Get the Best Pollination in Your Garden with a Bumble Bee Nest


Alright, this is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com.
Today we have another exciting episode for you, and it’s about a bee that you guys
don’t often hear about. I mean, it was a bee that I heard a lot about when I was a
kid because it was like a theme song on TV back in the day. [singing] “Bum-bum-bumblebee,
Bumblebee Tuna!” Now, I don’t know what bumblebees have to do with tuna, other than
being like a cutesy-putesy branding issue. Bees has nothing to do with fish, that I can
think of. I think a better song would be [singing] “Bum-bum-bumblebee, Bumblebee Pollinator!”
because bumblebees are probably a really good pollinator for your garden, and they’re
not often talked about. Honeybees are much more favored in home gardening, because they
produce something that we can use or—in some people’s minds—steal from them. And
I’m all for sustainably harvesting honey that your bees produce on your farm or in
your garden, if you don’t steal or take too much from the bees. Because after all,
bees are not necessarily making it for us, they’re making it for themselves so they
can get through the winter. Many commercial farmers and big beekeepers,
honey equals dollars signs in their eyes, and they’ll steal or take all the honey
out and sell it and feed the bees sugar water or corn syrup water, which is really horrible.
Because in many cases, the sugar or corn syrup may be derived from GMOs, and I don’t want
to be feeding bees any kind of GMO materials. I want them to eat their natural food, which
is naturally they eat the pollen and the nectar out of the plants.
Today I have this cool poster I got thanks to my local—I don’t know…conservancy
agency. And it’s actually called Join the Conversation about Native Bees. This is a
cool poster about all the different native bees in this area. And if you go over them,
there’s the sweat bee, the oil bee, squash bee, impatient bumblebee, blue orchard bee,
yellow-faced bee, valley carpenter bee, Morrison’s bumblebee, Easter carpenter bee, yellow-faced
bumblebee, leafcutter bee, digger bee, wandering cuckoo bee—thank god I’m not one of those—and
a sweat bee. And it’s the bumblebees that, you know, can help pollinate your crops.
Unlike honeybees, that have a shorter, kind of like…I’ll call it a snout, but I know
it’s not a snout. I’m not an entomologist or bee-ologist or that sort of thing, so…cut
me some slack if you’re one of those guys. But basically the bumblebees have a longer
snout so they can get in flowers that are a lot deeper and thinner unlike the honeybees.
So the honeybees will only be effective on pollinating certain crops, where the bumblebees
will have a larger range of crops they can pollinate, including things like natives and
some of the common vegetables that you might be growing at your farm or your garden. So,
yeah, very important to support a hedgerow, if you do have a hedgerow, and I do believe
in hedgerow gardening or farming if you have acreage. You definitely want to have some
hedgerows and you definitely want to have some bumblebees to keep the whole system going.
Because they are part of the ecosystem, and much like standard honeybees, they are getting
wiped out due to territory loss, and moth infestations and mites and other things caused
by humans. So, you know, in this episode, what I’m
gonna do for you guys is actually—I got a hive. I got a bumblebee hive. I had a honeybee
hive last year, and the honeybee hive, because it was a non-matched queen with some workers
that were just some random workers that this beekeeper threw together for me. They didn’t
take and they all flew away, so I didn’t end up with any honeybees to pollinate. But
now I’m glad to say that I have a bumblebee colony now, and you’re gonna get to see
that in a second. And this is a matched set. So the queen made all the bumblebees in there—and
I want to go over a few differences between the honeybees and the bumblebees.
Because to most people, a bee is a bee is a bee, right. Well, no. number one, there’s
like all different kinds of different bees, and bees are not simply bees. The honeybee
is basically a little bit more smoother and has some hair on it. But the bumblebees more
kind of furry. And the other thing is that the honeybees may have a large colony. So
they may have fifty thousand bees in one colony, and the bumblebees may have a much smaller
colony, maybe fifty to four hundred bees. So this is much less bees. In addition, honeybees
can live up to like three years, and the bumblebees will live maybe up to a year for the queens.
The other workers and drones and females and males will not live quite as long.
Another thing about the bumblebees is, yes, they do sting, but unlike Africanized honeybees
that are like aggressive and they’re gonna get you, like the dude’s all in your face
like maybe the bully in high school, the bumblebees are like Bruce Lee. He’s not really gonna
mess with you unless you get him, and then they’re gonna mess you up! So they’re
more defensive. So if you go in their hive, get in their way, and then you’re trying
to swat them and they get pissed off, then they’re gonna go after you. other than that,
they’re pretty—I don’t want to say docile because they are a wild creature in the world,
and they gonna protect their stuff the best they can, but they’re much more calm than
the honeybees that have much more at stake, honey in their hive. Since also the bumblebees
produce a kind of honey, but they don’t produce nearly enough for anybody to harvest
from, they just produce enough for themselves, and it’s actually more of a nectar kind
of thing that they put off in little pots inside their hive, which I’m actually gonna
get to show you guys. It’s really cool. And the honeybees, of course, just make mounds
and mounds and mounds and mounds of extra honey.
But I think they all have a benefit. I think you should have any kind of bees, any kind
of pollinators. Attract them to your place. If you can’t attract them, you don’t have
them, well then bring them in. because I do think it is very helpful. So anyways, let’s
go ahead and go outside, because it is the evening, before it gets too dark. And I’m
gonna go ahead and release my bumblebees and show you guys the cool hive setup I got.
So now we’re in the garden, and the evening time is the best time to release your bees
into the nature. And this is a little box I got with the bees. And I don’t want to
tip this up, because it shouldn’t be tipped over or tipped sideways. You’ll kind of
disorient the bees, and that’s not really cool. But I do want to show you inside, because
in this box, it came with a lid. You take off the lid and they have a clear panel, which
is super cool, so you can kind have like look in there and see what’s going on. This is
completely amazing, although if you listen, it’s like buzzing, and it’s actually kind
of scary. So let me go ahead and bring the camera and do a close-up for your guys.
Alright, so here’s the top of the box, and as you guys can see, it has a clear Plexiglas
window. And this is really cool, man. I mean, these are the bumblebees, these are not the
honeybees, and what they do is they make these little honeypots. I don’t think that’s
what Winnie the Pooh ate when he had pots of honey. But if you look, this is not a honeycomb,
these are actually just honey pots. And they actually store the nectar in there. Let’s
see if we can actually see the queen around in there. Basically we see all the worker
bees around in there, and I’m not really seeing the queen right now. The queen is actually
significantly larger than the workers. And lucky for me, on the front of this box,
there’s the little hatch right here, with the little slider thing that you can pull
up and let them free when you’re ready. Now this box should not necessarily be put
outdoors. They may have a better top and maybe a wax cardboard box for outdoor use, so I
do recommend you guys purchase a hive with this, or a home for the bumblebees. So let
me go ahead and next show you guys the cool hive or villa that I got for my bumblebees.
So now I’m gonna get to share with you guys my cool hive that I got for my bees. Now,
normally the bumblebees might live in a hole or something in the ground, but I’m glad
that I got a hive to put them in so it’s basically a safe place for them to stay. You
could leave them in the box, but I do recommend you guys get a proper hive, because there’s
gonna be a much higher chance and higher probability of your bees surviving and living. And my
whole purpose in having the bees is to get and help my plants to pollinate. So the bumblebees
will pollinate things like the tomatoes, like the aborigines—and if you guys don’t know
what an aborigine is and I might be saying it wrong, it’s an eggplant—the peppers,
and even things like strawberries. They can be helpful with pollinating those crops. So
I am growing those in my garden—actually, I’m not growing strawberries. So hopefully
my yields go up dramatically this year because of my bumblebees. Hopefully also they’ll
pollinate my cucumbers. I’m not sure if they deal with harvest—pollinate cucumbers
or not. Maybe they’ll like them, or they won’t, I have no idea. But hopefully also,
my yields on my cucumbers will go up too, and that’ll be completely amazing.
So the hive I got is actually called the Beepol Villa, and that’s actually from the UK,
it’s actually called DragonFli—D-R-A-G-O-N-F-L-I.co.uk. They were over at the recent trade show looking
for a distributor in the US, so I was actually glad to get a sample from them. But if you
are in the US and looking to distribute these awesome FSC certified wood hives, which nice
copper tops—I mean, they’ve taken some time to make this really nice, and I’m sure
this will last for many years to come. And basically, one of the cool things is it even
has a little door. I don’t know if you guys can see that little door opening and closing,
but that door is there to prevent intruders—INTRUDER ALERT! INTRUDER ALERT!…alright, if you remember
that video game, post it down below. I don’t know how many of you guys will get that one—but
it’s there to prevent intruders, like the wax moth that will actually get inside, and
the wax moth will get in there and lay eggs, and the larvae will hatch and basically they’ll
eat all the nectar and the bees and all this kind of stuff. So it’s really not good,
so they have this to help deter the wax moth. There are other things you can do to deter
the wax moth, like make a bait trap out of some sugar water, banana peel, and vinegar
and hang it in a tree. And you can also grow some other kind of nice, fragrant herbs near
the opening of the villa here to deter the wax moth, because they don’t like heavy,
strong smells. So how this works, this is super simple, super
easy. Easiest hive ever to set up. We’re just gonna go ahead an open this guy up, and
it’s just hinged on there. Gonna go ahead and take this box right in there. Lift it
up, including that little opening, and make sure that opening is oriented toward the front.
And be very careful with your bees, man! Don’t be shaking these guys up! They’ve had a
hard time, whether they came shipped to you or you transport them in a car or whatever.
So try to be as gentle as possible, because when you shake them up, there’s an excess
of movement, right, they’re gonna get riled up and they’re not gonna be—Oh!—too
happy… Wow, I just dropped them by accident, but
I want you guys to hear what they’re doing now. Look at that, they’re all riled up,
they’re making that bee noise, and this is when if it was open, then might try to
like attack me or something. Because I’m disturbing them, right! I’m disturbing the
peace! It’s like your neighbors at like midnight and they’re playing their rock
music. You’re pissed! Right now, these guys are not too happy, and this is when they might
sting. And normally, they’re pretty calm, they’re pretty quiet and they’re not gonna
be too angry at you. So as long as you respect the bumblebees,
they’ll respect you. And that’s what it’s about, right. We want to respect the younger
generation nowadays, because if we don’t, they’ll be saying “Watchu lookin’ at,
Willis??” We want to respect the older generation, we want to respect all the animals and plants
and creatures of the earth, including the bumblebees. Because if you don’t, and you
do what I did like drop them in a few inches because I couldn’t get my hands in there
properly, they’re gonna get upset and that’s disrespecting. So, yo, sorry I disrespected
you guys. No harm, no foul. …I mean, I don’t think they understand English, but they’re
probably still a little bit upset about be dropping them in there.
But hopefully, pretty soon they’re gonna forget about this, because I’m gonna go
ahead and put this in the back of my yard, in a nice shaded area. Super important, don’t
put them in full sun, don’t put them in a place that’s super windy. Put them in
a place that when they get out of here and step on the ledge, they have a nice flight
path. So it’s not like blocking in a wall or anything. You want to give a nice flight
path. Because just like when you’re at the airport and the airplane’s taking off, it
can’t just take off and go up like a helicopter, right, they got to kinda buzz off and go gradually.
So I’m gonna go ahead and put it in the back of the yard that doesn’t get disturbed
by me or anything. And it’s gonna be up off the ground so my little dog, Ogely, isn’t
gonna disturb the bees and the bees aren’t gonna disturb him. When I did have the honeybees,
some of them may have been Africanized and I was a little bit concerned for Ogely, because
he’s a little black dog. And small, black dogs look like honey badgers to the bees,
so they might swarm them and attack them. But with the bumblebees, as long as Ogely’s
not trying to get in the hive and mess with them, which he surely will not because he
can’t even get up to it, they’re not gonna mess with him. So that’s why I like them,
plus they’re gonna increase the pollination of the crops I’m growing.
So I want to encourage you guys to pick up some bumblebees. Because most gardeners talk
about the honeybees, and the bumblebees have been forgotten. There are actually over two
dozen varieties of native bumblebees that are probably native to your area. And they’re
disappearing like every other wildlife creature it. And once again, these are wild bees and,
yes, they do sting. So unlike standard honeybees that can sting one, their stinger comes out
in you—the bumblebees, actually, the stinger does not come out. But only the females and
the queens can sting you. But they can sting you multiple times if they’re pissed off.
And the males don’t sting. But once again, they’re pretty calm compared to standard
honeybees, and way calmer compared to Africanized honeybees, and they’re not really gonna
mess with you unless you mess with them, or you disrespect them.
Like now? Wow, it’s completely silent in there. They’re just back to their job, the
threat is over, you know, me dropping them, and they chilled out. And that was relatively
quick, just in the time I’ve talked—and trust me, I’m kinda loud! So they’re hearing
me talk, but they’re still cool with it. Alright, guys, sorry for the disrespect. Glad
you’re calmed down now. And now I’m gonna go ahead and open your hive and set you guys
up so that you can harvest some of the best nectar and pollen here in Las Vegas from my
high quality backyard garden. Alright, so now I’m gonna go ahead and head
to the back, and basically pull this little lever here, and when you pull the little lever,
it opens it up. You can actually just take out the lever, and basically they’re still
gonna have a little cardboard like jail cell thing they’re gonna have to bite through
to get out. So you pull it, and they’re not gonna instantly come out as you. they’re
gonna bite through that, they’re gonna smell their new place, they’re gonna smell all
the pollen around, and they’re gonna go to town on some of the flowers I currently
got in season. I got things like the onions, and I got some cool like sage flowers—oh
man, cool!—my gynura procums are gonna flower. Some lettuce flower’s happening, some pansies,
like over a hundred peppers in my garden right now. At least several dozen tomato plants.
And all on the black wall—I don’t know if you guys can see that—little yellow flowers,
those area all cucumber flowers as well. I got those zucchini flowers. So this is gonna
be a wealth a pollen for these guys, and I’m glad I can help them out. And at the same
time, they’re helping me out. And I think, as creatures on this earth, because
that’s what we are—you know, some people may think of us as the dominating species,
but we play a role in the ecosystem. We can destroy it, like most industrial agriculture
and farming and people are with chemicals and pesticides, or we can help to regenerate
it by having something and keeping something like the honeybees, bumblebees, or even encouraging
other kinds of bees, such as Mason bees that are solitary bees, with a Mason bee hive.
Now I’m gonna show you guys where I placed my bumblebee hive. And as you guys can see,
I got raised beds here, and I got my brand new peppers planted. Got some cucumbers and
squash over in that bed. This bed has some tomatoes, I got some ripe ones already, here
in May. And here’s the sugar snap peas still producing nicely with some go-go root and
some spinach now going to flower and seed. And I’ve decided to put the hive near the
back wall, and actually behind my overhang structure over here. And this is like a really
kind of shaded place, protect area so the bees can feel secure. As you guys can see,
I’m kind of going back here and these non-fruiting trees are set to come out, but I haven’t
had time to pull them out yet. I’m gonna replace them with fruit trees one of these
days, but that’s low on the list. But as you guys can see, down below, I have my top-bar
hive where the bees flew away, and they did not benefit me. And on the top, I have the
all new DargonFli hive with my bumblebees. So let me go ahead and set the tripod up and
go with you guys how to release these guys in the wild so that they can benefit you,
your garden, and nature and themselves at the same time.
Alright, so now that I got my bees in place, all I’m gonna have to go is just lift up
this top, which is conveniently hinged, and set it all the way up. And man, they’re
flying around in there. They’re making a little bit of noise. Probably not super happy
because I just moved them, and we’re just basically gonna go ahead and pull that little
plug out. It’s like a little trap door thing. Oh man, I can really hear them now. We’re
gonna pull this guy all the way out, and now my bumblebees have been freed. You are free,
my brothers! Alright, so they still have to actually work through a little cardboard thing
that they got to chew through, so they’re not just gonna come out and sting me, but
what you want to know is once you release them, I wouldn’t run like you just lit a
firecracker and you have to run and throw it away really fast. It’s gonna take them
some time. But you don’t want to necessarily be hanging out in the hive area. You want
to get this set up and make sure they have a nice flight path, and they will take out
and forage for their own food, help you pollinate your crops at the same time.
Now these bees, or bumblebees, are actually sourced from Michigan, although the company
that the hive is from is DraglonFli.co.uk that makes this awesome little hive here.
Optimally, I’d like to encourage everyone out there to get more native bees that are
more native to your area to put in your bumblebee box. Now, unfortunately, there’s probably
not a lot of native bumblebee beekeepers out there, so do the best you can and try to get
some bumblebees, because you’re gonna be helping them, they’re gonna be helping you,
and we can make the world a more resilient place by wanting to propagate and include
more species, more diversities in our garden, and help them with pollination, and also help
them lie and live a peaceful coexistence with us here on Earth, like it has been for millions
of years before all these chemical sprays and pesticides and forest destructions and
loss of habitat and subdivision development started occurring.
So my specific goal with these guys is, number one, they’re gonna help benefit me pollinate
my crops, so I’m gonna be eating more in my garden. But number two, super important
to me, I want to check in every once in a while with this closeable top—and a copper
top—they make it very easy, so I can just come back here, preferably in the evening
time when they’re kind of more mellow, and just open the top up and kind of look and
just make sure they’re alright and check in on them every once in a while. I doubt
I’m gonna be getting back here too often, but every once in a while to check them out,
make sure they’re doing alright. Because your health is in their hands, primarily.
So my main goal for having these guys, because the queen bee has a short, one-year lifespan,
and all the workers will basically be gone. But what will happen is the queen will lay
some eggs in the hive of future queens that will hatch the following year. And then those
queens won’t, unfortunately, live in the same hive. They’re gonna actually just come
out the hole and they’re gonna fly off somewhere and create a whole new hive somewhere else.
So this will propagate or encourage more of the native bumblebees in the environment,
which I think is greatly needed in this time and day here in America, and frankly any other
country, developed or undeveloped, in the world.
So I’m really glad to be having some bumblebees as my first bees that are gonna hopefully
be helping me out in the garden. And that’s what I like about gardening. The style of
gardening I teach is, you know, we’re not having to go around with a little toothbrush
shaker and pollinate your tomatoes like some of my cohorts may teach online, and they have
gadgets to do that, but I want nature, like the bumblebees, to go around and shake up
my tomatoes and pollinate things for me so that I don’t have to. That’s why I like
the organic gardening approach that I take. I have workers now of bumblebees that are
working for me for free, and I don’t have to pay them. They’re gonna work for their
food, which I’m providing for them greatly. I also have workers in my soil—so the beneficial
bacteria, the microbes, the mycorrhiza fungi, and maybe even some fungirls, and earthworms,
and beneficial nematodes and arthropods and all kinds of other cool things are in my soil,
breaking down the soil and making fertilizer for me. I mean, this is truly the way of earth,
truly the way of nature, and this is truly what I believe we should all start doing to
model nature and how it works to grow the healthiest, best crops on the entire planet
with the least amount of work. If you haven’t already, please subscribe
to my YouTube channel. I have over a thousand videos now on all aspects of gardening, including
pollination of the bumblebees now. Also be sure to check my past episodes. I have over
a thousand episodes, all different things, about gardening. And be sure to thumbs up
this video if you like this episode on the bumblebees. It’s getting dark, I’m getting
hungry, so I’m gonna go ahead and sign off and head inside and eat a nice dinner picked
from my garden tonight. So hope you guys enjoyed this episode. Once
again, my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com. We’ll see you next time, and until then,
remember, keep on growing.

Africanized Honey Bees Attack, Why do they do that? What should you do? Beekeeping Lesson


okay so first we just want to know you called me up and asked me to come over because your bees are behaving differently yes very aggressive and you have farm animals like the chicken that you’re holding we have chickens and pigs which looks like a barred Plymouth Rock oh yes okay and she’s been stung by the bees she’s been stung I don’t know how many times she was stung I had another one that was completely covered by them and you said you couldn’t even see what color the chicken was you can see the chicken hardly you could see her feet and that was about it okay and they are honeybees they were definitely honey do you know for sure if they’re bees from your own apiary we don’t know we assume they were okay but because we didn’t see any rogue swarms or anything right so we assumed they were okay now what other livestock do you have that you’re worried about right now we have also have pigs we have a mama baby three babies and a dad and the bees were just I mean you can see that literally looks like dots all over them from where the bees just were stinging them like crazy and some of your chickens are have died yeah these things some I have two that have died that I know of and there were a couple that were still out back that I couldn’t get to because the bees were still being a very aggressive okay so this one I could get to she was laying there with her head drooped down and I got her in the house made sure the bees were all off of her gave her some benadryl benadryl okay so did she show some swelling and some she able to walk on her own and walk just now starting to sit up okay she had a very droopy head she was laying off to her now was she outside when the bees went after her yes now your husband said that the hogs that you have the bees actually went in the hog shed yeah they were in the chicken we have the the chicken coop it’s like a dual-purpose building and they were in there they were covering the windows on the inside so bad you could hardly see out of them the bees were inside covering the windows because they’re trying to get out following the light yes okay and you yourself got afraid and you had to go inside the house right so even when your husband was outside they were did he get bees all over him about 50 times 50 times okay and he has not been to the beehives themselves to see which one might be hot no we haven’t been able to this is the first time we’ve actually been able to even get outside okay so now you want me to look at them so we’re kind of prepared to look at the bees and are you okay with if the bees you turn out to be extremely unreasonable let’s say are you okay with me exterminating your piece okay so we’re prepared we don’t use chemicals or anything on them what we’ll do is we’re doing all this video ahead of time because once we’re getting near the end of the day the sun’s starting to set and we expect the field bees the foragers to be heading back so we want them to have as much of the colony inside okay there was one just led by so that didn’t act like a guard that was just zipping by but if we pick up a guard we’re gonna seat up right away you’re obviously already covered I’m wearing a maximum protection BC and and so I’m ready to put a bag over them and I’ve brought honey bee healthy with me instead of smoke okay because it’s gonna do two things it’s gonna overdoes them with a scent which will prevent them from communicating their threat pheromone so my plan is once we approach the hives if they do start to respond in a hot way and we’ll know right away because it will get a disproportionate number of darts will come out and they won’t back off even if you walk away Africanized bees or bees that are really hot like that will follow you 100 yards or more they followed Scott down the road okay so you actually walk down the road kept going okay and that’s the other thing people need to know if you guppies Oliver you don’t run inside your house no just stand perfectly still and wait and it can take a half-hour or longer for them to calm down yeah he walk away because he was trying to get away because he had gotten stung so many times okay he was starting to panic a little bit he was worried he was gonna have an allergic reaction is he allergic to bees normally yes he took benadryl and passive right now he’s doing well he smokes out locally but he should not take a risk at all in other words if they come out and act angsty we are going to make sure he and and you guys will go inside for safety and I’ll just deal with it myself now the bees actually came into this building and then they were all clustered on the windows okay because they follow light so the bees would be trying to get out I see you’ve got some polish some maybe are those red comets and white leghorns and up here you’ve got your birth rock and we’re white leghorns and Americana over here which is people don’t know is the Easter egg chicken what color eggs is she laying like cream and most people want that baby blue and they’re not normally in this area right now did the chickens running on their own when the bees were after them like how did the chickens respond on we’ve got some eggs alright so now what kind of hogs do you have here these are American guineas American guineas and these are the young ones and the mother’s in the background there now who receives the most stings from the bees I think the mother okay now it’s his behavior right now normal for him or no so he would be up walking around so we have no idea how many stings he’s gotten and so did you do any preventive medication okay now that’s the problem – we have farm animals so we’ve got the Hogs here and most vets aren’t used to calls about hey my hog was stung about 100 bees so you don’t it’s not a medication you would have handy oh so you’ve just got them so even the young so these were okay where did you go okay so now do they raise this breed specific okay so now the young ones here are they normally laying around like this – or would they be up and active inactive when you’re here okay so it’s close to them so they’ve also we don’t know how many times I’ve been stung now can you do you know specifically where the stingers are actually they were in the ears but I see they have a lot of mud on their ears all right they were in the mud we tried to wash them off when the bees were attacking him without the hose well that was a good move washing them down with water okay and the other thing is it doesn’t help that your hogs are black no the bees if they’re hostile are ready or defensive they would certainly be threatened by black furry animals okay so now I’m gonna go and look at your beehive now that we have background on everything I’m gonna go and look at your colonies and see if I can solicit a defensive response from one of them and then we’ll know more about what the bees are doing and we’ll decide what to do about them from there does that sound good yeah okay okay so in the background offensive okay and you pass them how many years about two there been no changes in the bee population you have not reeked weaned no and here’s one be a zip and by which student back to ready so what I’m gonna do is we don’t know which one but we can see the freshly mowed path here so we know he mowed right in front of all right so as a tractor I’m guessing no return zero turn okay so a powered mower when it goes by vibrates the ground and the bees will respond to that vibration now which of the colonies would you consider to be your strongest and you’ve got a flow hive on the very end of that fill up this year okay we’re not talking about the FlowHive anymore I’m gonna edit that part out okay all right so what I’m gonna do is I’m gonna take the video camera with me and I’m gonna walk and stand directly in front of each colony we have not smoked them I have Honey B Healthy with me as my interrupter if I need it and if there’s a defensive response we’re gonna get it now that’s so and just for people that are looking at this that are on YouTube or whatever learning about these the wrong place to be at any bee hive is directly in front of the landing board so that’s where you’re in their way that’s where they’re doing their business if you want to visit bees and not antagonize them you stand to the side or to the back where you keep your distance I’m not gonna keep my distance because I haven’t gonna solicit a response cause we’re trying to find out who the culprits are that are attacking what we want sound good yeah okay okay so this is that’s normal landing board activity there tell me to go and listen to their wing sounds too – that’s a nice pink whose idea was that and you bought all these boxes for mann-lake is that right yeah okay okay now where did you come by that one and this is a very old box and what I want you to see on this one is that bees can chew the wood they can make their own exits these bees are kind of doing their own venting here and nobody cares and I’m standing here here’s a really populated one it’s painted red red is an angry color mm-hmm let’s get right down here and see if they care these bees don’t care now Africanized bees wouldn’t really let me get this close pretty normal landing board here down here we got an immediate response and these bees are behaving in a highly defensive manner response Guards are flying out and expanding the attack zone They are stinging the microphone and camera The other colonies are behaving normally and are non-defensive These are all normal and are not reacting to the orange hive behavior now they’re actually trying to dig into the windbuffer and openings They are so tenacious and are pressing into small openings The bees are all over the camera and the microphone The behavior is unprovoked we did not touch the hive and are being stung on the suit and gloves You can see more guards coming out from the hive and going after the camera, me and extending their defensive circle This colony in the orange hive is definitely the source of the earlier attacks. so now we’re gonna spray some honey-B-Healthy in there and see what happens see if we can distract them with sweets and pheromone Honey-B-Healthy will masque they’re defensive scent okay so I want you to look at this is the camera I’m using when I’m looking at the colonies up close it backed off a little bit but the bees are burying themselves in the microphone and they’re coming after the camera itself and they’re coming after me but we’re you know less than a hundred feet from the colonies and it’s a hot hive for sure probably have is there live stocks been injured their chickens are being killed and their bees have attacked their hogs so it’s no longer safe for those bees to be around and we have to change the stock we’re actually going to kill the entire colony entire colony and I’ll explain why later okay so now that we’re safe and sound back in our own neck of the woods here and back at my own backyard apiary I wanted to recap a little bit about what just happened or one of the caution people about being over sensational about African bees Africanized bees and just generally bee colonies that have become hot and unmanageable what happened at that farm is actually extremely rare in fact I don’t know of a single farmer or beekeeper in my part of the country that’s ever had to deal with honey bees that were so defensive that they started killing off livestock that’s a very a significant event but it’s a cautionary tale as well we don’t want people to overreact and begin rejecting honeybees from backyards all over the place because of the concern regarding how they could behave it’s highly unusual for bees to kill livestock but if you had bees in your apiary that get to the point where they’re so defensive that they’re coming after you and your pets and your livestock you have to personally be prepared to deal with those bees which may involve even killing them off now as it occurred here because they had livestock that were dead because if they had not had bee suits on it’s likely that they would have been at the very least a medical emergency it is very important to talk about the fact that you have to kill off bees like that and I don’t just mean hunt out the Queen and take her out of the scene I mean take the genetics out completely so you have to kill off the entire colony now how did I instruct them to do that I was going to stay and do it with them after nighttime so that when all the bees had come in they’d have maximum numbers in that colony I left them with 55-gallon black plastic trash bags and packaging tape the cellophane type that is airtight and they were confident that after it got dark they would wrap up that colony and seal it off so that the bees inside would fairly quickly suffocate they didn’t want to use any kind of poisons and I agree with that don’t use any kind of insecticide in a beehive and they wanted to get the honey and resources out of that colony and of course once the bees are gone they could recycle those resources to the other bees and their apiary so what happened there what’s going on those beets had been under their care for a couple of years in fact the colony that had the problem was calm up until now it had made it through winter which was a big deal because we had a significant winter last year so what’s going on well somewhere someone’s got genetics that are hot and those genetics branched out and affected that colony of bees I want to talk a little bit about Africanized bees now an Africanized bee is different from the African Killer Bee itself the African Killer Bee is a genetic line it is a species of bee the Africanized bees are those that have had genetics mixed with other genes of bees that were normally calm that have become overly defensive because of that interbreeding so that is why it’s very important to get those bees out of the genetic line in your area so there we’re gonna wrap them up kill the bees completely what if they kept just killed the Queen and left the drones in there well now the drones can carry those genetics to other bees in the area so that’s a no the other thing is what if they just kept the brood and strengthened some other colonies with that well the Brit that hatches out it has such genetics and would also be hot so when they graduated from being nurse bees and store keeper bees in the colony they ultimately would become the guards of that colony and you’d have a similar situation so you want to kill them all that’s just the way it is now the other thing is sometimes people will hear about colonies like this and use it as an argument to keep people from keeping backyard bees in urban areas or areas where there will be a lot of people I’d say the argument is actually for more people keeping manageable calm lines of bees because there are areas where bees are and if the Africanized bees are moving in they need to meet with resistance there need to already be colonies of bees of the type that you want present in the area and that creates a slower buffer zone for the progress of those Africanized bees Africanized bees are very different from other bees and one of the behaviors that they have is that a normal B colony when they’re going to reproduce they’ll generate a swarm and that means the old Queen will fly out and she’ll have a good number of the colony of bees with her and then the remaining bees in that colony will generate a new queen and then she’ll hatch and continue on in place some of the Africanized bees don’t do that when they send out their scouts to find other colonies to look into they may actually vacate the hive that they’re in completely so it’s not being superseded it’s not reclaiming they just move out in masse and they will do a hostile takeover of another bee colony that’s not as strong and then they just killed the Queen they move in and they assume all those resources including the bees that are already there they just take them over through strength and aggression so it’s a type of honeybee coup so the thing is you want to control the genetics as much as you can try not to work with hot hives somewhere around that farm there has to be some hot bee line now here’s the problem with beekeepers that don’t register some beekeepers are not friendly they don’t talk to other beekeepers they don’t want anybody to know about the bees are working with they don’t know what anyone to come and inspect their stuff so they don’t register and there are prone to sometimes work with bees that other people wouldn’t touch because some of these hotter hives some of these more defensive hives also may be super productive so you may be getting a lot of honey from them and for some people managing a colony of hot defense of bees doesn’t seem to bother them they just suit up and they’re well protected and they feel like they’re geographically isolated enough that that’s not a big deal well I’m here to tell you that it is a big deal because we want to exploit the good traits of the honeybees and part of that should be the honeybee behavior and how docile they are and how easily people will be able to manage them especially when it comes to a situation like this where the bees were coming out and actually killing I’ve stock these people were in bee suits and the husband had to actually go all the way down the road Africanized bees are so defensive they’ll chase you more than a thousand feet 1,500 feet 1,600 feet before they back off now my personal experience with their bees was that they are very hot hive I wouldn’t call him a five-alarm Africanized bee colony but let’s keep in mind they did attack the livestock they did kill their chickens and had these people not been in bee suits they could have been at the very least a medical emergency so it’s not to be taken lightly and you need to have an action plan hopefully so that if you ever encounter bees that are going to behave like this you need to be prepared to isolate those bees and take those genetics out it isn’t a time to try to salvage you know the resources that you can other than the honey and the comb and things like that take that by all means but when it comes to the livestock itself you need to take them out you need to kill them it doesn’t mean you hate bees that means you’re trying to protect the lines of bees that are favorable and they’re not threatening to people and livestock and you’re trying to deter those bees that are so defensive that it would actually kill something now to give you a quick recap about the family that had these bees those hot bees and that hive did last for several days wrapped up in that black plastic she wrote me several times saying that they thought that they were dead they couldn’t hear anything they figured you know they must be suffocated because it’s all sealed up and then they got to open it and there they boil out again and they were back in the situation so again I kept offering I will come and I’ll use co2 and knock them out and then we’ll really seal them up but they still feel confident that they’re gonna handle it on their own I do want to give you a recap too about the hogs that they had they’re back on their feet they’re doing okay other than the chickens that were killed the one that she was holding in her arm it’s you know they’re back to normal the chickens are back to normal their farm is good and other than that hive itself the other colonies are just fine so again thanks for watching this video please don’t over sensationalized offensive honey bees but I do also want you to be prepared to cope with these that may not behave in a way that’s safe for people and animals thanks for watching and look for links below for the suits that we wore that’s pretty much it you saw the cameras that I’m using I don’t see any need to market those but I’m sorry that you couldn’t hear a lot of my narrative when I was dealing with the bees they attacked the microphones they attacked the windscreens and they weren’t just trying to sting them they were trying to work into the scenes so they were really really intensely trying to get into every little opening so if you had had cuffed pants or if you didn’t have good seals around your whole bee suit those bees were definitely going to get in through all the seams because they intensified at all the contrast areas trying to work their way in so by no means were those normal behaving honeybees thanks for watching stay alert and I appreciate any comments that you have down below and I would be happy to discuss your observations thanks again

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Honey bees – Natural History 2

Honey bees – Natural History 2


Bees are called social insects because they
live and work together as a community. Thousands of female bees, called worker bees, live together
in a hive with a queen bee. The queen bee is marked with a red dot so we can see her
better. The worker bees are all females, but they
almost never lay eggs. Worker bees do almost all the chores in the hive. They gather pollen
or nectar, guard the entrance, clean the hive, build the comb, make honey, tend the queen,
and feed the larvae. They even fan the hive with their wings to keep it cool on a hot
summer day. The queen bee is larger than the worker bees.
She lays about a thousand eggs each day! Watch the worker bees attending to the queen bee
and feeding her. The worker bees touch and lick her as they tend to her needs. They get
a substance from the queen that they carry around the hive, and when they touch and lick
other bees, this substance, or pheromone, tells them that the queen bee is alive and
well. Then all the worker bees keep doing their jobs. The queen bee walks from cell
to cell to lay a small white egg in each one. She lays all the eggs.
Inside the cells, the eggs hatch into larvae or grubs. The workers take care of all the
larvae, which include several queen bee larvae. The worker bees take pollen mixed with honey
to feed them. The larvae eat a lot, but the pupae do not
eat at all. When the larvae are ready to turn into pupae, the worker bees close off the
cell with wax. Inside, the grubs pupate and metamorphose into bees in about 12 days. Pupae
use the stored up fat and tissue from the larval stage to metamorphose into adult bees.
Honey bees undergo a complete metamorphosis. After the pupae have changed into adult bees,
they chew their way out of the cells and start working! Watch the young bee crawl out of
the cell! The cells are also used for storing nectar
and pollen. Honey is made inside cells. Adult bees also rest in them.
If a female larva is fed special food called royal jelly, she becomes a queen bee. If not,
she becomes a worker bee. A new queen goes on her nuptial, or wedding
flight, a flight to mate with drones. Only a few drones, or male bees, live in each
hive. Thousands of drones from many bee colonies gather in one place. Queens fly there, too.
The drones mate with a queen bee. After the young queen has mated, she heads to the colony
where she was raised and becomes the new queen. The old queen and approximately half of the
workers leave the hive as a swarm, to find a new nest site.

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

What Happens If All The Bees Die?

What Happens If All The Bees Die?


Bees play a crucial role on Earth – some even
claim that if they go extinct, humanity would be next. So with the dramatic decline in bee
population, should we be worried? What happens if the bees all die? Simply put, if a plant produces a flower,
you can bet that bees help them reproduce. This long-standing, working relationship evolved
with flowers being bright and fragrant to attract bees, and the bees fuzzy, velcro-like
bodies helping them to efficiently transfer pollen from the male part of the plant to
the female part. This seemingly simple mechanism is directly responsible for the production
of 70% of fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts that we consume on a daily basis. 70%! Which
translates into almost $200 billion in global agriculture revenue. This huge responsibility
is accomplished by droves of commercial bees, reared by professional beekeepers for the
sole purpose of being transported to farms and orchards to pollinate crops. But since 2006, these hardworking, busy bees
have been mysteriously disappearing. This Colony Collapse Disorder has seen an average
of 1/3rd of commercial bees abandoning their hives. In fact, some beekeepers have even
reported that 90% of their bees have simply buzzed off. In some colonies, mites, viruses and parasites
have been to blame, but many are now looking at a class of insecticides called neonicotinoids.
This neurotoxin is used to kill off crop eating insects and pests, but also affects the central
nervous systems of bees when they consume contaminated nectar. And since nectar is brought
back to hives, the entire colony can be affected, leading to mass confusion and disorientation.
On top of this, other factors such as extremely cold and long winters, a lack of genetic diversity
in commercial bees, and less variable nectar in the fields may be at fault. If the trend continues, entire food chains
and webs may be at risk. Take almond plants for example; the hulls of these nuts are used
as feed for farm cattle and chickens. Fewer bees means fewer almonds, which could mean
declining livestock, and ultimately less milk, cheese, eggs and meat production. Not to mention
almonds are used in cereal, baking and many other food products. Beef and dairy cows would
also be harshly affected by the vanishing alfalfa fields which are used to harvest hay
for cattle. Looking for a morning buzz? Considering bees pollinate Coffea arabica, whose seeds
we grind for coffee, you can count that out. Without bees, our diet would consist of mostly
corn, wheat and rice, as they are wind pollinated plants. Like your clothes? Not only is cotton the
biggest cash crop in the US, it also makes up about 35% of the world’s fiber use. So
you can forget those blue jeans, towels, mattresses and high quality paper products. Simply put, we’d be living in a completely
different world without bees, not to mention suffering a substantial economic strain from
their disappearance. So while we may not necessarily go ‘extinct’ should the downward trend
persist, a world without the buzz of bees would definitely…sting! Want a free copy of our NEW book? Now you
can get one from Audible.com/asap which is the leading provider of audiobooks with over
150,000 dowloadable titles across all types of literature. Our book just came out this
past week and it covers a ton of questions that have never been answered in our videos
which we’re so excited to share with you! You can download it, or another audio book
of your choice, for free, at audible.com/asap. Special thanks to Audible for making these
videos possible, and to YOU for continually supporting our show and science education.
It means a lot! And if you missed our Live SCIENCE stream
last week where we performed the Periodic Table Song live and answered your burning
questions, be sure to check it out here, or by using the link in the description. And subscribe for more weekly science videos.

Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest | Deep Look

Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest | Deep Look


What’s this bee up to digging around in
the mud? This blue orchard bee is a mason, a builder. Her material is – you guessed it – mud. And she works alone. In fact, unlike those honeybee hives you might
think of, most of the 4,000 types of bees in North America are solitary. See how she scrapes the wet earth? She collects it with two huge pincer-like
tools on her face called mandibles. She’s gathering mud to make her nest. The nest is long and thin. In nature, she goes into places like hollow
twigs. At the University of California, Davis, she
uses a six-inch-long paper straw provided by researchers. In this nest without a straw you can see how
she builds a wall of mud. Then she gathers food from spring flowers,
but not only to feed herself. See the pretty purple pollen on the anther
of this flower? She grabs the anthers with her legs and rubs
the pollen onto hairs on her abdomen called scopa. And while she’s at it, she sips a little
nectar from the blooms. When she climbs back into her nest, she turns
the pollen and nectar into a sweet morsel next to the mud wall. On this purple ball she lays a single egg. She repeats this several times in her narrow
nest. Egg. Wall. Egg. Wall. When she’s done, she seals it all up with
more mud. A cross-section of the nest shows her incredible
craftsmanship: it looks like a piece of jewelry. Soon, the eggs hatch. The hungry larvae feed on their pollen provision,
the purple lunchbox their mom packed for them. Still in the safety of the nest, the well-fed
larva spins a cocoon. The following spring, the adult bee chews
its way out. Just like their name says, blue orchard bees
love orchards: fields of almonds and sweet cherries. And they’re really good at pollinating them:
A few hundred females can pollinate as many almonds as thousands of honeybees. And their tube nest means they’re portable. That makes it easy to distribute them to farmers. So why haven’t they taken over the fields? Well, they reproduce slowly. They only have 15 babies a year. A queen honeybee has 500 … a day. So there just aren’t that many blue orchard
bees around. But some farmers are enlisting them anyway,
hoping they can provide some relief to their struggling honeybee cousins. If you look carefully, you might just spot
a blue orchard bee foraging out in a field, helping keep fruits and nuts on our plates. Hi. It’s Laura. A special shoutout and thank you to Bill Cass
and James Tarraga, whose generous monthly support on Patreon helps make Deep Look possible. If you’d like to get in on the buzz, come
join our Deep Look community on Patreon. Click the button or link below to unlock rewards
like exclusive digital downloads, chats with the producers and cool swag. One more thing. Our partner, PBS Digital Studios, wants to
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shows. It takes about ten minutes, and you might
win a sweet T-shirt. Link in the description. Thanks!

Two Giant Killer Hornet Colonies Fight to the Death


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: The Samurai scouts
bring news that there’s an army on its way. [BUZZING] They rally the troops. But it’s too late. The Bamboo Battalion is on them. The Rock Samurais are ambushed
at their own entrance. When times are tough,
giant killer hornets turn on their kind. It’s like on like,
giant on giant. Claws, stingers, and mandibles,
all weapons deployed and heads will roll. Disabling the enemy is
the primary strategy. Beheading and severing
limbs, the mandibles are the ultimate weapon of war. It’s impossible to
determine who’s winning until the pillaging starts. The marauding Bamboo
giants enter the fortress. They’re conquered
the Rock Samurais and they’ve struck gold. The precious nursery of
developing princesses is ransacked, next year’s
queens killed and cannibalized in their chambers. The sentry can do nothing
but witness the devastation of her precious family.

Honey Bee Colony

Honey Bee Colony


My main mission if I’m going to look into
a hive is to make sure have a good laying queen and there’s ways later on
that we can sample for pests and disease but I don’t always have to find the
queen when I look through a hive because obviously a large hive with seventy,
eighty thousand bees we may not find her but we want to find evidence that she’s
there and has been laying. We want to find healthy brood and eggs and larvae in
various stages. Here we have the queen excluder. This grid allows workers to
pass through but not the queen, therefore we have a brood nest below it and honey
storage above it. There”ll be honey below it as well but this prevents the queen
from laying eggs in the supers that we may potentially harvest and it’s really stuck down. So when you lift your queen excluder, she
can’t be on this side but she could potentially be walking on this side, so you definitely want to inspect that. You’d hate to have your queen on this side and set her off in the grass. I rarely
remove the frame on the wall – the wall of the hive because a lot of times it’s bridged
to the wall and when you pull it you’ll break come and have honey running and
probably crush some bees on the way out. So I usually go for the second frame in.
You can use the hive tool here to pry and separate those frames. That creates space for you to lift that first frame. I’ll lift one edge. I have my fingers on it. This is a little more challenging with gloves but most folks will start by using gloves.
As you gain experience it’ll probably be the first thing you’re happy to leave behind
because you can feel your hands and you’ll be much more careful. I’m coming up nice and straight with that frame. These girls have a nice bunch of honey up top
here. So we’ll show you what we’re looking at. All this is a band of capped honey. In here
we have mostly empty cells, but there is a little pollen and we mentioned drones. There’s a
drone right there at my fingertip. Notice the large eyes on the front of his head.
Compared to the worker he’s blunt, he’s wide, has the very large eyes and then these are all workers around here. There’s the drone. It stands out quite a
bit. Drones don’t have stingers, so if you want to impress
your friends, you can pick up a drone without getting stung. See those large eyes, and he has large eyes because he has one purpose in life and that’s to find the back end of a queen with those big eyes. Now on the other side, we got a lot of workers, a lot
of capped honey. Here’s another drone here. And then in here, I don’t know how well you can see it but there’s a lot of pollen stored in here. Okay, the honey is the bees’ carbohydrate or energy source. That’s what allows them to generate heat in the winter, to survive
the winter when they’re clustered. It allows them to produce energy for flight but
the pollen is what they need, that’s their protein source. That’s what they need to
generate brood food and feed their babies and fatten themselves up for winter as
well as a protein source. So I’ve removed one frame and I’ve
glanced over that to make sure my queen’s not on it, because if she was there I wouldn’t want to set this frame down. I should have brought a perch. There’s a thing called a
frame perch and you can hang this frame on the side of the hive. I just didn’t bring one up so I’m going to carefully rest this frame beside the hive. Now that I’ve created space
here, I can move frames apart and there’s lots of room to lift a frame without
crushing bees are rolling bees on the face of the come. As you pull a frame, if it
gives you a resistance sometimes there’s a bulge in the comb and you’ll role and
crush bees on the face of that. So now that I’ve created space, I can use my tool to pry this frame over into that space and it’s stuck down below so it’s going to
take some work with the tool to pry it up. I’m careful how I place the tool not to crush a lot of bees as I do that but it’s it’s really stuck to the next box below and I can see down in here we’re going to get some brood on this one. So I come straight up
with the frame, nice and deliberately and ok what we’re looking at here – lots of worker bees. We have honey in the corners and
this is where brood is. What you’re seeing here compared to the capped honey – capped honey is very waxy. Capped brood is a little more papery or leathery looking. The
color will vary. On a young come it’ll be real light tan like this. On an old comb
it may be really dark. If they’re bringing in certain kinds of pollen, that may
affect the color so you can’t really go by color on this capped brood but then I
want to look down in these cells. We’re in a shady spot right here but you want the sun coming over your shoulder say from the direction of the camera and
you tilt that frame and get the sun to shine down into the cells and with the sunlight shining down the cells, you should be able to see eggs or larvae and with the angle I’m turning this
frame to get the angle right and I can see that as that capped brood hatched, the
little bit of capped brood we see, the queen has gone in and replaced all those cells
with eggs. Every cell in there’s got an egg in it. So this would be a very good
frame to find the queen on. Very likely you’d find her here because the frame is
covered in eggs. If you see the bottom of the cell there’s it’s a it’s a very tiny
little egg down in the bottom of the cell and then just keep the camera and as we turn this side, the queen was here a little sooner. You know maybe a day or two before, three days ago because there’s a lot of young larvae. We call that milk brood because you can see the jelly
down in the cells. For my purposes I’ve found what I need to find. I know I’ve
got a queen that’s laying well. It’s a robust hive of bees. It’s made almost three
supers full of honey… close to 250 pounds of honey and she’s laying but we’ll go
on to the next frame and see if we can show you a little more. Workers are
raised horizontally; queens are raised vertically. This is not a queen cell so
to speak, but it’s a cup. It’s where they would place an egg and raise a queen
down here. There’s another one on the other side. It’s a little more developed. Right here – you can see into the end of it. Now if that was had an egg or was full of jelly, I would know these bees were replacing
their queen. Either they’d swarmed or they were replacing the queen for some reason. Maybe just a
really really vigorous hive like this is going to send the queen out with a portion of the bees to start a new colony and the raise queens back home to replace her.
That’s where that tool is really useful. I don’t have the finger strength to pull
that frame up just on its own. Here we really going to see something. This is a really nice frame full of capped brood. So this area here, all this light
brown, that’s all capped brood. That’s at nine days after she lays that egg, they put that capping over it and that’s when the bee pupates. That’s when it goes from a worm to pupa which eventually at 21 days hatches and becomes a bee like
you see here. Honey in the corners, a band of pollen around the top of that brood
which may be kind of hard to see but they store the protein for making brood food
right around the brood. Let’s see what the other side has to show us. Lots lots more
capped brood on this side. This queen’s really doing a nice job. Lots of capped brood – some of it’s starting to hatch.
Lots of food around the brood good population; however, this is
deceiving. It’s the time of year when this massive population that made a
large honey crop is susceptible, greatly susceptible to crash in from
these varroa mites. The best hives who makes the most honey, it takes a lot of bees to
make a lot of honey and varroa mites reproduce down under these brood
cappings. I guarantee if we cut some brood open, we’d find mites down under
some of this brood and once that mite population reaches a peak your best
colonies by raising the most brood and having the strongest best honey
gathering ability will be the first ones to crash from mites because they
produced the biggest mite populations. So it’s kind of a sleeper situation. You
think, ‘Oh well they made all that honey and they did so well all season I don’t
have to worry about them’ but they’re the ones you have to worry the most about and so
we’ll be monitoring mite populations and determine if these girls need to be
treated to reduce mite populations at this point in the season.