Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)


Hello everyone, this is a new antsite video In this episode we are going to rebuild an ant city. Keep watching until the end – i promise it will be super exciting… This is an old formicarium A thriving weaver ant colony lived in it before. You can saw this colony in some previous videos, or even personally on terraristic exhibitions. This colony lived 2, 2 and half year long in this formicarium. So the goal is to populate again this formicarium with a thriving ant colony. We have chance now to rebuild this system, so why don’t we upgrade a bit this whole formicarium to be more spectacular? You know i have plenty of creativity, so i find out a cylinder shape instead of the previous brick. This is more elegant and even more spectacular. Then I want something more in my mind.. If the weaver ants can get an own tower, why don’t they get an own city instead? This is the story how comes the idea to build an ant city. The structure build up from three different towers, with three outside gallery between them. There are three escape-prevent edge, and three openable ventilation grid on the top of the towers. There are more ventilation grids on two place at the sides, for the better breezing. There are many carcase laying on the floor of the old formicarium. Also can find tainted, unhatched larvae somewhere. The diameter of the biggest cylinder was planned for the size of the old bonsai tree. Meanwhile we get a big family of weaver ants so they will move into the new place. You can see what a massive nest they built in their previous home. They weaved almost everything for nest in the left formicarium, and there are many of workers in the left formicarium also. The ant city looks much amazing after the furnish. The old bonsai tree also looks epic in it, and i put another, smaller bonsai tree inside. Ants can hide between it’s roots. The ant city looks like a real metropolis after the ants have moved in. Every ants working on it’s own task busily. Some of them are building new home and others throwing out the garbage from the old nest. Every ants run fast to their work on the busy trails. After the settlement the ants moved in the old nest at the top of the tree immediately, and they start to throwing out the old larvaes and garbage from it. I didn’t record video from the settlement, because I have put them through almost one by one during an afternoon. It wasn’t too interesting for a video you can believe. An now let’s see the freshly building new nest. One day after the settlement some ants gathered spectacularly between the roots. At that time we could guess what they planning, and a few times later the first strings just appear. The ants just start to weaving their new nest. Catch their larvae in their mouth and working busy on the building operations, so they pass so much with the building on the first day! A few days later the new nest starts to equal to it’s final form. The walls became more stronger as the ants wave more and more layers on it. They use every kind of building material, this reason there are black and green threads in the walls which comes from the fake grass which covers the floor. Meanwhile they start to renew the old nest at the top of the tree. They have repaired the entrances, and they start to build together the nest with the wall of the cylinder. Can see well the fresh silks with brighter color than the old weaves. We can see inside the nest through the formicarium wall. There are many of workers and larvae working hard inside. That workers who don’t work, they guarding in a typical position on the most important strategy places. Sometimes we can notice winged males (drones) in the colony. The smallest, sloping tower still empty, because I give them food and water here. I put a test tube with full of water here, and they start to use it ardently. Hopefully they won’t drown in the open water, if this happens i have to find out another method for watering. There is a build in thermometer at the side of the formicarium. The back of the thermometer have to cover with grid, to avoid them to move inside it. Those areas where the ants feel the ventilation of the air, they try to discover new places. They stick out their antennae often through the dish to find out what is at the other side. A few workers waiting standby on the only door where no any escape-prevent oil around. But don’t worry, i never open this door. If they thirsty or hungry many workers start to raiding in their territory to find food or water. But of course their activity depends from the temperature and light also, in cooler temperature they goes inside the nest instead. And it seems they try to reach the lighter places – i think this could be some escaping instinct. It is such a catching sight, as these tiny insects organizing their society and living their everyday. We can admire them for hours, and can observe more and more interesting ant-things, but unfortunately our video is ending now, hope see you again next time! Don’t forget to like, subscribe and hit the 🔔 icon to get notifications for our new videos! 🙂

NATURE | Silence of the Bees | Inside the Hive | PBS

NATURE | Silence of the Bees | Inside the Hive | PBS


A Healthy hive of honey bees functions like a perfect and fluid organism at the center of all activity is the queen an Egg-laying machine the queen is actually a slave to her duties laying up to [2500] eggs a day as many as 2 million in her lifetime The worker bees are all female and make up the bulk of the colony In a typical hive of 30,000 bees only about 100 of males called drones with oversized eyes and bulky bodies drones are not equipped to Gather Pollen or nectar and must rely on the workers to feed them the [invaluable] work bees. Do takes its toll in the summer workers only live around 30 days Literally worked to death But the hive is constantly replenished with new generations of beans ready to go to work from the moment they hatch When [abby] is three weeks old [she] becomes a forager and will spend the rest of her short life collecting nectar and Pollen She will fly up to three miles away, and amazingly always return to the same hive when she discovers an abundant pollen source she’ll recruit other foragers through a most unusual form of communication a dance She informs the other bees that food is [available] and [that] food is in such and such a Direction from the hive and is at such and such a distance away from the hive and those pieces of information Distance and Direction are encoded symbolically in movements and sounds that she produces Turn right at 100 feet take a left at 50 feet The Waggle Dance is the only known symbolic language that exists outside the realm of humans and lower primates? There’s really nothing that compares to the dance language of the honeybee it stands as one of the seven [wonders] of the animal Behavior world

What If Ants Were 10ft Tall?


Ants. Creepy little soil dwellers that will march
into your home if you aren’t careful. There are …. Wait for it…. ten trillion ants on earth…. So….what if they were bigger than humans. Hello and welcome back to Life’s Biggest
Questions, the channel that loves a good old fashioned piece of fanciful pondering! I am your host, Rebecca Felgate, and today
I am asking WHAT IF ANTS were 10ft Tall? Crikey. Before we get into this video, why don’t
you let me know your feelings on ants. Spill tea…although don’t drop the sugar
cube as those ants will be marching away with it. Also while you are down there letting me know
if you’re an ant murderer or not, why don’t you also leave a big beautiful thumbs up on
this video and share it with a friend. Also check out the links in the description
to all of the people that went into making this video and of course stick around to the
end where I will be reading comments from a previous video. ANTS. Now is your last chance to start playing the
game where you count how many times I say Ants in this video. Ready. ANTS. Ants are roughly 1-3 millimetres in length…wee
little buddies. Your average black garden ant, the common
ant, Is around 3 millimetres, with bigger workers reaching 5 millimetres and Queen ants
reaching 6-9 millimetres. The BIGGEST ants in the world are currently
BULLET ants…. Which are about as fun as they sound… These absolute menaces are 3-4 CENTIMETRES
in length, so ten times the size of your average garden ant, anddddd they sting. A sting from a regular sized bullet ant can
last 48 hours. Right right rightttt…. Also, in general, ants are HELLA STRONG. A common ant can lift 1,000 times their weight. This is the equivalent of a human of being
able to lift 75 US Tons, which is the weight of about 12 elephants…or very roughly the
weight of a space shuttle. Soooo, circling back to the whole 10 ft thing…. 10 ft is roughly 3 metres. 3 metres is 1 thousand times the size of a
regular ant…which makes me VERY NERVOUS. Are we going to scale here, too? If regular ants are 10 feet tall, regular
queens would be roughly 20-29 feet tall….and BULLET ANTS would be 98 feet tall and I just
want to cry! Like… many things to say here, but first
thing is first – your garden is about to get WAY MORE CROWDED! Regular garden ant colonies are around 7,000
ants strong…. But they can get as big as 40,000 ants…. Which….AH! Stress! The whole blooming world is going to get far
more crowed. We will be outnumber by giant ants twice our
size 7.5 billion to 10 trillion! That means, if my at times dubious mathematics
serves me correctly, there will be 1 thousand 333 ants to every human. They will be bigger than us, they will be
stronger than us… and… well… they will probably eat us. Ants are omnivores, they will eat plants and
they will eat bugs… right now they are happy to fight little spiders and eat bugs their
size, so they wont worry about us. The Giant Garden ants aren’t event reeealllly
the issue. There are 12,000 varieties of ants and you
don’t want to meet them. YO SOME ANTS CAN FLY AND SOME ANTS CAN STING. Let me tell you about a couple that are already
horrifying before you factor in the whole thousand times bigger thing…. Urrrm FIRE ants… winner winner, honey is
a stinger…we already talked about the dastardly bullet ants… but the real concern is the
BULLDOG ant… the most dangerous ant in the world, official – These can already kill
adults with their venomous bites, soo…you have no chance against one 1000 times bigger
than reg! These live on the coast of Australia, so Ozzie
baes, you better start your antpocalypse plans now, should these red devils mutate! Basically, what we are looking at with 10
ft and taller ants are new apex predators. Maybe they will be the ones pouring hot water
on our homes to get rid of us when we become pests….although… the lack of opposable
thumbs and a prior knowledge of electrical appliances may make that difficult. None the less, ants have existed for around
120 million years. They are a much older species than us humans. 10 ft tall ants would take over the world
with their colonies… imagine the state of the earth with giant ants digging it up. Chaos! The only defence we can hope for is seeking
out each colonies queens and killing them, for we know that the colony falls if the queen
dies…..eventually anyway. BUT getting to her, well, outnumbered as we
are, it would be very hard. It isn’t just humans who are totally screwed
by the existence of giant ants, the food chain would be all off! Ants provide the food source for a lot of
other species in the food chain. Birds would go hungry…. Maybe they will be ant food ….cause…hate
to break it to you, some ants can fly. Listen, I am abouts done with this absolute
horror express of a video, are you? 10 ft ants would be a nightmare land. I’d love to watch a movie about it, I would
absolutely hate to live it. So lets move on with our lives. Thaaanks. Do leave a thumbs up on this video, though. I know Stephen Spielberg is a big fan of life’s
biggest questions, so maybe the like ratio will encourage him to create REVENGE of the
FIRE ANTS… you can have that one for free, Steve… if I can have a starring role that
is! Comments from What if We Stopped Blinking:
Michael Diaz Said: I Couldn’t Stop Blinking Or Stop Think About
Blinking While Watching This Video Idk Why Quazar said:
What if people stopped stealing art? Then there would be no art – art is inspired
by something that already exists in form or concept, and a lot of art, some of the best
art, is created in response to other art. That is like asking….what if we stopped
using the same words as one another? Maci May said: y eyes look like honey in the
sunlight and dark brown in the dark

Honey Bees Bearding On Bee Hive Thermal Imaging FLIR C2 Hive Temperature


okay so today we have some more fun and
interesting stuff to do what I’m going to do is look at these beads and we’re
seeing bees actually bearded and mass on the outside of our beehives and this is
happening all over the apiary now we have cold mornings and we have an
abundance of bees in the work force in these colonies so what they do is they
forage out through the day they’re bringing in so much nectar and so many
resources that the workforce actually moves outside the hive and collects on
the side if you notice on the landing board here – that’s what’s called
bearding when they hang and collect underneath the energy level of these
bees is very low when they’re on the outside and the reason is because they
want to conserve their resources and here at the landing board at this
reducer you’ll notice that these bees are just Fanning their wings as fast as
they can and that’s because of humidity levels inside the hive are extremely
high right now as is the heat speaking of heat look at this thermal image of
the landing board and you can see that that lightest color dead center is the
vent to the hive and you’ll see that they are sending out temperatures that
go all the way up into the 80s while if you look at the right-hand scale here
there are portions in the field of view here that are down to 40 and even 39
degrees so it’s a cold day out there now what’s the temperature of the bees that
are collected on the outside and are all of their bodies the same temperature
well we’re gonna find out with this thermal imager all the way up to 84.2 now at the sensor
in the dead center of the field of view there this is just a close-up of the bees
beating on the landing board of course as I mentioned before now this is the
eastern side and what we have going on here notice their outstretched fore
limbs as they cling to that telescoping top what happens is once they lock their
little feet on there they’re using almost no energy
it’s a latching mechanism that’s in the design of the bee’s feet that once
they hook into something they can hold on without expending energy to do that
so now we’re gonna take a look first of all this is a couple inches thick and
the bees are just heavy-duty out here and we’re gonna also take a look
thermally at whether or not all of these bees have the same temperature and
they’re using the same energy at the same time there’s a lot of bees I don’t
know what’s going on this year but this fall all of my hives have generated huge
numbers of workers and they’re bringing in nectar at an incredible rate but
let’s see the thermal image now look at this the dark purple and blue areas of
course are the colder beats all the way down to 60 61 degrees and you’ll notice
if you look at the scale to the right on this screen it says 82 83 so then some
of these hot spots some of the warmer bees that are active actually have
a body temperature at temps in the 80s so this is really interesting to look at
those that are conserving and of course it’s early morning so these bees are
waking up and starting to move and this is the east side so it’s going to get
the sunlight first but it’s very interesting to be able to look at these
with a thermal image and see that there are hot bodied bees in this group and
others that are still virtually dormant and they’re allowing their body
temperatures to get down to 60 or 59 58 degrees in order to conserve energy on
the outside of the hive and again that upper left temperature
that’s bobbing around 71 degrees 73 76 those are the temperatures at the circle
in the dead center of the field of view here and of course the background temperature
is 46 degrees so it’s a cold morning now this is a valuable tool because we can
look at beehives in the apiary and look at the hot spots we can tell
which hive bodies are occupied and generating the most heat and of course
the more bees the more heat they’re generating and again they’ve collected
on the outside of the hives because it’s actually too hot inside and the humidity
levels are too high so they’re getting the air out and of course there’s a
yellowjacket trying to get in unsuccessfully a look again this is
another hive look at the number of bees that are collected on the outside it’s
too hot and it’s too humid inside these are field bees and again the venting
that’s coming out is in the 80s but we’re gonna look at the body
temperatures and see that there are heater bees and those that are remaining
cool in the morning air and just look at the little hotspots moving around here
it’s very interesting to have this tool and again if you look up or right on the
scale some of these hotspots are up to 93 degrees and this is on the outside of
the hive in a morning where the temperatures in the high 30s low 40s that’s something I want you to notice
when you see the bees moving around and then you see the yellow dot that appears
showing their temperature which is offset from the physical parameters of
the bee that’s because this camera uses parallax lensing one of the lenses is
the lower well one of the lenses shoots lower and that is just for the image
and then the lower lens on the camera is offset a little so it gathers heat or
shows the heat print and that’s why you see the bees moving off to the left here
and then the yellow dots above them we have two lenses at play here to give us
this compound image that we’re looking at but what a great tool we’re going to
be able to look at our hives and immediately know number one if they’re
occupied number two how strong the hive is and how much temperature elevation is
occurring at the entry board and at that reducer so we’re going to know that the
bees are doing well inside or not and this is a front and I’ll of course show
you the camera because I’m you’re probably dying to know this is a FLIR c2
and it’s a handheld self-contained thermal imaging camera it can also take
normal pictures if you look at the front here the upper lens is for the normal
picture capture and the lower larger diameter lens is the thermal imaging
lens also off to the side there you see that it has a light built into it for
flash or for a constant light so that you can see what it is you’re looking at
the camera does not collect video on its own
it only collects still images so I made the video by running another camera up
against the screen so that we can get a live view of what’s going on with these
honeybees but I’m just beginning to explore all the different things I’m
going to be able to do with this little c2 camera center button on top is for
taking the still picture and that’s the on/off button this thing goes in your
pocket it’s pretty heavy-duty the way it’s made it has a nice bumper built
around it and I’m super happy with it the weather is about to turn it’s gonna
get bad winters gonna come in the bees are going to need that pollen for the
protein to grow and develop and they’re also going to be needing to bring in as
much nectar as they can before winter arrives full force I hope you enjoyed
this video and I hope that you got something out of it
thermal imaging is going to be a terrific tool for me here in my apiary
as we learn more about the honeybees and their energy consumption thanks as
always for watching

Bee Colony Collapse : animated music video : MrWeebl


Bees flying around pollinating flowers
For hours and hours and hours Then it’s back to the hive
Where they’re suddenly All dead
All dead All the bees are dead
Who’s to blame for this lack of bees? It’s not going to be good for you or me
Oh no, no, no I blame Jason Statham He’s in your flower filled fields
Punching bee with his mighty mighty fists Oi!
Where’s my jam tart? Not a single bee is ever missed He’s getting into his transporter car He’s spotted the queen bee from afar
She’s flying higher and higher Statham does flips his car off a train and
a crane Flies into the queen bee
Destroys her brain Does a sweet flip
Lands on top of a plane Does a few more stunts
Calls a few bees ***** As he grind the bodies of their friends and
families to dust Sausage Nigels.

BEEHAVE: the honey bee colony model


BEEHAVE is a computer model that simulates
a honey been colony on the basis of daily time steps . It shows the dynamics of the
single honey bee colony and the foraging activities of the bees, so how much nectar and pollen
they collect from the landscape, but it also includes the dynamics of varroa mites and
it can address different conditions of weather and food availability in the landscape. So first you have to define the start conditions
of the simulation. For example you would choose the default setting and then you can add the
varroa mites and the beekeeper and press ‘set up’ and run the model. The main window shows the colony dynamics
each bar represents a cohort of bees. So for example you have the blue bars which represent
eggs, yellow bars represent larvae and brown bars represent kept brood; the orange bars
represents the in-hive workers, and foragers are shown as these little bees on top of the
window moving to the right as they are getting older. You can also see two flowers and green one
and a red one and they represent the food patches. You can define the food provided
at these patches in the green boxes on the right side for example you can define the
quantity of nectar they provide on each day, the sugar concentration of the nectar, the
pollen and the distance to the hive. The sun and the cloud show the weather today
and the two arrows indicate how pollen and honey stores have changed today. So the whole video presents a single year.
In the plot of the colony structure you can see that they start with about 10,000 bees
then it goes down in the late winter, early spring, then the colony size increases for
each of its maximum in summer and then declines again during autumn and winter. You can also see the number of varroa mites
in the mite plot. The varroa mites are parasites that transmit viruses that can affect the
bee health which means that bees have a reduced life span and an increased mortality, and
you can see that the number of mites is dramatically increasing but then when the bee keepers start
to treat against the mites you see that they are declining and almost all mites have gone
at the end of the treatment. You can also see the plot with the stores
in the hive, for example the honey stores and the pollen stores; we can also stimulate
how forage availability in the landscape interacts with the presence of the varroa mites, and
we see that at least to some degree improved forage availability in the landscape can mitigate
the impact of varroa mites. The advantage of a model is that we can create
new hypotheses to test what we can do in the field studies, models are cheap to produce
and quick to run. The BEEHAVE model can be used by scientists and researchers but it
can also be used by anyone interested in honeybees and especially beekeepers. Honeybees play an important role not only
because they produce honey but mainly because they are important pollinators. So we will keep on working with the BEEHAVE
model and address all sorts of questions. For example how the landscape and the food
availability in the landscape will effect colony dynamics, and also how pesticides might
affect the colony dynamics.

Honey bees – Natural History 1

Honey bees – Natural History 1


Honey bees are social insects in the family
Apidae, order Hymenoptera. The most important species to humans is Apis millifera, the honey
bee. Honey bees live in colonies or bee hives. Bees have two pairs of wings and compound
eyes. Beekeepers make hives for the bees out of
straw, pottery, or wooden boxes. Wild bees make their hives in hollow trees
or logs or sometimes under the eaves of houses. Worker bees stand guard at the entrance of
the hive, keeping out bees from other hives. Honey bees protect their hive by stinging
intruders. Bees communicate with each other with pheromones.
Pheromones are body chemicals that allow bees and other animals to talk to each other by
smell. Bees smell pheromones and other scents with their antennae and can tell whether a
bee is from the same hive, a worker, a queen bee, or is warning about danger.
Bees can fight most honey robbers like skunks, bears, and wasps who come to raid the hive.
When a honey bee stings, the barbs on the stinger get stuck in the victim, and the stinger
is pulled out of the bee’s body. The bee dies shortly after stinging. Queen bees however
can sting many times and can pull their stinger out of the victim’s skin.
The honeycombs inside the hive are made up of small boxes called cells. The cells are
six-sided or hexagons. They are tilted so that the honey does not flow out. All the
cells together make up the comb. The comb is made from wax that bees make with their
wax glands. The wax comes out from openings on the underside of the bee’s abdomen.
Bees forage thousands of flowers a day to gather nectar and pollen.
Nectar and pollen are food for bees. Pollen is sometimes called bee bread. Nectar is a
sweet liquid found inside flowers. The bee laps and sucks up nectar with her tube-like
tongue and stores it in her honey stomach. The female worker bees make honey from nectar
in the bee hive. Bees eat this honey in the winter when there is no food available from
flowers. It takes more than 5,000 flower visits to
make one teaspoon of honey. Honey bees also gather pollen grains from
each flower they visit. The bee uses her hind legs to scrape off the pollen grains stuck
to its abdomen and then presses them into the pollen basket on the hind leg.
While gathering pollen, the honey bee also pollinates flowers as she accidentally carries
pollen from flower to flower. When a pollen grain combines with a flower
egg cell inside the flower, a seed begins to grow. Bees pollinate many crop plants—plants
that give us food like oranges, apples and watermelons.