Warrior Wasp Adventure!

Warrior Wasp Adventure!


(creepy music) – I just know that if
this is more painful than the Bullet Ant, it’s
gonna be one, rough evening for Coyote Peterson. (mellow music) What I’m gonna try to do is
see if I can get Harvester Ants on my hands and let them bite
and sting me for 60 seconds. If you guys want me to be stung
by the Bullet Ant someday, I think you have to
walk before you can run. (grunts) Ah, there’s
one in my neck. Mario, get the one off my neck. (suspenseful music) This is crazy guys,
this is crazy. My nerve’s going this
much for the Velvet Ants. I can’t imagine what
the Tarantula Hawk
and the Bullet Ant are gonna be like. Ow. (grunts) Oh my gosh, guys. It’s super bad. You could feel, go all
the way under the skin. This is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question ’bout it. It’s worse than a Harvester
Ant, it’s worse than a Fire Ant. Now they say that the
sting of a Tarantula Hawk, it’s like being
stunned with taser, all you can do is scream. (dramatic music) Ah. I can’t move my arm. (grunts) Guys, I don’t know. I don’t know, I don’t know. Actually seen the
Bullet Ant face to face, Coyote pack, it is
unbelievably intimidating. (dramatic music) (grunts) Oh, it’s sucking my arm. It’s sucking my arm. (grunts) It’s stinger’s into
my arm, look at that. Oh my gosh, oh my gosh. The Warrior Wasp is in
a league of it’s own. And it is rumored that
this does in fact have the most painful sting
in the insect kingdom. Whoa. (suspenseful music) That is an enormous nest
of angry Warrior Wasps. Stay tuned coyote pack,
the Warrior Wasp challenge is coming. (suspenseful music) The climatic end to my climb
of the insect sting pain index is just days away. Will the Warrior Wasp sting
be the worse I’ve ever taken? Stay tuned and in case
you somehow missed it, make sure to go back and
watch my painful encounter with the one and
only Bullet Ant. And don’t forget, subscribe. So you can join me and
the crew on this season of breaking trail. Two. Oh my gosh, this is it. Three. (animal howls)

STUNG by a WARRIOR WASP!


(dramatic music) (screaming) (suspenseful music) (roaring) (water splashing) – [Coyote] The insect
sting pain index needs no new introduction in relation to the
work that we do. My climb towards its
summit began with a small creator known as
the harvester ant. This experiment
into what happens from an onslaught of
stings, opened the door to a world of pain, that
I would attempt to endure in the name of
education and science. Ow, there’s one on my neck. Maurio, get the one off my neck! If you are watching this video, there’s a good chance you
remember the velvet ant, also known as the cow killer. This wingless wasp
is famous for having the largest stinger
in the insect kingdom. A sting from that
creature was intense. It didn’t end there. This is the worse
sting I’ve ever taken! Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad! The tarantula hawk
delivered as promised. With a tidal wave of pain,
that literally put my arm into a state of paralysis. I can’t move my arm! And finally came the
moment that the world had been waiting for, the
one and only bullet ant. Ranked as having the
most painful sting in the insect kingdom,
it seemed as if I had conquered the sting pain
in the next mountain. (shouting gibberish) I had reached the summit. I had done it, or had I? Whispers began to drift amongst
the YouTube comment section. Questions began to arise, as to whether or
not the bullet ant is truly the king of sting! (screaming) It’s burning hot! It’s getting worse! Hold on, hold on! These whispers turned
into a haunting echo. What about the warrior wasp? Coyote have you heard
about the warrior wasp? Are you going to be stung
by the warrior wasp? Warrior wasp, warrior
wasp, warrior wasp! (dramatic music) That is an enormous nest
of angry warrior wasps. Man, they’re a lot higher
up there than I thought. This is gonna
definitely be tough. Think again, double check. Yep, those are warrior wasps. A hundred percent, and
that nest is so big. There are probably
thousands of them in there, all inside the walls. All it takes is a little
disturbance from them to literally spill out
and swarm like mad, and they’re incredibly fast, much faster than your
typical paper wasps. The local expert that
tipped us off to this field, where he said, “Yeah, I’ve seen
warrior wasps there before.” Actually at one point,
throw a rock through a nest and I was told that
they spilled out of the nest so fast,
he barely even had time to think about running,
let alone making an escape to try to get to his vehicle. And in the process he
was stung multiple times and had to go to the hospital. We do know they’re
incredibly fast, and incredibly aggressive. So Mark and Maurio are
gonna actually set up a mosquito net here underneath
the overhang of this tree. Now that will hopefully
keep you guys safe and out of the sting
zone, ’cause as we know the sting zone goal with
this is simply on my forearm, not all over our bodies. I’m gonna be wearing a
bee suit, so hopefully that will protect me
as I go in to extract one of these ornery
little insects, and with any luck, we’re
gonna get one up close for the cameras. None as one of the most
aggressive paper wasps species in the world,
these beautiful insects carry the warrior moniker,
from their commitment to attacking anything
that disturbs their nest. However, very few people
have ever been stung by one of these insects,
because unlike normal people, wasps species, they often
build their massive nests high up in the
trees of the Central and South American rainforests, a place where humans,
virtually never encounter them. Let’s go catch a warrior wasp. Alright guys I think I’m ready. Let’s get you tucked
underneath the net here. Now in the event,
that I am swarmed, it is best for you guys to
just stay completely put, and underneath this. Wrap yourselves up
as tight as you can. It’s a good chance they’re
not gonna get through there. – It’s a mosquito net,
so all the webbing’s very tightly wound. – [Coyote] Yeah. – Nothing could really
get through this, but still it’s gonna be a
pretty nerve wracking experience just to get swarmed
by the most painful stinging wasp in the world. Alright. – [Coyote] Are you guys ready? – Ready.
– Ready. – Good. – Alright guys, I am now going
to slowly approach the nest, and the goal is
going to be to just hold the net up in the
air and see if I get wasps to actually come to the net. If I am swarmed it is gonna be
one incredibly bad situation. I’m very close now. We’re all down on the low end. Oooh, its gonna be
swarmed around me. I hear a couple them movin’
around me left and right. My tactic was simple. Coax a single wasp from the
nest, using my extendable GoPro arm, and then
quickly swipe it up, using my entomology net. This was primed to be one
of the most dangerous animal catches I had ever attempted
as disturbing the nest could literally mean thousands
of these fearless warriors swarming me and the crew. Okay, I’m going to cut
this hand-held camera, and go for a catch. Here we go. (suspenseful music) (buzzing) I got ’em, I got ’em, I got ’em. I got one! I really got one, a big one too! Whew! Holy cow, that totally works. Okay there it is, right
there in the net, you see it! And what I did is I just
provoked one off the edge with the (faint speaking) we
got it right into the net. Check that out, wow, okay! Now this is the difficult part. I need to safely get
it out of the net and into the (faint
speaking) one second here. Oh man, my arm is shaking. That was the most perfect swipe, I could have possibly attempted. Nothing got scared
and there’s a wasp on the edge of the net. I just (faint
speaking), it came off, one swipe and I had it! Hold on a second. (suspenseful music) Yes! There it is, wow! Wow, there we have it! That is the warrior wasps. Oh my gosh, that
is a large wasp. Wow, I was excited to catch it. Now I realize I have
just sealed my fate. That is crazy, whew! Look at the abdomen
on that creature. Whew! Well, part one of this
mission is in the capsule. Part two is to get me stung. Oh, I have a feeling
this maybe just as bad as the bullet ant. (suspenseful music) Just based on the
knowledge that these are extremely aggressive,
I have a feeling that the sting is going to
be unbelievably painful, but I am mentally prepared
to take the sting, and I know this is the
moment that everybody’s been waiting for. We thought that I had climbed
the insect sting pain index, and reached the summit, and that was it, the
bullet ant was it. But, of course, we all knew
that we teased the warrior wasp at the end of that
episode, and ever since you guys have been
asking for it, so today, Coyote Peterson is
going to deliver. Here we go. (operatic singing) (leaves crunching) There it is. That is a warrior wasp. Now the ultimate question
that we are answering today, is will the warrior wasps sting, be more painful,
than the bullet ant? Oh, I have to just
sit back for second, and admire this creature. How could something
only that big, about an inch in
length possibly contain such a potent sting? Look at that iridescent blue
coloration on the wings, and its abdomen, almost looks
as if it’s covered in velvet. You’ll notice the body
structure of this wasp is very distinct. Of course, it has the
head, it has a thorax, and then a very,
very narrow space, between its thorax,
and its abdomen. Now one thing that I
did notice when we saw these out flying
around the nests, is when they fly, they
actually turn their abdomens upwards to a point in the air. Very different looking
than other wasp species that we see flying around. It’s interesting that this
thing looks like a warrior, and when all of
them are together and they’re on the
outside of the hive what they will do
to ward off anything that’s thinking about
getting into the hive is they will go boom, boom,
boom, boom, boom, boom, and sometimes they are
actually called drumming wasps, because they beat
their wings together, all in unison and that’s where they get the name warrior wasps. It sounds like
soldiers marching. So when I look at this creature and its fierce appearance,
definitely reminds me of one determined warrior. And you know the other thing
that’s real interesting about these wasps is they
have massive front mandibles. Now this is a species that
will kill caterpillars, and bring them back
to feed their young, but they mostly feed
on nectars and sugars. So this is not a
creature that’s out there hunting for self, only
hunting for its young, but those front mandibles,
I can easily see be used to decapitate or
kill something like a caterpillar or a grub. Whew, it’s an intimidating
face on that creature. Almost looks like the
face of the bullet ant, but, of course, it has wings, and a slightly different
body structure. This is the only time, I
have ever seen a blue wasp. Look at that. Now just like with did
with the tarantula hawk, the way to get this
animal to sting me, is we’re gonna actually
place a glass capsule inside of this net, and I’m
gonna take off the glass top, let the net fall down
on top of the insect and I’m going to pick it up
with these entomology forceps. I think you guys all know
the game plan from there. Coyote’s arm goes
down on the table, the insect touches my forearm, and a sting is induced. Now, of course, for safety we
always have an epinephrine pen on set, just in case
anybody’s wondering. I’m gonna just place this off
to the side at this point, and if you guys are ready, let’s get the warrior
wasp into the net. Mark are you all set? – [Mark] I’m all set. What happens if the wasp gets
aggressive and flies at us? – Whoo, that’s a great question, because I will tell you what. This is one fast insect. Now when I’m stung, as
always, I’m gonna try to get the glass
capsule back over top. If I do not, and
the wasp flies off, just hold your
ground for a second. A good chance is, it
just wants to escape and it’s not gonna
come after you guys, but if you are stung, I’m
pretty much just gonna turn the cameras around
and film you guys and see what happens. (laughter) – Oh, lets not do that today.
– Let’s hope. – That doesn’t happen. Well so far, I’ve managed
to get everyone of these stinging insects back
inside the glass capsule so that we can safely release
it back into the wild, right where it came
from and with any luck, we’ll be able to pull that
off again, once more today. – [Mark] Let’s keep that
streak alive please. – Yes, yes, for you guys’ sake, let’s definitely keep it alive. Maurio are you ready? – Ready. – Mark are you ready? – I’m ready if you’re ready. (blows air) – Alright I am going to
slide the warrior wasp off to the side. You stay there buddy. I’m going to place the net, right in the middle
of the table, and just like I did
with the tarantula hawk, I’m then going to replace
the capsule right there and I’m going to
lift up the net. See that, good. You guys got that shot. – [Cameraman] Yep. – I’m now going to
remove the glass capsule and let the wasp– – [Cameraman] A little
delicate procedure. – Ohh!
– Okay. – The wasp is in the net. I’m gonna gently pin it,
and I need to grab it right at the back of its thorax. Got it! Perfect hold. Okay, wow! There we have it! Okay, I’m gonna have
to do this quick. And that is about as good a
hold as I am going to get. Whoa look at that stinger. (suspenseful music) I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the warrior wasp. Here we go. One. Two. (suspenseful music) (screaming) (screaming) Ooohh! God! Arrgh! – [Cameraman] Are you alright? – Ahhhh! Ahhhh! – [Cameraman] Talk to
me, what are you feelin’? – Oh man! Oh man, yep, don’t be sad! Oh man (faint speaking)
really quickly. So far, not as bad as
the bullet ant though. Oooh, nope, nope, nope, hold on. Arrgh! Oooh, sharp shooting pain! There’s the sting
zone, right there. You see that, oh my gosh! My arm is swellin’ up
really, really quickly! Arrgh! Hold on, back to the
table, back to the table! Okay, so what is happening
right now is the venom is getting into my
bloodstream, right. And what’s happening
is it is breaking down the membranes around
my blood cells, and it’s causing
them to scatter. Now there’s cells in there
that are neurons, right. Those neurons are sending
messages to my brain that are screaming
pain, pain, pain, and trust me, when I say
there’s massive amounts of pain going through my arm right now! (groans) Initial onset is not as
bad as the bullet ant, but it’s an electrical
shock similar to that of the tarantula hawk. Hold on, let me compose
myself here for a second. Arrgh, oooh, oh my gosh, the pain is actually
getting worse, as time goes on, and I don’t
know if that’s actually the venom taking hold or
that’s just the neurons firing to my brain, saying you are in a lot
of pain right now Coyote. Hold on guys, give me a second. Arrgh! See the red! – [Cameraman] You
seem more squirmy. Arrgh! – [Cameraman] You
can’t sit still. – This is more of
a continuous sting than the bullet ant was. This is, this keeps firing. This just keeps firing. God this GoPro. Arrgh! (suspenseful music) – [Cameraman] Let me know
if I need to be worried. Talk to me. – I’m trying to just mentally like absorb the pain right now. And we’re tired. We’ve been working hard all
day and it’s hot out here. I’m light-headed. You know, when you get
into a really hot shower, and the steam sets on and you
feel like you’re gonna faint, I do feel like I’m
getting close to fainting and that is not good. I’m just trying to
control my breathing. Arrgh, look at that welt. Man! That thing walloped me! I can only imagine
what it would be like to be swarmed by these. Just a single sting dwarfs
the sting of a yellow jacket. The initial sting was not as
painful as the tarantula hawk, but then it set in, and it
was electrical in nature. It felt like an electrical
current going into my arm, and I was over here, I was
hitting the ground saying it’s not as bad
as the bullet ant, but in its own way,
it’s different, because the bullet ant hit me,
and then just kept radiating. This feels like I’m being
stung over and over and over. – [Cameraman] Man
it’s really swollen. It usually doesn’t
swell quickly. – Look at that. Go ahead, put your hand out. Feel the tauntness
of my forearm. – [Cameraman] Oh yeah. – And you can see–
– Oh yeah. – [Cameraman] Big time. – [Coyote] The stinger
insertion point is definitely swollen. It is very much isolated. It almost looks like a little BB or something underneath my skin. – [Cameraman] You know,
you’re reacting more like you did with the bees, with that immediate welt. – And my body may start to
react differently to venoms. At this point I’m just
feelin’ really light-headed, very hot, my arm is very
hot and I’m not necessarily a state of paralysis
like the tarantula hawk, but my– – [Cameraman] Any tightness
in your chest or– – Not my chest! Tightness in my hand,
like this motion, squeezing of my hand, is very,
very difficult right now. I’m really having a hard
time squeezing down a fist, and you can see the swelling
is setting in there. It does still feel, like
pins and needles in my arm, but I know, that everybody
wants me to answer the question. Is the sting from the
warrior wasp more painful than the bullet ant? I would definitely say that
the bullet ant is worse. However, keep this in mind. If you come across a bullet
ant while you’re out there venturing through the
rainforest of Costa Rica, let’s say one lands on your arm, falls out of tree,
and stings you, you can easily brush it off. However, if you stumble upon
a nest of warrior wasps, and you disturb it, you’re
going to have thousands of angry insects attacking you, and not only are they
going to be attacking, but they are going to
be chasing as you run through the underbrush. Now, imagine if you were
to talk sting after sting after sting, it could
potentially be lethal. So word to the wise, if you’re out there in the
rainforest of Costa Rica, simply admire these animals
from a safe distance and always pay attention
to your surroundings. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild! We’ll see you on
the next adventure! Hey, wait a second, (needle scratching record) I feel like we’re
missing something. – What? – [Coyote] You famous line. – Oh, you didn’t
notice my t-shirt. – [Coyote] Oh. – I been wearing
this all day man. – Cool!
– Check it out! – I read the comments guys. – [Coyote] As I hike back
through the sweltering rainforest, I could feel
the physical and mental exhaustion setting in. Yet I knew there was still
one thing left to do. Alright guys well, my arm is in considerable pain right now, but as always it is time
to release the creature back into the wild. What I’m gonna do is
open up the capsule, and let this warrior wasp fly
right back up to its nest. Slowly opening the capsule I
released this fearless warrior and watched as it
returned to the nest. I felt a sense of completion. My personal mountain, known as
the insect sting pain index, had finally been conquered. It was a long painful journey, but as I climbed
past the cow killer, traversed the tarantula hawk, battled the bullet ant, now
withstood the warrior wasps, I felt as if I had finally
reached the summit. However, as I stood upon
this moment in time, it seemed to pass in a flash, as I was quickly reminded
that the universe will always present
it’s next challenge when you least expect it. Alright guys, so we have
looked up vespid wasps of Latin American, and I
have found out what this is. Just after we finished
filming the warrior wasp, we came upon a species
whose sting had yet to be officially
documented and ranked on the insect sting pain index. Could this sleeping
giant be the dark horse that would emerge
from the shadows to claim the throne as the
newly established king of sting? There is only one
way to find out. I’m going to be stung
by the executioner wasp. If you are excited to
see how bad the sting of the executioner wasp
is, make sure to go back and pay homage to the
reigning king of sting, the bullet ant, and
don’t forget subscribe to join me and the crew on
this season of Breaking Trail! Oh my gosh this is it! (howling) (birds chirping)

Warrior Wasp ANTIDOTE?


– [Coyote] Okay I’m gonna
have to do this quick. And that is about as good a
hold as I am going to get. – [Man] Oh I can
see the stinger. – Wow, look at that stinger. (dramatic music) (sighs) I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the warrior wasp. Here we go. One, two, three. (dramatic music) (yelling) – [Man] You’re
turning red already. (yelling) Talk to me, what
are you feelin’? – Oh man. Oh man, yep, oh it’s bad. Oh man it’s gettin’ a lot worse. – Is it?
– Really quickly. So far not as bad as
the bullet ant though. (yelling) Nope, nope, nope, hold on. (yelling) It’s a sharp shooting pain. There’s the sting
zone right there. See that, oh my gosh man,
my arm is swellin’ up really, really quickly. (yelling) Hold on, back to the
table, back to the table. Okay so what is
happening right now is the venom is getting
into my bloodstream, right? And what’s happening
is it is breaking down the membranes around
my blood cells. And it’s causing
them to scatter. Now there’s cells in there
that are neurons, right? Those neurons are sending
messages to my brain that are screaming,
“Pain, pain, pain.” And trust me when I say
there’s massive amounts of pain goin’ through
my arm right now. Initial onset is not as
bad as the bullet ant. But it’s an electrical
shock similar to that of the tarantula hawk. (breathing heavily) Hold on, let me compose
myself here for a second. (yelling) Oh my gosh the pain is
actually getting worse as time goes on. And I don’t know if that’s
actually the venom taking hold or that’s just the neurons
firing to my brain saying, “You are in a lot of
pain right now Coyote.” Hold on guys, give me a second. (yelling) You see the red? – You seem more squirmy.
(yelling) Like you can’t sit still. – This is more of
a continuous sting than the bullet ant was. This keeps firing. This just keep firing. Cut this GoPro. (yelling) (upbeat jungle music)
(airplane flying) – [Man] Alright Coyote,
it’s time for the aftermath. The warrior wasp
after sting special. – Yeah, you know it’s
interesting between when we stopped filming and now, ’cause we took a little
bit of a water break after we wrapped the episode. Look at this dark
spot in my vein. Do you see that? It’s almost like a
broken blood vessel or something like that. And you can see just how
red the sting zone is. It’s interesting,
my forearm reacts in a very similar way to
every sting that I take. But this one specifically
does still feel like pins and needles coursing through my forearm.
– You actually turn your arm, you can see where it crests out.
– Yeah, oh yeah. It’s almost like you
can feel it right there. It feels like a golf
ball under there. – Yeah, it’s like a goose egg, like if you hit
your head real hard. – Yeah. – So you’re impressed. – Yeah, no I am
definitely impressed. It wasn’t quite the
theatrics of the bullet ant. But to be honest with you guys, it was painful but not
as bad as I expected. And I think at this
point we do know that the bullet ant
is the king of sting. It holds strong on it’s throne
and that’s totally cool, totally respect that. But what we wanna do
now is actually apply a little relief to my arm ’cause it is really
hot and really stinging and you guys know we
always use Sting Kill. So let’s see how Sting
Kill works up against the sting of a warrior wasp. Will this help with the burning? Works against bullet
ants and yellow jackets so I’m gonna go ahead and wager that this is gonna feel great. Let’s see here. Oh there it is. The green
(scoffs) now that’ll wake you up. Benzocaine and menthol. My two favorite things. Oh yeah. That’s nice. You know what guys? Sting Kill is in
my adventure pack and in an instance like this, I’m going to apply it because
we do have a very long hike out of the rainforest
back to our jungle camp. And I just wanna make sure
that my body is reacting well to the venom. And back to the actual
sting of the warrior wasp. It is very different than any of the other stings I’ve taken. And it does feel like the
venom is continuing to work and trigger my neurons
to say, “Oh sharp pain.” And then a couple seconds
later, “Oh sharp pain.” And that’s what I’m
experiencing right now, just continuous pain. Have you ever pricked
your finger on the tip of a cactus or on an
actual sewing needle or a safety pin?
– Oh yeah. Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah.
(yelling) – Oh no.
(yelling) (laughing) Now it’s in your hand.
– Coyote. – Yeah?
– Why do you always get me in these situations?
– Sorry man. – Like a band-aid?
– Like a band-aid. (yelling)
(laughing) – Oh my gosh that hurts. (laughing)
– Imagine what I’m goin’ through now? – Oh my gosh, it feels so
much worse to you right now. – Oh first blood, first blood.
– Okay. – That’s what it feels
like every few seconds. It’s just like boop, boop, boop. And it kind of radiates in
this entire egg looking area on my forearm. Look at that, you can see
all the liquid under the skin at this point. See that when I move the
– Oh yeah. – [Coyote] See it
move in my skin? – [Man] It’s almost
like a water balloon. – [Coyote] Yeah, now that
is my body’s natural defense to the venom. It is forcing water
into this area so that the liquid breaks down the concentration of the venom. That venom is working
very hard right now to keep me in pain. Now imagine if you were to stumble upon a
warrior wasp nest and be stung many times. It would be extremely bad. Especially if you
were stung in the face or your neck or near your eyes. The arm, look how much swelling
there is in just in arms so I can imagine if you were
stung all over your body, it would be really, really bad. – [Man] So Coyote out of all the insects that you’ve
been stung by so far, which one has been
the most intimidating? – Definitely the tarantula hawk. Nothing could ever take the
place of how intimidating that insect was, it was massive. I imagined that the warrior
wasp would be a lot larger than it was when I
actually saw it in person. But when it comes down to it, often times it’s
size that is scarier but not always the sting
that is more potent. A smaller creature like
that has more powerful venom to help ward off any
potential predators. – Would you say the warrior wasp is worse than the
tarantula hawk? – It lasted longer. At this point, my
arm definitely still was not in pain from
the tarantula hawk. And I still have
pins and needles going through my
forearm right now, yeah. I’m still in pain, I’m just
managing to compose myself really well right now. – I got a question.
– Yeah. – Can we maybe take
on another challenge? Like fluffiest animal out there? – Like what’s the cutest baby
animal that exists out there? I don’t know, Coyote
pack, you tell us. Do you want us to climb
the cute baby animal index so that we can get
the cutest animals up close for the cameras? I’m sure everybody’s writing in the comment
section right now, “Cute animals no, unless you’re
gonna get bitten by ’em.” – [Man] What about
the slimiest creature? – [Coyote] Slimiest
creatures, yeah. I’m sure we could come
up with our own index to climb with a number
of different cool things about these animals. But when it comes to stings, yeah guys, I believe we
are at the end of the road as far as what has been tested
out before and what we know. – [Man] But the adventure
continues right? There’s a whole lot
of adventure ahead. – Oh yeah, more
episodes than you guys can possibly imagine. The brave wilderness
train is a rollin’ and trust me guys, heading into 2018 it’s
going to be absolutely epic. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next location. – [Man] Ready for some dinner? – Ready for some more adventure. – [Man] Let’s do it. (dramatic music) – Alright guys, so we have
looked up vespid wasps of Latin America, and I
have found out what this is. Just after we finished
filming the warrior wasp, we came upon a
species who’s sting had yet to be
officially documented and ranked on the
insect sting pain index. Could this sleeping
giant be the dark horse that would emerge
from the shadows to claim the throne as the
newly established king of sting? There was only one
way to find out. I’m going to be stung
by the executioner wasp. Did you see the full
warrior wasp sting episode? If not, make sure
to go back and watch as I go skin to stinger
against this incredible insect. And don’t forget, subscribe
so you can join me and the crew on our
next big adventure. (coyote howling)

Why The World Hates Fire Ants


I feel most people either find ants gross
or even fear them, while others don’t even notice them, and some even hate them, especially
fire ants! But let me tell you, as ant keeper of many
years now, every single day, I am reminded of how epic and mind-blowing ants really are,
and most especially fire ants. So today I wanted to take you on a journey,
for a more intimate and deeper look into my tiny city of fire ants, whom you guys have
voted to be called The Fire Nation, and show you just how miraculous ant life truly is,
by using fire ants, perhaps the most hated ants of all as our subjects. We’ll even get to meet the most important
member of the ant colony who has been there since the genesis of this now massive ant
colony – the queen. You won’t want to miss this incredible ant
tour so keep on watching until the end. AC Family, let’s gather round my ant room
for another epic session of ant watching, and see what the world doesn’t know about
the secret lives of these creatures called fire ants, why they are hated globally, and
what it is truly like to live as an ant within the colony, along with our royal highness,
in this info-packed episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Get ready to be mind-blown! Who needs nature shows. Just watch this channel. Enjoy! People ask me why I am so crazy about ants. After all, they’re pests, especially these
fire ants, which most of the world loathes. Well, I see things a little differently. First of all, not all ants are household pests,
but for this video, let’s focus in on fire ants. I get why people hate them. They appear in huge numbers, eat our food,
leave us with painful stings, cause short circuits in our equipment, and during floods,
they even survive by forming massive rafts to float on water. Not even water, can kill fire ants! These fire ants that you see here, like most
fire ants are a very invasive species, and many countries including the US and quite
recently countries like Japan have put such fire ants on their “biohazard list of pest
species to quarantine”. The Fire Nation here is a species known in
the scientific world as Solenopsis geminata, and let me tell you, it is super famous, or
should I say infamous, because it has successfully invaded pretty much all of the world’s tropical
and subtropical countries. It’s hard to find a tropical place in the
world that hasn’t been conquered by these ladies. In the USA, these girls, as well as the more
prolific species, their cousins Solenopsis invicta have invaded and become the source
of many problems in human populated areas. Now when I say “invaded” it means these ants
somehow were introduced to a given area and spread like wildfire (no pun intended) colonizing
and establishing themselves in that place. Now the reason why this process of invading
can be a bad thing for an area, is because like most animal and plant invaders, what
happens is the invading species becomes a competitor to native species and can displace
them, destroy them, and/or even overconsume resources like food. Essentially, when you have an invasive species
of any animal or plant move into a new place, it affects the entire ecosystem of that area. In the case of the Philippines, where I live,
where the queen of this colony was collected, these fire ants invaded many years ago and
today mostly occupy cities, and luckily have not wiped out the native ants which now generally
tend to stay outside of the cities, at least for now. Locals here are used to seeing fire ants in
homes and know to stay clear of them because they sting. But in places like the US, fire ants have
become a major agricultural pest, killing native ants and contibuting to the destruction
of important crops due to their tendancy to tend plant-destroying aphids as a food source,
aside from their nuissance as stinging house pests. But what makes fire ants such destructive
forces of nature throughout the world? To better understand fire ants, you have to
look at where they came from. The dangerous fire ant species the world hates,
originated from South America. Let’s go there! It’s amazing to think that the jungles of
South America helped create through evolution these highly adaptive, prolific, and destructive
ant machines known as Fire Ants! The terrain there is very diverse and hostile,
a habitat full of predators, extreme climate, lots and lots of rain, and just full of many
other ants, insects, and creatures competing for the same resources. In the jungles of South America, survival
of the fittest certainly applies! So it’s no wonder that evolution and natural
selection helped give rise to the ever impactiful fire ant. No wonder they produce so quickly, in such
huge numbers, have the power to destroy ecosystems, deliver such painful stings, and even are
capable of floating on water during floods. Their native place of origin made them that
way! In fact, a lot of the world’s problematic
and invasive species of ant originated in South America, like argentine ants and rasberry
crazy ants. But the next question is, how then did they
get around and migrate to other parts of the world? Did they develop airlines, too? Well, believe it or not. That’s not too far from the truth. We humans flew them, sailed them, drove them,
and cargoed them around the world. The export of plants from South America in
the plant trade, as well as any cargo for that matter, including produce, all contributed
to the worldwide spread of Fire Ants. They actually migrated to other parts of the
world via trojan horses and are still doing it to this day. There really is no way of stopping them. Governments now try inspection and some even
spraying of all items entering a country. During a recent trip to Borneo, I was surprised
to learn Malaysian government requires all planes to be sprayed with pesticide prior
to landing, and they asked all of us to simply cover our noses while flight staff fumigated
the entire cabin. But even then, after all the precautions,
all it takes is one single pregnant queen ant hiding somewhere to start an entire massive
and growing ant colony in a new place. And speaking of a single pregnant queen ant,
back to my ant room. Let’s meet our Royal Highness, shall we? Here lies the entrance of what you guys have
called the Blaze Maze, a recently installed AC Hybrid Nest 2.0, our newest flagship formicarium
available at AntsCanada.com, and the Fire Nation here has made it their new lair. Opening it up, right at the heart of the Blaze
Maze is a mass grouping of worker ants, and if you look closely you will see deep inside
the mass of worker ants is the queen. She is bigger, and wow check out her completely
bloated gaster, just full of eggs. The technical term for this condition of gaster
bloating due to eggs is “physogastrism”. Now in a previous video, we mentioned that
this queen lays many eggs every few minutes, and one of you guys wrote to me asking how
this was possible seeing as, if she was constantly laying eggs every couple of minutes, that
would be some pretty fast egg development inside her. Well, what I failed to mention in that video
was that she isn’t always laying eggs. In many species of ants, the queen has egg-laying
seasons, periods where she will be popping eggs out like crazy, as seen here. This queen of ours is in her egg-laying period. But there are also times when she is not laying
eggs, and is simply producing more eggs within her. It seems in our video from a few weeks ago,
you guys spotted the queen dashing away from our camera, but if you look closely at her,
her gaster was not as physogastric, not as large as it is now. So at that time, our queen was in her egg-laying
break period. She also didn’t have as many ants completely
clamouring all around her at that time like we see here. For those of you who keep ants in North America,
Europe, Australia, and other temperate regions, you will also notice these egg-laying breaks
througout the year and throughout all of winter time. Now, AC Family, are you ready to be mind-blown? What is truly miraculous is how these fertilized
eggs are created inside the queen, and to learn about that, let’s go back to two years
ago when this queen was still a virgin. So at some point in our queen’s life, she
belonged to another nest of another mature colony somewhere here in the Philippines. She was born with wings, from another founding
queen of her birth colony. Now during mating season prior to rainy season,
she emerged from her birth nest, took off into the air along with all her fellow queen
sisters, and so too did her winged brothers. So get this, in this massive one month a year
event, called the “Nuptial Flight” all fire ant colonies’ virgin queens and males of her
species throughout all of the Philippines took to the air at the same time, and engaged
in a huge mating session. Can you believe it? Every year, completely by instinct, biological
clock, and cues from weather, the fire ants throughout the country release a specific
pheromone which floats through the air to signal all fire ant reproductives to fly in
this Nuptial Flight month, a yearly ritual that has remained unchanged for millions and
millions of years, and this is how it happens for almost every ant species in the world. Every species has their given Nuptial Flight
season in the year, and the ants fly and mate in the same way. So our queen, after having mated with several
male ants, who by the way, die after mating, dropped to the ground and broke off her wings. Can you imagine that after using her flight
equipment, she no longer needs it so it is completely discarded. Talk about body mutilation! Then she proceeded to start her own colony
somewhere else, and as she was wandering around, she was captured and cared for, and eventually
ended up in my ant room to start her own growing ant colony, which became what you guys now
know as the Fire Nation. It’s amazing to think that this massive ant
colony started with just this single queen ant? And what’s even more amazing? Just that one day of mating was enough to
allow her to produce fertilized eggs for her entire life which could span multiple decades! Yes, she has a special organ in her body called
a spermatheca which keeps all that sperm collected during Nuptial Flight viable, and she releases
each sperm cell to fertilize one egg inside her for years and years to come. Talk about the perfect ant-manufacturing machine! It just blows my mind how amazing this queen
ant is. By the way, guys, now that the Hybrid Nest
allows us to actually see her and check up on her periodically, should we give this queen
a name? AC Family, leave your name suggestions for
our Royal Highness in the comments section and I will choose my favourites for the entire
AC Family to vote on in a future video. So once an egg is laid, one of these worker
ants grabs it and proceeds to place it in an egg pile somewhere in the nest. All these eggs will be workers, except prior
to Nuptial Flight season where some of the eggs become alates, i.e. reproductive queens
and males. When the eggs hatch, the larvae are transported
to a larva room, a sort of nursery where they are fed and constantly licked clean by the
workers. The workers who are all their sisters feed
the larvae via trophallaxis, a process where they essentially regurgitate stored food within
their crop, or social stomach. Food which was put deposited there from either
a previous meal, or via trophallaxis from a fellow sister worker ant. Tropallaxis is a great way for ants to distribute
food to one another so that only a few ants ever have to leave the nest to physically
find and eat the food in its raw form. Everyone else just stays home and waits for
the food to be delivered. Eventually these larvae grow and become pupae
and are then placed into a pupae incubation chamber where they are allowed to develop
into adult ants. By the way, these chambers for eggs, larvae,
and pupae, are always changing in location depending on ideal environmental conditions
for each stage. Usually the most humid rooms are delegated
for eggs and larvae, while the warmest rooms are for pupae. Some species of ants will even bring their
pupae to the upper most portions of their ant hills in order to “bake” the pupae under
the sun’s heat to speed up development of the pupae into adult worker ants. The faster ants can get the young to adulthood,
the better because a larger work force means greater survival rate for the ant colony. And that AC Family, is the miracle of ant
life. Can you see why ant lovers like myself are
crazy about ants? They are just mind-blowing creatures designed
to survive and proliferate efficiently in their extensive undeground cities. Though most of the world might dislike ants,
they still are pretty amazing creatures, essential to the environment and important for our survival. They are vital predators, decomposers, pollinators,
seed-distributers, and prey items in ecosystems around the world. And now the next time you see an ant, you
know where it came from and what it took for it to get there. Thanks for watching another episode of the
AntsCanada ant channel. This is AntsCanada signing out. It’s ant love forever. Alright, AC Family, aren’t ants the coolest
creatures? Now that you know how cool they are, I hope
all of you guys get the unique opportunity to keep ants yourselves and observe them in
the comfort of your own home as pets. The ant farm set up you see in this video
is available at AntsCanada.com. I will leave a link in the description box
to a complete easy-to-use kit called the All You Need Hybrid Nest Gear Pack for you to
check out if you would like to try ant keeping, and just a note: we do ship worldwide, as
well as offer starting ant colonies with a queen for sale from ant keepers who may be
from your city through our GAN Project, an initiative to helps lessen the spread of invasive
ants while helping the ant keeping community grow, so watch more about that in this video
here. Promise, you will find ant keeping to be super
fun and educational, and for all you parents out there, it’s an awesome way to bond with
your kids while learning about nature. It would be super cool to keep ants together
with you, guys. AC Inner Colony, of course, I have also left
a hidden cookie for you here, if you would just like to watch some extended play footage
of the Fire Nation living in their setup. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week, we asked: The fact that the fire ants chose
to keep mostly larvae in the new Hybrid Nest indicates what? Congratulations to Emerald Lion 1717 who correctly
answered: The fire ants chose to keep mostly
larvae in the new Hybrid nest because it has more humidity. Congratulations Emerald Lion 1717 you just
won a free AC Test Tube Portal from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is the technical term for
the condition of a queen ant’s gaster that is swollen with eggs? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free ebook handbook our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, & SUBSCRIBE
if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

I Was Swarmed By Fire Ants And Survived (True Story)

I Was Swarmed By Fire Ants And Survived (True Story)


it was a boiling hot summer day the
temperature is easily over a hundred degrees the woods all around me are
silent but I know they’re out there looking for me and my partner we can’t
rest long we’ve been on the run for 18 hours straight since last night and
we’re both exhausted grudgingly we pick up our aching bodies and push on into
the thick brush once more checking our compass to make sure we’re on the right
heading I’m somewhere in the deep woods of the southern United States in a
military land navigation and survival training program six months ago I was
just a regular teenager and now I’m hiking through the deep woods on the
alert for the squad of instructors whose job it is to hunt me and my partner down
our goal is simple we have to reach three different way points and check in
with an instructor at each before hitting our extraction site the total
course is about 30 miles but the waypoints are set up so that you have to
take a long winding path to get to each and they each have to be hit in
Secession causing you to double back for part of your route the entire time
there’s six instructors hunting you and if you get caught you fail if you miss a
waypoint you fail if you take longer than 36
hours to complete the course you fail failure means you get washed back have
to try the entire program again with a different class or you simply get kicked
out of the program entirely I don’t want to fail before we set off we’re given a
crash course on all the natural hazards in this part of the American South
alternating between swamp and forest terrain there’s the threat of snakes
alligators of venomous spiders killer bees and last but not least fire ants we
all paid attention during the briefing but I think most of us were worried
about alligators and snakes how bad could insects really be I’d soon find
out eventually my partner and I made our way to a road that cuts through the
woods and we approached very carefully roads our danger crossings because the
moment you step out of the wood line anybody within two miles could have a
clear line of sight of you you typically want to cross a road in the middle of a
bend that way no one can have a direct line of sight to you past maybe a few
hundred meters no such luck here though this road is a
long and straight and though it probably makes a turn a few miles down or up from
us we’re not sure in can’t risk adding miles or hours to our
time we find a sheltered spot with a good view of the road to simply taking
the opportunity to eat a quick meal we’ve been given one meal ready to eat
or MRE each for the 36 hours we’re expected to complete the course
so hunger is ever-present we’ve been encouraged to forage even hunt if we can
manage it in fact I think we’re expected to there’s no way a single MRE can give
you the calories you need in this heat when you’re on the move for a day and a
half straight we munch on a few edible roots we manage to dig up early this
morning as well as a small portion of the MRE we decided to use the MRE to
supplement whatever food we find out here in the wild rather than eat it out
right as we rest we watch the road for 30 minutes waiting to see if there’s any
traffic it’s a small two-lane road and after a half-hour we don’t spot any
vehicles so decide it’s safe to cross a normal danger crossing would have one
or two members crossing at a time while the rest of the team took up overwatch
positions to give covering fire if need be
we’re unarmed though so decide that it’s best we cross together as quickly as
possible we identify a spot with great concealment in the woods on the other
side of the road that’s fairly close to the road itself and we slowly start
making our way to the road on our side suddenly there’s the sound of an engine
and in a flash we both hit the floor my partner manages to get behind the thick
bush but I’m a little more exposed than he is so I roll behind a thick fallen
log I got a little too much momentum though and to stop myself I reach out
with my left hand and brace against the log my hand pushes into the soft rotten
wood but I don’t notice a Humvee with someone in the turret is slowly making
its way down the road and I could see a glint of binoculars which means this
person is looking in my direction I freeze immediately barely breathing even
though I’m suddenly out of breath from panicked before we set out my partner
and I had put on thin skinned black leather gloves and then we use duct tape
to close the gap between the gloves and the sleeve of our uniform blouse we did
the same with our pant legs tucking them into our boot and then using the duct
tape on top of the boots this is so that fleas ticks or any matter of insect
would be unable to crawl inside our uniform it also means our hands and feet
are hot as hell but we stop every 6 hours to let them breathe and wipe up
excess sweat from our feet so they don’t start rotting away as I am carefully
watching the Humvee move in our direction I’m not paying attention to my
left hand unbeknownst to me when I reached out to brace myself against the
fallen tree truck to stop my roll I punched into the soft rotting wood and
straight into a nest of fire ants the ants are now angry extremely angry and
they are on the warpath dozens upon dozens of them have already begun
attacking my gloved hand but thanks to the tough leather I feel nothing now
they’re moving their way up my hand to my arm and because my uniform is sealed
at the wrists they can’t find a way in they can only keep marching up my arm
closer and closer to my neck and the only entry point to attack my body and I
am completely unaware that any of this is happening the Humvee is moving slowly
the person in the turret carefully scanning with binoculars he looks in our
direction and I remain utterly motionless holding my breath so that I
don’t accidentally make a small leaf or twig move as I inhale then I feel a
sharp pain on my neck a moment later a second sharp pain great some bug just
bit me and it’s probably still crawling around on me I just hope it’s not
venomous and I pushed the thought away I can’t move I can’t give myself away I
can’t fail my training then there’s three more sharp pains and a second
later a dozen all at once now I know something is seriously wrong and I can’t
help but turn my head and look at my shoulder I almost wish I had it my arm
all the way up to my shoulder is a black and red mass of ants
my hand is wrist deep in their nest and the angry ants are swarming by the
hundreds covering every square inch of my uniform and finding a way inside it
through the top fire ants are an invasive species to the United States as
well as many other nations and regions around the world believed to have been
accidentally brought to the US and shipping crates fire ants quickly set up
shop all across the American South and every year they push just a little bit
further up north while they can’t survive cold weather for long thanks to
global warming the maximum range that they can inhabit has been steadily
increasing year after year amongst ants they’re known as one of the most
aggressive species and regularly killed birds and small mammals they’ve even
been known to bring down larger livestock when it couldn’t flee after
stung into a fire ant nest the u.s. spends
millions of dollars every year in treatment for fire ant bites as well as
measures to attempt to control the insects for a long time it was feared
that the ants would even drive many species of native animals extinct most
notably lizards which are unable to flee fast enough to save themselves over the
last seven decades though American lizards have evolved longer legs and new
behaviors to avoid fire ants now these tiny aggressive invaders were
busy invading me and every second dozens more poured inside the top of my uniform
the horror of discovering my entire left arm and shoulder covered in a solid
matter Vance was too much for me and I immediately rolled away from the nest
part of me tried to fight for control to maintain my discipline but now my brain
was kicking into survival mode and the pain was becoming incredible I was being
bitten by dozens of ants every second I had to do something
fire ants attacked prey and intruders by biting down with their pincers and then
using their pincers for grip stabbing repeatedly with the Stinger in their
abdomen often an ant will fight in this circular pattern as it turns over and
over stinging repeatedly this is what makes fire ants unique amongst most ants
the ability to sting multiple times when the ants stinger penetrates the flesh
and injects a toxic alkaloid venom called Solon Thompson for humans this is
typically not dangerous unless you’re allergic much like a bee sting but it
does produce intense burning pain hence the name fire and recently those
scientists have discovered that a fire ants venom might actually affect the
nervous system itself which might account for reports of hallucinations by
victims the ants were now inside my uniform though thankfully I was wearing
a tight-fitting compression shirt beneath my blouse it fits snugly enough
against my body that a lot of the ants can’t find their way under that to get
to my chest but at this point I’m covered in so many ants that plenty do
in a panic I leap up and rip off my blouse tearing away the duct tape that
keeps it securely attached to my gloves at this point my partner has realized
that I’m covered in hundreds of ants and forgetting all about our tests he makes
a break for the Humvee to flag it down for help
as he’s running I’m stripping out of as much of my clothing as I can because by
now the ants have gotten my compression shirt and our stinging my
chest and back stumbling and wiping away dozens of stinging ants from my body at
a time I’ve worked my way toward the road and in seconds
someone’s grabbed me by the shoulders and is dragging me toward the Humvee at
this point my vision becomes hazy my hearing is slightly distorted and I
can’t quite tell what’s going on I’m laid down on the road and one of the
instructors grabs a can of diesel fuel from the back of the Humvee and douses
my entire body with it fire ants are pretty unaffected by water but in an
emergency gasoline or diesel can irritate ants and force them away I can
hear someone on the radio calling for a medivac but everyone’s voice is sound
distorted I can’t make out much of what’s being said and my vision is
getting dark around the edges the pain which was like searing hot fire across
my body is fading away too which is nice the next thing I know I’m
waking up in a medical tent and IV in my arm and a medic standing at the foot of
my cot I find out that I was unconscious for an hour but my heart rate and
breathing remained strong so they cancel the medevac flight to the hospital the
medic asks me how I’m feeling and I tell him that I can taste iron in my mouth
and that my body feels like it’s on fire my arm is covered in dozens of small red
bumps each one a different sting and when the medicals of a mirror for me I’m
horrified to see that I have dozens upon dozens of stings all across the left
side of my face down my neck shoulders the upper part of my chest down my arm
to the elbow it almost looks like I have severe chickenpox but in just a few
areas of my body a military ambulance takes me back to
the training depot and there I see the doctor at the attached clinic he tells
me that I’m thankfully not allergic or else I’d be dead as I received well over
a hundred bites all across the upper left side of my body he wants me to get
checked in at the hospital though just to monitor my condition is a cautionary
measure I asked him what that’ll mean for my training and he tells me that
I’ll get washed back but be allowed to repeat with a new class in a month I’ve
been through hell with my class by now pushing each other along when each one
of us wanted to quit at some point in our training we started with 40 and are
down to just 15 of us at this point I’m closer to these guys than almost anyone
else in my entire life I don’t want to quit now
want to finish with another team I begged the doctor to let me stay
eventually he calls in my training unit commander who tells me to shut up and
follow the doctor’s orders I beg him this time to let me stay he
thinks about it asked the doctor if it’s even possible the doctor says that if I
survive the initial stings there’s little danger now but it won’t be
pleasant for me I shrug tell them both that I’ll deal with it
my commander agrees but warns me that the only slack I’ll be cut is not being
forced to wear camo paint because of the risk of infection on my bites I’ll be
expected to keep up with everyone do everything else everyone else does
no quarter given I agree and the next day me and my partner are forced to
restart our navigation course from scratch
he doesn’t mind though he was given the option to finish alone the day before
but he refused because that’s what family does over the next few days the
bites hardened into small white lumps the doctor wasn’t kidding training
becomes even more of a living hell the bites hurt bad
due to the constant rubbing of my uniform and body armor against my skin
soon they start to lose paws and at the end of each day my shirt is covered in
salt and crusted sweat and pus I was given a cream to use to prevent
infection and ibuprofen for the pain the cream apparently works but the ibuprofen
doesn’t even touch the intense pain the nights are the worst though the
temperature stays close to a hundred degrees and I’m so miserable I can
barely get any sleep and we’ve already been sleeping too anyway
I pushed through it though eventually the small white lumps hardened and many
of them tear off due to friction from my skin in my uniform on my gear I’m
carrying up to 80 pounds sometimes and it’s sheer agony but I keep on anyway
after a week I’m exhausted and on the verge of total collapse but my bites
have finally begun to fade and this face of my training is nearly complete when
we leave this base of training a few weeks later my unit commander approaches
me and shakes my hand he doesn’t say anything just shakes my hand and
he doesn’t need to a year later I’m with my active unit but I hear about an
accident back in training some new kid was sleeping out on one of the courses
in the middle of the night fire ants came across him he got bit all over his
body and woke up in the middle of it he ended up having a worse reaction than me
and was medevacked out nearly died from it and they ended up giving him a
medical discharge from the military to most people fire ants are a nuisance but
to this day whenever I see any type of ant I can’t help but shudder and I thank
my lucky stars that I wasn’t born allergic to fire ant venom have you ever
been bitten by fire ants let us know in the comments and as always if you
enjoyed this video don’t forget to like share and subscribe for more great
content

MONSTER BUG WARS | Blood on the Forest Floor | S2E2

MONSTER BUG WARS | Blood on the Forest Floor | S2E2


The bug world is not for the feet-hearted. From the shadows, assassins strike without warning. They’re fast and they’re deadly. You can be impaled, clubbed or torn limb from limb. It’s no exaggeration beside that, this is the insect equivalent of sharp jaws. Death can be instant or drawn out. But it’s coming. (Music) The bug world is full of spies. With a license to kill. In this deadly game of high sticks espionage, any branch or leaf might be. Bug. When a hooded mantis and the Brazilian wandering spider go for the jug-killer. It’s all cloak and dagger. In the jungles of Central America, some of the deadliest predators are masters of the skies. From above or behind, the hooded mantis looks just like a leaf but if you’re a prey and it’s whirring above you, about ready to strike, it looks more like a king cobra, and its bite is just as deadly. Not only is it invisible, the hooded mantis makes other bugs disappear. Like all good spies, the hooded mantis excelles and surveillance. Two huge compound eyes, if the mantis stirious scopic vision and excellent view to a kill. It also deploys two extra long antennae, each lined with tens of thousands of highly sensitive kilo receptors. Free of debris, they pick up the fatest and the transmission. The antennae are consolated detecting chemical and physical information especially when the mantis is sizing up an opponent or prey. This is particularly important when it reaches that stage for the mantis can’t risk taking her eyes off the opponent in case they suddenly launch an attack them their own.

I Stuck My Arm into Thousands of WEAVER ANTS

I Stuck My Arm into Thousands of WEAVER ANTS


Before we begin today’s episode I wanted to
let everyone know that AntsCanada.com is having its big AC annual holidays Promo: the 20-2020
sale. That’s 20% off all Hybrid Series ant farms
and gear packs from now until January 2020, plus a free copy of our newly updated “Ultimate
Ant Keeping Handbook”, right now at AntsCanada.com. Click the link in the description to get your
AC ant farm today! And now enjoy today’s ant episode! Speaking of trees and being vigilant, making
sure everything was in order, I noticed the Canopy of Vortexia, our tree-top forest home
to our aggressive Weaver Ant Colony, The Emerald Empire was in need of some serious maintenance. First, the piping of the rain system had unstuck
from the glass. Also, the trees have seriously overgrown and
they needed to be cut back big time! But there’s just one problem, the only way
in was to open these front glass doors and well, it seems the weaver ants had decided
to fuse its main leaf nest to the glass. Oh boy! This whole maintenance operation was going
to be interesting! Last week, we had a fun-filled journey exploring
various kingdoms in our AC Antiverse. We visited Pacmania, this moss-adorned home
of our Surinam horned frog. Also, we prepped the moat surrounding Skull
Island, home to our ghost ants. And of course, our biggest accomplishment
last week, we crafted the greatest vivarium we’ve ever created in the AC Antiverse, a
multi-species, bioactive domain for the Dark Knights. These exciting journeys of discovery and adventure
around the ant room certainly don’t end there. This week holds yet again, another exhilarating
episode as we continue to dig deep, climb up, and experience first-hand the marvelous
territories of our beloved ant colonies. AC Family, without further ado, let’s begin
this week’s exploration! Standing tall in our collection of ants and
other animals, here in the AC Antiverse, is the Canopy of Vortexia, home to the extravagant
Emerald Empire. This savage colony of weaver ants, scientifically
known as Oecophylla smaragdina, has shown us their brilliance through the building of
their cool leaf basket nests in the trees, their collection of protein sources, and even
through their apparent understanding of sustainability and growth management of the Vortexian trees
on which they live. It seems that we have seen practically everything
these mighty and hard-working arboreal ants can do. But, this time, I wanted to push the boundary
of what is possible for the Emerald Empire’s housing, and it involves sticking my arm and
even my face into their highly guarded territories. Yup! It’s totally crazy, but hey, someone’s gotta
do it, but don’t worry. I have a plan, so stay tuned for that. But before we get started, for those of you
who are new to the channel, let’s catch you up to speed. In celebration for reaching 3 Million subscribers,
I decided try keeping these highly popular ants in the ant world – Asian Weaver Ants. Native to Southeast Asia, these Weaver Ants
are known for their arboreal life as they build their nest atop trees. To create their homes, they use silk produced
by their larvae effectively gluing tree leaves together. The transpiration from the leaves helps naturally
humidify the insides of their leaf nests, and as the leaves wilt, the ants go on to
create new leaf nests on the same tree. They seem to know when to start new nests,
which they do well in advance before their current nests wilt, and appear to somehow
have a feeling for how much their able to build sustainably so that their host plant
doesn’t die out. They’re surely one of the most captivating
ant colonies I’ve ever kept. Three months after the creation of the Canopy
of Vortexia, this is what the territory looks like now. Look! The trees had overgrown. Seems they had been working on plans for this
money tree to grow much taller and their plant management initiatives have been working! This money tree has grown leaves that extend
up to the top mesh, but here’s the very concerning problem with that: if I leave this tree unchecked,
I know for certain that its force would eventually push through the mesh, destroying the terrarium,
and setting the ants free. Hey, wait a second! Could this be the Emerald Empire’s master
plan of escape? OK not gunna even go there! Also, there were other tuning and maintenance
issues that needed to be dealt with like dislodged piping from the rain system, glass cleaning,
a hanging dead leaf nest which drove my OC mind insane, and this stray plastic cup that
fell from their feeding plate, which I’ve been dying for months to pick up and dispose. Given these major and minor concerns, it was
no doubt in my mind that maintenance was needed, but due to the way their enclosure was designed,
the only way I could get in was by opening these two front glass panels, so going into
Vortexia wasn’t something I could do every day. Vortexia maintenance definitely was something
I intended on doing as infrequently as possible and only when necessarily needed. Now AC Family, check out what else I was thinking
regarding all this! So the Dark Knight’s new bioactive planted
vivarium home we made last week, full of creatures like millipedes, bagworms, jumping spider,
etc living with the ant colony, made for a very self-sustaining ecosystemic environment. So I figured, then, if Vortexia was also made
much more bioactive, theoretically it would mean that I’d have to open the terrarium less
often and perhaps even improve the quality of the Emerald Empire’s life by making their
home much more natural, much more bioactive! And so AC Family, after careful thought, it
was then that I decided, while doing maintenance on Vortexia, it was also time for us to upgrade
the territories a notch, and transform Vortexia into a multi-species, bioactive vivarium. But before I tell you how I’m going to do
that, and what creatures I plan on adding to Vortexia, there was a neighbouring ant
kingdom that was also in need of some maintenance. To the West of Vortexia, sits the mystical
double floating islands of Avista, home to our Big-Headed ants, the Bobbleheads. You, the AC Family, named them after the big
heads of the supermajor workers. Take a look at how some of these supermajors
sport rather comically enlarged heads, compared to the ordinary workers. The big heads specialize in cutting things
up by the way! The great jaw force of the colony! Of the entire AC Antiverse, the home of the
Bobbleheads stands out because it is our only truly open-concept, glass-less ant setup. As you may see here, the potted bonsai plants
are rooted down into the soils which extend into these two jars which hold the island
up. Meanwhile, these jars are placed in the middle
of a glass enclosure, whose short walls are covered in baby powder, thereby keeping the
ants within the premises. From afar, the home of the Bobbleheads look
like floating mini-gardens. A second island is situated there in the back,
but we’ll visit that island in a sec. At the center of the main island grows a bonsai
red banyon tree, that we call the Great Tree of Life. The tree gets its name because it provides
life to the Bobbleheads in a few interesting ways. First, the tree offers the Bobbleheads shelter
as they nest beneath the solid tree, protected among its roots. It also houses herds of mealybugs, which the
ants farm and milk for their sweet honeydew excretions. Finally, the tree also eats up their ant poop,
a great fertilizer! In fact, this partnership between ant and
tree has been going so well, that the tree has grown profusely, and I’ve had to continually
trim the tree back almost once a week. In fact, I am about to do it now. Here we go! I started with the outer leaves. Now, watch this, guys! Every time I snip or fiddle around with their
sacred Tree of Life, the Bobbleheads get super mad! The ants never back down from defending their
precious tree! This has become a weekly ritual now. And oh boy! Here they come! The Bobbleheads came rushing out of their
nest with a sole mission to bite and attack my giant hands from the skies. Sorry Bobbleheads, but this process is essential
for the maintenance of your sacred Tree of Life. Hang tight! Ok, I’m done! Sheesh! No need to get feisty! Now, trimming the tree was not all that needed
to be done. First, the second island’s tree had actually
died. This once luscious bonsai tree of a different
species was now withered and dead. I suppose the species of tree did not fare
well in the semi-shaded conditions of my window, so it died. However, I couldn’t just get rid of the island
because ants were still nesting within its soils, as well. I needed to plant a new tree there to replace
the dead tree, because it does seem trees happen to be the Bobbleheads’ secret to success. I mean, look at how big the colony has grown
over time! You can truly appreciate the sheer size of
the colony every time I water the islands. They always come rushing out with their brood,
and I even get a glimpse of the royal queens surfacing at times. It was clear that this supercolony was now
bigger than ever. And so AC Family, aside from restoring their
second island by planting a replacement tree, I felt it was finally time to also give the
Bobbleheads a third floating island. Back to the Vortexia, I knew making the territories
more bioactive meant introducing more organisms to Vortexia, and so here was my plan! First, I knew I needed to increase the ground
cover vegetation. So I felt this gorgeous-looking heart-leaf
philodendron, scientifically called Philodendron cordatum, one of the hardiest terrarium plants
I know, was perfect. Next, I wanted to add some awesome leaf litter,
scooped up from my neighbourhood. It contained tonnes of springtails, isopods,
millipedes, and beneficial mites that would help breakdown organic waste to help fertilize
the plants in Vortexia. And hey look what else I found: this leaf
litter also contained a miniature species of forest roach. How cool right?! Speaking of which, check out the next creatures
I wanted to add: Dubia roaches, scientifically known as Blaptica dubia. These roaches, as you may or may not know,
are my feeder roaches, meaning I pre-crush them and feed them to various animals of my
Ant Room. But, after thinking about it for a bit, I
figured these roaches would be an awesome addition to Vortexia! They can eat decaying leaves that fall to
the floor, plus possibly the dead leaf nests from the trees. If you wish to know more about these underrated
and seldom recognized Dubia roaches, here’s a video I made about them and their home. Plus, I have been noticing that every now
and then, the Emerald Empire has been catching darkling beetles in Vortexia. The mealworms and superworms that we feed
to our various colonies in the Ant Room are actually larvae of darkling beetles. I guess sometimes the superworms survive my
pre-crushing somehow and manage to escape the deadly mandibles of their ant predators,
seeking out safe locations within the terrariums to proceed with the process of pupation, and
development into these shiny black darkling beetles, and it seems the Emerald Empire has
managed to successfully hunt these survivors at ground level. I’ve actually seen this happen with the Fire
Nation and Dark Knights, as well. Given these past experiences, I figured, why
not try to allow insect prey to populate the floors of Vortexia, reproduce on their own
while eating up decaying matter like they would in the wild, but also provide the Weaver
Ants with a supply of prey items. Now wait! I know what you guys are thinking! Ahhhh AntsCanada has changed his ways! He’s now condoning live feeding! Let’s cancel him! Hold on! I still make it a personal rule to never feed
live prey to animals like ants, that don’t need to eat live prey, because it’s a slow
and painful death for the prey item, but in this case, the prey animals would have a great
chance at escaping and avoiding the ants, by burrowing into the leaf litter or into
the ground, and can otherwise feed, breed, and live normally as they would in the wild. It theoretically would be an equal playing
field for prey and predator, in my mind anyway, so the cruelty factor isn’t technically even
an issue both for the Dubia roaches and darkling beetles living with the Emerald Empire in
Vortexia. The ants could simply wander around the forest
floor below their leaf nests to hunt for prey, which the ants do in the wild. I am sure that the co-existence of Vortexian
prey and predators would make for a very interesting bioworld. So first, I needed to remove this dead tree
on the second island in order to replace it with the new tree for the Bobbleheads. I removed the entire island from the island
network. Taking the island off its foundation base,
you can see that the jar is filled with soil in which the Bobbleheads were still nesting. I knew that removing the tree from the pot
had to be done with the utmost care because surely there were still ants nesting in the
soils. I was already expecting a tonne of Bobbleheads
to come rushing out once I they felt me touching their dead tree. So, here goes nothing! I carefully removed the rock from the island
then proceeded to cut the tree off at the roots, then attempted to firmly but carefully
pull the dead tree from the pot. Pop! The tree broke right off, and I made a bit
of a mess, but thankfully, no ants came boiling out. Perhaps they didn’t care about the tree much
since it was already dead. Good! Now, in its place I wanted to plant this baby
Schefflera plant, which also happens to be the same species as one of the trees used
in Vortexia. I feel this would be a better adapted plant
to the conditions next to my window, seeing as it’s done so well in Vortexia. I planted the Scheflera plant in. OK, so THIS WAS THE CRAZIEST THING I’ve ever
done in my life! I know you’ve heard me say this before, but
No, this is! As you may or may not know, although these
weaver ants don’t have stingers like the Fire Nation, they still possess some powerful mandibles
and a bite from these ladies combined with a painful formic acid spray is enough to make
any trespasser scream! Plus, what made this operation extra scary
was that the Emerald Empire had decided to fuse their main leaf nest to the door of their
terrarium. Could this get any more scary? I worry that as soon as I open this glass
door, it would rattle the nest, setting the weaver ants into an angry frenzy. I needed to prepare myself and make sure I
had a plan of attack. I needed to know what things I had to grab,
cut, pull out, and add before I went in to the territories. There was no time to think as soon as those
glass doors were open! I ran through the motions and checklist of
tasks in my head many times, as I knew it was imperative to get things right the first
time so the tank would be open for the shortest amount of time possible. It wasn’t a matter of if the weaver ants would
be attacking and escaping, it was a matter of how many! So AC Family, here was my plan. Are you ready? So, apparently there’s a superstition or tradition
among mango farmers, who have to deal with these ants when harvesting mangoes. Legend has it that if you whisper to the ants,
telling them that you are a friend and aren’t going to harm them, the ants will leave you
alone and allow you to pick the fruit without launching an attack. If the legends were true, this told me then,
that it was possible to work around these ants as long as I was gentle, and not just
obtrusively moving in shaking things around like a predator. Boy, did I hope I was right and the legends,
true! I put on my gloves and covered my hands and
arms with baby powder. There were ants that were already showing
signs of wanting to tear my skin up at the earliest opportunity. Why so aggressive, ladies? You can even see them here congregating at
the door opening, ready to greet trespassers with mandibles and acid. But I had no choice. Vortexia needed maintenance and there was
no other way. I took a deep breath… and looked down at
the key that would unlock the door. AC Family, behold, the new island I planned
on connecting to Avista. Isn’t it cute? It had three bonsai’d money trees, also one
of the two trees in Vortexia, so it was bound to do well as part of Avista. Green moss grew like a carpet along the front
of the island. I prepared the tray on which the new island
would rest by mixing baby powder and rubbing alcohol and painting it along the walls. Once dried no Bobblehead would be able to
scale these vertical surfaces. I then proceeded to add the two new islands
to Avista and arranged for the driftwood to create the connecting bridge between the three
land masses. And there we have it, Avista is now officially
an archipelago. Aren’t these islands beautiful AC Family? Looking from afar, the islands were a luscious
garden of greenery. I couldn’t wait to watch the Bobbleheads explore
their new territories, and of course, as always, in celebration of their new home, I provided
them with a tasty bite! “Please don’t bite.” I whispered softly, summoning up the most
calming words that came to mind: “Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel…” OK just kidding. That’s not what I said. Ahem… “Emerald Empire, I come in peace. I’m a friend, your Creator of Worlds”. The ants menaced me from the edges, watching
the tape being removed from the doors. “I am not interested in destroying your home.” With the tapes removed, I unlocked the door
and slowly opened one of the panels. Oh, there! The glass panel opened and to my surprise
the leaf nest detached quite easily without too much fuss — thank goodness! While some brave ants decided to wander out
and escape, I decided not to mind them for now, and focus on the task at hand, moving
as slowly and gently as possible. It seemed to be working. The ants weren’t rushing in a mad panic, but
were strangely standing quite still watching me. First things first. I went in and wiped the glass and the sticky
pads of the piping to improve its suction. Reattaching. There! Pipe reinstalled. One task down. Next, it was time to go into the canopy! I went in carefully and snipped away at excess
leaves. It tripped me out to see the weaver ant nests
so exposed to the outside world for the first time since they were moved in. I had to be extra careful not to touch any
of the main branches or groupings of ants. All it took was one startled ant to hit the
panic button, which would set off the release of thousands of angry weaver ants onto my
body and ultimately out into the ant room. Snip, snip. I placed the clippings on the ground. As these leaves decay, they’d contribute to
the bioactivity of the vivarium. This would also make sure that we keep any
weaver ants still clinging on to these leaves. I could feel some weaver ants crawling on
my neck now but surprisingly not biting me yet. They even crawled up my legs. The weaver ants were now all over the immediate
area and on me. The whole time, I felt like I was performing
a complex medical surgery, with guns pointed at me, ready to fire at any moment. I was holding my breath and made sure to be
unwaveringly present in mind and body. My movements needed to be precise and accurate. Every moment was crucial. My heart was beating loudly in my ears the
whole time. I noticed so many ants were already wandering
out of the terrarium, and it was in that moment that I received my very first bite Ahhhhh! The Bobbleheads were biting the superworm
housewarming gift, I gave them with such joy and gusto. It wasn’t long before the Bobbleheads had
discovered the two new islands we had prepared for them. It was so awesome to see! Ants traveled across the driftwood bridge
to check out the new territories they could call home. It was moments like this that made ant keeping
just so fulfilling! Ahhh! I brushed the biting ant away. Despite the bite, surprisingly, the majority
of the ants were still calm. I had to keep going and not be bothered by
the pain. I proceeded to carefully remove the dead leaf
nest and rest it onto the floor. Gosh, I had dreamed of removing this hanging
piece for months, I can’t even begin to describe! Now it was time to add the leaf litter. I made sure that every bit of the ground was
covered in this magical medium sauce teaming with bioactive life forms. I proceeded to add the plant. Then, I dumped the Dubia roaches. I threw in the superworms to join the party. And just when I thought everything was complete,
I remembered there was one last suction cup to restick onto the wall to fixate the pipe. But to reach this, I had to open the other
glass door panel. Now, all of the Canopy of Vortexia was exposed
to the outside world. Reaching deeper into the terrarium to restick
the pipe onto the glass, I found myself face to face with the Emerald Empire, just inches
away from my head! And when I thought that I had experienced
the worst part, there came another big surprise. Another bite “AHHH!” While the Bobbleheads were enjoying their
superworm, another battle was happening. Just nearby the Bobbleheads had seized a trespasser. A wandering weaver ant had somehow managed
to set foot on the new island. Of course, there was no hope for the weaver
ant against the Bobbleheads, who pulled at the weaver ant from all sides and mauled it
to death. A second weaver ant had also been unfortunate
enough to land on the island, and the Bobbleheads were quick to capture it. I suppose the weaver ants managed to climb
up into the lighting fixture above Avista and fell down to their demise into the foreign
ant kingdom. There was just no hope for them though, as
they were greatly outnumbered. The Bobbleheads were indeed savage! Arghh! The Emerald Empire was indeed savage! I had to finish up now! I restuck the last piping found on the other
side of Vortexia, and just like that I was done. I had only been bitten twice during the ordeal,
which is not bad! I sealed the tank up and the mission was complete! I was happy to know that it would be months
until the next maintenance visit into the Canopy of Vortexia was due. And just on time, the great typhoons arrived
to cool off the lands! Over the past 4 days, the Bobbleheads had
settled into their new network of triple islands quite nicely. I ended up swapping out the base to one large
shared glass pan for the two smaller islands, as this was much more space-efficient. My dreams of Avista becoming a huge archipelago
of floating islands were coming true. As were my dreams of Vortexia. AC Family, look! It was now a multi-species vivarium. The roaches lived happily in the forest habitat
provided by Vortexia. They occupied the leaf litter, huddled in
spaces within the driftwood, and even were daring enough to climb up into the treetops
and congregate along the screen mesh. Escaped ants were collected one by one by
hand over the passing days and inserted back into Vortexia. The rest were hunted down by the house geckoes
that run loose in the Ant Room. Speaking of hunting, I did also catch the
ants hunting the roaches. Look at this! They caught a huge adult male! I had no idea they could seize prey this big! Or maybe it had already died and they were
opportunistically making use of the carcass? Whatever the case, now that these tree-dominated
territories of Vortexia and Avista were restored anew, and the ants residing in these lands
we created, enjoying upgrades to their homes, it filled my heart with so much joy. One thing’s for sure, I learned today how
intimately connected my ants were to the trees that lived in their territories, how protective
they were of them, and just how much the health and well-being of the ant colonies inherently
depended on the health and well-being of the plants they live with. Isn’t that something we continue to discover
every time we step into these microworlds of our ants, AC Family? That to truly appreciate one organism, one
must understand the bigger picture, understand how its connected to other organisms around
it, and when you do, understand why its important to tend to, clean up, restore, respect, and appreciate the interconnected-ness of
life and the environment in which it is contained. And due to this great interconnection, Mother
Nature has set up, I learned this week, that in caring for life, we inherently care for
ourselves. After a long and successful day, I looked
down at the clippings and dead tree I had collected from our projects. Ordinarily, I would throw these away, but
suddenly an awesome idea came to me, an idea that I felt could completely change and affect
the lives of every creature and terrarium in the entire AC Antiverse! AC Family, it was time to embark on a new
and exciting biological engineering project! AC Family, did you enjoy this week’s episode? Trees are indeed integral parts of some of
our ant colonies. And like last week, this week’s episode is
in part, the AC Team’s collaboration with Mr. Beast, Smarter Everyday, Mark Rober and
thousands of other YouTubers in their quest to plant 20 million trees by January 2020. So, be sure to be part of the team trees movement,
by visiting TeamTrees.org to help out! It only costs $1 per tree. This simple gesture will make such a big difference
globally! Also, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please
be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button so you don’t miss out on the epic real-life stories
of the ants and other creatures of the ant room, and don’t forget to hit the like button
every single time including now! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like to see some extended play footage of me working within Vortexia,
as well as the aftermath. The new Vortexia is just awesome with all
its new creatures and modifications. Go check it out! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Why do we need to cycle our tank before adding
in our great water beast? Congratulations to 9Hashbrowns who correctly
answered: You have to cycle your tank because if an
animal went inside without cycling it, it would be filled with poison, namely ammonia
from waste. Congratulations 9Hashbrowns, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Name one of the bioactive creatures found
in Vortexia. Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Most PAINFUL Insect Stings In The World!

Most PAINFUL Insect Stings In The World!


From nasty ants to giant evil wasps, here
are 10 of the most painful insect stings…. 10. Yellow Jacket Wasp Yellow Jacket Wasps are the number one cause
of stings on humans in the US as a whole. Variations can be found in countries around
the world, with some being bold, aggressive, and able to sting their targets repeatedly. Chances are that you’ve experienced a sting
by a Yellow Jacket yourself, and it can be a nasty sensation. The pain, which lasts for about 10 minutes,
is caused by a venom that’s injected through the puncture in the skin and can cause swelling
and redness within a few hours. The effects of the sting are rated as a level
2 on the Schmidt pain sting index, the measure that’s used to describe how painful insect
stings are. Justin O. Schmidt, the creator of the index,
is retired entomologist from the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Arizona. He organizes the pain felt by an insect sting
from 1-4, with 4 being the most painful. Fire ant stings are just a 1…so….yeah… He assigned Yellow jacket wasp stings a 2
to give a reference to everyone of how painful stings and bites at higher levels can be. He describes the yellow jacket’s sting as
being ‘hot and smoky, almost irreverent. Imagine W.C Fields extinguishing a cigar on
your tongue’. Schmidt has been stung thousands of times,
most times on purpose, to analyze different stings and has compiled his experiences and
rankings in his book called “The Sting of the Wild”. Contrary to what you might think, he’s not
a masochist, but he was trying to understand the evolution of social behavior for insects
such as wasps, bees, and ants. Guess what he found out?? The more a colony has to lose and the more
risk, the more pain the insects inflict and the more toxic its venom. A sting is like a bazooka!! 9. Trap-Jaw Ant The Trap Jaw ant is a type of carnivorous
ant that lives in Central and South America, as well as Asia, Australia, and Africa. There are more than 1000 different species
of Trap Jaw ant, each of which has the telltale giant jaws that can snap shut quicker than
the blink of an eye- sometimes as fast as in one-tenth of a millisecond. Being bitten by a spring-loaded jaw like this
is, understandably, rather painful- so much so that it was given a 2.5 on the Schmidt
pain index. The pain experienced is described as ‘Instantaneous
and excruciating. A rat trap snaps your index fingernail.’ Those who are stung by the Trap Jaw ant can
expect to experience this pain for up to 10 minutes. The ants don’t just use their incredible bites
to attack predators or prey. They have also been seen using it to simply
eject intruders from their nests, or even to fling themselves backwards to get out of
harm’s way. 8. Paper Wasp Paper wasps are found in North America, mainly
throughout the Southern Midwest and the South. Unlike other wasp species, they are known
to share nests with others and even return to the same nest for multiple seasons. Paper Wasps are the most common type of sting
encountered by people in the Southern US and have longer and more slender bodies than yellow
jackets. They love to set up their nests in trees and
gardens so many an unsuspecting gardener has accidentally trimmed around the nest, making
them angry!! Their colonies are small, typically consisting
of up to 100 individuals, and they rarely sting far away from the nest. The males aren’t able to sting at all, so
it’s only the females that you need to be careful around- particularly later in the
fall when they are looking for hibernation sites. The sting itself injects venom into the victim,
and the searing pain can last for around 10 minutes. Schmidt describes the pain as “caustic and
burning. Distinctly bitter aftertaste. Like spilling a beaker of hydrochloric acid
on a paper cut.” Yikes!! If it makes you feel any better, everyone
except the fertilized queen will die in the winter. And then the process will start all over again
in a new hive. 7. Maricopa Harvester Ant The Maricopa Harvester Ant is commonly found
in Arizona and other southern US states. They tend to build their nests in mounds of
rocks and gravel, but can also create cemented caps on the tops of nests that are built in
softer areas. While they may look no different to other
types of ants, these ones pack a punch with their bite. Their venom is often said to be the most toxic
insect venom of any in the world, more than 20 times the strength of that of a honey bee—luckily,
they only release it in small doses! Schmidt, specifically mentioned the Maricopa
Harvester Ant at level 3, and described the pain as, ‘After eight unrelenting hours
of drilling into that ingrown toenail, you find the drill wedged into the toe’. Wow, that is really descriptive and makes
me really want to NEVER be bitten by one of these!! The pain can last for up to four hours, but
its attack method compounds this feeling. The ant will grip on with its mandibles, and
writhe about into different positions, releasing further doses of venom as it does so. This is incredibly effective against vertebrate
predators, such as horned lizards, and sure to make you regret getting too close to one! 6. Giant Bull Ant Giant Bull ants are one of the largest types
of ant in the world, and can grow up to 40 mm in length (1.57 inches). They are very recognizable both by their huge
size and their giant mandibles. Of course these giant ants with potent venom
are native to…..Australia!! Obviously!! Their colonies are quite small for ant species,
with only about a few hundred or so in each one, but they defend them aggressively. Hikers and campers often encounter them in
the bush and have experienced the extreme pain they can inflict. The ants have excellent eyesight, which allows
them to detect intruders no matter the light levels, and they have no hesitation to attack. Most who fall victim to the Bull Ant think
that it’s the giant mandibles that have bitten them but, in fact, it’s a sting in the abdomen
that causes it. The venom that the sting injects is capable
of causing pain for a number of DAYS after the encounter, yes, DAYS, and the ants are
able to sting repeatedly; Enabling them to effectively defend themselves against aggressors
and also to capture insect prey. Despite their gigantic jaws, the adult bull
ants feed on nectar. But their larvae however are fed with dead
and paralyzed insects that are then eaten alive. 5. Velvet Ant Velvet ants are actually a family of more
than 3,000 different species of wasp. (Their name is very misleading)! The females are wingless and, therefore, resemble
furry ants running around. They can be any of a range of colors, such
as orange, red, or gold, and are found throughout the world- with 400 species in the American
Southwest alone! I saw a big, fuzzy white one running around
while I was visiting family in New Mexico! While they may look cute, the velvet ant sting
packs a punch- so much so that they are also called ‘cow killer ants’ because it’s rumored
to be strong enough to kill a cow!! Velvet ants will only sting in defensive scenarios,
but if you are unfortunate enough to anger one, the searing pain will last for up to
half an hour. They are solitary animals, which means you
can easily come across one without any sign of a larger colony. Females will even dig into the nesting chambers
of other species of bees and wasps, and lay their eggs on the larvae- which serve as a
food source for the young velvet ants when they are born. If you see a male, though, there’s no need
for concern. They have wings, so are able to feed on the
nectar of flowers.. but this comes at a trade-off… they have no stingers! 4. Warrior Wasp The Warrior Wasp is a species endemic to Central
and South America. It’s a large paper wasp that builds complex
colonies to combat the large number of predators it faces in the region. The species swarms when moving from nest to
nest, and can be highly aggressive. It does, of course, have a powerful defense
method with its sting- one that’s ranked at the top level of a number of pain measures,
and is said to be traumatically painful. In writing his pain index, Schmidt described
the Warrior Wasp’s sting as ‘Torture. You are chained in the flow of an active volcano. Why did I start this list?’ Hes talking about his index. Upon being stung, the pain can last at this
extreme level of intensity for 150 minutes and usually requires medical attention to
try and relieve the symptoms. The problem with the warrior wasp is that,
due to its swarming nature, single stings are rare, and those that come into contact
with them will be subjected to multiple stings. Beyond the severe pain that you would experience,
further health complications would inevitably follow. It’s not called a Warrior for nothin!!! 3. Tarantula Hawk Is it a bird? Is it a spider? It’s the tarantula hawk!! They are actually a type of spider wasp and
get their name from their fondness for hunting tarantulas. Reaching up to 4.5 inches in length (11.43
cm), there are 133 known species of tarantula hawks across South and Central America, along
with the southern US. The spiders are much larger than them, but
the wasps have an arsenal that’s more than enough to take on a tarantula, with researchers
never having seen a spider win in a confrontation. The males get their nutrition from nectar,
and it’s the females that hunt tarantulas to provide food for their offspring. They sting them with their sharp, curved,
stinger that can be up to 7mm long… and the venom permanently paralyzes their prey
but keeps them alive. The wasp then lays an egg on the spider, which
becomes a meal ready in waiting. For the sting to have this kind of effect,
you know it has to be powerful. Most predators stay well clear of tarantula
hawks, but roadrunners do enjoy eating them if they can catch them. On a human, the sting is rated on the top
level of the Schmidt pain index, with Shmidt himself describing the sting as ‘Blinding,
fierce, shockingly electric. A running hairdryer has just been dropped
in your bubble bath’. Luckily the pain doesn’t last for very long,
rarely more than 5 minutes, but you’ll be left with swelling and redness for up to a
week. 2. Bullet Ant Bullet ants are found in the tropical forests
of central and South America, and are identifiable by their red and black coloration, along with
their large pincers and a visible stinger. They can grow from 18-30 mm (0.7-1.2 in),
and build colonies of a few hundred individuals around the bases of trees. They mainly feast on nectar and small animals,
like butterflies, and they are not aggressive unless provoked. If they do decide to attack, though, they
can inflict one of the most painful stings of any insect, because it will make you feel
like you’ve been hit by a bullet. It’s indigenous name translates to mean ‘the
one who wounds deeply’. A sting from a single bullet ant injects a
neurotoxin into the body, and leads to severe pain for 24 hours, along with other side effects
such as blood in feces, a pulsing heart rate, muscle spasms, and the accumulation of fluid
in the stung area. Shmidt described the pain as ‘Pure, intense,
brilliant pain. Like walking over flaming charcoal with a
3-inch nail embedded in your heel’. Others have reported it feels like waves of
pain as if you were getting hit by a red hot poker for at least a day. If that sounds bad enough, it gets worse. When a bullet ant stings, it releases chemicals
that attract other ants to join the attack and sting repeatedly. If you aren’t able to get away from this
onslaught you will most likely be in and out of consciousness for at least a few hours. Good news is that there are little to no lasting
effects after 24 hours, although many people say they don’t know how they made it. These ants are used in tribal initiation rites
where the Satere-Mawe of Brazil make teenage boys wear gloves filled with bullet ants that
are sewn in pointing inward so they repeatedly sting the boy’s hands. These boys repeat this ritual about 20 times
and then, they become warriors. 1. Executioner Wasp Executioner wasps are found in Central and
South America, where locals do everything they can to avoid contact with the species. It’s a large species of paper wasp, with vivid
yellow and brown colorations, and can be identified by their large wings and mandibles, and almost
futuristic looking design. The wasp has a hidden secret, though, as its
stinger only protrudes when it’s planning to use it. Schmidt didn’t test an executioner wasp
sting when creating his index, but others have described the sensation as far worse
than that from a bullet ant, and with longer lasting effects. The searing pain lasts for a long time, and
can even cause tissue necrosis, where fluid fills the region around the sting site, and
flesh can begin to die and rot away if not treated properly. Coyote Peterson who worked his way through
various painful stings, said that the executioner wasp sting was way more painful The strength of their sting seems overkill
for their preferred prey of caterpillars, but it is certainly an effective defense method,
with other animals doing everything they can to avoid crossing paths with one of these
wasps. If you ever find yourself in the jungle regions
where they live, be very careful!! Of everything!! Thanks for watching!! I hope you never experience these stings for
yourself. If you have let us know your story in the
comments below!! Would love to hear it!! Be sure to subscribe and see you soon!! Byee

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.