Bee Keeping Frequently Asked Questions 20 Saskatraz Update Beginning with bees


okay so thank you for joining me happy
Friday everyone today is June 7th and this is frequently
asked questions for beginning beekeepers episode 20 already so thank you for
joining me if you’re new this is for basic beekeeping solutions in your own
backyard small apiary just keeping bees for the fun of it and I hope we can
answer your questions here if you’re returning welcome and thank you for
being a frequent viewer and listener for those of you are commuting home on
Friday and if you have questions the way it works you just write them down in the
comment section below the video if you want to know what we’re gonna cover in
this video segment please that look down in the video description and we’ll
line-item each thing that’s covered so you’re not wasting your time if you’re
looking for something specific and it’s not in this video the final sequence of
this video will be outside in the bee yard thank goodness whether it’s good
and what we’re gonna do there is update you on the Sask attract bees we didn’t
install of the Sask of Trance bees 29th is go so a lot of people are wondering
how they’re working out and I did the Queen’s make it are they laying and so
on we’re gonna answer that so that’s gonna be great what is this weird piece
of gear right here next me one of the frequent questions I get and it does
fall under FAQ for beekeeping hey Fred what camera did you use to get those
pictures what what camera did you shoot that sequence with wow that’s really
good stuff well I’m gonna show you I do a lot of macro and micro video and still
work so this is a very uncomplicated very simple rig here that I’m sure
everyone already has or you can just use your cell phone very good this is one of
the Nikon’s new mirrorless cameras this is a Nikon z7 it has high resolution so
what is this weird setup what’s on top here is the su 800 which has been around
forever and it’s how I used to trigger off camera flashes but it partners with
these tiny flashes that are mounted on a macro ring so these are flashes and I
can set my exposure and use it anywhere running gun with it so that’s for still
picture but I can also shoot video with it so
sometimes when you’re seeing a really close-up video sequence you are seeing
stuff from this camera it might also be from a dedicated video camera it might
be from a big body Nikon d5 if you don’t know already I make my living as a
professional photographer and videographer and you may have even
actually seen some of my nature sequences without knowing that I took
them because I sell stock video sequences about nature and some of that
will be in fact upcoming in Animal Planet’s nature’s extreme secrets
explained I think it’s called so anyway this and this is a Nikon Micro
nikkor 105 millimeter F 2.8 if you’re not a shutterbug it’s not gonna really
matter to you you can really get good pictures with your cell phone I’m not
even kidding you do not have to dump this kind of money I also have the nikon
z6 mirrorless camera for low-light video sequences so if I’m out there you know
recently I did thing about bullfrogs if it’s low light and I need silky smooth
stuff I use that these little flashes on here are the SR 200 s for those of you
who need to know every detail and this actually comes as a macro rig for all
Nikon stuff you can probably get it for Canon as well
I don’t want to get into any discussions about Nikon vs. Canon or any of those
discussions which is exactly why I don’t do videos about photographic equipment
generally unless somebody gives something to me and I have to promote it
so let’s move right into B’s now that that question has been answered and first question this ask a try update
everybody wants to know how are the SAS katratzi is doing they’re doing great go
all the way to the end in fact the top comment in the comment section will be
the timecode for when that sequence starts so you can skip over all the
frequently asked questions parts the inside segments and get right out in the
B yard and see what’s going on I do have a rule of thumb when it comes to
checking in on brand new bees bees that are trying to make it you want to stay
out of their hive as much as possible and when and if you do have to go in the
five I hope that you keep that visit short as where I live this has been a
terrible weather season we have rain and we have a lot of overcast days it’s a
miracle they’re making it at all their build up is slow but we’re going to get
into that let’s see the most recent thing Scott senior bee yard what do you
do about them Scott’s in my bee yard Scouts are all around they cruise
through the bee yard all the time how do I know I have motion activated game
cameras I’m also testing some new game cameras coming out so if you like the
secondary videos that I produce watch for those I’m going to give a review of
that skunk show up on game cameras walking through my bee yard all the time
my bee art has an electric fence around it the skies don’t even care they go
right under it they have such thick fur they don’t get zapped what are they
after they’re after the bees most it might be
hives in fact all of them this year are up nice and high so the skunk’s can’t
scratch out the bees and to eat them the way they used to in the past they would
scratch the landing boards get the guard bees out at night they would flip them
off the board rub them around on the ground eat them and then go after more
and obviously they’re getting stung too because I had a sequence where the skunk
was making all kinds of noise Scouts are very cat-like in their general habits
and of course tonight I tried to video I was pouring rain and it didn’t come out
good at all and that was the last time I had a skunk visit my bee yard for bees
they wander through the bee yard and they’re looking for leftovers so if
there are dead bees cast out on the ground if there are Yellow Jacket
Hornets building the nests in the ground those are some of the worst and I’m more
than happy to have Scouts come and dig them out and eat them so scouts are
tough I have absolutely no motivation to remove skunks from my property or it
might be yard because I consider them to be a huge benefit those you are settings
bee hives on the ground directly are you know those are accessible discounts so
by raising your beehives up off the ground Landing boards up here skunks
have to get up on their hind feet they’re exposing their sensitive
underbelly scotts don’t like that they would rather stay low to the ground
protected by all that heavy fur and then they can eat the bees so elevate your
hives I don’t mind skunks at all and that’s
that next one would it be worthwhile to do an inner cover that is slanted or not
level so that water doesn’t drip down on your bees that’s a great question for
the wintertime here’s the problem the reason that the inner covers are flat is
we’re maintaining a bee space in there so if you had an arched or a peek inside
roof and there was no inner cover then yes condensation would build up just on
roof sheathing on houses for example we have soffit venting on houses and that
keeps an airflow up there which prevents frost buildup on the interior surface of
your roof sheathing so air movement between the outer cover and the inner
cover is important keep things dry but then you have an inner cover that also
gets cold because it’s exposed to that and now we have warm air rising inside
the colony inside the hive and it causes condensation inside that flat surface
some venting there will help remove frost build-up which later when it gets
warm enough to melt the frost melts and the drip sound on your bees and if it’s
in the middle of winter which is the worst time those drippings will fall
onto the cluster of bees which may more than likely also be in the center of
your hive so their indirect line they get wet and then they can’t dry out and
they can’t warm up so the problem with an inner cover that slanted or has some
kind of radius to it is that you’re going to create more bee space in there
and then what the bees are going to do is they’re going to build up their
network of comb and propolis and they’re going to fill the space that’s why we
ended up with the flattened inner cover in the first place so my solution rather
than tilting it is a great idea I mean it makes sense if it has some kind of
tilt and as things started to thaw it would trail along the edges and down the
sides the interior sides of the hive if some water drips down there much less
detrimental to the bees then drippings directly on their bodies so the problem
is bees bass and that’s why people just haven’t come up with that
yet so if you have a method for maintaining that 3/8 of an inch of space
which you know then they just use as a corridor and they don’t fill it with wax
and propolis then you’re much ahead but right now there’s no practical way to do
that and when you pulled it off you would be disrupting huge chunks of comb
and you would be in a mess every time you enter that high for inspection so
but it’s a great question the the key to that is really venting and moving air
enough so that the moist air is allowed to be pushed out by the bees and does
not drip down onto the bees and you want that double layer outer cover lots of
air movement inter cover a little more air movement and then that intermediate
cover and the bottom of it hopefully will not have frost on it that turns
into water in the first place so venting without drafts is the key so next I have
a whole ongoing sequence here with Amy amy has a hot hive she inspected the
hive there’s lots of varroa they are bringing in honey doesn’t want to ruin
it is oxalic acid vaporization bad well then here’s the thing I’m going to put a
link into what are the detrimental physical aspects to people from oxalic
acid in the first place because it already exists in plants it exists in
kale it exists in spinach so oxalic acid is around so often people say and I say
it too if you’re going to treat with oxalic acid vaporization take your honey
off the other thing is we want to talk about why her bees are hot and the fact
that there’s a presence of varroa when your bees are stressed and defending
themselves the chances of them not being welcoming to you as well when they’re
under such huge stress is also heightened so my suggestion to Amy was
she can do a couple of things about the honey super that’s on especially because
they’re bringing in honey right now and they’re going to want to be accessing
that your treatment cycle is very short you’re gonna treat for 6 or 7 minutes
and you can put everything back to normal once that fog has settled on the
interior surfaces of your colony so I want to know from her once you
treat with the Excel like acid vaporization and it does an initial hit
on those verroa that are taking hold does that immediately improve the
attitude of those B’s and my my guess is that it would if they’re already
fighting if they’re already stressed if they’re already fending off something a
couple of things can happen they can abscond they can start swarming often
bees will evacuate a space like that absconded and swarming or two different
things and abscond is when the entire colony just moves out
is too stressful but another response that bees often do when there are varroa
or some other condition inside the hive that is a threat to the lives of the
colony and the bees they can start swarming out and rapid
sequences until there’s nothing but a handful of bees left so when you have a
lot of that going on and it looks like they’re in profound decline it is time
to inspect and find out and Amy is right to be trying to find a solution and to
maybe consider treating I think her original question is what to treat with
and personally because I’ve gone all these years without treating colonies
and I use varroa resistant IG anak bees depending on the type of bees that you
have if they’re so being overwhelmed now you have a judgment call if they’re
overwhelmed by varroa then they’re spreading varroa so there is going to be
a responsibility move here to you have to deal with four if they’re
overwhelming your bees because they’re gonna travel with your bees and they’re
gonna go to other places they’re gonna go to other colonies so I
suggested to her that oxalic acid vaporization would be a good step and
she’s gonna do three cycles seven days apart which is appropriate because she
has brood and you want to have open brood at least during one of those
cycles so that you’re going to get all the varroa so but what she did and I had
an email from her again this morning was she split the hive already removed the
honey supers created at least two colonies from it now in my opinion
that’s kind of a problem because you have a varroa problem in the colony and
we’re to find out why the colony is behaving
in a hot way so if you do multiple things like splitting the colony killing
the queen a number of different things all at once you have a very difficult
time narrowing down specifically what the problem was to begin with it caused
them to have a change of attitude so if we kept everything the same if we kept
the honey supers on but just put a shim between the honey super and those bottom
brood boards so that we could treat the bottom with oxalic vapor without it
going up into your honey super and it’s only an issue if you plan to eat the
honey from the honey supers if it’s there for the bees if this is a new
colony that you’re building up and you know you’re not going to harvest from it
you don’t have to take off the honey super you can leave that on during your
treatment but if you are going to consume it if there’s a chance you’re
going to draw it off and use it for people then shim it or remove it and by
sham I mean a solid vapor barrier that would go between that we could just be
even a plastic trash bag you take off that super you put the trash bag on set
the super on and then do your treatment now if we had left everything together
and none of the conditions were changed except the fact that we introduced on
solid acid paper ization then what’s going to happen is as the varroa dieback
and if that colony calmed down and if it was no longer a hot colony we would know
for certain that it was the fact that they were fighting with varroa and
losing a lot of bees go out early in the morning and look at your landing boards
and if you see a lot of dead bees and bees and development if they’re
uncapping brood and dragging them out and throwing them out there’s a very
good chance that you have a lot of fur oh and that they’re fighting them off if
they’re losing that fight and it changes the attitude of the colony you are going
to have to treat those bees but now we have multiple things going on they split
it they did other things that have now introduced variables into what’s going
on with the colony which further stressed the colony so now even though
she does plan to do the oxalic acid vaporization treatment we won’t know now
if it’s because of all the interruptions in you know the
condition of the colony or if it’s the varroa or if it’s a combination or if
you know removing the honey and everything else so now there are so many
variables that we really won’t know but my first suggestion would be if you have
a colony and you’ve got a high varroa count it’s time to treat and oxalic acid
vaporization is my personal recommendation for that treatment and I
hope we get updates from her so that’s going to be interesting to follow on to
but in the future if anyone has a problem like that and they’re really
trying to diagnose what the behavior change is about what caused it only
apply one remedy at a time if you really want to understand what cause and effect
that was if you’re Queens deficient or if a queen is absent
sometimes a colony can get hot if they’re dealing with small hive beetle
czar something else if you know there are a number of things that go on but we
need to address those problems one by one methodically and keep notes in your
be journal exactly what they did what you did what the response was and then
what the next thing that you did so you could have a very simple problem
resolution if they respond immediately to a leak acid vaporization then you
know oh we killed the varroa and look the colonies back to normal as I showed
in other videos in the past when we had a queenless hive they were defensive and
very active in the minute the very minute we introduced a new
queen a fertile queen and that pheromones started spread throughout the
hive it there was an immediate change in the activity level in the hive they were
extremely calm landing board activity dropped right off so we knew that that
colony was responding this behavior was altered by the fact that they were
simply absent a fertile Queen so these are all interesting things and I hope we
hear more and I hope it’s a very good experience but they’ve done a lot of
different things at one time you installed Queens from the Queen cages
without leaving them for three days how do you know when to do that okay well
when I get new Queens in and I have a queenless colony and I know for sure
that their Queen LeSueur eggs there might be some open brood they
might be making queen cells but there are no eggs for sure so another queen is
missing from a colony when I bring in new Queens through the mail what makes
me decide to open that queen cage and let them eat through the candy you pull
the cork out of this in or you pull this cork out with a black dot there then you
direct release the Queen nine times out of ten I direct release the Queen
because they set it right on the brood frames I look at the nurse bees there i
watch them come up and start to feed that Queen right away if it’s an
infertile queen or if they already have a queen and their queen right as the
term goes they’ll reject this queen they’ll try to sting the workers in
there they’ll go after the Queen they’ll be biting at the cage instead of trying
to feed her they’ll try to sting through the cage you have a colony that does not
want that Queen two reasons she might not want the Queen one she’s not fertile
fertile Queens give off their own pheromone so in other words that’s a
queen that’s been mated she’s going to lay eggs they don’t have a queen that’s
laying eggs they want her right away I opened that and let that Queen go
right down in there and guess what every single one of those gets accepted now if
they’re biting at it and they’re acting frenzied and they’re rejecting it or
they want to ball around the Queen and superheat that and killer which is one
of their methods for killing off a queen they don’t want then I’m gonna get that
out of there I’m gonna go use that Queen somewhere else or there might be
something wrong with the Queen maybe she’s not capable of laying eggs so that
that’s why I do the direct release method I just I don’t see any reason to
interrupt a colony three or four days down the road after I install the Queen
cage to let the Queen out let them eat the candy and then I go back in and now
I have to retrieve this and it’s going to be completely covered in bees wax and
propolis and I have to interrupt those beasts which are trying to get a start
if it’s a new package or something so yeah Direct release is something that I
do more often than leaving the cage in and let
eat the candy out and it’s based on observations of honeybee behavior are
they accepting her do they want her out of there and are they feeding her right
away in my opinion no reason to wait release the Queen okay if she dies his
open brood if there was open brood there’s no eggs you know there are a lot
of things that happen but I personally released the Queen after I evaluate the
colony and see what their behavior is towards her this was interesting too
sometimes people want to know if there is a queen in there for example when
they’re pulling in splitting hives to me it it really doesn’t matter my practice
when I’m splitting a hive is I leave the resident queen in the hive that I’m
taking the split from and I let the new colony generate their own queen because
I’m gonna be careful and I’m gonna take out queen cells and supersede your cells
and things like that and I’m gonna put those in my new hive location and I’m
gonna let them produce her own how do I know for sure if the queen is going with
them or staying with the colony to me it really doesn’t matter I don’t spend a
lot of time hunting out the Queen because either way one of those
companies is going to generate the queen that they don’t have and they’re going
to do it right away now they’re going to use open brood they’re gonna build Queen
cells and they’re going to provide new Queens they never just make one queen
cell they make several and they’re not at ground zero remember we have open
brood we have capped brood we have a replenishment of the colony constantly
going on so it’s not the same as you know having a queen list colony with no
brood you fly in a queen you Installer that’s a total different scenario
because now we’re backed up more than 21 days before we’re gonna see new bees in
that colony so they’re in jeopardy but colonies that I’ve opened brood they’ve
got capped brood which is why you’re doing this what in the first place
they’re super strong they’re huge their numbers are high but what if you
absolutely want to see where the queen is this is from this is not my own idea
here so it’s Michael Palmer I don’t know if you’ve ever listened to Michael
Palmer speak he’s a he’s another northeastern bee keep
he’s way up in Vermont which is where my family comes from and he keeps bees in
the worst freezing conditions he shakes his bees on to a queen excluder and as
they migrate into the colony that they’re going to go into the Queen gets
trapped in the Queen excluder if she’s there
so as you you shake your nurse bees so you shake your bees off you have brood
that’s capped you have no bees on it because you shook them off in the parent
colony you install your brood in the new colony you put your queen excluder on
you take now the frames that are full of nurse bees and now you shake them on to
that box and as they migrate migrate down into the brood frames if there’s a
queen on those frames she’s going to be trapped on that Queen excluder and you
can catch her and you can put her back in that parent colony or you can remove
them all together whatever your plan is it is one method of making sure that you
distilled the Queen from the worker bees that are gonna go down through that
Queen excluder that is such an obvious thing to do and I had not heard of that
until I was listening to Michael Palmer and that’s a great recommendation but me
personally if the Queen stays with the parent colony great if she goes with a
split that I’m making also great I don’t mind because they’re just gonna make a
new queen either way somebody’s making a new queen and they’re already in
progress because we have Queen cells in the colony that we’re removing from and
we have Queen cells in the colander that we’re installing from I recently did
that queenless split both of them generated their own Queens I have a
queen of my observation hive right now running around and I have two other
Queens inside their queen cells that are piping they’re announcing themselves and
we were in there last night watching them and a queen comes out and cruises
over the surface of all the frames and then she’s scooted back up down in
between the others now she may have just recently hatched she may not have done
her virgin flight she may not be mated in now laying eggs because I saw no
evidence of eggs being laid but I have at least three Queen cells in there that
are unhatched so somebody’s got to kill those Queens the Queen herself can go
through and sting the other Queens inside their
queen cells when other Queens emerge if we have a colony with multiple Queens
which sometimes happens they can actually put up with each other if
they’re fertile the workers will show a preference for one queen over another
and the workers may in fact kill the queen in the method that I described
early on which is they ball around her super heater and killer and they would
do that to a new queen that emerges before she’s mated and capable of laying
eggs so there’s a lot going on in the observation hive problem is that thing
is not great for taking pictures through right now because the interior surface
of the glass is giving me trouble there’s a lot of detritus on it and I
can’t fill it up but anyway finding the Queen and should you
transfer the Queen that’s a personal preference your queen that you’re
getting rid of is older so if there’s a chance that they’re gonna swarm anyway
she’s gonna leave anyway so if you take her with your split you may resolve
their propensity to swarm which it leads me to another comment that everybody
wants to know how do I keep my beads from swarming how do I stop them from
swarming how to prevent swarming well let me tell you a healthy colony that’s
highly productive that wants to get there
their job is to reproduce their job is to generate a baby colony they’re going
to put out a swarm you’re going to have my by the way my clipped wing queen who
was also marked swarmed out I know I’ve always said well sew wings are clipped
she’s gonna swarm out right onto the ground and you’re gonna get them and and
they’re all gonna be clustered easy-access
and you’re gonna rehydrate oh I don’t know what they did with her she’s gone
there’s a new queen in there she’s huge very fat she’s laying eggs like crazy
and my clipped wing weaver queen is gone so i don’t know what’s going on we’re in
the middle swarm season right now every single hive that I have other than the
new packages they’re all trying to swarm including the splits that I did this
so that I did their numbers are so big they filled their new hive so fast that
again because we put so much brood in there they they’re just swarming out I
don’t know what to tell you that every you cannot control a swarm everybody
wants to stop a swarm you can do everything you want you can expand it
you can give them more space you can make sure they’re not honey bound you
can do everything absolutely right and those bees are following their own
biological clock and they are gonna zip out of there but the good news is you
end up with a bunch of new Queens new bees the drums that your Queens are
gonna mate with are gonna be from the area hopefully that have adapted to the
environment they’re cold weather hardy and so you’ve got a mix of genetics
hopefully from your local zone and those bees will do very well and that’s yet to
be seen but I’ve lost almost all of my original Queens including the best queen
of ever had she’s she’s gone she’s been replaced but they’re still we ever lion
queens and this time of year what are the bees doing well I can tell you what
the beads are doing you’re getting ready for winter it’s the first thing bees in
my neck of the woods do everything that a bee does the pollens are bringing in
the brood that they’re building they’re building a workforce they can go out
they can harvest more forage more bring in more resources maximize their
resources the entire function of that colony
aside from reproduction is to get themselves through winter so they are
storing up honey they’re loading everything in we’re not
even into the clover nectar flow yet when the clover starts blooming we have
a massive workforce that it’s going to start bringing in honey this is a great
it’s really weird because we’ve had terrible weather this is a great year
for the bees they are they are productive and I don’t even know why so
if you don’t know why they’re super healthy why question it just let them go
but all they’re doing all through the year every time the Sun shines every
time it’s not raining and my bees are flying in light rain they’re even
bringing it I don’t know why they’re bringing in
in light rain in general you know the consensus has always been well if it
rains on the flowers and the pollens dance abuse won’t touch it well my bees
are bringing in pollen even during light rain so there you go one thing for sure
when you know you think you know something for sure about bees you really
don’t know anything for sure about peace I know this is beginning beekeeping and
this is supposed to provide some answers for everyone
but the bottom line is do everything you can do so to prevent swarming let’s say
we could if your bees are filling up if that if that bottom box if your brood
box is filling up make sure you put a medium super on there to give them
expansion room if you see a lot of honey and nectar stored and and you’re filling
up the frames with that put another box on a give’em room to expand giving them
space ventilation a good solid structure that they’re in well-built hives hives
that are vented but not uncomfortable so you don’t want over venting bees don’t
like air movement that they’re not causing so and the other thing is stay
out of those hives if you’re in your hives in inspecting just for the heck of
it you’re harassing your peas and they don’t like it and they can leave so you
can cause a swarm if you want to be pesky and get into your beehives all the
time it’s been a lot of time looking at them and you know trying to learn from
your frames the the bees don’t like that I know there are people that that think
their bees love them and they want to interact with their bees and everything
else I’m not of that mindset I always know that I’m an intruder into that
beehive and so I want to limit my time and I want to limit the number of times
that’s why I multitask if I’m going in to feed I’ll combine that with other
activities like looking for the Queen if I’m gonna find eggs or something like
that I find the eggs I see that there’s a
queen I don’t have to find the Queen once I have evidence and then I’m out of
there so I don’t believe that my bees will want me inside their nursery bottom
entrance how wide should it be or should it be
closed up that falls under the ventilation of your my philosophy has
always been when you’re looking at the bottom board of your beehive if there’s
good egress and entry going on and you know they’re getting through that
opening just fine you’re probably good to go if it’s a small colony that can’t
defend itself very well the rule is always to have just you know an inch and
a half or two inch opening entrance so that the bees can defend it if you have
a large colony in there but they’re not piling up on the entrance if you see
that that entrance reducer has not created a traffic jam then I see no
reason to change it you do want to have for the summer at least upper venting so
they can cycle air through because there is nectar coming in and what will happen
when a lot of nectar comes in you’re going to see a work force on the outside
of your colony on the hive while they try to ventilate from the inside and dry
it out so you want adequate ventilation if you only have one entrance if you
only have a bottom port entrance then you are gonna want to open that more
during nectar flows otherwise they’re not going to be able to deny me hydrate
the honey fast enough and they’re also going to run out of spaces to store
their honey because what goes on when the filled bees are coming in during the
day they’re bringing in nectar and pollen
and the nectar has a very high water percentage I think it’s like when you
don’t because I came across this when I was looking at hummingbird nectar
because it’s very light on sugar so it’s like 90% water and 10% fructose 10%
sugar that’s provided by the plants so we know that when the bees condensed
down to honey what’s the percentage acceptable percentage of honey to water
we know that honey has to be well under 20 percent so that it won’t ferment so
that it won’t go bad so they’re going to dehydrate that down to 15 to 18 percent
water so when they’re bringing in all these nectar resources they need a lot
of space to put that otherwise there’s a term called being honey bound
when they bring in a lot of nectar and they’re spreading it into all the cells
because the nectar remember is not dehydrated down to honey yet so they
need a lot of space to store nectar that later about less than half that space
will be occupied when it becomes honey when it’s dehydrated down to the
appropriate percentage I think state inspectors for honey won’t accept honey
that is at or above 19% it’s between 19 and 20 percent water so because it has
the risk of not surviving on the shelf ferments turns bad and the stuff that I
have put refractometers on and looked at the water content might have always been
from 15 to 17 percent so what happens all that if you’ve got one box and you
haven’t expanded they start putting that stuff everywhere and eventually the
Queen runs out of a place to lay eggs so what can happen you can get honey bound
nectar bound whatever you want to call it and they’ll leave so that you get a
swarm how do I know that I used to do that intentionally because I was
studying swarms and I need it to video on photographs worm activity and get
audio sequences so I used to force swarms by letting them fill all their
resources not provide room for expansion and then knowing that I’m going to get a
great big swarm out of there but if you want to keep your bees which most people
do yeah this morning you can’t guarantee you’re gonna catch it so you want to
expand their space and you want twice the space of the need and at night time
if you look at a colony and you can see it if you’ve got enough I’m sure most of
you don’t have observation hives because that’s not kind of a beginner thing to
do in my observation hive I know that they are moving resources around so
right near the entrance the bees can fill a bunch of cells with nectar and
during the night the interior hive workers will be extracting from those
cells and moving it up and they start to fill the highest cells with honey
resources that they’re going to dehydrate down so there’s a lot of
movement going on and shifting of storage going on day and night but
primarily during the day when there’s the rush
all the foragers are coming in they’re just unloading the nurse bees not just
nurse bees but all the interior workers that have not been outside yet you’ll
see them sticking their tongues out W all these bees lined up each sticking
their tongues out they’re transferring their nectar from the field to the bees
that reside inside the hive exclusively and those beads put the nectar in the
cells foraging bees do not fly in run to a cell and deposit that themselves
interior worker bees do that the only resource that comes from the outside
that the bees come in and the foragers will deposit themselves will be pollen
you’ll see workers come in loaded with pollen they’ll go to their dance floor
which is specific area inside the hive they use it the same over and over
they’ll waggle dance around brag about the pollen that they got where they got
it then they run off and they scratch them off and stick them in the cells and
you’ll see balls of pollen in there so open the entrances if there’s a traffic
jam next is from so no Sun beam what purpose is Burke home serve does Burke
comb and propolis let’s say serve anytime you have more than be spaced for
sure what’s B space 3/8 of an inch so if you got a cap like this anywhere around
the hive if it gets bigger than that the bees are going to use propolis to seal
off whether for example and they also coat surfaces with propolis for hygienic
purposes and the comb is structural material comb is beeswax
so the beeswax bees will make comb all over the hive they fill every little
space this is the most evident again when I go back to my observation hive I
can see that they connect every frame together they connect the frames here’s
a surface of the frame glass front they run little structural connectors to that
glass to keep that in its position and they’ve put Queen cells out there so
they’re so honeycomb we already know the wax is structural the other thing is it
provides corridors and pathways for them to
late for them to walk through so the whole thing is a web of comb and then of
course they’ve got the comb that they store with the cells and wherever they
may calm it has the surface appearance of the six-sided cells even though
they’re not fully drawn out so they do that cell structure everywhere even
though they never develop into full depth cells and the purpose of it is to
modify the interior to suit the bees purpose so larger cells drones Queen
cells also you know for Queens and then the worker cells for workers and beyond
that it’s all structural connective tissue the purpose of propolis is to
isolate the colony members from anything that’s bad for them whether that be wind
cold weather bacteria mouse gets in your hive the bees can’t drag the mouse out
they stung it to death let’s say the bees are never gonna get that Mouse out
of there what’s it gonna do it’s going to decay and create a toxic air
environment so what do they do they cover that entire Mouse with propolis so
things that they can’t get out of there they seal up with propolis propolis is
antibacterial so it’s all structure now this by the way is another reason that I
became very mindful about how often I get into a bee hive and how often I pull
things apart when you see how much work they spend creating venting corridors
and passageways for the bees to travel through and where they’re storing
resources almost always when you’re pulling frames apart on your bee hive
the connective tissue between the the frame so you have a frame here frame
underneath those cells that they build between their general AR Drone cells so
when you pull it apart you’re gonna see developing drone that are just laying on
the bottom so you’re doing damage every time you open your hive every time you
start moving frames around so it’s just my opinion if you don’t have a reason to
go in your bee hive that’s meaningful to the bees that really is an assessment
that’s going to cause you to provide some kind of action
don’t just go in there out of curiosity if you’re curious you want to see what’s
going on you know or look at your hides every single day and I do observation
hive in fact I’m going to put a link to my video about the observation I’ve
installed in the video description so you can see what it’s like how I put it
together and how it populated it and what it was like so there’s that and
maybe I have a poultry guys anyway so that that’s what it serves structure or
isolation of materials that they don’t want in the hive next royal jelly okay
this question comes up all the time and people have very very firm beliefs about
royal jelly who gets it who doesn’t what’s the bottom line you know back in
the eighteen hundred’s eighteen eighty something there was a paper published
about royal jelly being fed to queen bees and that’s how queen bees are made
and then somehow worker bees are fed something else so it’s called royal
jelly because it’s four Queens the worker bees get something else it’s also
compiled from the pollen that the bees are bringing in after it’s been
fermented after the bees have altered it and then they feed that to non queen
workers or drones that I’m just gonna settle that right now it’s a somebody’s
gonna be mad about it here’s the thing follow modern science a lot has been
done about what the diets of bees are and a lot of observation a lot of
science a lot of lab tests have been done what is royal jelly royal jelly is
created by nurse bees they have glands that develop it it’s it has something to
do with the pollen that they’re also pollen that’s been fermented it’s been
altered there these are complex proteins that are being fed to developing bees
what they have found out it’s not that workers don’t get royal jelly they do
Queens get royal jelly what happens one gets way more than the other a queen
develops from egg to an adult queen and fifteen
day she’s hatching in 16 days so and she’s bigger and she’s completely
different this is a great area of study because with the amount of royal jelly
that they’re feeding they’re altering the physical traits of a developing bee
that’s amazing that’s astonishing and that’s why there should be more study
done about it because it has to do with diet alone is every be getting royal
jelly yes what’s the difference in why does the queen bee become a queen bee
because the queen bee gets fed more and listen to this when they’re after the
egg hatches and you have a larva in the cell workers nurse bees go right in
there and they start putting royal jelly in it and you can see it okay so then
that’s what it’s going to grow and develop on and you know what’s happening
this isn’t for feedings today or six feedings a day this is hundreds of
feedings a day so no sooner will one bee be in there feeding that then another
one comes along and they’re feeding it and it will never dry out and that
little pupa starts to develop and it develops fast it takes 21 days for a
normal worker to hatch because they’re holding back on how much they’re feeding
it guess how much the queen gets fed and this is from lab observations so they
know exactly how many visits to a queen compared to a worker will she be fed how
many feeding visits a queen on average gets 1,400 more feeding visits with
royal jelly than a worker does now what if they took that on artificially if
they started doing this artificially and they control defeating cycles what
happens if you feed more than a worker and less times than they feed a queen so
now we’ve done something weird they did something intermediate to that when they
gave more royal jelly than a worker needs but less royal jelly then the
Queen needed to develop you know what they came up with it’s really weird
half developed Queens they call them princess bees so lab science
it was the quantity not the composition and of course the quality of what you’re
feeding your bees is going to have an immediate impact on their overall health
and well-being could they also create undersized bees if they held back even
more so now this is people meddling with nature in order to find out what feeding
royal jelly does actually to the bees is it an ultra composition or is it an
altered quantity and the term determination was that is an altered
quantity I will try to find that study and give you a link to that also in the
video description for those you who want to read more about that that’s a very
recent study by the way I think nobody did anything meaningful until 2016
regarding studying royal jelly its composition impact on developing bees so
that’s amazing and that’s also why so many people have read books and
resources prior to 2016 that still believe royal jellies for Queen’s
something else is for the worker bees it isn’t it’s been proven scientifically
that it’s quantity that they’re there nothing else has changed and that they
can create little strange intermediate developing bees by altering quantities
in the lab so it’s a very interesting question I know it’s going to come up
again because every time I say something about it somebody chimes and it goes I
hope you know royal jelly is only for Queens well this isn’t my research I’m
happy to pass it on you can check it out for yourself and so that’s it now guess
what we’re doing we’re going outside thank you for watching the frequently
asked questions version we’re gonna go outside I’m going to walk you through
checking up on the Sask attract bees thank goodness the rain stopped just in
time so we can get out there the check that you’re going to be watching
happened yesterday and if you have questions if you want something
addressed and frequently asked questions episode 21 next Friday go ahead and
write it down in the comment section below all comments are welcome all
discussions amongst yourselves are welcome if somebody posts a question and
you’ve got an answer for it absolutely you know interact with each other and
write those down thanks for watching we’ll do a closeout right after we do
the update on tasket recipes so finally here we are out in the bee yard where we
need to be it’s nice and warm and sunny and I’m showing you the flow hive – this
is the one that we put the Queen in we had a little marshmallow in there these
are the neighbors also in a flow hive – this one’s been around for a while
fully loaded lots of landing board activity we got a break in the weather
everything is going super these guys are bringing a lot in they have honey
connector I’ve expanded this box recently but we want to see about the
Sask attract bees here is the first one that we did the install notice we’ve got
a slighted rack on the bottom we’ve got one deep and then we’ve got a feeder
shim on top we’re gonna open this up now keep in mind this has only been 29 days
since we put in that package so the Queen was released she is just laying so
we’re talking about new brood finally that it’s come for the Sask attract line
and we’re not using smoke we’re gonna use 50/50 sugar water mixed with the
essential oils and we’re bringing equipment with us medium boss in case we
need it we’ve got a clean wrap it around the feeder that we’re gonna put on there
we’re gonna pull the old one again we’re using a coil frames if we need them if
they’re fall so I’m gonna take a look we’re gonna see what’s going on and see
how much they’re expanding keep in mind the new brood is just now starting the
hatch out so I don’t expect big things but we’ll see this is the inside of the
feeder shim that I made and of course we have to have a bucket handy because if
we scrape off Bertone or propolis we want to drop it right in the bucket not
on the ground here we go not impressive notice that they’ve built out on the
acorn frames really nice they haven’t touched these lighter colored frames
which are by man Lake they are pre waxed you know it looks like we basically have
two full frames of bees considering this was a three pound package not that great
I’m spraying the sugar water on the outlying frames not the frames that the
bees around themselves let’s scrape some of this Burt ohm off of here and drop it
right in the bucket those bees will find their way back and
we’re gonna very carefully pull the frames to the side we’re going to take a
look inside here and see what’s going on I want to get
out of this colony fairly fast my only goal here is to see number one if the
queen is still here we’re gonna see evidence of that if we find eggs in open
brood so they’re again these are man-like frames are pulling out I’m not
excited about them I think I’m going to be sticking with the Acorn frames this
was just a test to see if they showed a preference and they certainly did they
jumped all over the acorn frames and built them up remember we started this
just as if you had no resources at all normally I would put drawn comb in here
this is honeycomb and this is honey so there’s no brood on that frame we’re
gonna slide that over here and remember I’m sliding to the sides I’m not digging
in and pulling these frames straight up and out we risk damaging bees in comb
that way so we’re gonna slide it sideways here nice and careful and we’re
gonna pull this up and take a look not huge numbers keep in mind they’ve been
challenged by weather and the other thing is look how calm they are we did
not use smoke remember we just did some spritzes with the essential oils there
is brood this is a brood frame well I’m the edges there is some honey but I’m
happy to say that there are rude frame there we’re gonna close this right back
up we had eggs in there and there were larvae so the queen is doing her job and
we’re gonna give them more feed and help them expand here we do not have a heavy
nectar flow going on but it’s coming very soon has the clover opens these
guys I expect to build up much faster especially now that we’re finally seeing
bees that are produced by the Sask attracts Queen remember this is the 29th
day since we did the package install let me close this right up I’m gonna put
that rapid round feeder in there always carry clean ones with you we’re gonna
put 50/50 sugar syrup in here I think it means that to draw a comb that’s what
50/50 is pretty good for and it’s nice and warm today it’s 80 81 degrees and
I’m wearing a vented bee suit so I can stay nice and cool and that is by
Guardian bee apparel it’s my favorite vented suit
I’ll put that down in the video description – here we are over the flow
hive – this is a ten frame flow hive – which just came out this year nice and
wide we have a screen entry board reducer there let’s get the straps off
and don’t forget to strap down all of your hives and make sure they’re not
gonna fall over and have an incident here their rapid run feeder is
completely empty so we’re gonna pull this off and replenish that again I
could just pour more sugar syrup in here but I choose not to I always bring clean
feeders with me and just as you would with smoke instead of smoke I sprayed
that essential oil in the I think we’re using ProHealth or honeybee healthy
they’re interchangeable in my opinion that’s the old one we pulled it off
we’re gonna release those bees later and here we got much better now look this is
the man like frames again and look how different these bees are definitely
building them out and I intermittently put wooden frames in there so we could
use the plastic frames as a guide and then hoping that the bees would draw
down the comb straight from the wooden frames without running them sideways on
us it is critical to make sure that your hive is perfectly leveled and this one
is I decide I’m gonna pull these plastic frames out of here I will say though
with confidence that I do recommend the acorn heavy wax frames over these men
like frames they’re just a little rough for my liking and here the bees have run
what often happens with some plastic frames they’re running their comb
parallel to it they attach it to the top bar there and they don’t really marry it
well to the surface and the next frame is a wooden frame foundationless there’s
no wire in this they are only attached to that top edge and be very careful if
you pull out a frame like this if you notice it’s attached along the top I ran
a little cran of wax across that piece there when we were doing the install
again I’m doing this as you would if you were a beginner with no comb to start
with when you pull those frames out don’t tip them flat keep a vertical
that’s when the comb is strongest now this colony is doing much better this is
the colony of the Queen have the a little marshmallow plug in there so we
put the marshmallow plug in just for kicks basically a direct release of both
of these Queens this one is doing much better than the other one
and their cone building is great keep in mind though we’re in transition here the
package of bees is getting to the end and the new workers that are coming out
are actually from the Queen but I would say this queen is outperforming the
other one here we are remember fragile stuff don’t tip it keep
it vertical look at both sides there is some brood in here so I’m impressed and
there’s also some honey around the edges now that’s natural comb it doesn’t come
any more natural than that they are attacking it only at the top and if you
want to make cut comb later that would be the method but that’s a
brood frame so we’ll just put that along the edge here and we’re gonna pull the
next frame over see what’s going on they do have plenty of honey in here we are
gonna keep feed on these bees we’re not gonna be pulling any honey off of this
colony so load them right up and make sure those rainy days don’t cause a
drawback there now this aren’t that’s capped brood we do have open brood we’ve
got eggs and larvae so we know the Queen is doing good the Queen’s are marked
they have green dots on them I don’t feel like I have to track down the Queen
specifically and again look how calm the bees are no smoke sugar water essential
oils that’s it and they’re pretty calm this is of course afternoon mid
afternoon and we’ve got some cat food here if you do this mid day early
afternoon most of your foraging bees around about then all this green come
they’re doing fantastic at cinnamon colored cappings here this is honey on
this side and they’ve got some comb mixed in there in the center so the
darker tan is the the capped brood and the light colored cappings are of course
honey and it looks like a pretty sporadic pattern here but I am happy
with the population of this colony I think I will put a
medium super on this one and expand them because they are filling up their frames
and the other one we left as a single deep because frankly they just weren’t
very productive this one going to expand and it’s exciting for me because this of
course is on the new larger flow hive too and I’d like to see if they can’t
actually get to the point when they would fill a flow hive this year so
we’ll have a deep and we’ll have a medium super on this one
we’ll watch them expand and of course we’re going to keep feet on them until
the clover starts to bloom and that will be a strong nectar flow and then we’ll
just let the feed run out and we won’t replenish it and if the population
builds really well we’ll open an upper entrance on these guys so I’m happy with
this one and look at the difference though the man light frames are in this
and the other one the other one they didn’t care about them
this one they use them well so you just never can tell and of course in this
medium super notice I’m using all heavy wax acorn frames we’re gonna see how
that goes these little gals out of the way here we’re gonna put that clean
rapid round feeder in I’m gonna fill that right up and since this is the last
hive I’m going to look at we’re gonna pour sugar syrup in here and I’m even
gonna empty my spray bottle into this rapid round feeder and you want to make
sure that clear centerpiece is well centered and set on the bottom shims
that support it as you know what your bees getting out when it gets to the
bottom we have not had that problem but other people told me they did have that
problem so make sure it’s well centered and on the lowest bracket there and we
cover this up and putting it right up here that’s it the flow hive on it we’re
gonna put the straps back on there and secure it I hope you enjoyed this in my
opinion the sastras bees are doing great the disposition is you’re very calm and
we have a wide variance in their productivity thanks for watching have a
great weekend

MIT Course: Evolution of an Epidemic

MIT Course: Evolution of an Epidemic


[MUSIC PLAYING] Students from MIT will come
with their own perspective. I’ve never taken a
class like this before. This is what MIT does
best– bring people with different
strengths and interests together and have
them solve problems. The most affected
country is South Africa. The most affected
province in South Africa is where we’re sitting
in KwaZulu-Natal. The most important
thing, post-apartheid, that I could think about
doing where I could make a difference– HIV. We left Boston– traveled
for about a day and a half– finally got to Durban. I had heard over and over
South Africa’s an amazing place that I didn’t expect it to
be so green and so gorgeous. Even when we’re
riding in the van just looking out the window– kind of imagining how
life is different here and appreciating that I get to
experience a little bit of it. It is a very, very good
mix for the students to have all this experience
and to have all this knowledge and to have all
these discussions and begin to develop their own
ideas about what can be done. I’m from Maine. I’m from southern Maine. If you are going to change
society for the better, solving the problem
of HIV and TB would require a
global partnership. We took 20 students to Durban
and taught lecture, field trips. And it ended up being this very
intensive course all about HIV. We really needed to take them
someplace where there are still a lot of people who are sick
and who are not on treatment and are continuing to
get infected to show them what AIDS was like in the
United States back in the ’80s when the epidemic first started. Because it’s so
different in South Africa than it is in America, I
think that it’s very important to be here and talk
to people– just sort of understand what
it is that makes the epidemic in South Africa
different than the epidemic in America. Research is about asking
questions and asking the right questions. If you ask the right question,
that’s half of the battle won. We could also look at rural
versus urban populations and see whether they have
different infrastructural needs when it comes to
preventing HIV and AIDS. We’re learning about
the biological side– how the epidemic occurs– what causes it– but also
how different communities are fighting it together. Bring people from all
these different backgrounds and sit down and
make a plan of how we as a country–
as a community– are really going to take a look
at these problems holistically instead of individually
and attack them. As a physician scientist,
when I look back, I think I will see HIV as being
the call for my generation. I genuinely believe
that we can turn the tide within my lifetime. We still have 36 million
people in the world who are infected with HIV. We still have areas where
enormously high numbers of young women are getting
infected every single day. [SINGING] FRESH is a program that recruits
young, HIV uninfected women in this region
outside of Durban, South Africa called Umlazi. If you look at 14-year-old
girls, less than 1% are HIV infected. But if you look at
24-year-old women, almost 60% are HIV-infected. So as scientists, we’re so
focused on the biology of the problem– that we
don’t think about the fact that even if it works perfectly
in a tissue culture or Petri dish, if people can’t
use it in the real world, it has no real value. So the opportunity to
interact with the participants and hear back from them has
really informed our science and has been a really
valuable part of the study. We founded this
organization, iTEACH. It stands for Integration
of TB in Education and Care for HIV and AIDS. We’re now screening 85%
to 95% of all patients who come to this hospital
for HIV and TB. We diagnose 300 new
cases of pulmonary TB every single month
here at the hospital. This is the only place
in the world where Western medicine and
traditional healers and sangomas have really united
to fight against HIV. And I think it’s just really
spectacular what you’re doing. I think what made it so special
was the singing and dancing after dinner, because you don’t
need to really communicate well for that. You just need to dance
the way they’re dancing, sing the way that
they’re singing, and wear the gifts
that they gave us. First they wrapped the
traditional cloth around us. And they dragged us
up and, like, forced us to start dancing. And it was, like,
this footstep movement with lots of stamping and stuff. Trying out the traditional
food and getting to sing and dance with them– I think it’s the most fun
thing we’ve done so far. I don’t think it’s a secret. Everybody knows only the
smartest people get to MIT. And so the expectation
is that these are the best minds in the world. And if these best minds
can apply their minds to the biggest and
most challenging issues of the world, certainly,
it can be a much better place. You can’t imagine this. You have to come here. The need to change our society, the need to make the
world a better place, is not in the domain of
politicians and lawyers and sociologists only. It’s all of us. And as scientists, we
have a big role to play. Every discipline has
something to contribute. So regardless of what field
somebody ends up going into, there’s a critical
role for everybody in dealing with these
type of global issues. I’m hoping to walk away
with a bit of perspective– being able to learn a bit more
about ways that we as Americans and me as an individual
can make the treatment a little bit easier and
more effective for people. We’re strangers. They don’t know us. We don’t know them. But they just accepted us. And knowing that we come from
very different cultures– knowing that we probably
don’t believe in the things they believe in, but
still they respected that. And we respected their
culture, obviously. That was the part where we
just really came together. It was pretty awesome. [MUSIC PLAYING] [SINGING] [VOCALIZING]

Baja Bugs – The People’s Beetle and Classic Desert Racer

Baja Bugs – The People’s Beetle and Classic Desert Racer


The VW Beetle is the bestselling vehicle of all time. Since production began in 1938 over 21 million have been sold. It’s a classic design which still dominates
one of the toughest motorsports in the world, off-road racing. JUDY SMITH: My name is Judy Smith. I’m basically a housewife, but when I can, I drive a Class 11 race car in the desert, in Baja, as far away from pavement and civilisation as I can get. There are different classes for off-road Beetles, Judy Smith’s is a Class 11. This is a Class 5-1600, a Beetle with limited modifications. And this is the most extreme Beetle of all,
the Class 5 Unlimited, the ultimate desert racer. The Beetle was originally designed by Ferdinand Porsche, when Hitler asked him to design a Volkswagen, German for People’s car. Porsche designed it to last. JUDY SMITH: People use VWs as off-road cars because of the fact that they were air-cooled, rather than water-cooled, didn’t have a
radiator, you didn’t have to worry about running out of water, or boiling over. And because the motor is in the back over the drive wheels so it gets such good traction in loose soft terrain. Judy has made only a few alterations to her Beetle, she has fitted slightly bigger tyres, slightly stiffer shock absorbers, and a roll
cage. But it takes more than just a good car to
survive in off-road racing. JUDY SMITH: You need to learn how to read the desert. But then you need to be able to make decisions and stick by them, you can’t be indecisive. You can end up over a cliff, or stuck in a river, or stuck in the ocean, so the decisions have some importance. You can get yourself into a real bind. It’s the last adventure left to me, I’m born too late to take the covered wagons across, and I’m born too early to take a spaceship and go out to Saturn or something, but I can ride in Baja, and I feel like an explorer, feel like I’m seeing new things, I am seeing new things. I am doing something that the average person doesn’t do, can’t do, won’t do. Love it! The next step up is the Class 5-1600. Wayne Cook has modified his Beetle to produce a world champion. WAYNE COOK: The street-legal Beetle is quite a marvel in itself, all we’ve done is make it better. Make it just a little bit bigger suspension, a little bit bigger torsion bars, a little bit bigger of everything. It will do just about anything except for climb a block wall. The most extreme off-road racer is the Class 5 Unlimited, a Beetle on steroids. GEORGE SEELEY: My name is George Seeley Junior and I drive a Class 5. Capable of speeds of 110mph over the roughest terrain, this car has no limits. GEORGE SEELEY: The ideal situation for this car is to have long suspension, which allows you to go faster through rougher terrain. It’s kind of a crowd pleasing car, because it will fly well, and it maintains a good attitude in the air, which lets you gain on your opponent and actually finish the races in faster time. It has a custom-built chromoly frame, with
a 3000cc engine suspended over the back wheels. It has 4 massive shock absorbers at the back with over 2 feet of travel, these absorb the impact of landing and keep it stable over bumps. GEORGE SEELEY: The greatest joy is you go over a jump, like you fly through the air, you’re leaving Earth for a while. It gives you a tremendous feeling of accomplishment when you battle the elements and come through. The basic Beetle design hasn’t changed from 1938, until now. It’s styled on the old Beetle, but that’s
where the similarity ends. It has abandoned original design features
like the rear air-cooled engine in favour of a water-cooled engine, and now it’s under the hood. It’s The Bug for the 21st century.

Advanced Arm Balance Yoga Poses : Advanced Flying Insect Pose Arm Balances in Advanced Yoga

Advanced Arm Balance Yoga Poses : Advanced Flying Insect Pose Arm Balances in Advanced Yoga


Hi! My name is Leta Koontz and I’m a yoga
instructor at Schoolhouse Yoga in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I’m here today on behalf of
Expert Village to teach you some arm balances. Okay, so if you’re feeling pretty comfortable
with flying insect pose, if you want to try the advanced pose here’s what you’re going
to do. You’re going to need to come a little bit deeper. You’re going to step your feet
that same distance apart, about the width of your mat. This time you have to come really
far back so you can get your shoulders under your knee. You want to bring your hands to
the floor and sit back. This time, instead of bringing your legs parallel to the floor,
you’re going to bring them perpendicular to the floor. You’re going to start to lift them
up as you drop your hips down. When you’re ready to come down, just come through to flying
insect and bring your feet to the floor. Let me show you that from a different angle. Again,
set your feet a couple feet apart. Come pretty deep so your shoulders are under your knees.
Keep the belly pulled in the entire time. Start to lift the legs up and to gaze up.