How stop motion animation began

How stop motion animation began


This beetle is going into the city to see
his lover. She’s a dancer. But this 1912 film is not just a staggeringly
weird tale of insect infidelity. It’s the true kickoff to a stop motion tradition
that has given us a ton of wildly different movies. But this invention didn’t come from Hollywood. It was made by an obsessive insect collector
in Lithuania who wanted to see insects dance. Stop motion is this combination of simplicity
and very, very tedious work. “Ah f..” An animator arranges objects in poses and
takes a picture. You move the object slightly and take another
picture. Played successively, it looks like motion.” You can tweak the process in a lot of ways
– adding more frames – and more precise movements, will make for a smoother animation. The potential of this illusion of movement
was obvious really quickly, like in 1908’s The Sculptor’s Nightmare, where busts briefly
moved or A Dream of Toyland, likely from the same year, which made toys come alive. But it took a European collector to elevate
it to an artform that changed the movies. Wladyslaw Starewicz was born in Moscow and
bounced around the pre-revolution Russian Empire, ending up in Kaunas – a city in modern
day Lithuania, then called Kovno. Some sources say Starewicz was a Natural History
museum director there (others say he just had a huge insect collection). Either way, he had a problem. As he revealed later, he was commissioned
to make educational films “to show the life of the stag beetles.” He “waited days and days to shoot a battle
between two beetles, but they would not fight with the lights shining on them.” So he started experimenting with making stationary
insects look like they were moving. He started with that stag beetle, which he
called by its scientific name: Lucanus Cervus. The goal was to show its fighting behavior,
but his next insect movie leapt to fiction to tell the tale of Helen of Troy. In 1912, The Cameraman’s Revenge — that
insect infidelity movie — became his most influential early work. See how this artist is actually painting another
beetle? Or how this grasshopper, filming Mr. Beetle’s
affair with a dragonfly, look how his tripod has individual legs. These miniscule touches were everywhere. He said he did it by installing wheels and
strings in each insect, and occasionally replacing their legs with plastic or metal ones. He used black threads to help move them. And it worked. After the Russian Revolution, Starewicz fled
to Paris. He continued making films. By the time he made Frogland, he’d changed
his name from Wladislaw to Ladislas to make it easier to pronounce in French. He continued to make incredibly influential
art — with stop motion — because “actors always want to have their own way.” He had a host of popular films and stop motion
quickly influenced popular art and special effects. Starevich’s stop motion inspired the work
that was done in King Kong. Terry Gilliam — the director and animator
behind the surreal Monty Python stop-motion animations — said Starevich’s The Mascot
was one of the best animated films of all time. And Starevich’s masterpiece, Le Roman de
Renard clearly inspired Wes Anderson’s “The Fantastic Mr. Fox.” This combination of wild invention and obsessive
detail created a new art form. At the end of The Cameraman’s Revenge, the
grasshopper screens the movie he filmed through a keyhole, the one of Mr. Beetle cheating
on his wife. She hits him with an umbrella. The movies changed forever. The beetles spent the night in jail. That’s it for this one in this series about
big changes to movies that came from outside Hollywood. Stop motion’s a really global form, so I
want to know some of your favorite examples in the comments. I also want to leave you with a testimony
to Starevich’s work, which is that in some of the early reviews, people were very very
impressed with how well he had “trained” his beetles to move around, and I honestly
don’t know if they were joking.

Insects in English

Insects in English


hello welcome to my English a-to-z
channel with a new lessonabout insects listen and repeat after me butterfly moth beetles ladybug ladybug or ladybird ladybird bee wasp wasp fly fly mosquito praying mantis praying mantis walking stick
walking stick bug stick bug stick dragonfly dragonfly aunt aunt grasshopper grasshopper cricket cricket cockroach cockroach bugs bugs louse plural lice lice we have human
and animal louse and plant lice flea worm caterpillar spiders spiders scorpion scorpion centipede
centipede Ticks ticks this is the end of my lesson I
hope you like it don’t forget to subscribe thank you

PINCHED! by a Giant Beetle!

PINCHED! by a Giant Beetle!


(playful music) – You guys see that? That’s a stag beetle. Right now I’m On
Location in Costa Rica, working on some of
my animal facts, because yes I do research
before I actually get on camera. I look over there at the balcony
railing, and what do I see. A giant stag beetle that must
have flown in last night, they’re attracted to lights, and he decided to make himself
a perch right over there. Now, I haven’t been bitten and stung by that many
things on this trip. I picked him up, and look
at that set of pinchers. And I said to myself, hmm, you know who would
love to see this? Everyone out there
in the coyote pack. I’m pretty curious as
to how hard this beetle can actually pinch. Now they don’t use those
pinchers to catch and kill prey, but they’re actually
used as defense and during mating displays
to attract the ladies. That is a mighty set of
pinchers right there. Let’s go for this. Are you ready? (adventurous music) Alright, so,
without further ado, let’s find how just how hard
the stag beetle can pinch. I’m going to let him
go for my pinky finger. Here we go, are you ready? I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to enter the
strike zone with a stag beetle. One… Two… Three. (pained gasp) Dang that hurt. – [Voiceover] Was it bad? – Yeah, he poked a little
hole in the top of my finger. And I think he popped a little
puncture on the other side. At least he didn’t pinch and, hold on, let’s try
it one more, ready? What I’m actually being chomped
by is a Mallodon Beetle, which is in the same
superfamily as the stag beetle, and with over 35,000 members, it’s tough to know
them all apart. – [Voiceover] Yeah, do
you want us to hold it? – [Voiceover] Be tight on him,
because he won’t expect it. – [Voiceover]
Alright, ready Coyote? What are we doing now? – Okay so now, I’m going to
be pinched by the stag beetle on my pinky finger,
of all places. – [Voiceover] How many times
have you been pinched already? – Four. – [Voiceover] Why are we
doing this a fifth time? – Because we haven’t
gotten the shot right. – [Voiceover] And why is that? – Because I’m scared
to get pinched again. (prolonged pained gasps) Can you see that? – [Voiceover] How was that bad? Was that really bad? Oh, yeah. He got you man. Good job Mario. (slow-motion pained gasps) – Well, I guess what we have
found out is the stag beetle… Has got quite the pinch! He popped holes in my pinky. Alright buddy, I know
that was a lot of stress, we’re going to let
you go now but, I guess we’ll add the stag
beetle to the list of creatures that have chomped, pinched,
stung, or mauled Coyote. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next location. (dramatic music) – [Voiceover] If you
thought getting pinched by the Mallodon
Beetle looked painful, check out my encounter
with the purple shore crab, and don’t forget, subscribe
to join me and the crew, on this season of
Breaking Trail.

CSI Special Insects Unit: Forensic Entomology


Here’s a fascinating niche science that, if you ask me, we should see on prime-time TV way more often: forensic entomology, the study of insects and arthropods used in legal investigations. As it turns out, there are lots of cool ways insects can help us solve crimes. Fair warning, though: you may not want to watch this one over lunch! [music/intro] The field of forensic entomology is
actually pretty broad and is commonly divided up into three general areas: urban, stored product, and medico-legal. The urban specialty focuses on insects in human dwellings. Scientists who do this kind of work
could surely tell you all kinds of amazing things about what goes on in
your kitchen cabinets at night, but as forensic experts, they specialize in
investigating both civil and criminal cases helping in lawsuits involving, say, damages from a cockroach or bed bug infestation. Stored product entomology, meanwhile, usually deals with the contamination of commercial products, like if you find a
family of dead ants in your fast food burrito, or a bunch of moth wings in your candy bar, or spiders in your toilet paper roll. But
the medico-legal area is the most flashy, popularized part of the field. It’s what you might see on an episode of CSI and it often involves reading the signs of blood sucking or carrion-feeding
insects at violent crime scenes typically involving murder, suicide, abuse, and neglect. At a fresh crime scene, for example, forensic entomologist would know that tiny flecks of what look like spattered blood could actually be the prints of roaches
or flies that had walked through blood elsewhere at the scene. These experts can even match human DNA from the blood found in blood feeding insects, living or dead. One murder case in Italy was solved when investigators scraped a blood filled mosquito off the wall in a
suspect’s house and found it contained the blood of the victim. Take that, bad guys! Crime-solving, bug-loving scientists are also often called upon to help estimate a victim’s time of death. A dead body goes through a whole series of phases from putrefaction and
fermentation to dry decay and skeletonization, and each phase attracts different life
stages and types of insects. Forensic entomologists use this rotating cast of critters to help determine a body’s death in a couple of ways usually involving larval development and species succession. The larval development technique studies the size and
prevalence of maggots and other larva and is usually useful if the body is less
than a month old. If the corpse is older, it’s best to use the species succession
method. For example, blow flies are great quickly discovering dead meat because they like their food fresh and full of fluids, so determining what phase they’re in can often provide the most accurate estimates for time of death, but as the flesh dries out the blow flies
take off just as other species like the coffin fly arrive in force. Once the corpse is too dry for even
maggots, all the flies clear out. Then beetles often roll in. Some species like hide and carrion beetles have robust mouth parts they can work on the remaining
dried flesh and ligaments. Mites and moth larvae round out the final cleaning crew, consuming the remaining hair and leaving only a skeleton. So thanks to all the insects out there and
the scientists who study them for solving crimes and doing a job I would rather not do! And thanks for
watching this SciShow Dose especially to all of our subscribers on Subbable who make this whole channel possible. Did you know that you can be an honorary associate
producer of SciShow or even pick the topic for one of our episodes? To find out how you can go to subbable.com/scishow and you can always find us on Facebook and Twitter and if you want to keep getting smarter with us, don’t forget to go to youtube.com/scishow and subscribe! [music]

Myrmecophiles: beetles living in an ant nest!

Myrmecophiles: beetles living in an ant nest!


An ant colony is an island. An ecosystem insulated from the world and full of resources. Some organisms have evolved to exploit these systems. These insects that live their lives inside of an ant nest are known as myrmecophiles. Many myrmecophilic species are beetles, and most are rarely observed. Some of the most advanced are rove beetles in the subfamily Aleocharinae, in the tribe Lomechusini. The three rove beetle genera in the sub-tribe Lomechusina have been studied in detail for more than a century. While out doing fieldwork last month I collected this colony of carpenter ants. it has for these beetles living in it. Now, the u.s. species are less well studied in comparison to European ones but a lot of the biology and behaviors is sort of shared across the group. The really cool thing about these beetles is how they’ve completely integrated themselves as members of the colony. They enter into an ant nest by using a series of glands to chemically persuade the ants to adopt them. When first encountering an ant a beetle meets any aggression with an upturned tip of its abdomen. This is the location of what’s known as the appeasement gland complex. The secretions from this gland seem irresistible to the ants who busily lick away while the beetle reaches back and taps the ant with its antennae. After this, the beetles grant the ants access to the sides of their abdomen which are lined with tufts of hair emerging from the set of glands that are known as the adoption glands. The ants lick the secretions from these glands and they grab the beetles by these tufts of hair and transport them into and around their nests. Once they’re inside of the nest the beetles take advantage of the ants’ method of food sharing, mouth-to-mouth regurgitation, also known as trophallaxis. The beetles mouth parts are thought to be specialized for stimulating food sharing. They coax ants to feed them like the would their own larvae or nestmate adults. Unlike the ants the beetles don’t share any food back, their existence in the nest is completely parasitic and predatory. When I look at these beetles i’m amazed at how they interact and behave with the ants. I think they’re an incredible reminder about how intricate and specialized organisms can be. If you’re interested in reading more about these beetles check out the two articles linked in the description below

Ant Apocalypse Stopped by a Rhino Beetle

Ant Apocalypse Stopped by a Rhino Beetle


You’ll never believe what actually goes on
in the soil. We humans, as giants, completely miss all
the events, the plot twists, the drama, the miracles, the battles, triumphs, and defeats
that occur every day, deep within the the very earth, that sustains us and is teaming
with life. Take this micro-village of springtails for
instance, which you guys have named the Spring Cleaners, the cleanup crew of the microworld,
busy eating up all the organic bits left behind by other lifeforms of the land, or this baby
millipede which eats up decaying vegetable matter, but don’t get too close; he uses cyanide
as a weapon, and that baby earthworm, feeding on vegetation above ground, a solo detritivorous
mite perhaps searching a mate. For a moment, try to forget your big size
and throw all scale out the window, and imagine this terrestrial world, as a giant forest. It’s called the Hacienda Del Dorado, home
to countless communities of creatures and plants. Those gnats you see there, they’re the vultures
of the land perusing the tree tops. But AC Family, something terrible has happened
to the original rulers of this gorgeous territory. You’re about to see what in a moment. I was admiring this lush kingdom one day,
when my eyes caught focus of this. An ant, of the supercolony, we know on this
channel, as the Golden Empire. She’s alone, and oddly she carries a message
for us. Look! It appears she’s struggling to grapple with
something that is locked onto one of her legs, something red, and clearly causing her much
discomfort. She tries desperately to remove it from her
appendage, to no avail. Guys, turns out, this ant, is one of a few
remaining survivors of what I discovered was a mass holocaust. It’s every ant keeper’s nightmare. This week to my utter horror, I learned that
out of nowhere, an apocalypse has come for our cherished Golden Empire, and worse, there
was nothing I could do to stop it. But, it may surprise you, that there was one
unlikely hero in this entire story, who possibly could. AC Family, you will not believe how a humble
rhino beetle rose to the occasion this week, to become the possible saviour of an entire
Ant Empire, during this ant apocalypse. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel and hit the
BELL ICON. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy. AC Family, I was legit crying this week, when
I saw this. Imagine an ant colony who you watched grow
over the years, an OG supercolony on this channel, within our world of Ant Kingdoms
in the Antiverse, suddenly amidst a mass extinction event. If you’ve been following this channel for
awhile, you have followed the epicness that the Golden Empire, our multi-queen supercolony
of yellow crazy ants, has experienced. From surviving a mite plague, to outsmarting
carnivorous pitcher plants, to keeping an array of pet beast, to even being elected
as the lucky colony to inhabit a Youtube Gold Play Button, these ants were definitely a
triumphant empire and favourite in the Antiverse. But I’m afraid to announce, that the Golden
Empire is officially seeing their end of days. I’ll explain everything, but we need to start
from the beginning. A member of the Golden Empire is wandering
the premise, assumingly in search of some food. She waves her antennae around smelling her
surroundings and the air for the scent of any new roaches that may have dropped from
the skies. There are in fact, several roach carcasses
around her, but for some reason, they’re unfit for her tastes. I watched as she inspected each roach piece
and moved on. In fact, I’ve been placing roaches into the
lands as I always have for years, but I noticed more and more, the ants weren’t eating them. Of course, the Spring Cleaners were loving
this abundance of food, and so were the earthworms which were coming up to the surface to have
a nibble! It was great that the creatures of the soil
were benefiting from all this extra food, but while this abundance in food was great
news for the soil creatures, it pointed out to me that something was indeed very wrong
in this biological food chain. Little did I know something from the soils
were killing the most important creatures of this entire biological kingdom, and it
was killing them, one ant at a time. When I began to notice the ants weren’t eating
as much, and less and less ants were seen foraging above ground, I started to get very
suspicious that something was up. Now, if you saw our last video on this ant
colony, you’ll know they disappeared on us once before, but after watering their lands,
we discovered that they were all just esthivating underground keeping moist during a dry spell. But this seemed different now. The soils were moist, and usually the lands
would be covered in foraging ants at this hour in the night. I only could see one ant now up in the leaves. I decided to prod around and try to agitate
the vegetation and create vibrations in hopes to set the Gold Empire into defense protocol,
so they would come pouring out of their nest entrances to fight me with their formic acid
sprays. I finally decided to dig into the soil a little,
and finally got a small squadron of ants to come out, but AC Family, check out how few
of them there were that emerged. Something very strange was happening, and
I did not expect, what I was about to soon discover. The next morning, I placed food into the territories
as I usually do, but as has been the case these past few weeks, no ants came to feed. Only soil creatures. I tried watering the lands again, to try to
get the Golden Empire to surface like they did before, but again, only the soil creatures
came to surface rejoicing in the moisture. OK, it was time to pull out the checklist
of possibilities as to what in “Thanos: Infinity War” was going on here. AC Family, are you ready for this? I had to see if the ants had possibly escaped? Now as you may or may not know, the Hacienda
Del Droado, like many of my ant farms, is an open top terrarium, which means it lacks
a cover. Ant keepers do this to ensure the ant territories
get proper ventilation, to decrease mold-growth, and access the ant farm easily. A baby powder barrier is applied vertically
and horizontally upside down, to keep the ants inside. This design in particular was made to create
the illusion of a barrier-less ant setup, with its landmarks rising up out of the top
of the tank, but though it looks like there is lots of places the ants could escape and
crawl out, they actually technically can’t as nothing is touching a point of access to
the outside and the ants can’t jump very far. The only place, the ants might be able to
escape was through this chord which powers the water pump and filter, but even that is
covered in baby powder and secured with a baby-powdered stopper keeping the ants from
proceeding up the chord. Ants making it that far fall onto this powdered
platform which is also secured with powdered walls to keep them from climbing further. Ants on this platform end up jumping back
into the Hacienda Del Dorado below. But could they have possibly found a breech
in the barrier that was keeping them in and moved out of my window one night while I was
sleeping? With their sheer numbers and nomadic tendencies,
this was definitely a possibility! But then I noticed some movement below. Alright! It seems the rains had caused some ants to
emerge to feed from my roach. At last! There clearly wasn’t as much ants as there
used to be, but it was nice to see at least some ants coming out to eat. And AC Family, that’s when I saw it. Look! This ant carried a something on its leg and
it was impeding its movement. A mite. Back when this colony had mites before, it
never affected their movement and general life processes. The mites they dealt with before were likely
phoretic mites, harmless hitchhikers wanting delivery to greener pastures. In fact, the reason this whole Hacienda Del
Dorado terrarium was created was to help those phoretic mites fall off, and it worked in
the end. But this time, things were different. And if you look carefully, although the ants
are hanging around this roach, it doesn’t seem like they have that same healthy appetite
to dive in and feast like they usually do. These mites were definitely affecting our
ants in a very negative way. AC Family, I’m afraid to announce that the
Golden Empire has been struck for the very first time, with every ant-keeper’s fear – parasitic,
blood-sucking mites. Some of the ants appeared mite-free, but many
of them carried the mite killers. Now, this is bad because every ant keeper
knows that once you find these blood-sucking mites on your ants, it is a death sentence,
and the killings happen quick. My heart sank, when the reality of situation
began to sink in. We found our answer and there was nothing
we could do to stop it. What we were witnessing here, AC Family, was
the extermination and final days of the Golden Empire. As weird as it sounds, I began to cry for
the ants. It was time to say goodbye to the supercolony
we grew to love, over the years. My house keeper and I began to take apart
the Hacienda Del Dorado, starting with the Golden Springs, which ironically were installed
as a population regulator. As I began to clean up the lands, again, with
little to no ants in sight, I started to wonder what I was going to do with the Hacienda Del
Dorado. Was I going to just throw the entire terrarium
away? Based on 98,000 of you who voted in a community
tab poll, most of you felt the Jawbreakers, our booming colony of trap-jaw ants, deserved
to inherit the Hacienda Del Dorado seeing as they were doing so well in their little
kingdom, and were ready to expand. But after discovering the mites, I knew I
couldn’t do this, because that would be like throwing humans into a zombie pit. The parasitic mites would then go on to annihilate
the Jawbreakers. But as I was digging around, something pretty
incredible happened. Check this out! I hit a vein! A gold vein. I must have hit some chamber where a lot of
Golden Empire were hiding out. It seems a lot of the ants were still brooding
in hidden chambers within the soil. It was nice to see this many ants congregating
in a single place. Though some of the ants had mites attached
to them, it looked like many of the ants were still quite mobile, energetic, and otherwise
seemingly healthy. I moved the soil around and scanned the premises. I needed to see if I could locate any of the
8 queens. Do you see any? I continued to move more soil around and sure
enough, a queen! There she is sprinting away! I continued looking, and to my delight, guys,
look! Another queen dashing away! I stopped for a moment to take a look at this
queen. Thankfully, she was mite-free. Amazing to think that her eggs helped fuel
the Golden Empire, along with her other 7 fellow queens, for years. Her workers each only lived for a couple months,
but queens like her can live as long as a few decades, and it was her steadfast role
as egg-layer over time, that lead to the Golden Empire being one of the most successful and
glorious ant colonies I’ve ever owned in my life. It was heart-warming to see one of her workers
coming to her side to tend to her. Soon another worker came to join the royal
entourage. And then a third. The sight was so moving for me, and suddenly
made me realize why I had fallen in love with the world of ants in the first place. These worker ants, who’d been through a lot,
were comforting their queen amidst crisis befalling their empire. It looked like these worker ants were among
the clean, mite-free group of the survivors, but although their days were numbered, their
home torn up, and hope for survival minimal, they weren’t going to give up. They were the Golden Empire, conqueror of
challenges. Now it was recently discovered that an entire
ant colony harbours collective memories that its individual members can’t possibly store
in their individual brains. I bet now, the colony was tapping into their
history to find ways to survive this mite plague. These ants were determined to fight for life
until the very end, like gladiators championing their Empire’s legacy… And that, AC Family, is when it hit me. Gladiators. OMG! About what I said earlier about there being
nothing we could do to stop the death of the Golden Empire at the hands of the mites…
well, that isn’t entirely true. For those of you who are new to the channel,
meet our rhino beetles. Three males of a fleet of 7 rhino beetle gladiators,
who are slated to compete in an Olympic tournament called the Rhino Beetle Games. Their names are Apollo, Dionysus, and Poseidon. Now upon welcoming them to the world as fully
formed adult beetles, we did notice they carried on their bodies, small gangs of mites. At first, I thought these were maybe bad mites,
but turns out, one of you guys pointed out that they are actually Hypoaspis mites, which
are predatory mites which live in symbiosis on the beetles, feeding on small soil creatures
and more importantly, bad parasitic mites that may want to feed on the beetles’ blood! In fact, Hypoaspis mites are often used by
gardeners to eat undesirable pest insects. So, AC Family, know where I’m going with this? So call me crazy, but what if we could somehow
collect a few of these Hypoaspis mites from our rhino beetles, propagate them, and then
release them into the Hacienda Del Dorado, where the Golden Empire are congregating,
to eat the parasitic mites that are feeding from the blood of our Golden Empire! The idea was insane, but by principle, it
could work right? AC Family, it was time for an important experiment. First, I prepared a water test tube. This test tube was a standard ant test tube
setup with cotton creating a water reservoir which would provide humidity. This setup was going to house a few of our
test subjects for a little while. Now it was time to go into the Hacienda Del
Dorado to collect our subjects. With our test tube, I went in, and collected
three ants. Two of the ants were infected with parasitic
mites and one was mite-free. I’ll explain why the third ant had to be mite-free
in a second. I also went in to collect three more ants
placed in a second test tube setup, again two infected ants and 1 non-infected ant,
so that we had a control group. Hello, Gr. 9 lesson on the scientific method! If this all works out, these six worker ants
were going to be heroes in the history of the Golden Empire. Alright, so now that we had our test subjects,
we now needed the help of one of our beetles, and I knew just who I was going to choose
to partake in this critical experiment. If you look to the left, you’ll see the living
chamber of Apollo, who is buried somewhere in here. Of the three available beetles, I chose Apollo,
because fittingly, he was named after the Greek god of medicine and healing, and also
of plagues, so it was only appropriate to choose him. He was not going to be happy at me pulling
him out, but the fate of our Golden Empire relies on it! I filled up a small dish of water and got
two q-tips. The plan was to go in, get Apollo out, and
try to collect a few Hypoaspis mites from his body. I started to dig, and carefully moved the
soil around until I heard his voice, well stridulation. There he was! As expected, he was very upset at my intrusion. Behold, our mighty gladiator Apollo, small
horns beautiful colour. And now, the possible saviour to deliver the
Golden Empire from doom. I carefully tried to look around Apollo’s
body for mites. I didn’t need a tonne of mites, just a couple
for our experiment. Turning him upside down, I saw them, and quickly
ran the swab to collect. Got it! I picked up one of the test tubes, and carefully
introduced the Hypoaspis mite inside with the ants. The mite instantly bolted into the test tube! This entire process made my heart race a million
miles a minute! I went back to Apollo and swabbed again one
last time, and placed the second mite into the same test tube. The test tube now had two Hypoaspis mites. I placed two inside so that if they were male
and female they could hopefully breed, but we didn’t really need to measure breeding. We just needed to see if the Hypoaspis mites
would feed from the blood-sucking parasitic mites on the ants. Also, the reason I included a mite-free ant
in the mix was to see if the two Hypoaspis mites would feed on the parasitic mites enough
to keep the parasitic mites from breeding and infecting other ants. If the group with the Hypoaspis mites suddenly
end up with the parasitic mites all gone, we know that the Hypoaspis mites would be
an effective biological agent to eradicate the parasitic blood-sucking mites killing
the Golden Empire. I then marked the test tube that contained
the Hypoaspis mites with black tape, and left our control group tapeless. By the end of this experiment having the two
test tubes to compare, will make it easier for us to understand the results. I took both test tubes, inserted a drop of
honey onto the cotton in each, and placed them into a dark drawer, to simulate the soil
conditions underground. And all there was left to do now was pray
to God, that the results of this experiment were favourable. Apollo, completely upset and shaken up, dove
straight into his soils to get away from us. Thank you Apollo, you’ve been a greater help
than you’ll ever understand. Guys, as giants, perhaps we may not see everything
that happens in the soil, but this time, we were going to try to learn enough, to at least
bring salvation to an entire Empire of gold, fighting for the continuation of their throne,
as rulers of the ever-evolving Hacienda Del Dorado. I was going to wait with baited breath for
the results. Alright, AC Family, it’s do or die now! It’s been a crazy week, but I’ll be sure to
let you know the results of our experiment to save the Golden Empire. Let’s hope the Hypoaspis mites prove effective
at eating the parasitic mites on our ants. At this point, it’s our only hope. So guys, be sure to smash that subscribe button
and bell icon now, so you get notified at every single upload and follow this continuing
story, and hit the like button every single time, including now. If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to explore the new Hacienda Del Dorado! I’ve had to remodel, completely removing the
Golden Springs seeing as we no longer need a population limiter anymore, so go check
out what the Hacienda Del Dorado looks like now! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Why are the Hypoaspis mites we see
on the beetles a good thing? Congratulations to GAMER X who correctly answered: The mites are beneficial because they eat
small insects such as parasitic mites that suck blood from the beetles. Congratulations, GAMER X, you just won a free
e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why did I choose Apollo to
participate in our experiment? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

European Mount Deer Skull Cleaning Using Bugs – Bug Bin Method

European Mount Deer Skull Cleaning Using Bugs – Bug Bin Method


(soft country music) (country music) – [Narrator] Okay, there
it is, I went and buried it with mostly dirt at the bottom, some pine needles and grass at the top and just gonna let it sit
there for a couple months. Let the bugs do the
work so I don’t have to. Okay, what I’ve got here is
I’ve got some paper towels in the garbage can, what
they recommend is that you mist it, you wanna keep
the inside of the barrel at least somewhat moist,
so that’s what the paper towels do, they help hold in the moisture. Also, I’ve added some dog poop, which had plenty of maggots in it and I figured the more bugs the better. Okay, here I am misting
it with just a common spray bottle and that usually
does a pretty good job. And here I am, I’m adding some styrofoam, the bugs will use the
styrofoam to nest in, it’s basically a bug condo, as you’ll see later on, they really use it and actually different
varieties of beetles will eat the styrofoam. Also, I’ve been keeping a lid on the top just so, you wanna keep it dark. I guess the bugs like the darkness, so that keeps most of the
sun out during the day, keeps it damp, dark. Damp and dark, I guess
that’s what the bugs like, so there ya go. Now it’s of course time
to pull it out and see what it looks like. (grunting) I have no idea what the bugs did to it. Wow. I mean this had the hide
on it and everything. Got pine needles on there. Man, looks like they
cleaned it up pretty good. You can see how clean they got it, they’ve eaten away all
the flesh and the hide of this skull. I’m gonna go hose it off real quick, see how it looks. Okay, this piece of styrofoam
that I threw into the barrel where the deer skull was, somebody told me that the styrofoam, this stiff styrofoam, works for basically
it’s being a bug condo, the bugs will come in, the
little beetles and everything and they’ll burrow into these things and they’ll use it as
a home and sure enough, you can see all these dark holes, most of those were made by beetles. In fact, in there, is one moving around and I don’t know if you can see it or not, he was moving earlier and yeah, so this is a
beetle condo, bug condo, works pretty good. (country music) Obviously, I have to.. Get a little brush out
and scrub the dirt off. (country music) Okay, here I’m using just a pan, deep enough to cover the whole skull and all I’m doing is soaking this skull in a solution of Dawn dish
washing detergent and water. (country music)

What Sound Does An Ant Make?

What Sound Does An Ant Make?


Ant colonies are like high security bank vaults. To get in, you need the right access codes. Usually, those come in the form of chemical
cues, which let the resident ants know you belong. But one parasitic beetle has cracked a secret
cipher to gain entry to the nest. It’s learned how to speak the ants’ language. And that language sounds a little something
like this. I’m Anna Rothschild, and this is Gross Science. As you might remember from movies like Ant
Man, ants usually communicate using chemical signals, like pheromones. But while that’s a powerful way to convey
important information, it’s not the only way ants talk. Many ants chirp to each other by rubbing two
hard parts of their abdomens together. Different species can use these scraping sounds
for things like getting organized, communicating with mates, and calling for help. In fact, the Mediterranean ant species Pheidole
pallidula has three kinds of calls: workers, soldiers, and queens each make their own distinct
sound. Now, Pheidole pallidula has a nemesis named
Paussus favieri. It’s a beetle that can only live inside
the ant’s nests. To get inside, the beetles use chemicals on
the outsides of their bodies to blend in with the ants. But, for an all-access pass to the entire
nest, scientists think they also mimic the ants’ sounds. The beetles also scrape their abdomens to
make chirps that match the calls of ant workers, soldiers, or queens. Here’s an example. Now, that call might sound pretty different
to us than the ant calls do… but it’s close enough to fool the ants. And that works out really well for the beetles. You see, ants normally attack any intruder
in their nest. But, these beetles have almost free range,
even interacting with the queen herself. And the ants don’t just ignore the beetles—they’ll
actually lick them in a way that resembles their own grooming behavior. Tragically, the ants still don’t object
when the beetles start eating them. Sometimes the beetles prey on adult ants,
but they especially like younger ones. A beetle uses its straw-like jaws to pierce
the abdomen of an ant larva, and then carries the larva around like a slurpee, drinking
its blood and soft tissues. This “beetle in ants clothing” is just
one example of what’s called “aggressive mimicry” in nature—where a predator or
parasite resembles a more harmless organism to avoid detection from prey. It’s actually a pretty ingenious solution. Ant slurpee, anyone? Ew.