I Stuck My Arm into Thousands of WEAVER ANTS

I Stuck My Arm into Thousands of WEAVER ANTS


Before we begin today’s episode I wanted to
let everyone know that AntsCanada.com is having its big AC annual holidays Promo: the 20-2020
sale. That’s 20% off all Hybrid Series ant farms
and gear packs from now until January 2020, plus a free copy of our newly updated “Ultimate
Ant Keeping Handbook”, right now at AntsCanada.com. Click the link in the description to get your
AC ant farm today! And now enjoy today’s ant episode! Speaking of trees and being vigilant, making
sure everything was in order, I noticed the Canopy of Vortexia, our tree-top forest home
to our aggressive Weaver Ant Colony, The Emerald Empire was in need of some serious maintenance. First, the piping of the rain system had unstuck
from the glass. Also, the trees have seriously overgrown and
they needed to be cut back big time! But there’s just one problem, the only way
in was to open these front glass doors and well, it seems the weaver ants had decided
to fuse its main leaf nest to the glass. Oh boy! This whole maintenance operation was going
to be interesting! Last week, we had a fun-filled journey exploring
various kingdoms in our AC Antiverse. We visited Pacmania, this moss-adorned home
of our Surinam horned frog. Also, we prepped the moat surrounding Skull
Island, home to our ghost ants. And of course, our biggest accomplishment
last week, we crafted the greatest vivarium we’ve ever created in the AC Antiverse, a
multi-species, bioactive domain for the Dark Knights. These exciting journeys of discovery and adventure
around the ant room certainly don’t end there. This week holds yet again, another exhilarating
episode as we continue to dig deep, climb up, and experience first-hand the marvelous
territories of our beloved ant colonies. AC Family, without further ado, let’s begin
this week’s exploration! Standing tall in our collection of ants and
other animals, here in the AC Antiverse, is the Canopy of Vortexia, home to the extravagant
Emerald Empire. This savage colony of weaver ants, scientifically
known as Oecophylla smaragdina, has shown us their brilliance through the building of
their cool leaf basket nests in the trees, their collection of protein sources, and even
through their apparent understanding of sustainability and growth management of the Vortexian trees
on which they live. It seems that we have seen practically everything
these mighty and hard-working arboreal ants can do. But, this time, I wanted to push the boundary
of what is possible for the Emerald Empire’s housing, and it involves sticking my arm and
even my face into their highly guarded territories. Yup! It’s totally crazy, but hey, someone’s gotta
do it, but don’t worry. I have a plan, so stay tuned for that. But before we get started, for those of you
who are new to the channel, let’s catch you up to speed. In celebration for reaching 3 Million subscribers,
I decided try keeping these highly popular ants in the ant world – Asian Weaver Ants. Native to Southeast Asia, these Weaver Ants
are known for their arboreal life as they build their nest atop trees. To create their homes, they use silk produced
by their larvae effectively gluing tree leaves together. The transpiration from the leaves helps naturally
humidify the insides of their leaf nests, and as the leaves wilt, the ants go on to
create new leaf nests on the same tree. They seem to know when to start new nests,
which they do well in advance before their current nests wilt, and appear to somehow
have a feeling for how much their able to build sustainably so that their host plant
doesn’t die out. They’re surely one of the most captivating
ant colonies I’ve ever kept. Three months after the creation of the Canopy
of Vortexia, this is what the territory looks like now. Look! The trees had overgrown. Seems they had been working on plans for this
money tree to grow much taller and their plant management initiatives have been working! This money tree has grown leaves that extend
up to the top mesh, but here’s the very concerning problem with that: if I leave this tree unchecked,
I know for certain that its force would eventually push through the mesh, destroying the terrarium,
and setting the ants free. Hey, wait a second! Could this be the Emerald Empire’s master
plan of escape? OK not gunna even go there! Also, there were other tuning and maintenance
issues that needed to be dealt with like dislodged piping from the rain system, glass cleaning,
a hanging dead leaf nest which drove my OC mind insane, and this stray plastic cup that
fell from their feeding plate, which I’ve been dying for months to pick up and dispose. Given these major and minor concerns, it was
no doubt in my mind that maintenance was needed, but due to the way their enclosure was designed,
the only way I could get in was by opening these two front glass panels, so going into
Vortexia wasn’t something I could do every day. Vortexia maintenance definitely was something
I intended on doing as infrequently as possible and only when necessarily needed. Now AC Family, check out what else I was thinking
regarding all this! So the Dark Knight’s new bioactive planted
vivarium home we made last week, full of creatures like millipedes, bagworms, jumping spider,
etc living with the ant colony, made for a very self-sustaining ecosystemic environment. So I figured, then, if Vortexia was also made
much more bioactive, theoretically it would mean that I’d have to open the terrarium less
often and perhaps even improve the quality of the Emerald Empire’s life by making their
home much more natural, much more bioactive! And so AC Family, after careful thought, it
was then that I decided, while doing maintenance on Vortexia, it was also time for us to upgrade
the territories a notch, and transform Vortexia into a multi-species, bioactive vivarium. But before I tell you how I’m going to do
that, and what creatures I plan on adding to Vortexia, there was a neighbouring ant
kingdom that was also in need of some maintenance. To the West of Vortexia, sits the mystical
double floating islands of Avista, home to our Big-Headed ants, the Bobbleheads. You, the AC Family, named them after the big
heads of the supermajor workers. Take a look at how some of these supermajors
sport rather comically enlarged heads, compared to the ordinary workers. The big heads specialize in cutting things
up by the way! The great jaw force of the colony! Of the entire AC Antiverse, the home of the
Bobbleheads stands out because it is our only truly open-concept, glass-less ant setup. As you may see here, the potted bonsai plants
are rooted down into the soils which extend into these two jars which hold the island
up. Meanwhile, these jars are placed in the middle
of a glass enclosure, whose short walls are covered in baby powder, thereby keeping the
ants within the premises. From afar, the home of the Bobbleheads look
like floating mini-gardens. A second island is situated there in the back,
but we’ll visit that island in a sec. At the center of the main island grows a bonsai
red banyon tree, that we call the Great Tree of Life. The tree gets its name because it provides
life to the Bobbleheads in a few interesting ways. First, the tree offers the Bobbleheads shelter
as they nest beneath the solid tree, protected among its roots. It also houses herds of mealybugs, which the
ants farm and milk for their sweet honeydew excretions. Finally, the tree also eats up their ant poop,
a great fertilizer! In fact, this partnership between ant and
tree has been going so well, that the tree has grown profusely, and I’ve had to continually
trim the tree back almost once a week. In fact, I am about to do it now. Here we go! I started with the outer leaves. Now, watch this, guys! Every time I snip or fiddle around with their
sacred Tree of Life, the Bobbleheads get super mad! The ants never back down from defending their
precious tree! This has become a weekly ritual now. And oh boy! Here they come! The Bobbleheads came rushing out of their
nest with a sole mission to bite and attack my giant hands from the skies. Sorry Bobbleheads, but this process is essential
for the maintenance of your sacred Tree of Life. Hang tight! Ok, I’m done! Sheesh! No need to get feisty! Now, trimming the tree was not all that needed
to be done. First, the second island’s tree had actually
died. This once luscious bonsai tree of a different
species was now withered and dead. I suppose the species of tree did not fare
well in the semi-shaded conditions of my window, so it died. However, I couldn’t just get rid of the island
because ants were still nesting within its soils, as well. I needed to plant a new tree there to replace
the dead tree, because it does seem trees happen to be the Bobbleheads’ secret to success. I mean, look at how big the colony has grown
over time! You can truly appreciate the sheer size of
the colony every time I water the islands. They always come rushing out with their brood,
and I even get a glimpse of the royal queens surfacing at times. It was clear that this supercolony was now
bigger than ever. And so AC Family, aside from restoring their
second island by planting a replacement tree, I felt it was finally time to also give the
Bobbleheads a third floating island. Back to the Vortexia, I knew making the territories
more bioactive meant introducing more organisms to Vortexia, and so here was my plan! First, I knew I needed to increase the ground
cover vegetation. So I felt this gorgeous-looking heart-leaf
philodendron, scientifically called Philodendron cordatum, one of the hardiest terrarium plants
I know, was perfect. Next, I wanted to add some awesome leaf litter,
scooped up from my neighbourhood. It contained tonnes of springtails, isopods,
millipedes, and beneficial mites that would help breakdown organic waste to help fertilize
the plants in Vortexia. And hey look what else I found: this leaf
litter also contained a miniature species of forest roach. How cool right?! Speaking of which, check out the next creatures
I wanted to add: Dubia roaches, scientifically known as Blaptica dubia. These roaches, as you may or may not know,
are my feeder roaches, meaning I pre-crush them and feed them to various animals of my
Ant Room. But, after thinking about it for a bit, I
figured these roaches would be an awesome addition to Vortexia! They can eat decaying leaves that fall to
the floor, plus possibly the dead leaf nests from the trees. If you wish to know more about these underrated
and seldom recognized Dubia roaches, here’s a video I made about them and their home. Plus, I have been noticing that every now
and then, the Emerald Empire has been catching darkling beetles in Vortexia. The mealworms and superworms that we feed
to our various colonies in the Ant Room are actually larvae of darkling beetles. I guess sometimes the superworms survive my
pre-crushing somehow and manage to escape the deadly mandibles of their ant predators,
seeking out safe locations within the terrariums to proceed with the process of pupation, and
development into these shiny black darkling beetles, and it seems the Emerald Empire has
managed to successfully hunt these survivors at ground level. I’ve actually seen this happen with the Fire
Nation and Dark Knights, as well. Given these past experiences, I figured, why
not try to allow insect prey to populate the floors of Vortexia, reproduce on their own
while eating up decaying matter like they would in the wild, but also provide the Weaver
Ants with a supply of prey items. Now wait! I know what you guys are thinking! Ahhhh AntsCanada has changed his ways! He’s now condoning live feeding! Let’s cancel him! Hold on! I still make it a personal rule to never feed
live prey to animals like ants, that don’t need to eat live prey, because it’s a slow
and painful death for the prey item, but in this case, the prey animals would have a great
chance at escaping and avoiding the ants, by burrowing into the leaf litter or into
the ground, and can otherwise feed, breed, and live normally as they would in the wild. It theoretically would be an equal playing
field for prey and predator, in my mind anyway, so the cruelty factor isn’t technically even
an issue both for the Dubia roaches and darkling beetles living with the Emerald Empire in
Vortexia. The ants could simply wander around the forest
floor below their leaf nests to hunt for prey, which the ants do in the wild. I am sure that the co-existence of Vortexian
prey and predators would make for a very interesting bioworld. So first, I needed to remove this dead tree
on the second island in order to replace it with the new tree for the Bobbleheads. I removed the entire island from the island
network. Taking the island off its foundation base,
you can see that the jar is filled with soil in which the Bobbleheads were still nesting. I knew that removing the tree from the pot
had to be done with the utmost care because surely there were still ants nesting in the
soils. I was already expecting a tonne of Bobbleheads
to come rushing out once I they felt me touching their dead tree. So, here goes nothing! I carefully removed the rock from the island
then proceeded to cut the tree off at the roots, then attempted to firmly but carefully
pull the dead tree from the pot. Pop! The tree broke right off, and I made a bit
of a mess, but thankfully, no ants came boiling out. Perhaps they didn’t care about the tree much
since it was already dead. Good! Now, in its place I wanted to plant this baby
Schefflera plant, which also happens to be the same species as one of the trees used
in Vortexia. I feel this would be a better adapted plant
to the conditions next to my window, seeing as it’s done so well in Vortexia. I planted the Scheflera plant in. OK, so THIS WAS THE CRAZIEST THING I’ve ever
done in my life! I know you’ve heard me say this before, but
No, this is! As you may or may not know, although these
weaver ants don’t have stingers like the Fire Nation, they still possess some powerful mandibles
and a bite from these ladies combined with a painful formic acid spray is enough to make
any trespasser scream! Plus, what made this operation extra scary
was that the Emerald Empire had decided to fuse their main leaf nest to the door of their
terrarium. Could this get any more scary? I worry that as soon as I open this glass
door, it would rattle the nest, setting the weaver ants into an angry frenzy. I needed to prepare myself and make sure I
had a plan of attack. I needed to know what things I had to grab,
cut, pull out, and add before I went in to the territories. There was no time to think as soon as those
glass doors were open! I ran through the motions and checklist of
tasks in my head many times, as I knew it was imperative to get things right the first
time so the tank would be open for the shortest amount of time possible. It wasn’t a matter of if the weaver ants would
be attacking and escaping, it was a matter of how many! So AC Family, here was my plan. Are you ready? So, apparently there’s a superstition or tradition
among mango farmers, who have to deal with these ants when harvesting mangoes. Legend has it that if you whisper to the ants,
telling them that you are a friend and aren’t going to harm them, the ants will leave you
alone and allow you to pick the fruit without launching an attack. If the legends were true, this told me then,
that it was possible to work around these ants as long as I was gentle, and not just
obtrusively moving in shaking things around like a predator. Boy, did I hope I was right and the legends,
true! I put on my gloves and covered my hands and
arms with baby powder. There were ants that were already showing
signs of wanting to tear my skin up at the earliest opportunity. Why so aggressive, ladies? You can even see them here congregating at
the door opening, ready to greet trespassers with mandibles and acid. But I had no choice. Vortexia needed maintenance and there was
no other way. I took a deep breath… and looked down at
the key that would unlock the door. AC Family, behold, the new island I planned
on connecting to Avista. Isn’t it cute? It had three bonsai’d money trees, also one
of the two trees in Vortexia, so it was bound to do well as part of Avista. Green moss grew like a carpet along the front
of the island. I prepared the tray on which the new island
would rest by mixing baby powder and rubbing alcohol and painting it along the walls. Once dried no Bobblehead would be able to
scale these vertical surfaces. I then proceeded to add the two new islands
to Avista and arranged for the driftwood to create the connecting bridge between the three
land masses. And there we have it, Avista is now officially
an archipelago. Aren’t these islands beautiful AC Family? Looking from afar, the islands were a luscious
garden of greenery. I couldn’t wait to watch the Bobbleheads explore
their new territories, and of course, as always, in celebration of their new home, I provided
them with a tasty bite! “Please don’t bite.” I whispered softly, summoning up the most
calming words that came to mind: “Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel…” OK just kidding. That’s not what I said. Ahem… “Emerald Empire, I come in peace. I’m a friend, your Creator of Worlds”. The ants menaced me from the edges, watching
the tape being removed from the doors. “I am not interested in destroying your home.” With the tapes removed, I unlocked the door
and slowly opened one of the panels. Oh, there! The glass panel opened and to my surprise
the leaf nest detached quite easily without too much fuss — thank goodness! While some brave ants decided to wander out
and escape, I decided not to mind them for now, and focus on the task at hand, moving
as slowly and gently as possible. It seemed to be working. The ants weren’t rushing in a mad panic, but
were strangely standing quite still watching me. First things first. I went in and wiped the glass and the sticky
pads of the piping to improve its suction. Reattaching. There! Pipe reinstalled. One task down. Next, it was time to go into the canopy! I went in carefully and snipped away at excess
leaves. It tripped me out to see the weaver ant nests
so exposed to the outside world for the first time since they were moved in. I had to be extra careful not to touch any
of the main branches or groupings of ants. All it took was one startled ant to hit the
panic button, which would set off the release of thousands of angry weaver ants onto my
body and ultimately out into the ant room. Snip, snip. I placed the clippings on the ground. As these leaves decay, they’d contribute to
the bioactivity of the vivarium. This would also make sure that we keep any
weaver ants still clinging on to these leaves. I could feel some weaver ants crawling on
my neck now but surprisingly not biting me yet. They even crawled up my legs. The weaver ants were now all over the immediate
area and on me. The whole time, I felt like I was performing
a complex medical surgery, with guns pointed at me, ready to fire at any moment. I was holding my breath and made sure to be
unwaveringly present in mind and body. My movements needed to be precise and accurate. Every moment was crucial. My heart was beating loudly in my ears the
whole time. I noticed so many ants were already wandering
out of the terrarium, and it was in that moment that I received my very first bite Ahhhhh! The Bobbleheads were biting the superworm
housewarming gift, I gave them with such joy and gusto. It wasn’t long before the Bobbleheads had
discovered the two new islands we had prepared for them. It was so awesome to see! Ants traveled across the driftwood bridge
to check out the new territories they could call home. It was moments like this that made ant keeping
just so fulfilling! Ahhh! I brushed the biting ant away. Despite the bite, surprisingly, the majority
of the ants were still calm. I had to keep going and not be bothered by
the pain. I proceeded to carefully remove the dead leaf
nest and rest it onto the floor. Gosh, I had dreamed of removing this hanging
piece for months, I can’t even begin to describe! Now it was time to add the leaf litter. I made sure that every bit of the ground was
covered in this magical medium sauce teaming with bioactive life forms. I proceeded to add the plant. Then, I dumped the Dubia roaches. I threw in the superworms to join the party. And just when I thought everything was complete,
I remembered there was one last suction cup to restick onto the wall to fixate the pipe. But to reach this, I had to open the other
glass door panel. Now, all of the Canopy of Vortexia was exposed
to the outside world. Reaching deeper into the terrarium to restick
the pipe onto the glass, I found myself face to face with the Emerald Empire, just inches
away from my head! And when I thought that I had experienced
the worst part, there came another big surprise. Another bite “AHHH!” While the Bobbleheads were enjoying their
superworm, another battle was happening. Just nearby the Bobbleheads had seized a trespasser. A wandering weaver ant had somehow managed
to set foot on the new island. Of course, there was no hope for the weaver
ant against the Bobbleheads, who pulled at the weaver ant from all sides and mauled it
to death. A second weaver ant had also been unfortunate
enough to land on the island, and the Bobbleheads were quick to capture it. I suppose the weaver ants managed to climb
up into the lighting fixture above Avista and fell down to their demise into the foreign
ant kingdom. There was just no hope for them though, as
they were greatly outnumbered. The Bobbleheads were indeed savage! Arghh! The Emerald Empire was indeed savage! I had to finish up now! I restuck the last piping found on the other
side of Vortexia, and just like that I was done. I had only been bitten twice during the ordeal,
which is not bad! I sealed the tank up and the mission was complete! I was happy to know that it would be months
until the next maintenance visit into the Canopy of Vortexia was due. And just on time, the great typhoons arrived
to cool off the lands! Over the past 4 days, the Bobbleheads had
settled into their new network of triple islands quite nicely. I ended up swapping out the base to one large
shared glass pan for the two smaller islands, as this was much more space-efficient. My dreams of Avista becoming a huge archipelago
of floating islands were coming true. As were my dreams of Vortexia. AC Family, look! It was now a multi-species vivarium. The roaches lived happily in the forest habitat
provided by Vortexia. They occupied the leaf litter, huddled in
spaces within the driftwood, and even were daring enough to climb up into the treetops
and congregate along the screen mesh. Escaped ants were collected one by one by
hand over the passing days and inserted back into Vortexia. The rest were hunted down by the house geckoes
that run loose in the Ant Room. Speaking of hunting, I did also catch the
ants hunting the roaches. Look at this! They caught a huge adult male! I had no idea they could seize prey this big! Or maybe it had already died and they were
opportunistically making use of the carcass? Whatever the case, now that these tree-dominated
territories of Vortexia and Avista were restored anew, and the ants residing in these lands
we created, enjoying upgrades to their homes, it filled my heart with so much joy. One thing’s for sure, I learned today how
intimately connected my ants were to the trees that lived in their territories, how protective
they were of them, and just how much the health and well-being of the ant colonies inherently
depended on the health and well-being of the plants they live with. Isn’t that something we continue to discover
every time we step into these microworlds of our ants, AC Family? That to truly appreciate one organism, one
must understand the bigger picture, understand how its connected to other organisms around
it, and when you do, understand why its important to tend to, clean up, restore, respect, and appreciate the interconnected-ness of
life and the environment in which it is contained. And due to this great interconnection, Mother
Nature has set up, I learned this week, that in caring for life, we inherently care for
ourselves. After a long and successful day, I looked
down at the clippings and dead tree I had collected from our projects. Ordinarily, I would throw these away, but
suddenly an awesome idea came to me, an idea that I felt could completely change and affect
the lives of every creature and terrarium in the entire AC Antiverse! AC Family, it was time to embark on a new
and exciting biological engineering project! AC Family, did you enjoy this week’s episode? Trees are indeed integral parts of some of
our ant colonies. And like last week, this week’s episode is
in part, the AC Team’s collaboration with Mr. Beast, Smarter Everyday, Mark Rober and
thousands of other YouTubers in their quest to plant 20 million trees by January 2020. So, be sure to be part of the team trees movement,
by visiting TeamTrees.org to help out! It only costs $1 per tree. This simple gesture will make such a big difference
globally! Also, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please
be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button so you don’t miss out on the epic real-life stories
of the ants and other creatures of the ant room, and don’t forget to hit the like button
every single time including now! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like to see some extended play footage of me working within Vortexia,
as well as the aftermath. The new Vortexia is just awesome with all
its new creatures and modifications. Go check it out! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Why do we need to cycle our tank before adding
in our great water beast? Congratulations to 9Hashbrowns who correctly
answered: You have to cycle your tank because if an
animal went inside without cycling it, it would be filled with poison, namely ammonia
from waste. Congratulations 9Hashbrowns, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Name one of the bioactive creatures found
in Vortexia. Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Most PAINFUL Insect Stings In The World!

Most PAINFUL Insect Stings In The World!


From nasty ants to giant evil wasps, here
are 10 of the most painful insect stings…. 10. Yellow Jacket Wasp Yellow Jacket Wasps are the number one cause
of stings on humans in the US as a whole. Variations can be found in countries around
the world, with some being bold, aggressive, and able to sting their targets repeatedly. Chances are that you’ve experienced a sting
by a Yellow Jacket yourself, and it can be a nasty sensation. The pain, which lasts for about 10 minutes,
is caused by a venom that’s injected through the puncture in the skin and can cause swelling
and redness within a few hours. The effects of the sting are rated as a level
2 on the Schmidt pain sting index, the measure that’s used to describe how painful insect
stings are. Justin O. Schmidt, the creator of the index,
is retired entomologist from the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Arizona. He organizes the pain felt by an insect sting
from 1-4, with 4 being the most painful. Fire ant stings are just a 1…so….yeah… He assigned Yellow jacket wasp stings a 2
to give a reference to everyone of how painful stings and bites at higher levels can be. He describes the yellow jacket’s sting as
being ‘hot and smoky, almost irreverent. Imagine W.C Fields extinguishing a cigar on
your tongue’. Schmidt has been stung thousands of times,
most times on purpose, to analyze different stings and has compiled his experiences and
rankings in his book called “The Sting of the Wild”. Contrary to what you might think, he’s not
a masochist, but he was trying to understand the evolution of social behavior for insects
such as wasps, bees, and ants. Guess what he found out?? The more a colony has to lose and the more
risk, the more pain the insects inflict and the more toxic its venom. A sting is like a bazooka!! 9. Trap-Jaw Ant The Trap Jaw ant is a type of carnivorous
ant that lives in Central and South America, as well as Asia, Australia, and Africa. There are more than 1000 different species
of Trap Jaw ant, each of which has the telltale giant jaws that can snap shut quicker than
the blink of an eye- sometimes as fast as in one-tenth of a millisecond. Being bitten by a spring-loaded jaw like this
is, understandably, rather painful- so much so that it was given a 2.5 on the Schmidt
pain index. The pain experienced is described as ‘Instantaneous
and excruciating. A rat trap snaps your index fingernail.’ Those who are stung by the Trap Jaw ant can
expect to experience this pain for up to 10 minutes. The ants don’t just use their incredible bites
to attack predators or prey. They have also been seen using it to simply
eject intruders from their nests, or even to fling themselves backwards to get out of
harm’s way. 8. Paper Wasp Paper wasps are found in North America, mainly
throughout the Southern Midwest and the South. Unlike other wasp species, they are known
to share nests with others and even return to the same nest for multiple seasons. Paper Wasps are the most common type of sting
encountered by people in the Southern US and have longer and more slender bodies than yellow
jackets. They love to set up their nests in trees and
gardens so many an unsuspecting gardener has accidentally trimmed around the nest, making
them angry!! Their colonies are small, typically consisting
of up to 100 individuals, and they rarely sting far away from the nest. The males aren’t able to sting at all, so
it’s only the females that you need to be careful around- particularly later in the
fall when they are looking for hibernation sites. The sting itself injects venom into the victim,
and the searing pain can last for around 10 minutes. Schmidt describes the pain as “caustic and
burning. Distinctly bitter aftertaste. Like spilling a beaker of hydrochloric acid
on a paper cut.” Yikes!! If it makes you feel any better, everyone
except the fertilized queen will die in the winter. And then the process will start all over again
in a new hive. 7. Maricopa Harvester Ant The Maricopa Harvester Ant is commonly found
in Arizona and other southern US states. They tend to build their nests in mounds of
rocks and gravel, but can also create cemented caps on the tops of nests that are built in
softer areas. While they may look no different to other
types of ants, these ones pack a punch with their bite. Their venom is often said to be the most toxic
insect venom of any in the world, more than 20 times the strength of that of a honey bee—luckily,
they only release it in small doses! Schmidt, specifically mentioned the Maricopa
Harvester Ant at level 3, and described the pain as, ‘After eight unrelenting hours
of drilling into that ingrown toenail, you find the drill wedged into the toe’. Wow, that is really descriptive and makes
me really want to NEVER be bitten by one of these!! The pain can last for up to four hours, but
its attack method compounds this feeling. The ant will grip on with its mandibles, and
writhe about into different positions, releasing further doses of venom as it does so. This is incredibly effective against vertebrate
predators, such as horned lizards, and sure to make you regret getting too close to one! 6. Giant Bull Ant Giant Bull ants are one of the largest types
of ant in the world, and can grow up to 40 mm in length (1.57 inches). They are very recognizable both by their huge
size and their giant mandibles. Of course these giant ants with potent venom
are native to…..Australia!! Obviously!! Their colonies are quite small for ant species,
with only about a few hundred or so in each one, but they defend them aggressively. Hikers and campers often encounter them in
the bush and have experienced the extreme pain they can inflict. The ants have excellent eyesight, which allows
them to detect intruders no matter the light levels, and they have no hesitation to attack. Most who fall victim to the Bull Ant think
that it’s the giant mandibles that have bitten them but, in fact, it’s a sting in the abdomen
that causes it. The venom that the sting injects is capable
of causing pain for a number of DAYS after the encounter, yes, DAYS, and the ants are
able to sting repeatedly; Enabling them to effectively defend themselves against aggressors
and also to capture insect prey. Despite their gigantic jaws, the adult bull
ants feed on nectar. But their larvae however are fed with dead
and paralyzed insects that are then eaten alive. 5. Velvet Ant Velvet ants are actually a family of more
than 3,000 different species of wasp. (Their name is very misleading)! The females are wingless and, therefore, resemble
furry ants running around. They can be any of a range of colors, such
as orange, red, or gold, and are found throughout the world- with 400 species in the American
Southwest alone! I saw a big, fuzzy white one running around
while I was visiting family in New Mexico! While they may look cute, the velvet ant sting
packs a punch- so much so that they are also called ‘cow killer ants’ because it’s rumored
to be strong enough to kill a cow!! Velvet ants will only sting in defensive scenarios,
but if you are unfortunate enough to anger one, the searing pain will last for up to
half an hour. They are solitary animals, which means you
can easily come across one without any sign of a larger colony. Females will even dig into the nesting chambers
of other species of bees and wasps, and lay their eggs on the larvae- which serve as a
food source for the young velvet ants when they are born. If you see a male, though, there’s no need
for concern. They have wings, so are able to feed on the
nectar of flowers.. but this comes at a trade-off… they have no stingers! 4. Warrior Wasp The Warrior Wasp is a species endemic to Central
and South America. It’s a large paper wasp that builds complex
colonies to combat the large number of predators it faces in the region. The species swarms when moving from nest to
nest, and can be highly aggressive. It does, of course, have a powerful defense
method with its sting- one that’s ranked at the top level of a number of pain measures,
and is said to be traumatically painful. In writing his pain index, Schmidt described
the Warrior Wasp’s sting as ‘Torture. You are chained in the flow of an active volcano. Why did I start this list?’ Hes talking about his index. Upon being stung, the pain can last at this
extreme level of intensity for 150 minutes and usually requires medical attention to
try and relieve the symptoms. The problem with the warrior wasp is that,
due to its swarming nature, single stings are rare, and those that come into contact
with them will be subjected to multiple stings. Beyond the severe pain that you would experience,
further health complications would inevitably follow. It’s not called a Warrior for nothin!!! 3. Tarantula Hawk Is it a bird? Is it a spider? It’s the tarantula hawk!! They are actually a type of spider wasp and
get their name from their fondness for hunting tarantulas. Reaching up to 4.5 inches in length (11.43
cm), there are 133 known species of tarantula hawks across South and Central America, along
with the southern US. The spiders are much larger than them, but
the wasps have an arsenal that’s more than enough to take on a tarantula, with researchers
never having seen a spider win in a confrontation. The males get their nutrition from nectar,
and it’s the females that hunt tarantulas to provide food for their offspring. They sting them with their sharp, curved,
stinger that can be up to 7mm long… and the venom permanently paralyzes their prey
but keeps them alive. The wasp then lays an egg on the spider, which
becomes a meal ready in waiting. For the sting to have this kind of effect,
you know it has to be powerful. Most predators stay well clear of tarantula
hawks, but roadrunners do enjoy eating them if they can catch them. On a human, the sting is rated on the top
level of the Schmidt pain index, with Shmidt himself describing the sting as ‘Blinding,
fierce, shockingly electric. A running hairdryer has just been dropped
in your bubble bath’. Luckily the pain doesn’t last for very long,
rarely more than 5 minutes, but you’ll be left with swelling and redness for up to a
week. 2. Bullet Ant Bullet ants are found in the tropical forests
of central and South America, and are identifiable by their red and black coloration, along with
their large pincers and a visible stinger. They can grow from 18-30 mm (0.7-1.2 in),
and build colonies of a few hundred individuals around the bases of trees. They mainly feast on nectar and small animals,
like butterflies, and they are not aggressive unless provoked. If they do decide to attack, though, they
can inflict one of the most painful stings of any insect, because it will make you feel
like you’ve been hit by a bullet. It’s indigenous name translates to mean ‘the
one who wounds deeply’. A sting from a single bullet ant injects a
neurotoxin into the body, and leads to severe pain for 24 hours, along with other side effects
such as blood in feces, a pulsing heart rate, muscle spasms, and the accumulation of fluid
in the stung area. Shmidt described the pain as ‘Pure, intense,
brilliant pain. Like walking over flaming charcoal with a
3-inch nail embedded in your heel’. Others have reported it feels like waves of
pain as if you were getting hit by a red hot poker for at least a day. If that sounds bad enough, it gets worse. When a bullet ant stings, it releases chemicals
that attract other ants to join the attack and sting repeatedly. If you aren’t able to get away from this
onslaught you will most likely be in and out of consciousness for at least a few hours. Good news is that there are little to no lasting
effects after 24 hours, although many people say they don’t know how they made it. These ants are used in tribal initiation rites
where the Satere-Mawe of Brazil make teenage boys wear gloves filled with bullet ants that
are sewn in pointing inward so they repeatedly sting the boy’s hands. These boys repeat this ritual about 20 times
and then, they become warriors. 1. Executioner Wasp Executioner wasps are found in Central and
South America, where locals do everything they can to avoid contact with the species. It’s a large species of paper wasp, with vivid
yellow and brown colorations, and can be identified by their large wings and mandibles, and almost
futuristic looking design. The wasp has a hidden secret, though, as its
stinger only protrudes when it’s planning to use it. Schmidt didn’t test an executioner wasp
sting when creating his index, but others have described the sensation as far worse
than that from a bullet ant, and with longer lasting effects. The searing pain lasts for a long time, and
can even cause tissue necrosis, where fluid fills the region around the sting site, and
flesh can begin to die and rot away if not treated properly. Coyote Peterson who worked his way through
various painful stings, said that the executioner wasp sting was way more painful The strength of their sting seems overkill
for their preferred prey of caterpillars, but it is certainly an effective defense method,
with other animals doing everything they can to avoid crossing paths with one of these
wasps. If you ever find yourself in the jungle regions
where they live, be very careful!! Of everything!! Thanks for watching!! I hope you never experience these stings for
yourself. If you have let us know your story in the
comments below!! Would love to hear it!! Be sure to subscribe and see you soon!! Byee

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

Winter is Coming For These Argentine Ant Invaders | Deep Look

Winter is Coming For These Argentine Ant Invaders | Deep Look


Once upon a time, the Argentine ant seemed invincible. Why? Well normally, ants in different colonies
of the same species fight each other to the death for territory and food. But take an Argentine ant from a colony in
Japan, or Spain, or from your kitchen, put ‘em together and… Nothing happens. They recognize each other by smell. Just like
these nest mates. Worldwide, Argentine ants act like a huge,
international super colony. Countless nests, each home to hundreds of
queens, producing millions of highly disposable workers. Massive Argentine ant super-colonies are spreading
all over the globe, overwhelming local ant populations. They can take down much bigger ants. Like
this harvester. The tiny Argentines throw themselves at their
enemy. Exhaust her. Then slowly pull her apart. They seemed unstoppable. But there’s more to this story. The Argentine ant has an Achilles heel. At Jasper Ridge, near Stanford University,
Nicole Heller has been tracking ant populations since the late 1990s. She wanted to know, how long would it take
for Argentines to completely overwhelm the native species here? One year? Five? But it didn’t happen. To her surprise, one native species was actually
thriving behind enemy lines. The winter ant. Winter ants aren’t much bigger than Argentine
ants. They aren’t much stronger. But they have a secret weapon. Put Argentine and winter ants together near
something they both want, like this cotton ball soaked in honey. See how the winter ant aims its abdomen at
the Argentine? And that little white dot appears right at the tip? And how the Argentine scurries away? No one had ever seen this before. In fact,
as far as we know, this is the first time anyone’s caught it on camera. No one knows yet what exactly it is, but this secretion can repel, even kill, those Argentine workers. At Jasper Ridge, this little drop has been enough to halt an implacable invader’s march toward world domination. Hi, it’s Amy. See how these ants all tap
each other when they go by? Well when ants touch antenna, they’re not
just exchanging information…they ARE the information. They switch jobs based on how
many other ants they run into doing the same thing. Join our ant army. Subscribe. Tap that button and we’ll let
you know about our next episode. Thanks for watching!

10 Bug Bites You Need To Be Able to Identify

10 Bug Bites You Need To Be Able to Identify


You feel a sharp pain and then look down
all of a sudden on your arm you see a red mark could this fight be dangerous
or is it totally safe that’s the question many people ask when
they’re bitten by a bark watch this and say goodbye to mysterious red marks on
your body with this information you’ll be able to spot exactly what bug has
bitten you and if it’s dangerous or safe I’m Charlie and today we’re going to
look at ten bug bites you need to be able to identify birth before he gets
bitten too much why not subscribe and press the notification bell – coming up
first we have Hornet Hornets are also known as the Asian wasp but they can be
found in Europe Russia North America and Northeast Asia many people swat these
away thinking that there was Orbeez but actually they’re far more dangerous in
fact every year 1,100 people passed away due to hornet stings they can be very
dangerous and must be treated immediately
especially if it’s on a child but how can you identify a Hornet sting well the
area around where you’ve been stung will become a very swollen and red this will
cover a large area around where you’ve been stung you may even get blisters
forming on your skin where you’ve been stung the person who’s been stung will
also likely be in a very bad pain it will be far more extreme and painful
than a wasp or bee sting Hornets can sometimes be double the size
of a wasp or bee and because of this hornets can store a lot of poison inside
them when you’re stung that poison goes into your body the poison contains two
very harmful elements acetylcholine and histamine histamine can cause extreme
itching it also can affect your brain spinal cord and uterus that’s why if
you’ve been stung and feel cold in the limbs then that this could have been
Hornet also if your ears and lips go blue this is another bad sign you may
also have breathing problems if you’re stung by a Hornet and if this happens
make sure you see a doctor right away next up is bedbug I’m sure some of you
are watching this in bed well if so then you need to be very cautious of bedbugs
the real name for bedbugs is mitosis but they’re called bedbugs
because they’re often found in mattresses they feed on humans blood
usually when you’re asleep but most people who are bitten by bedbugs don’t
even know they have bedbugs that’s because at first sight a bedbug
bite can look like the bite of a flea or mosquito some also mistake them for
allergic reactions your skin will get red swollen and also become quite itchy
but there’s a way to tell if you’re being bitten by bedbugs the bites will
all be very close to each other and they’ll kind of look like little roads
on the skin this meaning that they’ll kind of be in a rectangular or curved
shape and go down or up bedbug bites can be very painful much more than a
mosquito bones if you think you have bedbugs the best bed is to clean your
bed with a vacuum and if that doesn’t work maybe call a bug removal expert
next up is plague you may not have heard of a clegg before but it’s basically a
big fat flying Clegg’s are also known as horse flies the nasty thing about horse
fly is it can bite humans and it feeds on their blood they’re kind of like the
vampires of the insect world unlike a house fly these are brown instead of
black but what do these bites look like they’re actually very easy to spot
because at first it will be a 1 millimeter red spot you may not even
notice it at first but eventually it will begin to get very swollen and itchy
it can then be very very painful much more painful than a mosquito bites
now the bites themselves aren’t that dangerous after all they’re only
drinking a tiny amount of your plant but Clegg’s can transmit various different
diseases one of these is called tularemia this can affect your eyes
lymph nodes and lungs and it can also transmit anthrax this can cause pain
while swallowing and terrible nausea so if you get a click bite you may want to
go to the doctor next up is tick tick bites are very very hard to spot because
many assume it’s an allergic reaction and not a bite the weird thing about
ticks is they actually go into your body over time they grow bigger and bigger
and they drink your blood in fact ticks can live in a human body
for a long time also ticks can infect people
various diseases so what does the text byte look like well it’s basically a
large red mark and it’s sometimes as they ring around that mark if you’re
able to remove a tick from your body but the red mark doesn’t go away and
continues to grow you need to see a doctor right away that’s because you
could have been infected within TEFL Isis or Borelli olace next up is louse
everyone knows about head lice but did you know that they can also bite you
louse bites are small red dots which appear in places where your hair grows
these can appear on your back fairly hands or legs the bites are usually a
few inches away from each other and the skin looks like it was pierced maybe
with a nail or a pin now you may think that these are pretty harmless but they
are not lies can transmit very serious diseases like typhoid and trench fever
next up is flea many people mistake flea bites for allergies but the way to spot
them is that they will be red and swollen you’ll be able to tell this is
not a mosquito bite or an allergic reaction as it will be very painful also
it will itch a lot please usually go for a person’s legs and it happens when
they’re asleep also fleas can buy to you many times in
similar places the bites are usually around one inch away from each other and
also fleas can transmit infections on to use so maybe see a doctor if you have a
lot of flea bites next up is and so ants are very annoyed in the summer they may
ruin your picnics or go into your pantries but did you know that ants can
also buy to you and I don’t just mean red ants in Indiana Jones I mean typical
black ants an ant bite will look like a very small red dot it’s maybe totally
painless and it may not even inch on the other hand red fire ants can cause you a
lot of trouble and be a real danger these bites can look like large white
head pimples also red fire ants contain a lot of toxins which can put you into a
shock so make sure you know the difference between a regular ant bite
and a red fire ant fire next up is mosquito depending on where
you live I’m sure that in the summer you encounter mosquitoes they’re incredibly
annoying and love to bite humans mosquito bites will be red and swollen
they mostly appear in open areas of your body where you’re not wearing clothes
also it will happen where your skin is very thin as is trying to get to your
blood vessels when they bite you they also inject their saliva into the wound
this saliva causes your blood to get thinner which makes the skin red and
itchy better get that mosquito spray out this summer next up is be one thing many
people don’t realize about bee stings is that you need to remove the sting unlike
a wasp but bees actually lose their stinger when it goes into you right
after that the bee passes away instantly once the sting has been removed from
your skin it will likely get red and swollen if you’re not allergic then you
should be fine but if you are then you could have breathing problems and should
see a doctor and finally on the list we have wasps wasps are like a bee sting
but you won’t usually need to remove the sting from your skin the stung area will
become red and also swollen later on you also may feel a burning and itchy
sensation unlike a bee sting wasps can sting you multiple times but unless
you’re allergic you should be okay after a wasp sting but now it’s time to make
your voice hurt vote in the poll in the top right corner how many of these
insects you’ve been stung by if it’s all ten then I feel really bad for you if
you want some more amazing videos then check out my second channel they’ll be
linked to that on screen in a moment but as always thank you for watching check
out some more videos on screen right now leave a like if you enjoyed and if you
haven’t already what you waiting for subscribe to Top 10s

HANDS get DESTROYED by Fire Ants!

HANDS get DESTROYED by Fire Ants!


– That’s just in case
anybody is wondering, a bottle of Coyote’s urine. – Yeah, but that’s my
own pee, so it’s okay. It’s okay if it’s your own pee. – No, it’s not. ♪ Fire ♪ ♪ A fire on the mountain ♪ – What’s going on, Coyote Pack? And welcome back to Base Camp, the not exactly adventurous
show, that we film here from our office in
Westerville, Ohio, where we dissect old videos and tell you exactly
how we made ’em. How are you guys feeling today? – I’m feeling great. Sunny day in the neighborhood, we got a good day
here in Columbus. Mario, how you feeling
about the sunshine? You’re used to it in Florida, but this is new for us.
– Yeah. – Today’s a great day
to be here in Base Camp, talking about adventures. – May not be an
outside adventure, but the inside adventures
can be just as fun and we have an awesome episode
planned for you guys today. But before we get into that, the Base Camp set is
really coming along and that’s because of you
guys out there watching. We asked you to send
in fan mail and boy, did you guys send in fan mail, didn’t they, Mark?
– Yeah, oh my goodness. So we got a call from the
post office the other day and they alerted us to the fact, that we are flooding
their mail rooms with all kinds of art
from around the world, so we did need to tell you
guys, keep up the good work. – Yes, the more fan
mail, the better and specifically artwork. Now today, we’re featuring
a letter from Kit Libby, now Kit, I did read your letter, you even wrote in
here, that you’re like, “You probably won’t
have time to read it,” I read all of the fan mail,
guys, believe it or not. But Kit also sent along
these amazing pictures, check that out.
– Wow, Kit is quite the artist.
– It’s a rat, – Whoa!
– it’s a cockroach, green tree frog, she’s even
got my favorite in here, the snapping turtle.
– Nice. – Clearly watches the videos, but I really wanted to focus on the Monarch butterfly,
– Nice. – which is Kit’s favorite
animal and Kit asked if we could do an episode
on Monarch butterflies. What do you guys think? – I think it’s a great idea. Mario, where should we do that? – We could go find
the migration routes of the Monarch butterflies.
– Hm-mm, yeah. – That would be pretty epic. Now, I don’t know when
we’ll get to do that, but we will put it
on the episode list. We’ve never done a
butterfly episode before, so I think it’d great
thing to feature. – Absolutely. – And the good news for me
is they don’t bite or sting. Alright, give me
those pictures back. – Hang on, I thought
we get to keep these. – Well you can have
them after the episode. I don’t want you to wrinkle
it during the taping. – You promise?
– I promise. – You heard that. – I know you, you’ll
put that in your pocket and you’ll wrinkle it up, we don’t wanna
wrinkle the artwork. Alright, guys, keep
sending in that artwork, we will keep featuring
different Coyote Pack members every week, sharing their art and encouraging you
guys to get artistic, when you’re not watching videos. So if you guys are ready, let’s plunge our hands into
a burning ring of fire ants. – Here we go.
– Oh! – [Coyote] You can see,
I’m already nervous, right from the beginning. I’m Coyote Peterson. This is a mountain of fire ants. Yes it is.
– Oh yeah. – I think we all know
where this is going. – [Mark] And there’s
your hands, pre-scars. – Well enough people had seen the harvester ant
video at this point to know that like,
oh, hands, ant mound, here we go.
Holy cow, that’s a lot of stings already! Argh! – Oh, Eeh.
– Hm-mm. – [Mark] This is already
bringing me back, man. – Oh yeah.
– what a bad idea this was. – Yeah, I warned ya.
– You did. – [Coyote] A lot of
people learned about
fire ants that day. – [Mark] We’re gonna talk
about that in a second, Mario. – [Mario] Yeah. – [Mark] Hold that right there. – Alright guys, so
when I was in Arizona, you saw me put my hands into
a mound of harvester ants. – [Mark] Not smart, not
something you wanna be doing. – I lasted 60 seconds. What’s funny is that
this is so far before a lot of these other
more painful stings, so you gotta keep in mind, that as we’re filming
the fire ants, like the bullet ant was so far
down the road at that point, like.
– Yeah. – We had not even really
seriously considered doing that. – No.
I’m sure that you’re looking at this pile of dirt,
thinking to yourselves, is that really an anthill?
– That’s interesting, – Yeah.
– so, these ant mounds are
all over in Florida. Mario, why don’t you tell
us a little bit about these. – Yeah, so fire ants are an
introduced species to the US and if you grow up in Florida,
you see one of those mounds, you know there’s trouble, okay? – Hm-mm.
– Hm-mm. – So they’re somewhat
inconspicuous, if you don’t know
what to look for. – Right.
– it just looks like a pile of sand.
– Yeah. – There’s no ants
on the outside. – Someone from Ohio, like these two guys,
– You guys. – we are walking
around sometimes in our sandals or bare
feet and we’re like, ooh, there’s some sand.
– I’m like no watch it. – Yeah.
– Yeah. – and you don’t know, ’cause there really aren’t
many ants around the mounds. – Sure, yeah, it’s
very deceiving, but
as you’re gonna see, once you pop a little hole, – [Coyote] Let’s see that, I
think it’s actually coming up. I promise you
there are thousands of these fiery little
ants beneath the surface. – [Mark] And are
there thousands. Mario, do you know about how
many ants live in a colony? – [Mario] Thousands. – [Coyote] Hundreds of
thousands, probably. – [Mario] Hundreds of thousands, yeah,
– Yeah. – [Coyote] ‘Cause it goes
deeper down in the ground too. Most people don’t realize, that just because we
disturbed that ant mound, they build those
mounds so quickly, that mound probably
would’ve been rebuilt by the next day.
– Absolutely, and once again, they are
invasive species, too. – [Mark] I imagine the
rain does a number. – [Coyote] Oh, yeah,
every time it rains, they probably flood out. Yeah, you have to imagine
that if you’re down in Florida and you’re on
vacation and thinking, “Oh, I’m gonna just
go out somewhere “and have a little picnic,” and you think to yourself, “Oh, look, this mound
is kind of sandy, “this might actually make
a good place to sit,” whoa, bad idea, these were
cool macro shots though, I mean, it’s tough
to really tell how small these creatures are, until you get, like, okay,
– Yeah, there you go. – There you go right there,
– let me get in a little bit, so you get a clear shot.
– that’s a great example. Like it was really hard to
hold on to one of these ants without, you know, not
wanting to injure them or anything like
that and you can see, if you would align these
things up vertically on the fingernail of a human, you could probably
pack five to eight ants on a single finger,
which is crazy. – Yeah, I’ll tell you what is
particularly impressive to me about fire ants, not only
what they did to you, but also the fact that
they’re able to sting, like they can actually
get through human skin, being so small. Mario, how is that
even possible? – Sure, well, they do
have a long stinger and you know, to Coyote’s
point, they’re small, but it’s numbers
that count, right? So unlike the harvester
ants, which are large and intimidating looking,
these guys are tiny – Hm-mm.
– and individually, you’re like, oh, that’s
not gonna do much harm, but they come at
you with a swarm. – Yeah.
– Yeah, with a force of swarm,
that’s like a tidal wave of fire and insanity
and dragons and chaos. Let’s keep rolling the video. – Oh no, Mario, I’ve
been stung by one or two and it’s still pretty bad.
– Yeah, it’ll still get ya. – [Mario] Yeah. – Now before I actually
go through with this. Here’s my arbitrary what
have become well known, selfie GoPro shots,
building suspense just before we get to it and I think we were just
learning at this point how to start to build that
suspense in these episodes to make the audience feel like, “Okay, we’re building
to that moment.” – Right. – And you can see here
might have that view and call that of what I learned, so back that up
just a touch there. Look at, yeah, look at, what I learned from
the harvester ants was tuck your pant
legs into your boots, roll up your sleeves tight, so that the ants can’t
get in your pants. – But you didn’t
learn your lesson about getting stung by ants. – Well no, but for the purpose
of the science experiment, I had to go through
with it, it was just let’s be a little more
intelligent about it this time around, trust me,
guys, fire ants in your pants would have been the
worst thing ever. – Ooh, for sure. – [Coyote] And
anyone who is stung. This not only
causes searing pain, but also causes the
sting zones to swell. – [Mark] Ooh, takes me back. This was just not smart. I was warning Coyote,
– Yeah, science at its finest. – Let’s talk about that,
– Okay. – real quick, so you know, here’s a little backstory,
that I think is important that everyone in the
Coyote Pack knows about, so Coyote–
– we, wait, we should call this
like Responsible Corner with Mark and Mario,
(laughing) where you guys talk about, Coyote’s like, I’m gonna
do this for science and you guys are like, “Let’s
talk about this responsibly,” – Yeah.
– Yeah. – so listen to these
two for a second. – Right, so everyone thinks
that maybe it’s Mario and I putting you up to these things, we actually ask him not to
do ’em, as a matter of fact, but in this circumstance,
it’s really interesting, because you don’t get
mosquito bite welts, so therefore I think you thought maybe you had some sort
of magical immunity to ant stings or
venom in general and I remember Mario
warning you, saying “Coyote, I’ve seen what happens, “when people get
swarmed by fire ants “and it is not
pretty, don’t do it,” and what did you say? – I said, I’m the ant man, didn’t you see the
harvester ant episode? I’m probably immune
to fire ant stings, yeah, they may sting me,
but nothing’s gonna happen, those little white pustular
things you were talking about, not me, buddy, don’t
get mosquito bite welts, don’t get bitten by deer flies,
horse flies, you name it, usually good to go, fire ants,
they’re tiny, not a problem. – Yeah, that’s right,
he was very confident and I kept giving
him the warnings, like dude, if you go
through with this, it’s not gonna be pretty.
– Mm, mm. – He insisted and well,
we’re gonna see the results. – Yeah, and not pretty is
an understatement, guys, just so you know. And boy, am I about to
get my fair share of them. You build yourself
up for these moments and then you–
– Oh, old GoPro. – [Coyote] Hm-mm, I think
that’s the Hero three, which was still encapsulated
inside of a plastic container, so we had to use your
camera to capture the audio, that was coming from this shot. – [Mark] Yeah, now you just
go do that by yourself, while Mario and I hang out. – Well, the Hero six
captures amazing audio. Don’t wanna go into
anaphylactic shock or anything, I did okay with the
harvester ants, so. – Pause it real quick.
– Okay. – So of course,
harvester ant venom and fire ant venom,
completely different. – Yep.
– Right? – Hm-mm. – And there’s a special
property in the fire ant venom, that’s gonna actually
give you some of those – Right,
– things, that you had. – So the harvester ants
that were just a swelling, whereas the fire ants were
going to attack my body completely differently. – Yeah, and we’re gonna see.
– Hm-mm. Alright, here we
go, are you ready? – [Mark] Alright,
go get in position, I’ll be there in a second.
– Alright, man. – [Coyote] Never under
any circumstances try to replicate what
you are about to witness. See, there’s a responsible
warning from me right there. – [Mark] Yeah,
don’t do this, guys. That’s a big one.
– Yeah, that’s a big mound. I’m about to enter
the strike zone with the fire ant,
are you guys ready? – Strike zone?
– It should have been the sting zone, I don’t know
what I was thinking there. – [Mario] I remember I told you, dude, why don’t
you put the GoPro in the mound itself.
– Hm-mm, yeah. – [Mark] Yeah,
look at it go boom. – Holy cow.
– Look at ’em swarming! – Let’s see that one
more time actually, I wanna go back to that. Look at the ant counter,
’cause we start the counter as soon as the GoPro
gets in position. – Right. – Look how quickly
the ants are on you. – [Mario] Yeah. – Boom,
– Fire ants, you’re– – three seconds,
boom, you’re covered. – Yeah, they’re voracious,
– Ow, ow, ow! – [Mario] way faster
than the harvester ants. – Much faster
– Yeah. – [Coyote] and they look
for soft spots in your skin, I feel like they can sense
in between the fingers was definitely the worst.
– Yep. – Guys, feel your skin in between your
fingers is much softer. Argh! At that point, I was like, man, we’ve only gone 20
seconds into this, I’ve gotta get my
hands out of here and I failed, I couldn’t
get it to 60 seconds, I mean, maybe I could have, but I could feel how bad
it was already getting. – I remember you going into
this being very confident, – Yeah, yeah.
– I think you did even mention at one point,
like, “Is 60 seconds enough? “Maybe I should do
like two minutes.” – He did say that.
– Yeah. – Well I thought
it was smaller ants and to one up the
harvester ants, ’cause harvester ants, I
did make it to 60 seconds and I was thinking, well,
everybody watching at home will be like, “Oh, come on, go
two minutes with fire ants.” Woo,
– Yeah. – Good thing I didn’t do that. – Deceiving, right,
’cause of the size? – Yeah. – [Mark] You alright? Made it 40 seconds, hey,
still very respectable. – Yeah.
– very respectable. – A lot of pain, oh,
oh, they’re still on me. Argh, my hands are
on fire right now. It was an interesting feeling. – So tell me some initial
thoughts right here, are you able to really
concentrate on the pain? Are you trying to not
concentrate on the pain? – I guess the
squeezing of my fists was more like just trying to contain and absorb
the pain in one spot, it was coming on like a
searing, that was building, so it was almost like imagine
putting your hands on a stove and turning them on and
as it begins to heat up, it’s getting more and
more and more painful as the onset takes hold. – Yeah.
– I know that feeling, I’ve been bit. – When a mound of fire
ants is disturbed, thousands of them instantly
swarm the invader. Man, if you were an
unsuspecting like lizard or frog or something like that, that has stumbled upon
a mound like this, you can see how
– Yeah. – it could kill an
animal very quickly. – Well, remember during
one of our croc segments, I told you fire ants actually
prey upon hatchlings, – Right.
– so they do kill – Hm-mm.
– large organisms. – Hm-mm. My pain tolerance
finally gave out as my brain was screaming, get your hands out
of that ant mound. I love these shots,
where the ants continue to go over the
lens of the GoPro, we sort of learned that through
the harvester ant episode, we were like, oh, we’ve
gotta get more GoPro shots of the ants moving
over the lens. – Now look, you can
kind of see here, – Yeah.
– You can see the welts forming, and I believe you thought
you were out of the woods, you were like, “That’s it?” – I was like, okay,
respect, fire ants, I have some respect, now
I at least have welts, this is more than a
mosquito’s ever done – Yeah.
– to me, and I was pretty much out
of the woods at this point. – Well, I told you that
the worst is yet to come. – Yeah. Let’s see what happens. It’s actually not too
bad at this point. Not too bad.
– At this point, this is like about
five minutes after having my hands in there,
so we cut for a second, you know, reset to get framed
up, get this outro shot. Now if you wanna know the
answer of which is worse, the harvester ants
or the fire ants. See, so this was
a good comparison. – [Mark] Yeah,
that’s a good shot. Look at the size difference,
– Hm-mm. – [Mark] it’s dramatic. – [Coyote] But
obviously the swarm was more impressive
with the fire ants. – Right.
– Right. – [Coyote] This is much
worse than harvester ants, argh! (laughing) Argh!
– It’s still good, see. – That’s my sasquatch
right there. – I think we may have
overdone it with the slo-mos. – No, it’s funny.
– You like it? – Yeah.
– I don’t know. – I don’t know, you guys tell
us, do you like the slo-mos? We haven’t used them in a while, but I thought they
were funny back then. – It cracks me up, I love ’em. – At the end of the day, the lesson that we’re
all taking away from this is that if you’re out in
nature and you’re exploring, always do your best to avoid
any and all ant mounds. – True statement.
– Look how happy you look right there. – [Coyote] Well, you know, I
seemed a little more jovial at this point, than I
probably should have been considering what is about
to happen to my hands. And for over a week, I
suffered through incredible– – Here it goes.
– Here it comes. – [Coyote] So that was a
little ways before we started– – There it is.
– Ooh! – There you go,
– look at that. – that’s the next morning. – So? – I was hideous, Mark, hideous. – Oh, I remember, I mean, I
have it burned into my memory, that morning, we went to
go get you for breakfast, Coyote, are you
ready for breakfast? The room was all dark
– Yeah. – and you’re like,
“Guys, I can’t,” and we’re like, why not? “My hands, look,” and this was what
you were covered in and we were like,
oh, my goodness. – I mean, it was
gross, I looked like I had contracted some
sort of crazy disease, I had to wear gloves
for six weeks, before the pustulates went away. Now, pause it for a second,
before we get to this next part, pause it, Mario, why do these
things form into putulates, what’s the science behind this? – Yeah, it’s a good question, you certainly didn’t get those from the harvester ant, right? So the venom of the fire ants
is actually not water soluble, so it doesn’t dissolve easily
throughout your system, so it actually stays at
the surface of your skin and creates those
little putulates, which as you realized
are very itchy and if you pop ’em, will
actually cause scarring. – Now I did pop some
of these putulates from just scratching, it
was so incredibly itchy and what I didn’t realize is
that they were gonna leave pock marks in my hands, which
then in turn became scars, which at this point are gone, I don’t have scars from
the fire ants anymore, but wow guys, it was
quite the aftermath. – And this was in the
summer, so you were wearing long-sleeved shirts
for weeks after this, I remember we would
go to the store and you’d go to
pay for something and you would roll
your sleeve up all over the tips
of your fingers, you were like, “Here you go,” – Yeah.
– and it was super weird, I remember I was like,
why are you doing this? And you would show people why. – Well, occasionally somebody,
like the grocery store, I’d go to buy a carton of milk and I’d give them my debit card and they’re like, “Oh, what
is, oh, what’s on your hand?” and I would be like,
hold on, let me explain and then I’d be like blah,
blah, blah, blah, blah, I do these bite and
sting things on YouTube and some people would be like, “Oh my gosh, you’re that guy!” I mean, this was real early, before we even had a million
subscribers on the channel, but they would be like, “Oh, I
guess that makes sense, ugh!” Like still, people
think it’s contageous, it’s not contagious, if
you’re stung by fire ants, you can’t like rub it on your
friend and be like, ha ha, now you’re gonna
have pustulates, it
doesn’t work like that, but they are very embarrassing. – Yeah. – The pustulates were
not the only gross thing about this video, you had
another trick up your sleeve or I should say
in your backpack, – That’s right.
– which was. – [Coyote] Do you know
the simplest remedy for neutralizing ant
stings in the field? If not, make sure
to click Watch Next. – Oh man.
– That’s, just in case anybody
is wondering, a bottle of Coyote’s urine. – Yeah, but that’s my
own pee, so it’s okay, it’s okay if it’s your own pee. – No, it’s not.
– Why not? – Gross.
– No. – Guys, that is gross, okay. – Well, there is
some science to this, is there not,
wildlife biologist? – As gross as it
seems and it is gross, there is some science to it,
urine and vinegar, for example, help neutralize
venoms and stings. – Vinegar, why did
you not bring vinegar? – There’s nothing
entertaining about vinegar, people want to see pee
being dumped on your hand. – Is that what you
guys wanna see? – I figured it would
work and this episode, the aftermath became
extremely successful, I mean, you had that
great thumbnail, that said 100% Pee
and gazillions of
people clicked on it. – Yeah, but are you
encouraging people to do that? – Well, in a worst
case scenario, if you stumble upon a fire
mound and you get stung, the best thing to do is
pee on it and in honesty, it did neutralize a lot of
the pain right from the start. Now here’s the backstory
on the pee, right, I did read about this
and that morning, I drank a bunch of
orange juice, right, so it was highly acidic
– Ugh! – and I could also make my pee a really nice, perfect,
pee yellow color, so it was hot pee
going into the bottle, then I put it in my backpack and walked around the
Everglades all day, so it heated up even more, so it was hot pee going
in, hot pee coming out and trust me, you
could smell it, couldn’t you, Mark?
– Oh, yeah. You know, in all actuality, I thought you were pulling
our leg on this one, I thought you had filled
up a water bottle, put a little bit of food
coloring, you’re like, “Oh guys, I’m gonna
pour pee on my arms,” so I made you open it,
– Yeah. – and I could smell
it immediately. – Well, I thought
it was apple juice and I was about to drink it. – That sounds like a
you problem, buddy. But let’s put it this way,
for me, it was a Godsend, because it immediately
neutralized all the burning in my hands,
but did it stop the pustulates? Not so much, so basically
I got two hands full of pee and no real, ultimate payoff.
– Yeah. – And you got to ride back
in the trunk of the truck. – Right, yeah,
– Yeah, I did. – he was not allowed to
ride up front with us. So I’ve been counting
and I believe there are three main
takeaways from this video, number one, apparently pee can neutralize the sting
of fire ants, gross, number two, look out for those
sand mounds in Florida, guys, those aren’t sand,
those are fire ants and number three,
Coyote Peterson is not immune to insect venom, right?
– Right. – Are you willing
to admit that now? – I still get pustulates
from fire ant stings, as will you.
(laughing) – And can I add in number four? – Sure. – I told you so.
– Ohh! – In all fairness, he’s right, anyone that’s stung by fire
ants will get pustulates, but what this little
science experiment did was educate a lot of people,
in fact, millions of people about what to look for
in the environment, when it comes to
avoiding fire ants and of course, if you’re stung, what to do to help
prevent some of that pain, what it also did for
us was begin to tee up the next rungs of the
insect sting pain index. Now, believe it or
not, the fire ant, for a small and mighty as it is, only ranks at about
a two on the scale, so that means we got
a long way to go, before we ultimately
hit the bullet ant. But the Coyote Pack
was cheering us on and they said, “Well, Coyote,
how about the cow killer?” Sure enough, that’s kind
of what came up next, but we won’t talk about
that in this episode, instead we’ll just
encourage you guys not to pee on each other, okay, it’s probably a good,
after school message or something like
that, isn’t it? – Sure. (laughs)
– Don’t, don’t. – Unless of course,
you’re stung by fire ants, right, maybe?
– Oh! – What if you
didn’t have to pee, would you have
allowed Mark to do it? – Let’s just wrap this up.
– That’s what I’m saying, – It’s time to end this one. – Let’s just go to the
outro at this point. I’m Coyote Peterson. – I’m Mark Laivins. – I’m Mario Aldecoa. – Be brave, – Stay wild.
– Stay wild. – We’ll see ya on the
next Base Camp adventure. – I gotta go pee. – You didn’t pee on yourself
on the other stings, did you? – I peed on myself
earlier by accident. Plunging my hands
into a burning ring of fire ants was
a horrible idea, but a good idea would be going
back to watch this episode, so you can see what happens, when I was swarmed by the
colony and stung over 300 times and don’t forget,
subscribe so you can join me and the crew on our
next big adventure. (light jungle music)

Flesh Ripping Ants?

Flesh Ripping Ants?


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Recently, I ran into a
species of ant with a bite so powerful, it’s capable of
breaking through human skin. If you don’t believe
me? Watch this. One (phew) Two, three Ouch (grunts) Ah. Ah! Yep, that might break it
through the skin there. Oh, like little razor blades. Ah! Yeah, he’s popping
holes into my finger. Ahhh! Oh, yeah, that hurts. He’s got me good right there. Ahhhhhh! Oww! Look he’s
banged his head in my finger. Argh! Ah! Ahhh! Ah ah ah Ooh! Yikes! Yeah, that hurt. (panicky wilderness music) – [Voiceover] All
right, Coyote, yikes. That leaf-cutter ant. That was something, but what
people at home might not know, is that was actually
not the first time you were bitten by
that ant, was it? – No, no it was not. Now when we arrived
at Costa Rico, we were told by all the locals
that when you’re out there looking for creatures,
whatever you do, make sure to avoid
leaf-cutter ants. I said to myself,
leaf-cutter ants? I didn’t even know you
had leaf-cutter ants. Do they bite? Sting? They
said, “No, no, no, no. They don’t sting.
They only bite. The bite is so powerful, it
can break through human skin.” Knowing me, first
thing I think is, “I gotta see if this
is really true.” So as we’re out there
walking through rain forests, we finally came across
a track of leaf-cutters. Found some workers,
found some soldiers. Mark said, “Okay,
here’s the ants. Let’s catch one, and
let’s do the scene.” So I picked up an
ant. You guys ready? – [Mark] I’m ready. Wait, wait. Where are you
gonna let him bite you? – Right there in
the crux of my hand. Hold up my hand like
this, put it right there, and let it start chomping,
and it’s chomping, and it’s chomping, but
it’s not breaking skin. Even with all that
power and that pinch… Ouch! That really, really hurts. I don’t think he’s gonna
be able to break skin. We’re thinking, okay.
It’s just a myth. Leaf-cutter ants can’t really
cut through human skin. Ah, there we go. – How’s that feel?
– [Coyote] Wow! Ah! Feels good to have
it off of my hand. Well, there ya go. Finally. An ant challenge where I’m
walking away mostly unscathed. Well, as we’re heading
back to our base camp, we come upon the nest. All right, well we
have found the nest. Watch your feet. Look at how many of
these monster-sized leaf-cutters are coming out. They are sending out
the troops right now. What you didn’t see
is me wandering into
the nest at first. Me, I’m like, holy cow,
these ants are everywhere. And just for fun, I
pick up another ant, put it on my finger, and boom! Immediately, it cuts
through the skin. Those things are monster! Ow! Ooh, yeah.
Ow! Bite me there. Oh, geez! Ah! Ah! Ah! That one definitely popped
right through the skin. Look at that. Holy cow. Fortunately, you’re
looking at it here. This is me holding up my finger, and you can see all
the blood running down. Now you didn’t see
this in the episode because we weren’t
ready to actually shoot the scene a second time. I didn’t think he was
gonna bite me that hard. The one that we were working
with through the scene didn’t. Break skin. Ah, an angry one is definitely
capable of breaking skin. What should we do? Should
we shoot that again? – [Mark] Think we have to. – Like right here. – [Mark] Yeah. Sigh. – Hehe. So, like a good director, Mark
says, “Cut, cut, cut, cut. Back to one. We gotta
shoot this scene again.” Now at this point,
I’m pretty nervous, because I’m thinking
to myself, oh, boy. That ant just massacred my
finger in one single chomp. Now he want to actually
put an ant on my finger, and let it do its thing. So, what you did see
is Mark, Mario, and I heading back into the nest, and this is where all the
ants were swarming out. Mark’s getting bitten.
Mario’s getting bitten. And finally, I get a
large, angry soldier. Come back into the
scene, sit down, put up my finger, and
place the ant right there, and it was painful. Now, I did last more
than 60 seconds, and I had to last
more than 60 seconds so that we could
get all the shots. Shooting these episodes
is pretty tough because there’s
multiple cameras going, and we have to make sure
we get the cool shots so that you guys can
enjoy the episode. In total, I was really chomped
by this leaf-cutter ant for probably about two
and a half minutes. Now that also includes,
once the video camera stopped rolling, and we
get out the still cameras to get that cool shot, you know
that’s the screen grab there on the YouTube video of
me like this, “Ahhhhhhh!” of an ant on my finger. A lot of pain to go through
just to get that single frame, but it was totally worth it because ultimately we
proved a myth to be true. The leaf-cutter ant is capable of chomping through human skin. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave. Stay wild. We’ll see ya next week. – Whoa whoa whoa. What
about the million subs? – Oh, yes! Sorry. I get so excited
about those ants. Coyota pack, we have made it to a million subscribers
on YouTube. How cool is that? ♪ Oh, yes ♪ Oh, yes ♪ Oh, yes ♪ Yes, yes, yes ♪ Now, on behalf of
myself and the entire B rave Wilderness team, I
just want to take a moment to thank each and
every one of you out there who’s
watching all our shows. We couldn’t do this without you. It’s you guys that keep
us out here in the field making these awesome adventures, and getting ya up
close with animals, whether it’s Breaking
Trail, Dragon Tails, Coyote’s Backyard
or a new series that’s about to come out
this summer, Beyond the Tide. Stay tuned for that. We couldn’t do it without
each and every one of you. So from the bottom of my heart, thank you for being
such an awesome member of the Coyote Pack. All right. That’s it for me. We’ll see you guys next week. If you enjoyed this
behind-the-scenes look, make sure to go back and
watch the full ant attack, and don’t forget, subscribe
to join me and the crew on this season of
“Breaking Trail.” Oww! Ahh! (loud rumble) (coyote howling)

SUPER Toxic Ant Venom!

SUPER Toxic Ant Venom!


– You know what I love
about laying in the snow? There aren’t any ants,
which is good news for me considering what I had
to endure in Arizona. But stay tuned ’cause today
we’re talking about ant venom. (dramatic, fast-paced music) (growl) Welcome back, coyote pack. Man, it’s just not getting
any warmer here in Ohio, and to keep my fingers warm, I’m gonna mentally
project myself back to the scorching
hot deserts of Arizona. Oh, wait. Last time I was there, I was bitten by a Gila monster, attacked by cactus, and
swarmed by harvester ants. Ah! Ugh! I guess there really
is no place like home even if it is freezing cold. Okay, so we had
several great questions about the harvester ant episode. Now, many of you wanted to
know if the harvester ants could only sting once or if
they could sting repeatedly. The simple answer is yes. They can sting many times, and, unlike a honey bee, they
don’t lose their stinger. In fact, once an ant has
latched on with its mandibles, they swing their abdomen
underneath their body, where they will hold
themselves in position and inflict a sting
over and over again without letting go all the while pumping
more and more venom into their victim. This happened to me
in several areas. Where it wasn’t a sting and
go, it was a sting and stay, and these sting zones
were the worst by far. (exhales) Still one in my pants. Ah! This is truly the meaning
of ants in your pants. Honey bees are actually
one of the only animals that lose their stingers,
and it’s not for the better. These stingers are barbed, so when they sting, it
gets stuck in the victim and then gets pulled from
the body when they fly away, resulting in an
abdominal rupture, and sadly the bee ends
up dying in the end. Now, another question we had,
asked by Christine two, was “If a harvester ant’s sting “is 20 times more
potent than a honey bee, “what makes it bad? “Is it the venom or is it
how deep the stinger goes?” Oh, that burns. Ah, they’re all over my
hands now, look at that. Well, Christine, when
we’re talking about venom, it’s all about the
potency and the yield. The potency is how
toxic the venom is, and the yield is the
amount that’s injected. Now, it is true that
harvester ant venom is 20 times more potent
than a honey bee. However, their
yield is rather low, especially from a single sting. This is how my body was able
to take so many stings at once. Ah! Ah! Now, if I had been stung
60 times by honey bees, which have a much
higher venom yield, I might have been in
some serious trouble. All venomous animals, whether it be a Gila
monster, a scorpion, or a harvester ant, are all ranked on
the LD50 scale, which means lethal dose of
venom required to kill 50% or half the members of
a tested population. It’s a controversial test as it’s often
performed on lab rats. However, it does allow
scientists to rank venom toxicity in
the animal kingdom. So while the harvester
ant is considered one of the most toxic insects, it has a rather low venom yield, making it less
dangerous to humans. Hence why I was able to
be stung so many times. Make sense? Ah. – [Voiceover] I know it hurts. (exhales) Whoo! Aw, man. Arms, legs, neck, armpit
all on fire right now. Now, I know this could all
be just a bit confusing, so let’s just
remember one thing. As long as you stay
a safe distance from animals in the wild,
there’s a good chance that you won’t end up
in the strike zone, pretty much guaranteeing
that you won’t ever be bitten or stung. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave. Stay wild. We’ll see you next week. If you want to see me get
swarmed by harvester ants, make sure to check out
the Ants Attack episode, and don’t forget. Subscribe to join
me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (bear growls)
(rumbling) (birds chirping)
(howling)

ANT ATTACK!

ANT ATTACK!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. This morning, we’re
gonna answer the question do ants bites or do they sting? And I’m about to
find out first hand. (yelling and groaning in pain) (dramatic music) The southwestern United States has a reputation of
being rough and rugged. It’s cowboy country, and in many people’s minds, it is laced with
dangerous reptiles and dream haunting arachnids. When it comes to
Arizona’s Sonoran Desert, a fair share of
this lore is true. There are venomous animals and some pretty big spiders. It never becomes any
less nerve wracking to pick up a tarantula, I promise you that. But trust me when I say they are much more afraid of you than you should ever be of them. Insects on the other hand, are another story. And living in many
Arizona backyards is a fearless creature
armed with one of the most toxic venoms in the world. And while they are no bigger
than the tip of your finger, they are absolutely fearless when it comes to
attacking an intruder. OK so, right now I am
tucking my pant legs into my boots because
what I am standing in is the attack zone
of the harvester ant. Now there are many
species of ants that live out here in
the Sonoran Desert, but nothing is more aggressive
than the harvester ant. All ants have the
ability to bite, but what most people don’t
realize is that many species, including the harvester ant, also have the ability to sting, and boy is it a whooper. What I’m gonna try to
do is see if I can get harvester ants on my hands and let them bite and sting me for 60 seconds. If you guys want me to be stung
by the bullet ant some day, I think you have to
walk before you can run, so I think the harvester
ant is a great test to see how I would fend
against the bullet ant. All right, you ready? Now before I go
through with this, let’s talk about the toxicity
of the harvester ant. A single sting is said to
be almost 20 times as potent as a honeybee. Personally, I’m not
allergic to any bees, wasps, or hornets, still, this is
incredibly dangerous, so I stress never,
and I mean never, attempt what you are about
to see in this episode. I’m basically just
gonna put my hands down right here in front
of their burrow, and let them hop on. When harvester ants attack, they use their powerful
mandibles to bite and hold onto their victim. Ahh! Yep, getting stung already. While repetitively stinging
and injecting venom through the stinger at
the base of their abdomen. Oh, that burns. The venom is laced with
an alkaloid poison, which when released,
(yells in pain) acts as an alarm pheromone that causes other ants
in the area to attack. (yelling in pain) They’re all over my
hands now, look at that! This was very obvious, as after the first
sting was inflicted, it seemed as if
the entire colony was called to the front lines. Oh boy. (yelling in pain) 60 seconds seemed
like a lifetime. Ahh! As tiny stingers jabbed
me over and over. I could feel them
getting into my clothes, up my back, and onto my neck. Ow, there’s one on my neck. Murray, get the one off my neck. And eventually the
pain became too much. – [Voiceover] All right,
I think that’s 60 seconds. (yelling in pain) I was done. The ants had won. Ahhh! I gotta take my shirt off. So why in the world
did I do this? Well, many of you
out there watching have requested that I be
stung by a bullet ant, which can inflict a single sting that is considered to be one
of the most painful stings in the animal kingdom. Ow, there’s still
one in my pants. Ahh! This is truly the meaning
of ants in your pants. The producers and
I wanted to see how my body would
react to several stings from the harvester ant. When it was all said and done, the crew and I counted
63 sting zones. And the effects of the venom
lasted for nearly a week, which included searing pain
during the first couple hours followed by
swelling, tenderness, and periodic itching. My arms, my hands,
the back of my head are absolutely on
fire right now. Wow. The harvester art is one
formidable little foe, I can tell you that much. If I could sustain
this, maybe, just maybe, the bullet ant challenge
isn’t too far off. – [Voiceover] We
gotta get a shot, man. Come on over. (Coyote groans in pain) I know it hurts. – I think a half hour
from now, if I’m OK, there’s a good chance
that I’m gonna be able to get up close, possibly
stung, by the bullet ant. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave, stay wild, stay away from harvester ants. I’ll see you on
the next adventure. I’m sure your’re shaking your
head right now, thinking, “Coyote, you are
absolutely crazy.” And maybe I am, but
I hope that we have all learned something from
this little experiment. One, that ants both
bite and sting. And two, never, I mean never, tangle with a colony
of harvester ants. If you thought getting stung
by harvester ants was crazy, check out the time I was
chewed by the solpugid. And don’t forget to subscribe
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. Oh my gosh, his little
mandibles are razor sharp. (moaning in pain) Ow.