Bee Keeping Ovservations Yellow Jacket Wasps Attack the hive, Honey Bees Kill Them


okay so here we are on September 20th it
is right at sunrise here and it is only 50 degrees Fahrenheit so once again I’m
out in the bee yard and I’m inspecting the landing boards to see what they’re
getting rid of and wouldn’t you know it the honey bees have cast off again lots
of drones also there’s a yellow jacket in the foreground there now it’s up to the
screen on the right and it’s been stung by bees so much it’s just barely
quivering there and here on the left side is a yellow jacket wasp that’s
chewing away on a carcass which was cast off by the honeybees in this colony and
it looks to have been a drone so this time of year the bees are getting rid
of drones but they’re also cleaning house constantly and I have found an
increase in the number of Varroa destructor bodies that are being cast out
and I found some on the landing board and as some of the other hives where I
have an inserted drone counting board there are bits and pieces of varroa on
that so they’re really cleaning house and sometimes you’ll find the varroa
concentrated in the cells where these drones are developing so the drones seem
to go first it also may be due to the cooldown that the honeybees are
dispensing with their males they won’t need them in winter but I think it’s a
little early for that I think they may be discarding them because the cells may
actually have varroa in them these guard bees are defending the colony again
Yellowjackets can fly at much colder temperatures than the bees do so the bee
colony is really just waking up here and when the yellow jackets land they try to
scoot in on the edges thinking that that’s a good way to get in but they’re
met pretty fast by guard bees so with the colonies as strong as they are I
don’t see too many successful runs being made by the Yellowjackets here’s a
yellowjacket wasp again working over a drone that’s been cast out by the bees
so keep in mind this is not a bee that was going to make it anyway but it
is kind of pitiful that it’s alive while this Yellow Jacket tries to bite
pieces off of it but it proved unsuccessful at doing that so Yellow
Jacket mandibles aren’t the great cutting tools we might think they are
pretty good on soft bodied insects again it’s being run out there in the
background by the guard bees and here’s another one trying to chew away again on
a developing drone now this has been torn apart see it’s head’s damaged torn
apart and pulled out again by the worker bees and I have seen an increase in the
number of varroa destructor bodies that are chewed up and also cast out the bees
completely throw them away so it’s hard to get any kind of count there in the
coming weeks we are going to do some parole accounts on the bees we’re gonna
check out the brood frames but today we’re just looking at the activity on
the landing boards again when the Yellowjackets have that cold weather
advantage here’s a worker bee tugging away on a drone that is still partially
alive and she’s gonna fly it away this is why you don’t see piles of dead bees
and parts directly in front of the colony because the workers actually
collect them later and fly them away and drop them in the grass sometimes 100
yards or more but it’s a terrific amount of effort that gets expended here to
discard these dead and dying drones there’s a yellow jacket in the
background there it is still alive as it doesn’t move gradually but it appears to
have been stung so much that it’s shutting down now some of the workers that are laying
on this landing board in the foreground that are on their backs may have
actually been stung by Yellowjackets or they may have been discarded by their
fellow bees in that colony it’s hard to tell since I didn’t actually observe
what happened to those individuals but remember as before if I didn’t come out
early like this I would not see what’s going on in the landing boards and I
would not see all the remnants of the things being cast out this is pretty
much a daily routine this time of year and the hives are full of honey and
that’s why they’re fanning their wings so much and they’re still dehydrating
that and we’re about 80 percent capped in this colony there’s a yellowjacket putting up a
pretty good fight another thing I’d like you to know is when the bees are
stinging Yellowjackets one of the questions that I often get is first of
all can bees kill yellow jackets usually they just bite and repel them but if the
Yellow Jacket is tenacious as this one is and insists on being in the colony
it’s going to receive several stings from these guard bees they try to get
their stingers in between the joints in the abdomen they sting its head and neck
they sting it around the thorax and unlike when they sting a person the hard body
of a yellow jacket doesn’t hold the stinger so the bees do have an
opportunity to sting it several times and not lose their singers subsequently
these guard beads do not lose their lives when they deliver stings to
Yellowjackets so you don’t have to feel bad for them this Yellow Jacket is
trying to extend its own stinger and get one of the honeybees here you can see that the yellow jack is
really slowing down otherwise it would fly away by this point but I think it’s
been stung enough times that it is really incapable of flight now we do know that the Yellowjackets as
we observed earlier in this video are trying to get meat and fly it back so
you know if you’re putting out yellowjacket traps this time of year you
definitely want to have some meat resources in it you’ll be attracting
these Queens this appears to be a yellowjacket Queen you can correct me if
I’m wrong there but when you see the abdomen and it has those individual
black dots that are not connected on the abdomen generally that is thought to be
a queen I’m sure somebody will clear that up in the comment section and again
as as we predicted it can’t fly it’s ultimately gonna die from all the venom
that the bees have injected into it now this worker has decided that the
yellow jacket hasn’t had enough yet you can see the stinger pretty prominent there
it’s kind of a futile defensive attempt there on the part of the yellowjacket at
this point and the bees are doing their best to bite it but remember bees don’t
have flesh cutting mandibles so it takes a lot of work for them to chew anything
off like that and I’ve never seen honeybees successfully bite another
insect apart like a yellowjacket but they’re just so angry that they use
that to drive it off and vent their anger biting the toes there but again
they can’t even bite the little toe tips off they do do a good job as we already
know looking at this landing board of pulling apart their own developing brood
and it’s that soft tissue that these Yellowjackets go after here’s another colony with another
tenacious Yellow Jacket that thought it could get past the guards another big mistake on
the part of this Yellow Jacket it’s kind of interesting that even with
a struggle going on with the yellow jacket that’s in there there are a number of
guard bees that have all come out on the landing board and are facing outward
just in case other Yellowjackets show up then they do a great job as shown in
this video defending their colonies even with the wide open landing boards in a
couple of hours as the Sun comes out this landing board will be wall-to-wall
bees so it’s only during the cold early hours that the Yellowjackets really even
have a chance to get into that beehive and of course by the time I came out
here there were more than enough guards to fend them off and it’s unfortunate
for the Yellowjackets that do make it in there they will be quickly overwhelmed
by the bees and stung to death and discarded and again here are Yellow Jacket wasps
chewing away at another discarded carcass and here’s a drone on its back flailing
its legs it will be thoroughly ignored by the bees and it will either die from
exposure or starvation and a worker will come out later and just discard that
drone here’s a yellow jacket that again has been stung like some of the others
and is being dragged out by a worker bee I hope you found this early landing
board video interesting and the ability to watch how the bees handle intruders
like the Yellowjackets and I hope you’ll go out and check your on landing boards
right after sunrise especially in these cold mornings you’ll learn a lot about
how they’re surviving what they’re throwing away and how they’re faring
against Raiders like the Yellow Jacket wasp thanks for watching as always

Adam Ruins Everything – We Should All Eat Bugs (and You Already Are!) | truTV

Adam Ruins Everything – We Should All Eat Bugs (and You Already Are!) | truTV


Crunchy, tasty, buggy. Today’s chefs have
to cook up the best bug dish and avoid
getting squished. (splat) Hello, chefs.
Today, you must use the everyday ingredients
in your baskets to prove to Miranda
that even though she doesn’t realize it, she actually eats bugs
all the time. If your dish doesn’t cut it,
you will get squished. Okay, open ’em up. ♪♪ And our contestants
have bugs, bugs, and more bugs. (woman)
My strategy is
to tell the truth. If you’ve ever eaten
a lobster or crayfish, you’ve eaten a bug. They’re both arthropods. Hmm, that’s very smart. Lobsters are essentially
spiders of the sea. I’m never eatin’
a lobster again. A bug’s head shall never
pass these lips. Oh, the truth is bugs
are already in most of our foods,
and there’s nothing unsafe or even unhealthy about it. Our produce and canned foods
are full of little bug bits. Broccoli, spinach,
and canned tomatoes can contain heads,
legs, thoraxes, and even entire insects. How is that allowed? Until I become
a chef full-time, I still have my day job
at the FDA. And we allow these bugs
in there because eating them is totally safe. In fact, the only reason
the FDA puts limits on bug parts in food at all is so people
don’t notice them. Generally, our policy
is if people don’t notice, they won’t care. (Arana)
Oh, now I like what I’m seeing
here with the chocolate. Chocolate is full of bugs. Yes, great move. In fact, if you eat
100 pounds of chocolate, you’ll have eaten
one entire pound of bugs. There are even bugs
in certain drinks. Up to five percent
of the hops in each batch of beer is bugs. (chuckling)
I love a hoppy beer. I do not.
I think we’re done here. Yes, we are,
with the dishes that contain bugs
unintentionally. But our chefs were also asked to
prepare a dish of common foods that contain bugs
on purpose. Chefs, please step back. ♪♪ Mmm. Nice choice by
Chef Mei Ling here. Yes, the red dye found
in milkshakes, yogurt, and sausages is often made
from scale insects. (Mei Ling)
I’ve created dishes that really represent me. And the bugs. (Aaron)
So I look over at
chef Tony’s dish, and I realize we both went
for the lac bugs. Lac bugs are used
in the coating for jelly beans,
and other candies, and cake fondant. I’m still confident in my dish. I… just hope the judges
feel the same way. For me, it was
just disgusting. I didn’t even try it. I say more. If you’re gonna put
the bugs in, put the bugs in! Well, do we have
a decision? ♪♪ Chef Aaron, I’m afraid
you’ve been squished. (Arana)
Chef Aaron, you did demonstrate
why humans unknowingly ingest around
one to two pounds of flies, maggots,
and other bugs hidden in their food
each year. But at the end of the day, the execution
just wasn’t there. Yeah… Be well. ♪♪ (Miranda)
Wait a minute! Are you telling me
I could be eating up to two pounds
of bugs a year without even knowing it? I’m gonna have
my jaw wired shut. My friend Joyce had it done,
she looks divine. Or you could just accept it. And for the sake of humanity,
you should. Because bugs might be the best way to feed
our growing population. Worldwide demand for
meat-based protein is rising at
an alarming rate. But if that trend continues and everyone starts eating
as much meat as Americans do, raising that amount
of livestock would require more land area
than even exists on the planet. But if we replaced just half the world’s meat consumption
with bugs, we’d use one-third less land
for agriculture. Plus, eating bugs
is a lot less wasteful. 80% of a cricket’s body
is edible, compared to just
40% of a cow’s. And not only could we feed
way more people, it would be more
environmentally efficient. Farming crickets requires
far less water than farming lean meat. And bugs are straight up
safer to consume. Unlike traditional meat,
bugs are genetically different enough
from humans that diseases don’t jump to us
when we eat them.

Community Ecology: Feel the Love – Crash Course Ecology #4

Community Ecology: Feel the Love – Crash Course Ecology #4


I wouldn’t be much of a teacher if I didn’t tell you that life is tough and that everyone’s looking out for themselves in this world. That’s just the way it is, people. You know how I always say that biology is
ultimately about sex and not dying? Well both of those things are more difficult
than we’d like them to be, because of competition. There’s a finite amount of resources on this
planet, so evolution drives us to compete for them so that we can survive long enough to spread
our genes all over the place And naturally, competition is a really important part of how different species interact when their habitats overlap. These interactions between species are what
define ecological communities. So it makes sense that community ecology studies
these interactions anywhere they take place, from a tide pool to the whole ocean,
from a rotting log to an entire forest. But just because inter-species interaction
is mostly competitive doesn’t necessarily mean that community ecology is all about big, bloody, tooth-and-claw scenes like from cable-TV nature shows. Actually, a lot of it is, but we’re not going
to get there until next week. For now, let’s just note that competition,
while prevalent and important, is also pretty dangerous, kind of a hassle,
and can, like, really hurt. So a lot of inter-species interaction is actually
about sidestepping direct competition and instead finding ways to divvy up resources,
or otherwise let species just get along. Can you feel the love? [Theme Music] Careful guys! Because right now we’re surrounded potentially lethal interspecific competition going on all over the place. Since we’re animals, we usually think of competition
as going on between animals, but really it happens between almost all members
of the four kingdoms of life. Whenever species compete, they’re going after
the same resources that they need for their survival and continued population growth. In this garden, the weeds are competing with the sunflower, the corn and the dill for nutrients and water in the soil. So these resources, because they’re finite in this area, are the limiting factors that we’ve talked about. The population can only get as big as these
factors will allow. Now, a particularly nasty weed could, over
time, eliminate the veggies entirely. Such elimination is known as competitive exclusion, and it’s one of the most fundamental properties
in community ecology, and also, like, life. Because the fact is, when two species are
competing for the same resources, one of them is eventually going to be more
successful and eliminate the other. This bitter truth is known as the Competitive
Exclusion Principle, and it was first identified in 1934 by Russian
ecologist G. F. Gause in a study of two closely-related species
of microscopic protists. When he was only 22 years old, Gause made
a name for himself by conducting experiments that pitted one species of protist, Paramecium
aurelia, against another, Paramecium caudatum. First, Gause grew each species separately
with the exact same resources, and found that each developed rapidly and
established stable populations. But, when he grew them in the same container, P. caudatum was soon driven to extinction by P. aurelia. Paramecium aurelia gained a competitive advantage because its population grew slightly faster than P. caudatum’s. So Gause’s experiment showed that, in the
absence of another disturbance, two species that require the same resources
cannot live indefinitely in the same habitat. The inferior competitor will be eliminated. Makes sense, but if competitive exclusion
is the natural law of the land, then why isn’t all of earth just a crazy crap-circus
of constant competition, predation, and ultimately, extinction of all those losers? Well, for a couple of reasons:
first, not all resources are limiting. Two species of sharks may compete for water
in the ocean, but the ocean is, you know, gigantic. So that’s not what limits their population
growth. Rather, the amount of food, like a specific
fish that they both eat, could be limiting, while other resources are plentiful. Second, as the overwhelming diversity of life in almost any community shows us, most species — even ones that are almost identical to each
other — are adaptable enough to find a way to survive in the face of competition. They do this by finding an ecological niche,
the sum of all resources, both biotic and abiotic, that a species uses in its environment. You can think of an organism’s niche as its job in the community that provides it with a certain lifestyle. We tend to keep jobs that we can do better
than anyone else in our community, and if we’re desperate, we do a job that nobody
else wants to do. But no matter what job we have, what it pays
in terms of resources dictates our lifestyle. So finding a nice, comfy niche that you have
pretty much to yourself not only provides a steady income of food and other stuff, it also allows a species to avoid competitive
exclusion, and this, in turn, helps create a more stable ecological community. It’s and elegant and peaceful solution, I wish that we humans could figure out something as good, but as with anything in life, this relative
security and stability comes at a price. The bummer is that it prevents some species
from living the lifestyle that they could have if nobody else competed with them at
all. This ideal situation is called a fundamental
niche, and it’s just that, an ideal. Few, if any species ever get to live that
way. Instead, because of the need to avoid competitive
exclusion in order to survive, many species end up with a different job,
and hence lifestyle. It’s not necessarily the job that they studied
for in college, but it makes a decent living, and that’s called a realized niche. This, my friends, is how nature does conflict
management. But it sounds kind of unnatural, doesn’t it? I mean, Gause taught us that competition, and winning the competition, was the natural order of things. So how could it be that part of the natural order actually involves letting everyone compete and win just a little bit? And how did we ever come to discover that
things actually worked this way? Well, it took a special kind of person, and to to tell you about him, I’m going to need a special kind of chair. Canadian born ecologist Robert MacArthur was
in his late 20s when he made a discovery that made him one of the most influential
ecologists of the 20th century. While researching his doctoral thesis at Yale
University in 1958, he was studying five species of warblers that live in coniferous forests in the northeastern United States. At the time, because there were so many different species of warblers that lived, fed, and mated in such close quarters, many ornithologists thought that the birds
occupied the exact same niche and thus were an exception to Gause’s competitive
exclusion principle. But MacArthur was not convinced. A mathematician by training, he set out to
measure exactly how and where each kind of warbler did its foraging, nesting, and mating. In order to do this, he studied each tree the birds lived in, dividing them into zones, 16 zones to be exact, from bare lichen at the base of the trunk, to new needles and buds at the tips of the branches. After many seasons of observing many birds
in many trees, he found that each species of warbler divided its time differently among the various parts of the tree. One warbler, called the Cape May, for example, spent most of its time toward the outside of the tree at the top. Meanwhile, the Bay Breasted fed mostly around
the middle interior. MacArthur also found that each of the warblers
had different hunting and foraging habits and even bred at slightly different times of the year, so that their highest food requirements didn’t overlap. These differences illustrated how the warblers
partitioned their limiting resources, each finding its realized niche that allowed
it to escape the fate of competitive exclusion. The phenomenon he observed is now known as
resource partitioning, when similar species settle into separate
niches that let them coexist. Thanks in part to this discovery, MacArthur
became known as a pioneer of modern ecology, encouraging curiosity and hypothesis driven research, championing the use of genetics in ecological study, and collaborating with biologists like E.
O. Wilson and Jared Diamond. Sadly, he died of renal caner at the age of
42, but his study of northern warblers remains a classic example of community ecology that is still taught today. So, if organisms can do this, if they can
behave in ways that help minimize competition while increasing their odds for survival, it follows that traits associated with this
behavior would start being selected favorably. After all, that’s what natural selection is for. When this happens, it’s known as character displacement. To demonstrate, let’s go back to some other
famous ecologists, our favorite couple of evolutionary biologists
and love birds, Peter and Rosemary Grant. I told you before about how they observed the process of speciation among Darwin’s famous Galapagos finches. Well on the same island, Daphne Major, in 2006, they witnessed character displacement in action. For a long time, a small population of finches
had the island to themselves, where they ate a variety of seeds, including
seeds of the feverplant, which were bigger and more nutritious than
the smaller seeds that were available but were harder for the little finches to open. Then in 1982, a group of much bigger finches
showed up on the island, and they began to commandeer the island’s
abundant supply of feverplant seeds. Within just 20 years, the Grants found that
the small finches’ beaks shrunk to allow them to specialize in eating only the smaller,
less nutritious seeds. But now the little finches had those seeds
all to themselves. The traits of the two populations had actually diverged to help facilitate the partitioning of resources. See? Competition can be hard on us, but it
also can make us better people, or you know, finches or warblers or kangaroo
mice. But there are also kinds of interspecies interaction in which species actually join forces in the fights for survival. This is the ultimate in conflict-avoidance. In these cases species in a community actually
manage to avoid competition altogether by forming downright tight relationships that
benefit one, if not both, of the parties involved. You may have heard of both of these cases:
First, mutualism, where both species benefit, and commensalism, where one species benefits
and the other is kind of like, “Whatever.” Mutualism abounds in nature, and for those
who’ve been paying attention to Crash Course, you’ve heard me talk about it many, many times
before. A prime example [of mutualism] are mychorrhizae, the fungal root that we talked about a few weeks ago, where fungi and plant roots get tangled and essentially rub each other’s backs for nutritious favors. Others you may have heard about include flowering
plants that produce nectars to attract pollinators, and that bear fruit to attract animals to
help spread the seeds inside. Oftentimes these relationships become rather
needy, like in the case of termites — they can’t break down the cellulose in the
wood they eat without the enzymes produced by the microorganisms that live inside their
digestive systems. Without the little critters, the bigger critters
would die. Such a needy relationship is called obligate
mutualism. By contrast, commensalism is where one species definitely benefits and the other isn’t really hurt or helped. Such neutrality, of course, is difficult to prove because even a seemingly benign interaction probably has some effect. Barnacles, for example, hitchhike on gray
whales, getting a free ride through swaths of plankton-rich water for feeding. While clearly a benefit to the barnacles,
the relationship is often considered commensal because the whales probably don’t really care
whether the barnacles are there or not. Or do they? The barnacles might slow down
the whale as it swims through the water, but on the other hand, they might also serve as a type of camouflage from predators like orcas, in which case they confer an advantage. So it probably comes down to “meh” for the
whale. And when you consider all the other possibilities out there when species interact, “meh” isn’t such a bad option. Especially considering that next week, we’re
going for the throat, by which I mean we’ll be investigating the
kill-or-be-killed world of animal predation and all of the fantastic evolutionary changes it can trigger that lead to even greater diversity in ecological communities. There probably is going to be a lot of blood
though, so you might want to bring your poncho. Thank you for watching this episode of Crash
Course: Ecology. If you want to review anything, there’s a
table of contents over here for you to click on any of the parts that you may want to review. Much love and appreciation to all the people
who helped us put this episode together, and if you have any questions or comments or ideas, you can leave them for us on Facebook or on Twitter, or, of course, down in the comments below.

GIANT BOARD GAME CHALLENGE!! Winner Gets Vy Qwaint SECRET Revealed

GIANT BOARD GAME CHALLENGE!! Winner Gets Vy Qwaint SECRET Revealed


– All right Spy Ninjas. If you don’t want me to reveal, Vy’s big secret, then you’re gonna have to compete, in the dangerous board game! – This is a huge board game PZ9. Okay, I volunteer to
go (claps hands) first. – Let’s get into it! Ah! Roll the dice. – Don’t worry Vy, I’m
gonna win this challenge. And I will not reveal your secret. (suspenseful music) I got a three! Woo! One, ow. – [Vy] Oh my God! – Two. Three. What’s blue mean PZ9? – It represents the color of water, which you’re gonna cross on this, plank challenge. But to spice it up, you’re on a scooter. – What?! How am I supposed to
ride this little scooter, on this huge plank? I’m gonna fall on the water. – I think that’s a fact. (laughs mockingly) Look at the wood planks, they’re not even. Gonna be difficult. – So if I fall in the water– – Then you start at the beginning. (laughs loudly) You guys are Spy Ninjas. You guys should not fail. (laughs loudly) – Woo! Let’s do this! – [Daniel] Ooh! – Show off. – I got a little plan here. I think it’s gonna ride very nicely, right along this little groove here. – It’s like a train– – (train whistles) – Just going on the railroad track. – You can do it, Chad! You can do it! – Yeah, you can do it, Chad! You can fall in the pool. (laughs loudly) – I don’t think Regina has
much faith in me either. She’s recording slow motion, like I’m gonna fall in
the water or something. You think I’m gonna fall
in the water, Regina? – Maybe. – I got my GoPro on, so you guys can see what I see. – Everybody ready? – Ready! – Three, two, one, scoot! Oh my goodness! Oh shoot! It’s bending! The bars are bending. (suspenseful music) – You did it! – [Spy Ninjas] (cheering loudly) – Well it was too easy. Next challenge! Ah! Do you need help rolling this dice, Vy? (laughs loudly) – I don’t need your help. – It is like half your size. (laughs mockingly) – It is, but I’m strong. (rubber ducky squeaks) I don’t wanna roll a three because that’s what Chad rolled and it’s a water challenge. And I can’t swim. – Let’s get a three! – What!? – Yeah, a three. That’s good. – Is she on PZ9’s team now or what? – It’s a joke. – Good luck Vy! – [Daniel] Go Vy! Go! – Five! Oh my gosh! – [Chad] One! – Two! – Three! – Ha!
– (screams loudly) Oh my gosh!
– (laughs loudly) – I can’t swim, PZ9! Four, whatever! – Here’s the second half of three. – Four! – Five! – Miniature golf. – I can do this. Miniature golf for a miniature person. I can handle this. – (laughs loudly) Cause she’s small. I guess I have a miniature brain. (laughs loudly) – He finally got something right. – (stomps loudly) – All right Vy. You ever played golf before? – Maybe once. – Okay, it’s all in the hips. Swing it and get a nice strike. – Shut up already. You’re taking forever. Let’s play! – Vy, you gotta listen to me. I’m a pro at golf. Home run! – All right, okay. – Home run? Daniel! I don’t think he knows
anything about golf. – What did you say? – I said, if you think this is a home run, that’s not golf. That’s the wrong sport, buddy. (suspenseful music) – [Spy Ninjas] (cheering loudly) – You did it! – Oh my God! – Way to go out there! – Yeah! – Who’s up next? Regina! – I don’t know. Let me roll this thing. Woo! – [Chad] A one! – [Daniel] Oh! (sad trombone) – Awh. – [Daniel] Aww, how sad. (jump squeaks) – [Chad] One. – [Daniel] Aww. – (laughs loudly) – Whatever! – [Chad] What does red mean, PZ9? – It means you move back one space. – What?! – Which matches her life. (laughs loudly) – Hey! – [Chad] Well, at least, okay. – I have rolled many dices in my lifetime. I’m a Yahtzee expert as they say. Here we go! What is that like a six? – [Regina] It got two.
– Seven? – [Regina] Daniel, you suck like me. – Not as much. Two is better than one. – [Regina] Whatever, go! – One! – Two! – [Regina] Oh, very close. – Black. – Black means back to the
start! (laughs loudly) – What?! – [Regina] You have to
go back to the start too. – It’s my turn next. Let’s go! – [Regina] What the heck? – It’s for my Instagram. – [Regina] It says Tar.
– Tar. You Tarzan or something? – Superstar! Okay. – [Regina] Six! – No! – [Regina] He cheated! – No. See you later losers. – [Regina] Hey! – (laughs loudly) Oops. (laughs loudly) – You’re ruining your own game, PZ9! – [Daniel] It’s four. Five. Six. – Right over here where you belong. – Get in your six. What does white mean? – It’s the absence of color, thus, I don’t do anything! I’m cool. – You’re just making these rules up. Give me those dice. PZ9’s in the lead. I have to go pass him, so I’m gonna go ahead and move this dice. Oh, come on! – Come on! Oh! – Hey, but at least I’m safe. – Yeah, and you’re closer to me now. – Vy’s turn to roll. – All right. Are you ready, Daniel? – [Daniel] I’m ready!
– [Chad] Come on, Vy! – [Spy Ninjas] A two! – Yeah! Passing PZ9. (laughs loudly) – [Daniel] (laughs loudly) – She thinks. – What’s red, PZ9? – Do you remember when Regina got red, she went back one space. Welcome back, Vy! – I have to share a square with you? – (laughs loudly) – I don’t wanna be next to you. Can you move over, please? – I’m a big body. – Okay, Daniel. Your turn. – Huddle real quick. Vy, she’s with PZ9 where she belongs. – She’s been acting really strange. She’s definitely hiding a big secret. So we got those two secrets, but now we need this third one to read the full sentence. – I know your secrets Vy. – You don’t know anything. You think you know, but you have no idea. – Well say with your Spy Ninjas. Wait until they find out. – I’m gonna win this challenge and no one’s gonna know the secret. – I’m telling you right now, if I win I’m opening that envelope. We’re gonna find out what her secret is. – Okay. If I win, I don’t know what I’m gonna do. What do you Spy Ninjas think I should do? Should I keep Vy’s secret and not show everybody or should I show all you
guys what’s on that envelope? I don’t know. – Big number.
– Oh! – [Regina and Chad] Six! – Whoa!
– Good job! – [Chad] You got this, woo! – Let’s go! – [Chad] One. Two. Three. – Four. – [Chad] Four. – Five. – And six. Hey, there’s not much room for ya. – Oh this is weird. – Regina, it’s up to you. Come on. – I gotta roll a big number. – Yes. – Three! One. Two.
– Uh oh. – Three. What’s this again? (gasps loudly) – You gotta scooter across the pool. – Oh no, I’m scared.
– Oh no! I believe in you, Regina. – Thank you. – Unlike when I went and
you were filming slow-mo, cause you thought I would
fall into the water. – But it would’ve been good. – That’s true. It would’ve been good. – I’m nervous. – You got this. Hang on, let me get to the other side. Vy, what do you think’s gonna happen? – I don’t know. She’s really clumsy, so I think she might fall. – Regina can barely walk. She’s like, oh! – Jeez dude, jeez.
– Nevermind. – You can barely stand. – Yeah, okay. You don’t know. – She’ll fall. – [Chad] Come on, Regina. – I’m nervy. – [Chad] You can do this. Are you ready? – No! (suspenseful music) – [Chad] You got this, girl. – (screams loudly)
– [Chad] Oh God! – (screams loudly) – [Spy Ninjas] (cheering loudly) – Good job! – That challenge I didn’t
realize was gonna hurt my ears. – (screams loudly) That’s me. – [Chad] PZ9’s turn. A one. – Oh no, it hit Daniel on the way down. – [Chad] You go to the red, and then you go back one space. My turn! All right, back up Daniel. I’m gonna throw it nice and high. – [Daniel] Okay. – Whoa! Four! – You get, three chances to land the water
balloon in that blue square. Make it and you advance. Miss all three, go back to the start. Plot twist! The three of you will be standing, in front of that blue square. (laughs loudly) – He’s gonna hit us. – I’m gonna throw it over
those three Spy Ninjas, into the blue square. – Do your worst, Chad. – You’re gonna film it in slow-mo, Daniel? – I am.
– Yes. – Just in case I hit you. – You can do this, Chad. – Ready?
– Ready. – Give me a countdown. – Three. Two. One. (suspenseful music) (water splashes) – It broke before I let go. I guess I filled up too far. Try number two. This guy’s smiling. Oh shoot, he’s ready to go. – [PZ9] (laughs loudly)
– Okay. – [Spy Ninjas] Three. Two. One. (suspenseful music) (upbeat music) (water splashes) – (screams loudly) – Shoot, I was a little too short. – [PZ9] (laughs loudly) – My leg. – Third times the charm. Here we go. I’m really sorry about hitting
you guys in that last one. I feel really bad about that. We got this. – [PZ9] Do it again. – Give me a countdown, guys. – [Spy Ninjas] Three. Two. One. (suspenseful music) – [Spy Ninjas] (screaming loudly) (water splashes) – I made it! I made it! – Yea! – I’m in the blue. Okay, what is this PZ9, Melvin? Whatever, whoever you are. – He’ll find out next
round. (laughs loudly) – Vy, you’re up. – [Regina] Go Vy! – Four! (jump squeaks) (jump squeaks) (jump squeaks) – Woo! – You almost made it to me, Vy. – I know, but I’m safe here in the white. – [Regina] Danny boy’s turn. Big money. – [Spy Ninjas] Three! – Okay, see you later PZ9. One. Two. Three. (fail buzzer plays) Oh no! – Black! – That means go back! – It does! – Back to the beginning, Daniel. Oh! – It’s like I made that square for Daniel. What a loser, right? – Yeah. I mean, no. No. – Come one, Regina. It’s up to you. – Big numbers.
– [Chad] (cheering loudly) – Ready?
– Yeah, I’m ready. – It’s a two. – You’re supposed to get
a big number, Regina. – One. Two. – Hey!
– Mini golf. Hole in one. – Daniel, you said you were a pro at golf. – What’s your advice? – Regina, Vy took my advice and you know what happened? Home run, baby. You got to do the exact
same thing I told her, okay. – On the hips. – Yeah, on the hips. Go down the alley and get a strike. – Down the alley, strike, bowling? – Three. Two. One. – [Chad] Yeah! (cheers loudly) PZ9’s turn. – See you later. – Six. You’re in the blue with me. – (laughs loudly) – And it’s my turn, so now you’re going to explain
what this bridge thing is. – Just cross over it, that’s all.
– [Chad] Oh. – You just gotta trust my carpentership. – This thing does not look stable at all. I’m gonna fall into the pool here. This is a bridge to nowhere. You see how skinny this plank is, Daniel. Look how shaky this thing is. This isn’t gonna hold my weight. I’m so heavy. – We made a fort out of these. Vy ran into it, no problem. It broke. – No, I’m strong and huge. – You’re strong, not huge. – Use that for balance. – I’ve seen circus acts do this. Okay. Oh my goodness! PZ9 you did not build this very well. – Yes, dangerous, ain’t it? I wasn’t kidding. – Whoa! Oh!
– [Vy] (screams loudly) – It’s falling apart already. I don’t need this thing. I’m a spy. I’m a ninja. I’ve got the balance. Oh my gosh. – [Vy] (screams loudly)
– [Daniel] Oh my gosh! Oh no! – I don’t know if it
can support my weight. If I step right in the middle, that’s gonna fall apart. I’m gonna try to skip over the middle. Oh my God!
– (screams loudly) – Oh gosh! – (screams loudly) – Oh! Yeah! – [Spy Ninjas] (cheers loudly) – You did it. – There’s no way PZ9’s gonna
make it across that thing. – Oh my gosh, that was so intense, I hope I don’t get that water one, Chad. – I hope not either cause you can’t swim. You’re not gonna like that one. – No.
– Two or four. – [Spy Ninjas] A four! (jump squeaks) (jump squeaks) – Not this one? – No.
– That looks fun. (jump squeaks) – Oh, my lucky day. I’m safe again. – Vy’s the closest to the finish line. And that means her secret
might lay in her hands forever. – You’re right. You’re not gonna win Vy. – Roll a big one. Yeah, you got it. A five. That’s pretty good. – My specialty, golf. I’ve won many super bowls in golf before. Don’t wanna get a foul. Let’s do this thing. – He’s embarrassing himself. – Three, two, one. Go! (trumpet plays) – Daniel, I thought you were a pro. – You’re back at the beginning. – Oh! – You don’t understand how golf works, so you hit it past the hole, it’s like eight more points. – [PZ9 and Chad] (laughs loudly) – Go Regina. – Go Regina! – All right, big number. – [Spy Ninjas] Five! – (cheers loudly) (jump squeaks) (jump squeaks) – Five. – Uh oh. – What’s this? – You already know what it is. Jump in! – Jump in! Jump in! – Hey! – [Daniel and Vy] Hey! – Shout out to Stephen Sharer, yeah. – So are you down or not? – I guess I have to do this, whatever. It’s hot. Push me in. – Okay. – (screams loudly)
– [Chad] (screams loudly) (upbeat music) – It feels good PZ9. (splashes water) – Okay, all right. I get the point. – You thought it would be a punishment, but it ended up to be a reward. I had to cross the bridge, now it’s PZ9’s turn. Ooh. You’re gonna fall in. You know why? You ain’t got the balance of a Spy Ninja, to ready to collapse. – You probably don’t
have this much muscle. I’m probably twice as heavy as you. (clock ticking) – Nope. Oh my goodness. – This thing is gonna go! (suspenseful music) – Uh oh. – Your foot looks really slippery there. (suspenseful music) – What are you doing? (upbeat music) – I’ll give it to you. That was a pretty good move. – Yeah, that’s terrifying. Yeah! (laughs loudly) – What the heck. – Regina, you still have a chance to win. – Yes, I do. If I win, I think I’m going to expose Vy. Although, I do know what
it’s like to have a secret, I have the secret room, so maybe I won’t expose her. But I really wanna know! I don’t know. – Here we go it is Chad Wild Clay’s turn to roll the dice. Oh! A big two. – That’s a very small number actually. One. Oh. And number two. Oh this looks fun and familiar. PZ9 what do these sodas mean? – For ever soda bottle you
cut through in one slice, you advance that many squares. With only a couple squares left, you can win! – If I can slice through three bottles, one– – Then you can be in the square with me. – Two. – The black square. (laughs loudly) – Back to the beginning. I wanna slice through three. The end. – Vy’s secret. I think you oughta know Chad, of all the Spy Ninjas to know. – You think I should know the secret? It’s like she betrayed us. And I wanna see what
those missing words are. I kinda do wanna know what the secret is. I’m gonna get through all three of these, with my futuristic machete. – Ooh la la. – Remember this lie detector, Daniel? – [Daniel] I do. That was the first ninja
gadget I ever held. – That’s right. – I got to use it too. (laughs loudly) It’s sharp. – It’s gonna go plonk, plonk, plonk. (rockets to the sky) – You gotta find her secret Chad. I wanna know. – Me too! Ninja slice. Give me the countdown everybody. – [Spy Ninjas] Three. Two. One. (suspenseful music) (upbeat music) – [Spy Ninjas] (cheers loudly) – You did it Chad! – You barely got this one. – Look at that, I definitely knicked it. Look at that a soda stream. Ah! Orange soda in my mouth, in my face. – That really looks tasty. – Here have a sip. Have a sip. Oh! (laughs loudly) – You ruined my beard. – But you know what that means, I hit three sodas, so that is a one, a two, and a three. (triumphant music) Vy’s secret! Yay! Oh gosh what should I do? Spy Ninja’s comment down below. Count how many are there open it, or comment, don’t open it, or burn it. I don’t know. – Chad, open it! – Yeah, open it. – Open it already. – Vy, what do you think? – Don’t open it, Chad. You’re my husband. You should respect what I want to do. – That’s true. I should respect your
privacy, shouldn’t I? – Yeah. – Even though I really
wanna know what’s on here. – Remember our vows? For better, for worse. For whatever your wife wants to do, you do it. – I don’t remember saying
that at our wedding. Vy, I probably should trust you. You are my wife. I’m gonna open it like this. I’m gonna reach into my pocket. – Yes. – For my glasses, so I can read the note. Just kidding. – No! – [Daniel] Chad, what?! – I gotta respect Vy’s privacy. It’s the interest to light things on fire, so we’re just gonna go ahead and stomp it, out like that. – [Daniel] No, Chad! – Vy needs her privacy. If she doesn’t want us to see something, if she’s got a secret– – Yes. – We should let her have her secrets, just like–
– Yes – Regina’s got her secret room. – Oh yeah. – Chad, that was a really bad idea. You just missed out on
one of the juiciest piece of spicy knowledge. – About Vy? – Oh yeah. – Juicy, spicy? – But I guess it’s good. You guys can continue on
with your regular lives now. – Chad, we told you man. – [Spy Ninjas] Hey! Get ’em! Go! – Give me back my phone! – We’ll look in that envelope. – It’s only half way burnt. – Yeah, let’s go. – It’s sitting right there. – Yeah, yeah. Here’s the secret. – Yes. – It’s finally time to find out. – See. (gasps loudly) Oh! (suspenseful music)

John Cena Eats BUGS?! πŸ› & More 5th Grader Surprises! | Nick

John Cena Eats BUGS?! πŸ› & More 5th Grader Surprises! | Nick


Are you challenging me to a dare? Insects, uh… freak me out. [screaming] And here’s our host, John Cena! [cheering] Oh, yeah! [screaming] [cheering] Hey everybody! Alright! Enough of this, alright. Oh! We have peroxide, we have yeast,
we have Quinn, we have science! – Let’s do this!
– Pour the yeast into the peroxide. – Really quick.
– Woo! So… science. Science is happening, ohh! Science! You’ve done it.
You’ve created a monster reaction! Through the power of science! – Science!
– To science! Colin is a wrestler. OK! Alright! Now, I would like to give you
a chance at a WWE style entrance. – Would you be up for something like this?
– Yes. OK, you run over there and in
a few seconds give me your best entrance. Ladies and gentlemen, Colin! [crowd cheering] We are excited to go into 2nd grade. Principal Ryan, you interact with
your students in a unique way. – Yes.
– Tell me about this. We do a lot of crazy dares at my school. – Crazy dares? I love crazy dares.
– Yes, I ate some insects. Uh… what? I ate some insects. What does that even look like? I think we should try some. Are you challenging me to a dare? Ew! – I’m gonna let you go first.
– OK. Aw… Oh, no! Oh, that was good.
That was good. I’m gonna throw up. You’re a big guy,
so you might need to… Every pound of me is frightened and… Eat it! Eat it! Eat it! Eat it! – Eat it!
– Insects, uh… freak me out. But you know what,
I am facing my fears. Here’s to your performance on the show. [crowd cheering] Pick the ingredient
you can add to vinegar to produce a chemical reaction
that produces carbon dioxide gas. Before you answer, I got something extra cool to show you. It’s our beautiful Are You Smarter
Than a 5th Grader volcano! [cheering] Right now, it appears to be a dormant
vegetative-covered hill, with beautiful puffy clouds,
but if you pick the right solution, it could be an erupting volcano. [cheering] – What do you think?
– I’m going to lock in a peek. Locking in the peek. So Cooper, what did you have
as an answer? Well, I got B. The way I remember it is basically
if you switch the H and the C, it would be ‘Nacho’ with a 3. And I know that that is baking soda. And when you put baking soda
into vinegar, it starts fizzing up – and it produces carbon dioxide.
– Yeah! OK. [crowd cheering] I like your explanation of
your answer, you know why? – Why?
– Nachos are my favorite food, brother. Alright Coop, come on over.
Let’s do some science. [cheering] Sister Mary Jo locked in B,
based on a nacho philosophy. Let’s see if it’s ‘nacho’ average volcano. [laughing] – Nice!
– Go for it. We have foamy lava! The answer is correct! [cheering] Alright, Alright! You see Elvis.
You see the face of the king! What are you gonna do to the king? [cheering] Hey! Hey!
Put it right here! Put it right here! [screaming] Ah! [moaning] Oh! Hey! I am not good. Alright, ding, ding, ding, ding,
ding, ding, round, round. Woo! Topic: animal science. Before I ask you this 3rd grade question,
I am going to need a helper. Hm… got an idea, hold on. Oh my… Oh my gosh! Oh my gosh! Oh, no! I am afraid for my life right now. [laughing] Saya, would you like to come
say hello to my friend, Zigzag? Saya, our resident snake expert. I’m so scared right now. – Legitimately scared.
– It’s alright, it won’t bite you. I don’t believe you.