What I Gave My Ants for Christmas | ‘Twas the Ants’ Night Before Christmas

What I Gave My Ants for Christmas | ‘Twas the Ants’ Night Before Christmas


Please subscribe to my channel! *ding* Thank you, enjoy the video! *music (Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy)* ‘Twas the ants’ night before Christmas, In the home of the master, Not a creature was stirring, not even A hamster. *music* A gift from above For all Fire Nation Ants Set in the offering temple *ding* From the AC fam. *music* The workers indulged In joy and jubilation As this gift brought nourishment To their great Fire Nation. *music* It’s been an epic journey Of both wonder and fear As we reminisce the memories Of this colony’s year. We watched as these fire ants quite eagerly moved in To every home we gave them; They even showed us they could swim. They inspired and humbled us As they seized all prey. At times, it got ugly But that’s just nature’s way. Completely unaware, YouTube fame found these girls. You named them the Fire Nation. You voted from around the world. *ding dong* And speaking of voting, over countless days and nights, AC fam, you officially named these black crazy ants: *ding* The Dark Knights. So the Dark Knights we celebrated with burning Christmas torches For the preparation of our gift to them: Canadian-honey-dipped roaches. *music* This year, we marveled At how the Dark Knights perfected Moving through the Fire Nation Completely undetected. *music* Not a maze too hard could outsmart their clever. They’ve even found a way for their colonies to live forever. *trumpets* All hail the Dark Knights, Go and feast all you can Upon this Christmas gift From we, the AC fam. *music* Oh, we’re not through yet. Another colony remains, And the AC family also decided its new name. Among knights of darkness and a nation of fire, Rises the new ant colony: The Golden Empire. *ding* The Golden Empire used all available resources, And banded together their 3 queens joining forces. *music* Like the 3 kings of Magi bearing frankincense, myrrh, and gold, The AC fam, too, has prepared 3 gifts. Behold! 3 large roaches prepared meticulously by hand, Disected and stuffed With organic strawberry jam. *music* May these 3 gifts of love pass through their security teams, And fly into the mouths of the empire’s 3 queens. For it has been an epic year for us, For our little ant club. Well, perhaps, not so little anymore. We hit half a million subs! *fast* Oh, my God. While this is amazing… *fast* *overlapping voices of appreciation* AC fam, thank you, thank you, THANK YOU!! *record scratch* *clears throat* Sorry. *small laugh* Just a little burst there. Gotta play it cool. After all, this is an educational channel. Back to our poem. Many of you are ant keepers raising armies of your own. Many of you may be starting to discover ant love, full-blown. Many of you have written about how you’d never thought You could ever love an insect, but now you love ants a lot. We’ve read all your warm messages, from both parents and their kids, How, together, you discovered the world of ants through these ant vids. So whether your ants are sleeping on this cold winter night, Or whether it’s anting season, and you’re searching for queens in flight, We hope these ant videos will keep your curious mind blown As you discover the lives of ants in our crafted ant homes. And so, on this night, expressed as heartfelt as I can, I feel so much gratitude to you, the AC fam. I’m sure if these ants could talk or read messages from their fans, They’d thank you for supporting and for giving ant love a chance. Here’s a toast with some egg nog *ding* to our new ant beginnings, And to your loved ones and colonies, more blessings and ant winnings. From your ant nerd AntsCanada, to every AC family member Happy holidays to all, and to all, ant love forever. Greetings, AC family. First, I would like to thank you for watching this video. As always, it means so much to me, and If you enjoyed it, please feel free to subscribe to this channel and give this video a thumbs up. Second, AC family, we did it! We hit 500K subs! Thank you guys so much. It’s just crazy. I cannot believe over half a million of you guys liked watching and learning about ants each week. Insects which most people take for granted or don’t even think about at all. You guys truly are ambassadors of ant love. Third, for all of you inner-colony members, Of course, I’ve included a hidden cookie for you guys here, *ding* Where you can just watch ants drinking egg nog. It was funny. At first, they didn’t like it and were a bit skeptical of it, But soon warmed up to it and couldn’t get enough egg nog. Fourth, I would like to take this opportunity to wish each and every one of you out there watching a warm seasons greetings. No matter what it is you may be celebrating this season, May you, your loved ones, and your ants Be immersed in happiness and joy. Thank you guys so much for being a part of this whole ant journey with me on this channel. And, finally, we can’t end without our *ding* AC Question of the Week. Last week, we asked What is the name of the species featured in our last video that gives piggyback rides to fellow smaller sisters? Congratulations to *ding* Ryanplays101, who correctly answered Carebara diversa, or Asian marauder ants. Congratulations, Ryanplays101, you just won a free AC test tube portal V2 from our shop. And for this week’s AC Question of the Week, we ask The honey into which the Dark Knights’ cockroaches were dipped came from what country? Leave your answer in the comment section, and you could win our brand-new AC test tube rack V2 from our shop, Which is now clear, holds your test tube securely in place, and is stackable for extra security when storing. Good luck, AC fam, and until next week, It’s ant love forever. *music (Oh, Christmas Tree)*

Sugar Ants | Tandem Running Their Way to Victory

Sugar Ants | Tandem Running Their Way to Victory


Hi, my name’s Jordan Dean, and in this episode,
we’re going to be looking at one of the most widely distributed and diverse ants on
the planet. They’re known as Sugar Ants… Sugar Ants cover the genus “Camponotus”,
a large genus, comprised of around a thousand-different species, and they can be found worldwide,
within forests, grasslands, mountains, and even deserts too.
Like most ants, Sugar ants typically nest underground, with some species living in rotting
wood, and others, up in the trees, within hollow branches, or clusters of leaves which
have been stitched together to form a shelter, much like green tree ants do.
Because they’re so globally ubiquitous and varied, they go by many common names. Often
called “Carpenter Ants” after the wood dwelling species. Which can carve out nesting
chambers with the use of their powerful mandibles. Here in Australia, they’re mostly referred
to as “Sugar Ants” for their love of sweet foods, like tree sap, nectar and honeydew
excreted from sap sucking insects, like these little leafhoppers here. The two have a mutualistic
relationship. The leafhoppers offer the ants nutritious honeydew, and in return, the ants
provide these little bugs protection from predators. Sugar ants can often be quite distinctive for their large polymorphic appearance. The
workers vary in size and shape, often to fulfil a certain role within their colony. Minors
workers are small and slender and are usually the ones doing the foraging, tending of the
brood and caring of the queen. While the majors are often much larger and
stockier. See how they have bigger heads in proportion to their bodies? These large heads
are full of muscle, allowing them to deliver powerful bites. Great for crushing up and
carrying food back to the nest, and defending the colony from predators. Typically, they’re
seen sitting by the entrances of their nests acting like doorkeepers. Only moving to let
fellow colony members pass by. On top of their powerful bites, many Sugar
ants possess another lethal ability. When dealing with predators or prey, the ants will
grip onto them and start curling up their bodies, as if they’re trying to sting them
like a Bull ant would. But these ants don’t have stingers. What they do instead, is excrete
a deadly liquid. See that little white blob coming out of this ant’s abdomen? This stuff
is a kind of formic acid. They use this chemical weapon as
a means of stunning and subduing their prey and predators alike. In this case, they target
the vulnerable leg joints of this helpless Bull ant. Sugar ants navigate as most do, by following pheromone trails laid down by their fellow
colony members. But there’re some species that can perform a rather unique trait among
ants. Native to Australia, and one of the most widely distributed, is the Banded Sugar
ant. When foraging, these ants use social techniques
which often make them the first ants to a source of food. See how these two ants run
along together, almost like they’re playing follow the leader? Well they are. This process
is known as tandem running, which involves teaching and social learning.
The leader ants are usually the most skilled of foragers, often having prior knowledge
of the best sites to explore. Think of them as the old wise ants educating the youngers
on how things are done. The leader runs rapidly in a short burst, and then pauses, waiting
until she feels a tap from her follower, and then she continues on. Stopping and starting
frequently to make sure her follower is still on her trail. These tandem runs, usually consist of a couple of ants, but on occasion, there can be several
workers following along, each stopping and waiting for their trailers to catch up.
This unique process of communication greatly benefits the ants’ foraging capabilities.
During a tandem run, the followers can discover food much faster compared to just foraging
on their own. And the added presence of these ants will ensure that their colony is the one controlling the site. Occasionally, some ants can be a little stubborn
in being recruited. So occasionally, the leaders will attempt to pull others along for encouragement. Sometimes even resorting to completely picking them up and carrying them if they continue
to resist. In times of plenty, Sugar ants will stock
up on food and water by filling the stomachs of certain colony members. These ants become
known as repletes and are used as living storage vessels. When there’s little food to be
found above ground, due to times of drought or cold weather, to get a feed, the workers
simply stroke the antennae of the repletes, causing them to regurgitate some of their
stores. Some Sugar ants are more specialised in this
method than others. These arid dwelling species are nicknamed, “Honeypot ants” for their
ability to distend their gasters to an enormous size. So large in fact, that they become unable
to move on their own. Often just hanging motionlessly from the ceilings deep within their nests. Many Sugar Ants are highly competitive for territory and resources. Often seen plugging
the nest entrances of other ant colonies And raiding them if given the chance. Even Bull ants have to be wary of these guys. They’re larger and more deadly, but fear
the smaller ants for their chemical weaponry, and oft times, their superior numbers too. So, regularly, they’ll commit several ants to guard their nest entrances in order keep
these dangerous intruders at bay. There are some ants that can rival them, however.
Meat ants are equally as competitive. Their colonies can reach massive scales, with hundreds
of thousands of individuals, and they often live right alongside Sugar ants. Despite this,
the two are usually able coexist as most Sugar Ants are nocturnal, whilst Meat ants are diurnal.
Although, in their active hours, they’ll constantly plug each other’s nest entrances
to try and gain an edge on their competition. Because of their large size, Sugar ants are
easily spotted by predators and make for a temping snack. Regularly, they’re targeted
by birds… spiders… and other insects too. Like this hungry praying mantis. Other ants
will willingly take on the weak or injured too. Here you can see just how large Sugar
ants can be in comparison to the more common sized species. Nuptial flights are especially perilous for Sugar ants as the female alates are often
huge and cumbersome. Making them easy prey. Birds, like this magpie, will often sit by
the entrances of their nests and pick them off as soon as they emerge. If the female alates are lucky enough to survives
predation and find a mate, they’ll then dig themselves out a new home. A small chamber
in which they’ll lay their eggs and tend to them until they develop into workers. Here’s a look inside the nests of some young queens who’ve just recently made it to this
stage. Their first workers are very small and skittish, and highly protective of them
and their developing brood. You may notice them tending to these little
brown casings here. These are known as cocoons. They’re comprised of silk which the larvae
expel from special glands near their mouths. So the larvae spin themselves up in this silk,
much like a caterpillar does when its ready to metamorphose into its pupal stage. Some other ants spin cocoons too, like Bull ants… and Green Headed ants. However, most
leave their brood bare. Like Big-headed ants… Rainbow ants… and Argentine Ants too. The purpose
of spinning cocoons is still not fully known. It’s suggested that they assist in keeping
the developing brood within clean, and protect them harmful bugs, bacteria, fungi and pathogens. Once the brood inside has fully developed, they’ll then begin emerging. They’re cable
of escaping the cocoons on their own, but it can be a little tricky at times, so the
workers will often try and help out. Most of these emerging ants will be workers, which are all female. But, this particular
ant looks a little different from your typical worker. It’s oddly shaped and it even has
wings. This is actually a male, known as a drone. Drones don’t do anything for their
colony, other than use up their resources. Their only purpose in life is to mate with
winged females during nuptial flights. Shortly after which, they die. These ants are produced
from unfertilised eggs, usually when a colony reaches a mature size. A typical Sugar ant colony only contains a single queen, the only ant of which can lay
fertile eggs. So, what happens to a colony if this queen were to die? Well, here we have
a queenless colony of Banded Sugar Ants. The queen died around 6 months ago, leaving behind
a hundred or so workers. Despite having no queen around, these ants continue to cooperate
with one another and function as a normal colony would. But, with the absence of their
queen, there aren’t any new workers emerging to replace the old and dying. So slowly, but
surely, the colony will die off. Remarkably, the ants can actually sense that
their colony’s coming to an end. So occasionally, what the remaining workers will do is begin
laying their own eggs. Sugar ant workers are sterile, so all these eggs you see here are
unfertilised, and will develop into drones. It’s like a last-ditch effort to spread
their genes and help ensure the survival of their species. And that really sums up Sugar Ants. They’re incredibly determined little creatures. Highly
efficient in the way they both find food and subdue their prey… Extremely competitive
with other ants, raiding and sabotaging at will… And amazingly resourceful for the way
in which they adapt to their environment, with desert dwelling species utilizing workers
as living storage jars…and some tropical species weaving leaves together to act as
shelters…and many ground dwellers, heightening their nest entrances into towers when they
sense rain coming, to prevent water rushing in and flooding their homes. It’s pretty
safe to say, these ants will be around for a long time to come. Hey guys, hope you enjoyed the video. So far we’ve looked at Bull ants, Argentine ants
and now Sugar ants. So, which ants should we cover next? I’d love to hear your thoughts
so leave a suggestion below. Next video will be another ant keeping tutorial.
This time on how to build your own ant nest. So look forward to that, and as always, thanks
for watching.

STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

Bullet Ant Venom

Bullet Ant Venom


– So the other group of ants
[Dr. Corrie Moreau, curator/ants] that we have today are bullet ants.
[Dr. Corrie Moreau, curator/ants] – Why are they called bullet ants?
[Bullet ant, Paraponera clavata] – Well, they’re called bullet ants
[Bullet ant, Paraponera clavata] because their sting is so painful
[* causing excruciating pain, numbness & trembling] it feels like you were shot by a gun.
[* causing excruciating pain, numbness & trembling] – And you’ve experienced
this firsthand? – I have, just once, I’d like
to keep it that way. And so you can see they’re
actually quite tremendous ants, I mean, they’re really foreboding,
[* worker bullet ants are 18–30 mm long] they’re crazy big and they’re cool.
[* worker bullet ants are 18–30 mm long] – Are they the largest ant? – They’re one of the largest ants. There’s another genus called Dinoponera.
[Dinoponera, Dinoponera australis] In some ways larger.
[* females may surpass 30–40 mm in length] Not as painful of a sting, though.
[* females may surpass 30–40 mm in length] This is Paraponera.
[Bullet ant, Paraponera clavata] We’re studying the gut bacteria
actually in this group of ants. But we’re also
interested in the venom. And so what I was telling
you is part of the reason I brought them back
alive is that at one point I had tried to milk them, because
my colleague was like, “It’s because we weren’t sure if
we’d have permits to bring back alive.” – Yeah.
– You can just milk them. So I can show you how
I attempted to do it and I will tell you that it
didn’t work in the end. When I got the venom back
it was actually not usable. But let me grab my equipment. – It’s not every day you get to
milk a venomous ant. At work. – So this is our fancy equipment. So if you think about, like, how they milk the venom
from spiders, right? Usually they just have
them bite something and squirt the venom inside
and it’s the same principle. So again, we just have
our empty tubes, and we have a little
bit of parafilm, right, which is essentially just like
a waxy kind of paper-y thing that we can stretch
across the top of this. And we’re going to get them
to try to sting through the tube and deposit their venom
on the side of the tube. – Wow.
– Yeah. One thing I have noticed is, what’s really interesting
actually, is with these bullet ants, when you collect them in the
wild they’re incredibly aggressive. You disturb them at all, and they
just go into immediate attack mode. In fact in the field, if you
even like blow on them, you can physically
hear them stridulate, which is a way of communicating
between individuals. And now that they’ve been
in the lab for just a few days, they’re actually almost docile. And so I’m curious to see whether
they’ll even sting through this. But we’ll try. Yeah, see, this one stridulates. So now let’s see if we
put her abdomen up, yeah, she is depositing
her sting through. – Oh!
– See that? – Sting it! Sting it! – So you see, she’s got her sting out, this is where I don’t want
to lose control of her. She’ll try to sting through, oh, there, you saw that sting go? That’s huge.
– Yeah. Wow. Focus your anger. – We will try to get another one to sting
– Come on, ladies. – You look like a new victim,
raaah, let’s get her all mad. – Yeaaaah! Oh, she’s stridulating. – She’s actually kinda not
mad as much anymore. – They’re—they’re just
like, they’re like, “Corrie, we wanna hang out,
I thought we were cool.” – I know, that’s probably
exactly what they think. – Like, “Come on, Corrie,” “I read your latest paper about
climactic regional distribution” “of my sister species.” I don’t even know if that’s
what you’ve written about, I don’t even know if that—
those words even make sense. – You don’t read all my
scientific publications? – Um, I probably couldn’t
get through the abstract. Not—not just yours, but most. – I won’t take it personally. Oh, yeah, she’s got a very big sting,
so let’s see if I can get her to— – Yeah. Sting it. – So that’s how you milk a
bullet ant for their venom. So essentially, just getting them
to sting through this material, they have now
deposited their venom all over the top of this
and inside of that tube, so I can just shove
that in there and then take it back
to an analytical lab to look at what are the—what’s
the chemistry within the venom. Now, I’ve already told you that
that didn’t work so successfully, so in a sense, what we need to do
is dissect out the venom glad, and that’s where it
gets a little more tricky, because in this case, you
can see they’re big and— – Cranky. – Cranky. And they
don’t like to hold still. Do this under the microscope. Okay, so now, again, we’re
gonna just pull off her abdomen, oh God, these are some tough ants.
[* abdomen] Even tougher than the bullet ants.
– Wow. – So now we’ve got—
– You did it. – —her body separated
from her abdomen. I wanna just tease apart some
of the parts of the abdomen and then we can usually pull the
venom gland out through the sting. So I’m just gonna start
pulling apart the body, and since I don’t want to
rupture the venom gland, I wanna try not to stab too much. – Yeah, this is meticulous work, dissecting ants.
– Yeah. – What is the smallest ant that
you’ll work on under a microscope? – Oh, I’ll work on anyone. – Even the ones
that are so small that you can’t even see
them on the labels? – Yep, even those. I’ve had to
dissect out their guts, too. – How do you even get
forceps that small? – Suspense, right?
– Yeah, the pressure. – Yeah, nothing like having
to dissect on camera, too. As if it’s not hard enough, right? – Yeah, all the viewers are
at home, quietly judging you. They’re like, “Well, when
I dissected ants last—” – I was thinking they were biting
their fingernails in suspense. – Yeah, that too. – So at the one end, let’s see if I can put it
in a good orientation— you can actually
see the left side, if you look through
the microscope, you can actually see the sting hanging all the way out.
[* sting] – Oh yeah!
– It’s like a giant hypodermic needle. – Yeah. – And then starting at the
other end on the right side, we can actually start to see
those parts of the digestive system. So first you have the crop, right?
[* crop] So it’s that social food sharing organ,
which then transitions into the mid gut and then into what’s called the ileum
[* mid gut, * ileum] and then finally into the rectum,
[* rectum] and then alongside that is where the venom gland sits.
[* venom gland] – That’s amazing.
– Yeah, it’s really awesome. One of the things that’s cool
when you first open them up is that the contents within the gut, you can see fat and
you can see the trachea and all those other things,
and even within the gut, it’s either clear like it
almost looks like water, or sometimes you can see
things that look like waste, but within the venom sac,
it’s actually almost like oil. And so when you burst it,
it’s literally like oil coming out, not like liquid, like, you
know, in the same sense. – Cool.
– Yeah. – Nice.
– So now the question is, are you gonna hold
a bullet ant for 10 seconds? The Brain Scoop is brought to you by the Field Museum in Chicago It still has brains on it.

Bull Ants | The Giants of the Undergrowth

Bull Ants | The Giants of the Undergrowth


Hi, this is Jordan. In this video we’re going to be looking
at one of the largest and most aggressive ants out there, they’re known as Bull Ants. Bull Ants fall under the genus, Myrmecia,
and have around 90 different species, almost all of which are endemic to Australia. They’re one of the most primitive group
of ants on earth, and they function quite differently from most other ant species. Typically, when an ant wants to communicate
with its fellow colony members, it lays down pheromones, which the others can smell using
their antennae, and be guided towards, some food for example. Forming a sight, you’ll probably be familiar
with, a long trail of ants leading to a source of food. But, Bull Ants are different. Instead of laying down pheromone trails and
relying largely on their sense of smell to direct themselves, they navigate through a
different sense. Through their sense of sight. While most ants have relatively poor eyesight,
Bull Ants have exceptional vision. Just look at those massive eyes. They often travel long distances from their
nest in search of food. And as they go, they use their enhanced vision
to scan, and even memorise their environment. Relying on landmarks, like the surrounding
trees and logs, in order to navigate their way back to their nest. Bull Ants’ acute sense of vision, also makes
them incredibly effective at tracking down and stalking prey. The workers prefer to feed on sweet substances,
like nectar and tree sap, and fruit, like this apple core, if they get the chance. But the colonies’ larvae demand protein
rich foods, like other arthropods. Once they get within striking distance, they
use their powerful mandibles to grip onto, and then, quickly subdue their prey by delivering
a deadly sting, which they, like their wasp ancestors, can inject multiple times. Bull Ants occasionally prey upon other ants
too. Usually seen targeting Carpenter Ants, which
often live alongside them. A successful kill comes with great reward. Not only do the ants provide great nourishment
for their colony, but it also reduces the numbers, and subsequently the strength of
their neighboring colonies. Increasing the Bull Ants’ odds in finding
food within the area. This can be a little dangerous, however, as
these Carpenter Ants will raise alarm pheromones when felt threatened, causing their fellow
colony members to rush in against their attacker, sometimes even resulting in the predator becoming
the prey. So instead of constantly hunting these foreigners,
in order to compete for territory and resources, Bull Ants have developed a safer alternative. They do so through sabotage. The Bull Ants pay a visit to their neighbors,
and start dropping debris, like rocks and twigs, into their nest entrances. By shutting in the rival colony, it forces
them spend time and energy in order to clear these blockages, effectively, limiting their
foraging capabilities. Bull Ants are even known to multitask too. Here they’re cleaning out their nest, carrying
out scraps, like the exoskeletons of past prey, which they no longer have any use for. So they move it out of their nest and straight
into their, not so fortunate neighbors’. One of the most abundant and commonly found
Bull Ants across Australia, are Myrmecia pilosula, commonly known as Jumping Jack Ants. As their name suggests, they actually have
the ability to jump, and they utilize this unique trait for a number of different circumstances. When they’re agitated, particularly around
their nest, they perform a hoping like action, perhaps to warn intruders to stay clear by
showcasing their agility and ferocity. And when they really feel threatened, they
can use it as a defensive mechanism. Leaping into the air, several times their
own body length, in hope of escape. And paired with their great vision, they occasionally
use it whilst foraging, jumping from place to place relatively accurately, much like
a jumping spider would. Here’s a look inside the nest of a captive
colony of Jumping Jacks. This colony is only just in its early stages,
with a single queen and a few worker ants present. These workers eclosed from the queen’s very
first batch of eggs, and so, are known as nanitics. The first generation or two, tend to be smaller
in size than the preceding generations, as the colony simply has less workers around,
foraging for food and making sure that the brood and queen is well nurtured. Apart from the obvious size difference, Bull
ant queens look quite similar to regular workers. Most queens you’ll see, like this Carpenter
Ant queen here, tend to have a disproportionally large thorax and gaster section. After these queens dig themselves out an egg
laying chamber, known as a claustral cell, here they’ll remain, living off their fat
reserves and waiting patiently for their workers to arrive. These types of queens are known as fully-claustral
queens. Unlike fully-claustral queens however, Bull
Ant queens just don’t have the sufficient fat reserves to fast through this long period. And so, found their colonies in a semi-claustral
manner. Meaning, they leave their claustral cell to
search for food, so as to nourish both themselves and their hungry larvae. Bull Ants can be some of the largest ants
you’ll see. With some species, reaching up to 2.5cm in
length, and the queens measuring even larger. Here you can see the difference against an
averaged sized ant. As you can see, Bull Ants are like giants
by comparison. Generally, however, the larger the species,
the longer it takes for the brood to develop and for workers to emerge. Because these ants are so large, the life
cycle of the ant, from egg to adult, can take several months. It’s worth the wait though, as Bull Ant
workers exhibit greater longevity in comparison to other ants, having a life expectancy of
over a year in age. Whereas, the more common, smaller species,
tend to live for only just a few months. These Bull Ant workers also possess a unique
ability, in that they can actually reproduce with male ants and lay fertile eggs. Becoming what’s known as, gamergates. In most other species of ants, it’s only
the queen of the colony which is able to do this, and all the workers are completely sterile. This trait is particularly useful if the original
queen of the colony were to die. As a gamergate or two, would then be able
to take over the role of egg laying and extend the lifespan of colony. All these unique characteristics makes Bull
Ants a true favourite of mine. Despite this, I’ve never actually raised
up a colony of them until now. I was always a bit apprehensive, as they can
be quite aggressive and do have the ability to sting. Because of their great sense of sight, they’re
immediately drawn to any movements. So it’s really hard to do basic things around
their nest, like adding in and removing foods, without causing any alarm. I’ve never been stung by a Bull Ant before,
or ant for that matter. But apparently they deliver quite a potent
and painful sting. With some species of Bull Ants being considered
the most toxic within the entire insect world. So if you do come across these guys, I’d
recommend keeping a good distance and definitely wouldn’t recommend trying to raise them
if you’re a beginning ant keeper or prone to allergies. Currently, I’ve got this colony housed within
a test tube setup which is placed within a plastic container, acting as their foraging
area. Which is the kind of setup I’d recommend for
young colonies like this one. They really don’t require too much food
at this point. I’ve just been feeding them little slices
of fruit, like apple and mango, and occasionally some sugar water, every few days. They’re not so interested in insects right
now. This is due to colony not having any larvae
present. Unlike the omnivorous adults, Bull ant larvae
are known to be carnivorous, so once the eggs do hatch into larvae, I’ll be sure to offer
them insects more regularly. So far the colony looks to be doing well and
has quite a large pile eggs going, which I’ve noticed the queen likes to constantly stand
guard over. I didn’t actually catch this queen myself,
I obtained it through Brendon, who has only recently got into ant keeping. Within that time, however, he’s been engrossed
into the hobby, and has caught and raised dozens of different species, and has even
founded a website all about ant keeping, at gamergate.com.au. Here, they showcase intuitive formicarium
designs from ant keepers all over the world, and post some really amazing,
original photographs of all sorts of different ant species. They also offer queen ants and colonies for
sale. Which is great if you’re interested in getting
into the hobby, but struggling to find a queen, or just acquiring one of those rare, difficult
to find species, which in my case, would be these Jumping Jacks here. After observing Bull Ants in the wild and
filming all the footage for this video, and as well as raising a colony of these ants,
I’ve developed a real fondness for them. Discovering they aren’t as ruthless and aggressive
as they look, and as people make them out to be, but are actually rather timid and quirky
in behavior. If you keep still and don’t make any sudden
movements, they don’t really seem to take much notice of you and continue on going about
their business. When they do spot you, they become fixated
on your movements and usually will just cautiously back up. As long as they don’t see you as a threat
to them and their colony, they’re really quite harmless. And personally, I think they look adorable. Just look how curious this little worker is. So that’s it for this video. I really hope you’ve enjoyed. I put a lot of time and effort into making
these, so if you did like it, share it with your friends, it really helps me out. In my next video, I’ll be showcasing the infamous
Argentine Ants, and looking at a young colony of which I’ve recently started raising. So look forward to that and thanks for watching.

How Fire Ants Took Over America 🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥

How Fire Ants Took Over America 🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥


[MUSIC] There’s nothing like walking through cool
grass on a warm summer’s day. But every Southerner knows that a barefoot
stroll in the yard comes with risks… “Ow, ow! OW!” This fire ant mound should be a familiar sight
to anybody who lives in the southern U.S. But you won’t see them marching around in little
lines on the ground. We’re surrounded by an underground network of foraging tunnels, but
this is home base. And the best way to get to know what’s inside is to give it a poke. A fire ant’s main senses are touch and smell.
The slightest disturbance and workers release alarm pheromones, a chemical signal that can
raise the entire mound to defense within seconds. Anything sitting still is now a target, so
let’s get out of here. A fire ant’s bite isn’t what hurts. Their
mouths only serve as anchors so they can curl around a sharp stinger and inject a dose of
venom, a painful reminder they’re in the same order of insects as bees and wasps: the
Hymenoptera. Insect researcher Justin O. Schmidt developed
a pain index for Hymenoptera venom, mostly by allowing himself to be stung over and over.
The tiny sweat bee, for instance, is a 1… “a tiny spark singeing a single hair”.
The bullet ant scores a 4, the most painful grade, like “fire-walking over flaming charcoal
with a 3-inch rusty nail in your heel.” Fire ants score a mere 1.2 on the Schmidt
Pain Index, but they tend to sting multiple times, like this one did. It’s already starting
a local immune response around that venom: it’s red, it’s itchy, it’s burning. It does
not feel good. Within a few days the cells will actually die and leave me with a nice
little white bump that I will not be able to resist popping. The things I do for this
show. These stings have made fire ants a target
of pure, unadulterated hate in the southern U.S., but it’s important to remember that
just like us, these ants are an imported species. The red imported fire ant, arrived in the
U.S. between 1933 and 1942, accidentally scooped from their home in South America, placed onboard
a ship, and dropped in Mobile, Alabama. They left behind a hard life full of daily
ant warfare, but in Alabama they found opportunity, few enemies, and a boy named Edward Wilson.
E.O. Wilson would later become the world’s leading expert in ant biology, but as a teenage
scientist in Mobile, he recorded the first known sighting of imported fire ants.
Over the next two decades, as Wilson and other scientists watched these ants spread out from
Alabama, southern farmers went into full freak out. [DRAMATIC MUSIC] Now, maybe it was because the nation still
had war on the mind, or the ants had “red” in their name, but the US stopped at nothing
to eradicate them. Retired World War II bombers took to the air loaded with pesticide, indiscriminately
showering the South with millions of tons of poison. We’d later learn that the pesticides used
were many times more toxic than DDT. E.O. Wilson called the bombing campaign the
“Vietnam of entomology” and it was one of the inspirations for Rachel Carson’s
“Silent Spring.” In the end, aerial pesticides did do a lot of killing, but instead of fire
ants, it was mostly to livestock, birds, fish, and native ant species. Nature hates a vacuum. By wiping out the native
ants, we made it easier for imported fire ants to advance. They’ve since spread from
Florida to Texas… on to California, even to Mexico, China, and Australia. Solenopsis
invicta seems perfectly evolved for invasion. Part of the answer lies in their how they
reproduce. Hordes of winged males and future queens take to the air in massive mating flights.
Pregnant queens then air-drop into new open territory free of competition, break off their
wings, and bury themselves to give birth to new colonies. In many places, like here Texas, a genetic
variation has made some fire ants lose their territorial nature. Many colonies here are
home to many queens, they’re more densely packed than their territorial relatives, allowing
them to spread like a creeping fungus instead of airborne seeds. Thanks to their tropical origins, during floods,
entire fire ant colonies can clump together and float until they find a new home. They
invade by land, air, and water. It’s no coincidence fire ants and humans
are constantly running into each other. Fire ants crave disturbance, and humans provide
that everywhere we go. Think of it this way: If you clear an area, take away the natural
vegetation, the first thing to move back in are weeds, and so it is with fire ants: Tiny
animal weeds. Like weeds, they’re more annoying than dangerous,
but imported fire ants cost $6 billion every year, damaging everything from golf courses
to electrical equipment, where they sometimes nest. Eradication is impossible, but the answer
to controlling them might come from their South American home. Tiny buzzing insects, barely visible to the
naked eye. Ant-decapitating flies.
Phorid flies – that’s their technical name – are one of invicta’s natural enemies back
home. They hover over unsuspecting workers, zip
down, lay an egg inside the ant, and fly away. That egg hatches, a maggot crawls into the
ant’s head, eats everything inside, and eventually the ant’s head falls off.
Scientists have imported these flies into the U.S. so they can be used as a biological
control method. One fly can terrorize hundreds of ants, putting a whole colony on the defensive.
These flies are super-specific to the species they attack, so scientists don’t think they’ll
become a threat to native ants. But even if phorid fly control works perfectly,
imported fire ants will remain permanent residents. The name “invicta” means “unconquered”
after all. Just like the people who accidentally brought
them here, these ants found themselves in a strange land of opportunity, just trying
to make the best of it. The bright side is that after decades of studying how to kill
‘em, the fire ant now rivals the honeybee as the best understood of all social insects.
And for all their stinging, they’ve taught us a ton about evolution, social behavior,
and of course parasites that make your head fall off. Karl von Frisch said something about those
honeybees that I think applies equally well to fire ants:
They’re “…like a magic well, the more you draw from it, the more there is to draw.” Who knows, each time we walk barefoot through
their little world, maybe they’ve just been begging to be noticed.
Stay curious.

Free Handling Bullet Ants?!

Free Handling Bullet Ants?!


– I’m going to
free-handle a bullet ant. – Oh, risky. Now you’re conquering
the bullet ant. – Well I do feel pretty
confident at this point that I’ve already taken a sting, it was a pretty bad sting. But, I’m pretty comfortable
just free-handling one of these ants. – Mark, are you ready? – Are you gonna do it?
– Is it possible? – Yeah.
– Ooh, ooh, ooh. – (Laughing) Be careful. (pounding jungle
music with drums) Well guys, it is
officially the end of 2016. I cannot believe
it, I’m still alive, gone through many crazy
episodes this past year. What I wanna do is to
actually bring the guys who are normally
behind the camera in front of the cameras with me. So Mark, Mario, come on
down here and join me. – [Mark] Woo, all right!
– Yeah. Ah!
– Mario, we’re on screen. (laughter and claps) – These guys, what a year, dude. – Yeah.
– My buddies right here. We could not bring you
guys all this content without these two guys
behind the camera. Now it’s been a wild year. It has been the year
of the bullet ant. – [Mark] Yeah it
has been actually. – And actually, I’ve
got one right here in this little container. – (Laughing) You brought one? – Yeah I did, and you know what? – Uh oh!
– What are you doing? – I’m going to
free-handle a bullet ant. – Oh, risky. Now you’re conquering
the bullet ant. – Look at that, well I
do feel pretty confident at this point, that I’ve
already taken a sting. It was a pretty bad sting. But, I’m pretty comfortable
just free-handling one of these ants.
– Mark, are you ready? – Is that possible?
– You gonna do it? You ready?
– Yeah, oh, oh, ooh. – Be careful.
(suspenseful drumbeats) – [Mark] I need a little help. – There you go.
– [Mario] There you go, Mark. – [Coyote] Look at that,
there’s the director of Brave Wilderness Shows
free-handling a bullet ant. A little nerve-wracking, huh? – A little bit.
– What’s that feel like? – [Mark] I try not to
think about it right now. – [Coyote] Now what
we need you to do. – [Mark] I’m trying to
stay as still as possible. – Is take a sting
and then present. – (laughing) Okay, I don’t
want to take your job, that’s your job. – [Coyote] Yeah, we already
cut, let’s do that again, Mark. – (Laughing) No, no. – [Coyote] All right,
let me get the ant back onto my hand,
okay there we go. – Woo!
(laughing) – Bullet ant back
in the container. Okay, let’s back it up. So the beginning
of the year started with the harvester ants.
– That’s right. – [Coyote] Then there
were the fire ants. – [Mark] That was bad,
that was a lot worse than we anticipated. – [Coyote] Yeah, the fire
ants were really, really bad. Then it went to
the alligator bite. – [Mark] Um, hm.
– That one was pretty gnarly. – [Mark] Yeah.
– Then it was. – [Mark] Leeches?
– The leeches, we did the leeches. There was the crab pinch. Then there was the
velvet ant sting. – [Mark] And the
tarantula hawk sting. – And the tarantula hawk sting, that was a rough one for me. And then we finally made
it here to Costa Rica where we faced the
bullet ant challenge, and that was crazy. The ant’s stinger actually
got lodged in my arm. I actually still have.
– You can still see it, yeah. – A scar right there.
– Right there. – Man, that was wild. And we’re at the end of our
Costa Rica trip right now and you may notice my
voice is pretty hoarse. – [Mark] Yeah,
we’ve been filming for the last 12 days straight. – 12 straight days
of power presenting in front of the camera. What are we coming
away with, 15 episodes? – 15 pieces, yeah. – 15 pieces of
content in 12 days. So looking back on
the whole year, Mario, which episode or location do
you think was your favorite? – Oh well, Alaska was such a
different environment for me. The animals are different,
the climate was different, everything about it. So I think that stands
out for me, Alaska, yeah. – Well definitely, I mean,
I think the craziest thing that happened to us in Alaska
was that bear encounter, where we ran into
that sow and her cubs on the side of river. I mean, talk about a real moment that you could never
plan to capture on camera that we got little
bits and pieces of and managed to put out that
episode, The Bear Scare. – Yeah I’ll never forget that. I remember hearing
you, that this is like, “Bear, bear.” And I’m like, “Am I getting
attacked by a bear?” (laughing) “Wait, is he getting
attacked by a bear?” – All right, so Mark what
was your favorite location or moment from this past year? – For me personally, it’s
actually unreleased video. You guys are gonna be
seeing it soon, the green and black poison frog has
been my favorite animal since I was nine years old. If Ms. Honeycutt’s out there,
I actually did a project in Science class on that frog. So getting to actually
be out here in Costa Rica and hold one, that’s
been a 23 year journey for that moment. So, for me that
was really special. So hopefully you guys
will like that episode, it’s gonna be coming soon,
but that’s my highlight. – Um hm, oh so many great
episodes are coming out of this trip here to Costa Rica. I probably have a favorite I
could pick out of this trip, but when I look back at
the year, I’d have to say that the wolverine
was my favorite. – [Mark] Um, hm, right, yeah. – As we expressed to you
guys in that episode, it has taken us so many
years to be able to get to Alaska, I got to
work with Steve Kroschel and get up close with
that amazing animal. It’s something I
will never forget and it was awesome. I mean, you talk about
our year on YouTube, the wolverine episode
premiered, trending as the number one video
the day after Thanksgiving. Which was amazing.
– Amazing. – A 30 minute video,
and that was you guys watching the video,
getting it to number one. I mean, we trended so
many times this past year and subscribers, all of you,
new members of the Coyote Pack. – Yeah.
– I mean Mark, what was the biggest day we had? – I think the velvet
ant sting day. – Yeah.
– I remember I was on a flight to Spain actually, and I was watching
our sub counter just
go ding, ding, ding. So, just so humbling that
that many people are jumping on board the Brave
Wilderness ship and watching all this great animal content. – And what was it? 342,000 new subscribers
in a single day? – In a single day. I think we got, there
was a million of you who joined in just a
period of three days. – Yeah, three days there
was 1.2 million new members of the Coyote Pack
in just three days. Now we do have some
cool stuff planned for you guys in 2017. First of all, we will
be traveling worldwide at this point. What’s our first location? – [Mark] We’re actually
going to be coming back to Costa Rica in January on
the west coast this time. So we’ll be bringing you
cool stuff from there. But what Mario and I are
really excited about, we’re going to Australia. So that’s.
– Oh man. Lots and lots of reptiles. – [Mark] Yeah,
it’s gonna be good. Lots of snakes, lots of lizards. – [Coyote] Lots of danger. – Lots of tide pools, all
kinds of cool, creepy crawlies to get in front of the camera.
– Yeah. – We’ve only explored
just one little part of the world so far.
– Yeah. – [Mario] I mean
the world is huge. – [Mark] North America. – [Mario] The animal
kingdom is huge. Like so many bizarre
creatures that we haven’t even come upon yet. – [Coyote] Um, hm.
– I’m excited. – Well I know, speaking
on behalf of myself and the entire crew,
both here in the field and in post production,
we couldn’t thank the audience more,
the Coyote Pack. You guys grow more and
more every single day. It inspires us to get
out here into the wild, take the risks that we
do, battling the elements of nature to get the
episodes right there in front of the lens,
and then eventually out to you guys on YouTube. And all I know is that
if we can come near to as close in 2017
as we did in 2016, it’s gonna be
another amazing year. You guys ready? – [Mario] Yeah.
– Let’s do it. – Let’s do it.
– All right. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you guys next year. – Woo!
– Woo, bullet ants! If you enjoyed our
end of the year video, make sure to go back and
watch my favorite episode of 2016, Phantom
of the Wilderness, featuring the wolverine. And don’t forget,
subscribe so you can join me and the crew on
our next location. No, no, no, no, no, no,
we’ve got meat and you, I need you to go this way. Go this way, okay I’ll
get behind the meat. (growling, crackling) (crashing pound, wolf howls) (birds chirp)