alive, which is, ironically also another
source of the tons of disease they can carry. Suffice it to say, it’s best to bathe in bug
spray before going out to the lake. Number 1: The Asian Hornet. Three inches long. Three! The Asian Hornet will grow to a massive three
inches, so don’t worry about mistaking it for something else. This finger-length devil-spawn is incredibly
deadly, releasing eight different chemicals with its sting. One of the chemicals is known to dissolve
human tissue, which is just as awful as it sounds. Another one of these chemicals is even specifically
used for attracting fellow Asian Hornets to the victim so everyone in the family can enjoy
the feast! The other six chemicals have their very own
horror stories, so rest assured that any and all of them are terrible. If you want to keep all of these terrible
chemicals outside your body, stay away, just stay far away, from the Asian Hornet. Tell us about your encounters with insects
in the comments below, and thanks for watching!

Most DANGEROUS Bugs Around The World!

Most DANGEROUS Bugs Around The World!


From bullet ants to mosquitos, here are 9
of the deadliest insects in the world! Those deeply afraid of creepy crawlies beware! 9. Bullet Ant Known as the World’s Most Painful Insect,
getting bitten by a bullet ant is something you never want to experience. Native to the rainforests of Central and South
America, the small but powerful bullet ant is also known as the hormiga veinticuatro
meaning the “24-hour ant” which refers to the full day of pain that follows after
being stung. Only a little over an inch in length, it is
hard to believe that their sting can feel like getting shot with a bullet. Dr. Justin Schmidt, an entomologist and research
director of the Southwest Biological Institute in Tucson Arizona, invented the Schmidt Sting
Pain Index (SSPI) which categorizes the level of pain felt when stung by wasps, bees, and
ants. He let himself get stung by all kinds of insects
in order to rank their sting. He said that it really felt like getting hit
by a bullet with waves of burning pain that were absolutely excruciating and went on for
hours. The good thing is that it is a localized effect
and this sting does not directly affect your heart or lungs, so you won’t die from it
but it will hurt like a bi-atch. These ants are greatly feared across the rainforest
by people and animals alike. However there are several indigenous tribes
that use these ants in their initiation rituals. Young boys wishing to be seen as men by the
tribes must endure placing their hand in a woven glove filled with these ants. They must endure getting stung repeatedly
for at least ten minutes. If that wasn’t enough, the boy must sometimes
go through over a dozen of these rituals! None of them suffer long term effects although
the trauma may last forever. 8. Japanese Giant Hornets The highly aggressive and territorial Japanese
giant hornets are infamous for their painful sting and fearsome nature. A subspecies of the Asian giant hornet, these
monsters are much larger than normal hornets and are known to hunt and consume up to 50
unfortunate honey bees a day. As if honey bees didn’t already have enough
problems… The creatures which are rapidly becoming a
pest have now made nests in France and England and due to poor shipping practices, are spreading
across the globe. Their venom is known to destroy red blood
cells and those with allergic reactions are especially at risk of death. The Japanese giant hornets kill 30-40 people
in Japan alone every year, and send hundreds to hospital. Its venom attacks the nervous system and damages
the tissue of its victims. The stings can also cause renal failure. The giant hornets are attracted to human sweat,
alcohol, and sweet flavors and smells. They are especially sensitive when animals
or people run and they will start to swarm and attack. Some victims have required hundreds of stitches
and numerous dialysis treatments to survive and are still are left with deep scars. These hornets have lead to government initiatives
to destroy the nests in Japan and China, and maybe they have the right idea? These aggressive insects are pretty scary. 7. Fleas The hidden villain of the famous black death
that ravaged Europe during the Middle Ages, the flea feeds on blood and can spread diseases
to animals and humans. Capable of leaping 150 times their own height
they can move from animal to animal to consume 15 times their own body weight every single
day. The bubonic plague was spread by fleas carrying
the disease on-board infected rats and some estimates say it wiped out close to 2/3rds
of the population of Europe at the time. Though some might say that is was not the
fleas but the infectious bacteria they carried which made it difficult for the creatures
to feed. Therefore they would regurgitate infectious
materials on the host. In fact, the disease still survives in many
flea infested parts of the world, though it is much more easily treated today. Though the black plague changed the entire
face of Medieval history, modern fleas can still infect humans with diseases such as
typhus and are still common among the quickly breeding rat populations. Flea bites can cause disastrous allergic reactions
on both pets and humans alike due to the saliva that they leave behind after the attack itself. In most cases the only real stress is avoiding
the very itchy swollen bite marks and dealing with the infestation quickly as fleas can
lay over 50 eggs in a single day! 6. Tarantula Hawk Wasp This insect is the only other bug to reach
a 4 on the SSPI scale along with the bullet ant. The tarantula hawk is a solitary wasp that
wanders around looking for tarantulas. The goal of the tarantula hawk’s sting is
to get a predator such as a bird or a lizard to let it go. The pain from a tarantula hawk is like getting
shocked with a high-voltage electric line in a wind storm. The super intense blast is meant to surprise
and the pain only lasts for about 3 minutes. It might seem like longer if you are screaming
in agony but after a few minutes, it is suddenly gone. However if you are a tarantula, this sting
will not only shock but paralyze. The wasp will then lay a single egg inside
the tarantula’s body. When the larvae hatches it will began feeding
on the tarantula, avoiding vital organs for as long as possible so the tarantula stays
alive. For the rest of us, tarantula hawk wasps rarely
sting without provocation but geez, nature you scary! 5. Botfly The botfly though rarely fatal, makes this
list for the parasitic horror show it unleashes on it’s mammal victims. Last chance to preserve the innocence of your
dreams as the human hunting botfly allows its eggs to grow in human skin which burrow
deep and eventually develop into larvae which can be felt under the skin. They do this by catching a mosquito as host
and then implanting it with the bot fly’s eggs, which when they go to feed on a mammal
(and in many cases human), the eggs fall into the open wound. This insect horror show can cause the victim
to feel the larvae within the skin, squirming when their airway is blocked. Thankfully this species have the decency to
not have too large populations and live in many parts of Central and South America. They are usually treated with petroleum jelly
over the wound, which suffocates the invaders so that they can be removed with tweezers. Only one type of botflie routinely targets
humans but others can as well, though they usually target the intestines such as the
ones that specialize in horses. Some other animals can become easily infected
by the bacteria or other conditions and die soon after. 4. Killer Bees Widely known and feared, the Africanized honey
bee or killer bee has certainly earned its fearsome reputation. Though their sting is just as deadly as an
average honeybee, they are supremely aggressive, sending many from the colony to repeatedly
sting any perceived threats. In fact, they are so relentless they will
sometimes completely abandon the hive as the entire colony pursues an enemy, leaving the
nest completely unprotected. Deaths from bee swarms are disturbingly more
common in this species of bee. They were created in the 1950´s when Brazilian
scientists cross-bred the southern African honey bee with the European honeybee in an
attempt to create a bee that was more suited to the South American climate. Some bees were accidently released into the
wild in 1957 and had no problem breeding and multiplying throughout the Americas. They have since bred with many other colonies
of bees and are beginning to spread across North America as their African honeybee DNA
allows them to quickly build hives and grow their population. Unfortunately they have also inherited the
aggressive personality as well. These killer bees have been know to respond
viciously to simple things such as noises and even vibrations from vehicles, equipment,
and pedestrians. The good thing is that as bee species continue
to decline, more bees are good news for the flowers of the area. 3. Kissing Bugs Not nearly as innocent as they sound, the
kissing bug is incredibly deadly because of its tendency to spread the terrible Chagas
disease to human populations. Infected with a parasite that causes the disease,
they feed on blood during the night and at the same time transfer the parasites to humans. They get their name from their tendency to
bite humans near the blood vessel-rich areas of the eyes or lips, though this typically
isn’t the kind of makeout people are looking for. A little larger than the size of a penny,
they are mostly found in warm climates, such as the Southern US. I used to live in Florida and saw these all
the time but I didn’t know they carried diseases! The chagas disease that they spread has two
distinct stages, the first in which common symptoms such as muscle aches, rash, vomiting
and other such symptoms may or may not manifest. The second is the chronic stage, which affects
30% of the infected and can cause enlarged heart, and heart rate conditions. Good news is that this stage can take years
to develop, sometimes close to twenty, so if you can make it you’re laughing as you´ve
outlived your attacker by at least twenty times as they tend to have a one year lifecycle. If you suspect you´ve been effected there
are support centres to which you can send the bug if you can find it to ensure proper
treatment. 2. Locusts The name locust summons images of swarms of
flying insects that raze everything in site until only nothing is left. This plague however is all too real. They are very similar in many ways to grasshoppers
though their tendency to gather in large groups is what truly makes them a menace. The main damage isn´t directly to humans
ourselves, but a huge swarm can descend on a farm and devour everything in sight. Crops, grass and even clothes can disappear
forever within the giant cloud and lead to mass starvation for the communities affected.These
clouds can stretch hundreds of miles across and consume millions of pounds of plants every
day, in a vicious feeding frenzy made up of billions of locusts. Their telltale buzzing sound is the fear of
farmers the world over, yet many quickly scramble to construct large fires as the smoke can
debilitate a swarm. Interestingly, the locusts are a delicacy
in some parts of the world and their bodies can help make up for the lost food they consumed. Considered a natural plague by some the desert
variety is especially known for destroying the little crops that can be grown and are
known to move large distances in search for food. In fact one particular swarm was noted for
traveling all the way from Northern Africa to the island of Great Britain! 1. Mosquito The bane of fishing and camping trips alike
this seemly minor annoyance is in fact not only the most deadly insect but one of the
most deadly creatures on the entire planet. They accomplish this by spreading diseases
such as Zika, West Nile and Malaria where they can cripple a human population, especially
in areas where medical treatment is unavailable. Interestingly mosquitos feed mostly on plant
nectars but the females use blood to help their eggs grow and can consume up to three
times her own weight in blood to nourish them. Though this blood is easily replenished in
most working bodies, the diseases that the mosquito can spread are numerous and deadly. They are attracted to and lay their eggs where
there is still water, such as flooded sinks or buckets and can locate human targets by
sensing the Carbon Dioxide we exhale. They can even sense our body heat to know
exactly where to draw blood! At around 210 million years old as a species,
they have been feeding on Dino-DNA long before humans ever entered the scene. In fact, Alexander the Great was believed
to have died of malaria which is famously spread by mosquitoes and kills more than a
million people a year. As it turns out dragonflies may be our best
friends as they hunt hundreds of the mosquitos per hunt and some places even release them
into the wild as natural mosquito control. Thanks for watching. What insect are you the most afraid of? Be sure to subscribe and see you next time!