Warrior Wasp Adventure!

Warrior Wasp Adventure!


(creepy music) – I just know that if
this is more painful than the Bullet Ant, it’s
gonna be one, rough evening for Coyote Peterson. (mellow music) What I’m gonna try to do is
see if I can get Harvester Ants on my hands and let them bite
and sting me for 60 seconds. If you guys want me to be stung
by the Bullet Ant someday, I think you have to
walk before you can run. (grunts) Ah, there’s
one in my neck. Mario, get the one off my neck. (suspenseful music) This is crazy guys,
this is crazy. My nerve’s going this
much for the Velvet Ants. I can’t imagine what
the Tarantula Hawk
and the Bullet Ant are gonna be like. Ow. (grunts) Oh my gosh, guys. It’s super bad. You could feel, go all
the way under the skin. This is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question ’bout it. It’s worse than a Harvester
Ant, it’s worse than a Fire Ant. Now they say that the
sting of a Tarantula Hawk, it’s like being
stunned with taser, all you can do is scream. (dramatic music) Ah. I can’t move my arm. (grunts) Guys, I don’t know. I don’t know, I don’t know. Actually seen the
Bullet Ant face to face, Coyote pack, it is
unbelievably intimidating. (dramatic music) (grunts) Oh, it’s sucking my arm. It’s sucking my arm. (grunts) It’s stinger’s into
my arm, look at that. Oh my gosh, oh my gosh. The Warrior Wasp is in
a league of it’s own. And it is rumored that
this does in fact have the most painful sting
in the insect kingdom. Whoa. (suspenseful music) That is an enormous nest
of angry Warrior Wasps. Stay tuned coyote pack,
the Warrior Wasp challenge is coming. (suspenseful music) The climatic end to my climb
of the insect sting pain index is just days away. Will the Warrior Wasp sting
be the worse I’ve ever taken? Stay tuned and in case
you somehow missed it, make sure to go back and
watch my painful encounter with the one and
only Bullet Ant. And don’t forget, subscribe. So you can join me and
the crew on this season of breaking trail. Two. Oh my gosh, this is it. Three. (animal howls)

Two Giant Killer Hornet Colonies Fight to the Death


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: The Samurai scouts
bring news that there’s an army on its way. [BUZZING] They rally the troops. But it’s too late. The Bamboo Battalion is on them. The Rock Samurais are ambushed
at their own entrance. When times are tough,
giant killer hornets turn on their kind. It’s like on like,
giant on giant. Claws, stingers, and mandibles,
all weapons deployed and heads will roll. Disabling the enemy is
the primary strategy. Beheading and severing
limbs, the mandibles are the ultimate weapon of war. It’s impossible to
determine who’s winning until the pillaging starts. The marauding Bamboo
giants enter the fortress. They’re conquered
the Rock Samurais and they’ve struck gold. The precious nursery of
developing princesses is ransacked, next year’s
queens killed and cannibalized in their chambers. The sentry can do nothing
but witness the devastation of her precious family.

Is KILLER BEE Honey Dangerous?!

Is KILLER BEE Honey Dangerous?!


(bees buzzing) – [Coyote] Oh boy,
starting to get swarmed. Holy mackerel. Dude, you are like, covered
in bees right now, man. Oh my gosh, my legs are shaking. (percussive music) (tranquil music) – [Coyote] A light breeze
drifts across the desert sand as morning sun crests
above the mountains. All seems calm amongst
the rocky outcrops, yet nestled down between
the cracks and ridges, a powerful giant
quietly slumbers. To disturb this
creature by accident would be a literal nightmare. Disturb it intentionally
and you will likely seal your own fate. Oh boy, starting to get swarmed. Holy mackerel. – [Coyote] It sounds as
if I speak of a creature from a storybook, but
this is no creature of myth and lore. It is a very real animal
that, since the mid 1980s, has become one of
the southwest’s most
notorious threats. Killer bees. So, what is a killer bee? Well, to keep it simple,
it’s basically a hybrid between an African and
a European honeybee. They’re typically more
defensive, faster, and more aggressive
than other bee species. Tucson, Arizona is
just one of the places that has recently fallen under
the cloud of killer bees, and today we will
be working alongside bee specialist Chris Britton. Chris monitors several
beehives that exist naturally in the mountainsides, and our
goal is to extract aged honey from a wild hive so we can
compare it to his locally farmed honey and determine
which one is more delicious. Using a drone will
help us locate the hive and determine exactly how
we should approach it. This is an incredibly
dangerous mission, so to protect ourselves
from the thousands of bees that will be swarming
and trying to sting us, we will be wearing bee suits. We are taking extra precautions
by taping up the wrists and ankles to ensure the
bees cannot work their way into the suits. Okay, so, this is
the moment of truth. We are completely suited up. This is probably going
to be one of the craziest and most dangerous
things we’ve ever done on an episode of Breaking Trail. The following scene was filmed under the supervision
of bee specialists. Never approach a
beehive in the wild. – Okay, Chris, so this is
kind of our last checkpoint, about as close as we
feel comfortable getting without the bees
actually swarming out. Now, I’m looking at the
hive and I see there’s lighter-colored comb
on top, in the middle, it’s slightly golden,
and then at the bottom, it almost looks like it’s brown. What’s the best area for me to
extract comb and honey from? – We’re gonna go right to
the center of this hive. – Okay.
– So, not on the dark and not on the completely light. That light stuff is not
gonna have anything in it. At this present point in
time, the bees are working more into the layers of
comb, so you’re gonna go right to, basically, the
middle, where it’s a little bit golden, but it starts to
turn just a little bit, and there’s some capped
honey right there. It may be last season’s
honey, but it’s right there where the bees are going
to be working, and we’ll be able to just get in
there and grab a bunch. – [Coyote] Okay, cool. Well, I think at this point,
let’s get into the hive and get this honey. You guys all ready? Cutting into the hive causes
no harm to the bees, and this extraction method is commonly
used by honey farmers. In the wild, hives are
often invaded by animals, which, in turn, causes an
increase with productivity, and in a matter of
days, the hive will be completely reconstructed. Okay, I’m right
underneath the hive. Whoa. Look at that. Do not want to get stung. Bees are starting to come out. You can see all the comb here. – [Chris] And over here. – [Coyote] They definitely
know that we’re here. – [Chris] You hear ’em? – [Coyote] I can hear
’em, they’re going crazy. – [Chris] How hard is it? – [Coyote] Wow, it’s
hard, very waxy. Oh boy, starting to get swarmed. Holy mackerel. I’m nervous. You see, they’re trying to
sting in through the mask. (bees buzzing loudly) Here they come. This is the outer layer here. Dude, you are like, covered
in bees right now, man. – [Chris] We gotta hurry up. (intense music) – [Coyote] We are
absolutely surrounded by killer bees right now. Fortunately, they are not
stinging through the suit. I got a couple of
good pieces of comb, but I’ve already come out here. There we go, found
comb with honey. Some stingers are actually
getting through my suit. I am getting stung
at this point. Ow. Jeez, okay, alright, I’m
gonna cut out a big section of comb from right here in
the middle, can you see this? That is all filled with honey. I’m gonna cut through that and
we’re gonna get out of here. Ugh, it’s sticky! This is it, this is good honey! Oh, look at that! Okay. Woo! That is pure, golden honey! Alright, I’m gonna put it
inside the mason jar here. Yep, here, let’s
back up a little bit. I can’t even imagine what it
would be like to be out here and come across a
swarm like this. This could definitely kill you. We are probably surrounded
by 30,000 bees at this point. I mean, it’s absolutely crazy. They’re attacking the GoPro,
they’re attacking the cameras. – The microphone. – [Coyote] The microphones,
everything is getting bombarded by bees right now. – It’s hard to even
touch the camera. They’re just covered in bees. Like, you can’t even tip the… – [Coyote] It’s crazy. Alright, look at that,
that’s about what we want, right there. Woo, that is absolutely
filled with honey. So what are we
doing here, Chris? – I’m basically covering
the air with smoke, so that way we can actually
get the bees to change their pheromones so
you guys can walk away. – [Mark] ‘Cause they’ll
follow us to our car. – Oh, they’ll sting you
all the way to their car. Africanized honeybees
know no limits. – [Coyote] I can’t even
imagine what it would be like to be out here and come
across a swarm like this. This could definitely kill you. Wow. Well, we escaped the
swarm of killer bees. Now, the next step is to
compare the killer bee honey to European bee honey and
see which one tastes better. To the victor go the spoils. What you’re looking at
right there are two jars of delicious raw honey. Now, right here, we
have honeybee honey, and on this side,
the killer bee honey. Now, we certainly had to
go through quite the ordeal to get both of these honeys. They’re all in my face! We are absolutely surrounded
by killer bees right now. But it was totally worth it,
because this is the moment we have all been waiting for. The comparison between
killer bee honey and honeybee honey. Which one is better? You guys ready to find out? – [Mark] Oh yeah, I’m ready. Do we get to taste test also? – Oh, yeah, you guys are
gonna taste this too. Okay, I’m gonna start
with the honeybee honey. We take off the cap here. Wow, that smells
incredibly fresh. Big spoonful right there. – [Mark] Oh, wow.
– I just go for it, right? – [Mark] I think you
go for the whole thing. – Wow. That’s sticky. Oh, really sweet, I can
taste all those granules of honey, they’re starting
to disintegrate in my mouth. Wow. That is delicious, oh my gosh. That is an unbelievable honey. That might be the best
honey that I have ever had. Here, let me get a
little bit of this honey on the tip of the knife. Go ahead there, Mark,
just take a little squidge off there.
– [Mark] Don’t cut myself. – [Coyote] That’s good, huh? – Wow, you could eat that
straight, like, all day. – Wow, I took a big
spoonful of that. – [Mark] You feeling
the sugar rush yet? – Yeah, I think I’m about to. Now, this is what I’ve
really been excited about. Let me get a big…
– [Mark] Get a gooey one. – [Coyote] Hunk of it
out here, let me just scoop some out onto my hand. Yeah, I’m going full
Pooh-bear here, guys. Let me get my paw in there. Oh, yeah. I’ve always wanted to do that. Look at that honey. Look at the different
colors in the honey. You have the darker
honey, and you have the real light golden honey. Think it’s gonna
make me throw up? – [Mark] Nah, man,
it’s like candy. – Whoa! That is crazy sweet! – [Mario] Put the rest in there. – [Mark] Can you
do the whole comb? Hey, Pooh-bear,
how’s that taste? – Very sweet. – [Mark] Very sweet indeed. – This is almost making my
eyes water, it’s so sweet. – [Mark] Bravo, I’m impressed. That was quite the honeycomb
you just had there. – Let me wipe off my
face a little bit here. Little bit more presentable. Wow, that is so sugary! I’m gonna have a major sugar
high for hours right now. You guys wanna try this, right? – [Mark] Yeah. – Stick your finger out, there. Just wait ’til it
gets in your teeth. Soon as it hits your lips. – [Mark] Wow.
– [Coyote] Right? Now, both of these honeys
taste amazing, but honestly? I think the killer bee
honey is a little more tasty and a little more… Gave me a rush of
energy, like, the second that it hit my mouth. But I think both types
would be excellent on anything that
you put them on. Although, going to get
killer bee honey is something that I can never recommend
anybody out there watching ever try and go do. Probably the best way to do
it is to buy from a local honey farmer and have
something that’s pure and granulated, just like this. And you put it on toast,
you can put it on… You name it, honey goes good
on absolutely everything. Ahhh, I can totally feel,
like, a sugar rush coming on right now, that is crazy. My hands are so sticky. – [Mark] Hey, Pooh-bear. – What? – [Mark] You get enough? – No! How did that silly old
bear get his paw into that jar of honey all the time? – [Mark] He didn’t get his
paw stung by bees yesterday. – Yeah, I got fat paw right now. Watch this, two bee
honeys at the same time. (men yelling and groaning) Sugar rush! Full honey face. – [Mark] Mario, there aren’t
any bears out here, are there? ♪ Climbin’ in a honey tree,
Pooh bear, I know he’s out there ♪ It’s me and it’s you, oh
silly oh Winnie the Pooh – Well, I would say we
endured quite a bit to get both of these honeys up
close for the cameras. Aside from wearing the bee
beard, which resulted in me being stung 32 times, to
then scaling the side of a cliff to extract comb and honey
from a killer bee hive, we went through it all
to do this taste test, and at the end of the day, I
have to say that the killer bee honey is actually
the most tasty. I’m Coyote Peterson,
bee brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. One more handful. Ooh, that’s some good honey. (inspirational music) There are many
misconceptions surrounding the Africanized honeybee. Or, as they have become
famously vilified by so many, as killer bees. Nearly all attacks happen
when a hive is accidentally disturbed, or a swarm is
provoked by a non-professional who is attempting
to exterminate it. And while many people
are stung every year, very few deaths are
actually reported. If you see a swarm or come
across a hive in the wild, quickly and quietly move
in the opposite direction. And if you are looking
for some delicious honey, well, my advice is
to support local and buy it from a honey farmer. If you thought getting swarmed
by killer bees was intense, make sure to go back
and see what happened when I tried to trade in my
fur beard for a bee beard. And don’t forget, subscribe! So you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail! They’re all over my face! My eyes! Oh man, my face hurts. – [Mark] You should see the
sting you have in your neck.

STUNG by a YELLOW JACKET!

STUNG by a YELLOW JACKET!


(upbeat music) – [Coyote] Hold
on, oh it’s flying. Hold on let’s go back
towards the nest. No wait, wait, wait, don’t move. – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yes, yes. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the yellow jacket. Here we go. (yelling) (upbeat music) Today we are headed out
into the suburban wilds of Westerville, Ohio to search
for any species of paper wasp which can be carefully
caught and ultimately used to give me a good
series of stings. Welcome to another
day in the office for Coyote Peterson. – [Mark] Coyote, are we doing what I think we’re doing today? – Oh yes, today is
yellow jacket day. Now you guys may remember
a little episode called, “The Bullet Ant Challenge” where I was stung
by a bullet ant. (yelling) And then a subsequent
video called, “Bullet Ant Kryptonite” where I used a product
called Sting-Kill to help alleviate the
pain and the itching. A Sting-Kill absolutely
loved that video and then they came
to us and said, “We’d love to work with you
guys and do a sponsored video, but let’s get you stung by something a little
more commonplace.” You know, not many people
are running into bullet ants. So they said, “What if you
get stung by yellow jackets?” Now we all know that
yellow jackets can be found at your local park, maybe you
see them in your backyard, sometimes they even
get into the house. We know they’re angry, we
know they’re aggressive, and people are often
stung every single summer. So what we’re gonna do today is actually build a bug vacuum. (record scratches) – [Mark] A bug what? – [Coyote] A bug vacuum. Bear with me here for a second. So you see this? I found this online, right? – [Mark] Looks pretty cool. – Right, the Extreme Bug Vac. But unfortunately, I
have one opened up here. This is supposed to
have a lot of suction, Mark put your hand out. – Yeah, no. – Pretty sure that’s not
gonna catch us any hornets but what I love about this
is the plastic capsule. Check that out. It’s got this little
revolving door and you are supposed to be able to suck a bug in
there, close it up, look at it through
the magnifying glass and then of course it’s
go a little screen, so that the insect can breathe. What I wanna do,
is actually take this capsule from the bug vacuum and Macgyver something
with a real vacuum. (vacuum sucking) Check out that suction. – Oh yeah.
– Yeah. – [Mark] Suction power there. – Oh yeah, that’s
gonna catch a hornet. But what I need to do
is reconstruct this, where I’m gonna
actually cut the hose and duct tape the
capsule in between. Then I’ll be able to use
this end with the nozzle, which has great suction power. And then I think
we’re gonna be ready to go out and start searching
for some yellow jackets. Oh I almost forgot, I am gonna mount the
GoPro on it as well. – [Mark] So where are we today? We’re in Ohio, right? – We are in Ohio. We’re actually
right in my backyard here in Westerville, Ohio. And I actually put
in a phone call and email to a number of my
different friends in the area and I said, “Go out this
morning and look around near the eaves of your house.” You know where the gutter
attaches to the roof? “And let me know if you
see any wasps nests, hornet nests,
yellow jacket nests, anything that looks
like a stinging insect, let me know and we may
come and investigate it.” So we’re gonna kinda
go on a little bit of a field trip today guys, until we can find ourselves
some good stinging bugs. – [Mark] Are we testin’ it out? (vacuum sucking)
– Yep. (vacuum sucking)
– Yep. I think it’s gonna work. – Last step. (Mark laughing) Now it’s like a proton pack. (Mark laughing) Oh yeah, this thing is awesome. Alright, well if
you guys are ready, let’s go try to catch
some yellow jackets. – [Mark] Let’s do it. (Coyote cheering) – Alright, well we might as well check the park
that we started at. Great structures here
for us to invest. You see that all these
eaves and overhangs, perfect place for paper wasps. – [Mark] Now why do paper wasps
like these under hangs here? – Well because it’s a
great spot to build a nest. It’s out of the realm of
predators and the rain. See anything yet? (mysterious music) There are eight known species
of wasps that call Ohio home. And many of them
can be encountered right in your own backyard. However, unless they
are intentionally or accidentally provoked, your odds of being stung
are actually very slim. Let’s go this way. – [Mark] Come on Mario. – Well it’s a fun
day at the park. – [Mark] Yep. – On the weekend. – [Mark] Should’ve
brought a soccer ball. What do you see? – [Mario] Did you see
something fly out? – I did, I think it
was a honey bee though. Now honey bees, you often
times see on clover. Let me see, there’s
one right there. Look, look, look, look. That’s a honey bee. – [Mark] European honey bee. – Yep. Now that is
not what we’re after. honey bees actually have
fur all over their bodies, whereas yellow jackets
are completely bald. Bees also have barbs
on their stingers, so when you get stung by a
bee, it’s stinger gets removed. If you get stung
by a yellow jacket, no barbs, so it can sting
you over and over and over. If I was looking for honey
bees, we’d be in the right spot. But unfortunately, yellow
jackets do not pollinate clover. Alright, let’s keep lookin’. (mysterious music) – [Mark] So why are we
looking at the ground now? I thought we were looking up. – That’s a good
question actually. Oh. That could be perfect, I
see some ants in there. A lot of times yellow jackets will actually build
their nests underground. So if you see something
that looks like a mole hole, just respect it
from a safe distance because it’s possible
that yellow jackets have built a nest in there. A cavity in a tree like
this is also fair game. But there’s nothing
in this tree. Not sure we’re gonna find
anything in this park, guys. Might be time to
take a road trip, see where else we can
look for yellow jackets. You ready? – [Mark] The bug suckers
are hittin’ the road. – Oh yeah, vroom vroom. (upbeat music) Well it is 12:43, which means
it’s officially lunch time. And we have a new plan. – Searching for the
yellow jackets ourselves is not exactly
panning out very well. We found some nests
that were vacant, we found some honey bees,
and some bumblebees. But we haven’t found the
infamous yellow jacket. What we’re gonna do, bear
with me here for a second, is actually have a picnic. Because often times,
if you think about it, yellow jackets show up
when you’re at a picnic. So I’m thinking if we get some
soda pops and some ice cream, we hang out in the sun,
maybe these stinging insects will come to us and
we will then be able to use the Bug Sucker 5000 to
just sit there and just go, vroom, and suck ’em up. Give me this, I’m gonna go look
in the garbage can right now and see if there
are any hornets. Guys, we are really lookin’
hard for these hornets but you know what, they
empty their trash a lot. Check this out. There’s like nothin’ in there. Can’t exactly find hornets if there isn’t a bunch
of sticky stuff around. And what Mario did was, he put, look at that. Ice cream in the
grass on top of a lid. Maybe that will
bring in the hornets and the yellow
jackets, and the wasps. I don’t know, I guess
we’ll see what happens. – Mmm. – [Mark] Pretty good, huh Mario? I’m enjoying mine. – It’s a beautiful
day for a picnic. – I’ll see you
then, alright bye. – [Mark] No yellow
jackets though. – Guys. – [Mark] What’s up? – We might be in business. I just got off the phone
with my friend, Jasper. Now I know at the
beginning of the video, I kinda made a joke and said, “Yeah I sent an email and
texts to my friends that live “in the area and I
told ’em to go outside “and check around their houses “to see if any yellow
jackets were hanging out.” Sure enough, my
friend Jasper went out and he said right
on his back patio, there’s a little nest and
there are three yellow jackets. And I said, “You’re sure?” He said, “Well, they’re
yellow and they’re black “and they look like
they wanna sting.” So, I think we may
actually be able to put the Bug Sucker
5000 to the test. You guys ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it. And can we bring
our treats with us? – Oh of course. – Yeah. – Let’s catch some
yellow jackets. Alright guys, well we
are at Jasper’s house. Now he has asked to
not be on camera, because he’s not used
to being on YouTube. So you won’t get
to meet him today, but he has given us permission
to go out on his porch and scout for these
yellow jackets. If they’re there,
we’re gonna use the Bug Sucker
5000 to catch them and then go to a
controlled environment so that we can get me stung. You guys ready? – [Mark] Sounds like
a plan, let’s do it. – Gear up, you guys
grab the other cameras and we’ll be ready to go. – [Mark] You look happy. – [Coyote] See that
corner right there? – [Mark] Uh-huh. – That is a small nest and there are two
yellow jackets. Now Jasper has provided
us with a step stool. He was thinkin’ ahead. So I’m gonna use this step stool and get up close with
the Bug Sucker 5000. You guys ready? We’re gonna have
to do this quick ’cause I already see
that they’re on the alert with their wings
kind of propped out ready to swoop
down and sting us. So we really just
have one shot at this. Okay so what I’m gonna do,
I love my Ghostbuster pack, but to really make this
work I do have to take the Bug Sucker 5000 out. – [Mark] The moment we’ve
all been waiting for. – Let’s put it this way, it’s either gonna work, or
we’re all gonna get stung. (vacuum sucking) – [Mark] Move fast. (vacuum sucking) Did it work? – We got one of ’em in there. – [Mark] Oh there’s
still one on the nest. (vacuum sucking) – [Coyote] Get the net,
get the net, get the net. Oh it’s flying. Hold on, hold on let’s
go back towards the nest. Wait, wait, wait,
wait, don’t move. (vacuum sucking) – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yes, yes. – [Mark] Shut the
door, shut the door. (laughing) It totally worked.
– Look at that. Totally caught the
yellow jackets. Both of ’em, just like that. (cheering) The Bug Sucker 5000 pays off. Can you guys believe that? Holy mackerel, we caught ’em. Wow. That was crazy, the one
was actually climbed onto this thing and I was like, “Uh, oh. We’re gonna get stung.” I was like, “Get the
net, get the net.” But then it went
back up to the nest and sure enough, got it
inside of the capsule. – [Mark] So alright
Coyote, now we have to go to where we’re
gonna get you stung. Not at Jasper’s house. – Yeah, no we’re gonna go
to a controlled situation, and we’re gonna get
these yellow jackets out of the little
capsule and get me stung. But what I’m gonna
do for transport, is not take this hose apart. Now I’m actually just
gonna place it inside of the bug net just
in case they get out. And just like that,
we’re ready to go. – [Mark] Nice. – Awesome, high fives guys. (laughing)
– That totally worked. – That’s so cool
that that worked. – [Mark] That totally worked. Boom. – Alright guys, and we’re back. Now we do have the
yellow jackets on hand. But first let’s
talk about the kit that I have here on the table. Now as always, with
these sting episodes, I have my trusty
entomology forceps here. I’ll be using this
to actually hold one of the yellow
jackets against my
arm to induce a sting. And just in case something
goes horribly wrong, as always, the epinephrin pen. – [Mark] Now do you think you’re
in the clear at this point? You’ve been stung a bunch. – I have and you never know. Every single insect
sting is unique and you never know how
your body will react. Even a yellow jacket can force
you into anaphylactic shock. So I always have this just
as a safety precaution. And of course, the star of
today’s episode, Sting-Kill. Who probably is
sponsoring this episode. Now what we’re gonna
do after I’m stung, is try out both of these
products on the sting, to make sure that it can
relieve not only the pain, but also the itching that’s
gonna come after the fact. You guys ready to see
the yellow jackets? – [Mark] Let’s bring ’em out. – Alright, well they
did transport safely
inside of the net and still inside of
the little capsule. – [Mark] Pretty happy they
didn’t escape in the car. – Yeah that would’ve been a
bad situation, wouldn’t it? All of us in the car and then
yellow jackets flying around. And sure enough there they
are inside of the capsule. Now what I need to
do is actually remove the hose from the capsule so we just have
this individualized. And then I can carefully get one of those yellow
jackets out of there. Now here’s a really interesting
little fact to remember, all hornets are
technically wasps, but not all wasps are hornets. How about that? And anything that
is black and yellow is technically considered
a yellow jacket. – [Mark] So what do we
have, what did we find? – This I believe, is what’s
called a European paper wasp. But because it’s
yellow and black, we’re just generically
calling it a yellow jacket. – [Mark] And is this
what we find at picnics? Is this what’s swarming
us when we’re trying to eat our ice cream? – No, that is usually a hornet. Now a hornet has a much
stockier looking body, a thicker abdomen and
a narrower thorax. But these ones look
just like wasps. You see the very pointy wings,
if you kind of see there. Do you see where
the thorax leads into the abdomen right there? It’s very narrow and indicative
of being an actual wasp. But I think at this junction,
what we’re ready to do, is bring the bug
net back into this, place the capsule inside,
and work on getting one of these yellow jackets
out of the container. You ready for that? – [Mark] So what’s
the process here? You’re gonna let ’em
go inside the net and then grab them
with the forceps? – Yeah, here’s
what’s gonna happen. So I’m gonna place
the capsule down inside of the net like
this, keep it contained. I’m going to open the capsule, hopefully only let
one of them out, close it back up,
remove the capsule, and then go in there with
the entomology forceps, to pick it up, bring it out,
and place it on my forearm. (suspenseful music) I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with a
yellow jacket, here we go. One, (breathes), two, three. (suspenseful music) Ow. – [Mark] Did you get there? – [Coyote] Got me there, yeah. (suspenseful music) (yelling) – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yeah it got me twice. Ah. Here we go. (suspenseful music) (yelling) – [Mark] Was that the worst one? – [Coyote] Yeah that was
the worst one so far. – [Mark] Are you good? (yelling) – He got the stinger all the
way inserted into my arm. Oh my arm’s startin’
to hurt a little bit, hold on, let’s do this. We’re gonna get back
into the capsule. – [Mark] Gonna lay it back. (breathes) – Ah, yep there you have it. You see all those welts? I took several stings
all right in that area. And look at this, there’s
a lot of red coloration developing right near the veins. That is really
interesting looking. And it burns and it’s really
warm, really warm right now. Honestly, it’s hot
to the touch right? – [Mark] Yeah you can
definitely feel the swelling. – Yeah, now it was
not nearly as painful as any of the other
stings I’ve gone through. I was actually able to keep
the yellow jacket on my arm as it was inflicting stings. It did get me one time pretty
good right at the end there, and I had to let it go. Of course we got it safely back into the capsule, as
you can see there. There they both are, they’ll
be released here shortly. But what we wanna
do now, is actually use the Sting-Kill products to see if it will alleviate
some of the burning in my arm and of course the itching
that is almost certain to come if I don’t use the
Sting-Kill ointment. You guys ready for that? – [Mark] Let’s do it. – [Coyote] Okay. – [Mark] Well which
one do we want? Do you want the capsules
or do you want the? How about you take both. Let’s talk about both.
– We’re gonna give a shot at both. So this is the Sting-Kill wipe. Often times used for
anything from a bee sting or a wasp sting, even a
mosquito bite, even a jellyfish. If you guys are on the
beach and you’re swimming and you run into a jellyfish, this is perfect for that. So what I’m gonna do, is
I’m gonna open this up. I’ll tell you what, I keep
myself pretty well composed in a lot of this, but
now that the pain’s actually starting to
set in my arm, I do, I get a little bit light headed. So the Sting-Kill wipes
have a maximum strength mix of benzocaine and menthol and
I actually really like these. They’re neon green, looks
like Ninja Turtle Mutagen. Check that out. And wow that is a strong
smell right there. Alright I’m gonna put that
on the sting, are you ready? – [Mark] Yeah sure go ahead. – Oh wow, it’s cold. The menthol definitely
cools it immediately. (sighs) Yes.
(laughing) Wow that really does have a pretty incredible
cooling effect. Now similar to the bullet ant, I was in a lot of pain
after that and it did help, but of course the
bullet ant pain eventually did come back and
lasted for nearly 36 hours. I’m hoping that this
relieves much quicker. Now I do love the wipes. And I carry the wipes in my
pack, but this right here, the sting kill capsules.
– Those, I like those. – Yeah these are my
absolute favorite. Okay let me open one up for you. Now they are individually
wrapped, see this, very cool. And all you have to do is pop
the back end out like that. And inside here is a
little glass capsule within the plastic. So all you have to do, this
is my favorite part, ready? (glass breaks)
(laughing) Shatter the glass on the inside that has this
little cotton swab. – [Mark] It’s
strangely satisfying. – I know, it’s like, “Oh
here comes the ooze.” Yes, ah. (laughing) Oh that is my favorite. And that real thick
serum right there is literally
instantaneous relief. I personally love
to just do this, dab it right on the sting zone. Wow. And as you can see,
there is more liquid here than you get in the wipes. So if you have a
really bad sting, or you’re stung multiple times, I definitely recommend going
to the Sting-Kill capsules, ’cause as you can see, look
how much of the ointment is actually coming out there. – [Mark] Okay, so once again,
Sting-Kill saves the day. (breathes) – Yes. Sting-Kill
has saved the day. My arm feels a lot better. In fact, there’s also a little
bit of a numbing agent here, so I can’t feel any of
the pain at this point. Wow, arm is a little bit stiff, but hopefully this
formula will also reduce any potential itching that’s
gonna come down the road here. And I know you’re
thinking to yourselves, “Coyote, those were
simply yellow jackets. “And you’ve been stung
by tarantula hawks,
and bullet ants, “and hopefully soon
warrior wasps.” But keep in mind guys,
that the yellow jacket is something that is
right in your backyard. It’s something you
can easily come across and something you definitely
have the potential of being stung by. Now if you are
unfortunately stung, remember, Sting-Kill is
definitely gonna help you out when it comes to
alleviating that pain and any potential itching. Alright guys, well
I think it’s time to release the yellow
jackets back into the wild. But before we do,
I just want to give an extra special
thanks to Sting-Kill for supporting this episode and of course, for
keeping us kitted up with sting ointment, when
we’re out there in the field. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. It is not often that an
animal like a yellow jacket is safely relocated from an
urban setting to a wild one. As most human
encounters usually end with the insect being
sprayed and killed. I know this sounds strange, but
it truly made my heart happy to know that this
beautiful pair of wasps will now have the chance to continue building
their nest in the wild. No matter what, always
admire these insects from a safe distance. However if you are
stung, all you need to do is visit your local pharmacist, where you are likely to find
the Sting-Kill products. And whether you use the
sting wipes or the capsules, both are armed with
a maximum strength benzocaine and menthol formula that is certain to
provide fast relief to the pain and itching. For more information,
visit Sting-Kill’s website to connect with the
brand for special offers. If you thought
(yelling) getting stung by a yellow
jacket was intense, (yelling) make sure to go back
and watch the episode where I applied
Sting-Kill to help alleviate the searing pain
of the bullet ant’s sting. And don’t forget, subscribe. So you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. What I’m gonna do
is open this up, and let’s see if
the sting wipe helps (sighs) to cool off my arm. This is nice, these are perfect. This could fit right
in any hiking backpack. (coyote howling)

The Death Of Bees Explained – Parasites, Poison and Humans

The Death Of Bees Explained – Parasites, Poison and Humans


Human society is extremely
complex and fragile, built upon various pillars. One of them is the honey bee. One out of three meals eaten by humans
is made possible by honey bees. They are so important that if all the
honey bees were to die out, thousands of plants would follow, which could lead to millions of people
starving in the following years. On top of that, honey bees have
a huge economic impact. The dollar value of plants
pollinated by them each year is around $265 billion. Food we take for granted would just
stop existing without them, or there would be a massive
decrease in productivity. Food including apples, onions, pumpkins,
and also plants used for feeding livestock and thus extremely important
for our milk and meat. Einstein is often quoted as having said, “If honey bees die out, humans
will follow a few years later.” Actually, he probably didn’t say that, but there might be some
truth in the statement. It’s unsettling, but honey bees
have started to disappear. Millions of hives have died
in the last few years. Beekeepers all over the world have seen an
annual loss of 30–90% of their colonies. In the US alone, bees
are steadily declining.>From 5 million hives in 1988
to 2.5 million today. Since 2006, a phenomenon called
“colony collapse disorder” has affected honey bees in many countries. And we’re not entirely sure
what’s causing it. All we know is that it’s pretty serious. Over the last few decades bees have seen
an invasion of very dangerous foes. Parasites straight out of a horror movie,
like Acarapis woodi, microscopic mites that infect the tracheae
(that’s the breathing tubes) of bees. Here, they lay their eggs and feed from
the fluids of their victims, weakening them considerably and spending
their whole life inside the bees. Or Varroa destructor, a fitting name
because they can only reproduce in honey bee hives and are one of
the bees’ greatest enemies. The female mite enters a honey bee brood
cell and lays eggs on the bee larva before it’s about to pupate and before the hive bees cover the
cell with a wax capping. The eggs hatch and the young mites and
their mother feed on the developing bee in the safety of the capped cell. The bee is not normally killed
at this stage, just weakened, so it still has enough strength to chew
its way through the wax capping and release itself from the cell. As it does, it releases the mother mite
and her new offspring from the cell, and these are free to
spread across the hive, starting the process over again
in a cycle of about 10 days. Their numbers grow exponentially,
and after a few months, this can lead to the collapse
of the entire bee hive. Once outside of the cell, adult mites
also suck the bodily fludis of bees and weaken them considerably. To make things worse, they also transmit
viruses that harm the bees even more and can lead to birth defects
like useless wings. But there are other threats too,
such as viruses and fungi. Under normal circumstances, these
phenomena should be manageable and are not enough to explain the horrendous amount of
dying going on in bees. Over recent years new insecticides
have been introduced that are deadly to bees. Neonicotinoids, a chemical family
similar to nicotine, was approved in the early 1990s
as an alternative to chemicals like DDT. They attack insects by harming
their nervous systems. Today, they are the most widely
used insecticides in the world. Globally, they saw sales
of €1.5 billion in 2008, representing 24% of the global
market for insecticides. In 2013, neonicotinoids were used in the
US on about 95% of corn and canola crops, and also on the vast majority
of fruit and vegetables, like apples, cherries, peaches, oranges,
berries, leafy greens, tomatoes, potatoes, cereal grains, rice, nuts,
grapes, and many more. Bees come into contact with the toxin while collecting pollen or
via contaminated water, often bringing material into the hive, where it can accumulate and
slowly kill the whole colony. The toxins harm bees in a
variety of horrible ways. In high enough doses, it quickly leads
to convulsions, paralysis, and death. But even in small doses, it can be fatal. It may lead to bees forgetting
how to navigate the world, so bees fly into the wild, get lost, and
die alone, separated from their hives. If this happens often enough, a hive
can lose its ability to sustain itself. We know that neonicotinoids
are harmful to bees and that we urgently need
an alternative to it, but there are billions of dollars
to be made in delaying this. Studies sponsored by the chemical
industry magically appear to prove a much lower toxicity to bees, compared to
those produced by independent scientists. There are even more factors
contributing to the demise of bees, like too much genetic uniformity,
crop monocultures, poor nutrition due to overcrowding,
stress because of human activities, and other pesticides. Each of those factors on its own is
a major problem for bees, but together, they probably account
for colony collapse disorder. With parasites upping their
game in recent decades, the honey bees are now
fighting for survival. It would be a catastrophe
if they lost this fight. This is a conundrum we have to solve
if we want to continue living with a relative abundance
and diversity of food. Humanity is deeply interconnected with
Earth and the other lifeforms on it, even if we pretend that we’re not. We have to take better care
of our surroundings, if not to preserve the beauty of nature,
then at least to ensure our own survival. This video is supported by the
Australian Academy of Science, which promotes and supports
excellence in science. See more at . It was a blast to work with them,
so go check out their site. Our videos are also made possible
by your support on . Recently, we passed
an important milestone, which is why there will be
an additional video in July. If you want to support us and become
part of the Kurzgesagt Bird Army, check out our Patreon page! Recently, the YouTube channel
Field Day gave us the oppotunity to make something different: a
short video about Game of Thrones. Go check it out on their channel! Subtitles by the Amara.org community

Bee Beard GONE WRONG!


– [Coyote] I am
getting nervous now. – [Chris] No turning
back now buddy. – [Cameraman] You alright? – I’m getting stung a lot. Alright, gotta get ’em off. – [Chris] Go ahead
and just jump. Real hard. – They’re all on my face. My eyes! – [Narrator] From high in
the sky, the Sonoran Desert looks like an endless
expanse of rocky terrain that is speckled with cacti. Hidden amongst this
unforgiving environment exists a world of animals, many of which can be
difficult to spot. However, today is going
to be a little different, as instead of looking
for the animals, they’re literally going to be
placed right in front of us. Or in my case,
directly on my skin. – That’s a lot of bees. – [Narrator] With the goal
to prove that honey bees are not just out to sting
you, or so I thought. The crew and I headed out
to Life’s Sweet Honey Farms where I will be
working alongside bee specialist, Chris Britton. Chris and his team
specialize in safely removing bee swarms from
residential areas, honey farming, and per my
special request, bee beards. – [Chris] This
the craziest thing you’ve done this
morning, Coyote? – [Coyote] Sure is. Other
than shave off my fur beard. – [Narrator] Ah yes, the beard. I’m sure you were wondering, Coyote, what in the world
happened to your fur beard? Well, the answer
to that question is that I shaved
it off to make room for the nearly 3,000
European honey bees that will soon be
swarming all over my face. Get ready for the newest trend in facial hair
fashion, the bee beard. The following scene was
filmed on private property and under the supervision
of bee specialists. A single sting has the
potential to be fatal. Never approach a bee
hive in the wild. – Okay well, we’re gonna
start the preparation here. Chris is actually going
to apply Vaseline, you said to my nose, and
my ears, and near my eyes, so that the bees don’t go into these holes
in my face, right? – Well, you’re either gonna
look homeless with a beard or we’re gonna look like
a nice manicured beard. So this is a pseudo-queen. This is basically a
queen pheromone lure. So this is what’s going
to push those bees to actually gather somewhere because they’re actually looking
for that queen pheromone. They’ve been
separated for a while, so this is what’s gonna
actually hold them on your face. Okay, so we’re gonna put
this underneath your chin. – [Cameraman] So this is
gonna be the attractant. – This is the attractant. – Alright guys. Well I think we have reached
the final moment here. It’s either back out
or get covered by bees, and I don’t think there’s any
backing out at this point. I have the pheromone
attached to my chin. Got a GoPro here,
GoPro on my shoulder, both of your cameras going. Now wait, wait, wait, wait. Before we go through with this,
how do I get the bees off? What if something goes wrong? What do I do? – Good luck, man. I’m just gonna drive away. (Coyote laughs) Nothing’s gonna go wrong when
it comes down to the bees. If they get to the point where they are
stinging excessively, you can just shake
off real quick. – Put these in your pocket. – Epinephrine pens. Just in case this
really goes wrong. I am getting nervous now. Now I’m getting nervous. I’m Coyote Peterson and
I’m about to take on the bee beard challenge. Are you ready? – [Chris] Yep. – Okay, let’s do this. – [Chris] No turning
back now buddy. Come on girls. Come on girls, up you go. – [Cameraman] How you
feeling now Coyote? – It’s a lot of bees. It’s tough to talk. – [Cameraman] There’s a
bee right on your nose. – I feel it. – [Cameraman] That’s
a lot of bees. Are you feeling nervous? Have you been stung yet? – No stings yet. – [Cameraman] That’s good. That
means you’re remaining calm. – My leg is shaking. Stung on the lip. – [Cameraman] It’s stuck on you. You alright? Be brave. – My neck is consumed. – [Cameraman] I’m gonna
take a couple steps back. I just got stung. Right in my hand. I didn’t realize we were getting swarmed by bees this morning. – There a lot of bees on me? – You got it. You got this. – Getting stung a lot. I’ve gotten stung
about six times. Ow, my neck is
getting stung again. – This is what we
start with right here. We just get more for the
bees to start on him. Then what they’re gonna do is they’re gonna
emit a pheromone, and it’s a location pheromone, and those bees are just gonna
start basically migrating. So now I can actually just
basically hold this right here and they’re gonna all
start marching up, watch. – Are all the bees out? – [Chris] No. – My lip is swelling up. – [Chris] You’re alright. – [Cameraman] You definitely
have a full neck of bees. – I can feel them all. – [Cameraman] Are you
still getting stung? – No, not right now. – [Cameraman] So what is Coyote- – It stung the lip again! Same spot. It’s really starting to hurt. – [Cameraman] Wow, Coyote there. You are just
covered in bees man. – It’s actually turning
out pretty well. – Lip! Alright, I think I
need to get them off. – Are you okay or
you want them off? – It’s a lot of pain. – [Cameraman] But
you’ve almost got it. You’re so close. – Go ahead. – [Cameraman] You
got it, you got it. Power through, you got this. You already got
stung, you can do it. – My eyes. I’m getting stung a lot. Alright, gotta get ’em off. – [Chris] Go ahead
and just jump. Real hard. You
just knock ’em off. – They’re all on my face. My eyes! – [Cameraman] You alright? – Smoke me, I’m
getting stung a lot. – [Chris] You got
stung quite a bit. – There’s one on my hand. – [Cameraman] Oh yeah. I guess
he just stung you big time. – [Chris] You got
stung a bunch bud. – Can I walk away? Oh man, my face hurts. – [Cameraman] You
should see the sting you have in your neck. – Oh my gosh. – [Cameraman] Are you okay? – Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. – [Cameraman] Is your
tongue swelling up? The tongue is the indicator. – No, not yet, but
my face is on fire. – [Cameraman] Oh man, okay. I think we’re good now. It’s only a couple bees
and they’re just following the pheromone on your face. Hold on, you still got
stingers all in your ears. Oh my gosh. Let me see if I
can get them out. – Dude, I got stung
like so many times. All of a sudden, all at once
they started stinging my face. And on my ears. – [Cameraman] I wanna get
the stinger out of your ear. – [Chris] You okay bud? – Sorry, I was just
getting a lot of stings. – No, it’s fine buddy. You got ’em through your
shirt and everything. For some odd reason,
all of the sudden, they started just absolutely
going to town on you. You can see, look
at that right there. That actually literally… – [Cameraman] It drew blood. – [Chris] Yeah, it got
blood to the surface. You just got stung like 40
times in the face by honey bees. – [Cameraman] 40! I don’t think that was
supposed to happen Chris. – [Chris] I don’t know why. I wasn’t getting all blasted up. I mean, I got stung
like once or twice but he was literally
just getting beat up. – Oh my gosh. Dude, my face is in so
much pain right now. – [Cameraman] You alright? How’s the tongue? – Really, really painful. My tongue is not
swollen but my entire, my lips, I can’t feel my lips. – [Cameraman] Where’s Mario at? – [Chris] He’s
over there filming. – [Cameraman] Hey, tell
him to come over here. – [Chris] Hey Mario. – [Cameraman] Mario! – [Chris] He’s probably
covered up by bee sounds still. – [Cameraman] Come over here. Was it worth it? – Oh man, I can see
my lip in the lens. – [Cameraman] You don’t wanna
look at yourself right now. You don’t wanna look
in a mirror right now. – Well, I guess I better
give you some sort of outro of where I can’t talk
’cause I find that my lips are not working
properly at the moment. – [Cameraman] Alright,
I’m gonna try to be calm. Alright, go for it. – I’m gonna be calm. I think based on
the look on my face, the bee beard is not
the new fashion trend. I lasted for about
a minute and a half with my face covered
in around 3,000 bees. Once they started stinging my
lips, it got really painful. They were swarming
around my eyes. I was getting stung on my hands, on my arms, on my
forehead, on my ears, but it was definitely the lips as you can see from how
swollen they are right now that were the worst. I’d definitely say
that the bee beard was an experience
worth experiencing. So far I haven’t had any major
adverse allergic reactions other than just this
localized swelling on my hands and on my face. – [Cameraman] (laughing)
You can hardly tell. – You think this looks okay? – [Cameraman] You
can hardly tell. – I can tell you guys are
having a real hard time not laughing while we’re
trying to get this outro. We counted around two dozen
stings on my body at this point. My lips are swelling up. My eyes swelling up. As you see, the drool’s
coming out of my mouth. But I’m Coyote Peterson,
and that was the bee beard. Be brave. Stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Oh, that’s painful. – [Narrator] When it
was all said and done, we counted a total of 32 stings that spanned my face,
lips, ears, neck, and arms. The neurotoxin of the
European honey bee is very specialized
and is notorious for causing extreme
localized swelling. For me, this began immediately, and despite the
disfigured, lumpy, baked potato look of my face, I actually handled the
venom very positively, and within 48 hours, was
completely back to normal. – Now the guys have
their bee suits on and they’re gonna put the
bees back into their hives. So far, about 30
minutes have gone by. No anaphylactic shock
so I should be just fine other than the fact that my face looks like the face
of the elephant man. Now I can see in the
reflection of your glasses, it is not pretty. It is not pretty. – [Narrator] If you were
wondering how this compared to the single sting
from a bullet ant, I can honestly say it was worse. As compared to the warrior wasp, I guess we will just
have to wait and see. If you thought wearing a beard of European honey
bees was intense, wait until you see what happens when we go up against a
swarm of 30,000 killer bees to extract some wild honey. Don’t forget, subscribe so
you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

How to get rid of, kill in-ground yellow jacket wasps for good using Delta Dust ANGRY WASPS

How to get rid of, kill in-ground yellow jacket wasps for good using Delta Dust ANGRY WASPS


okay so I had a problem here we have Yellowjackets in the ground and this is in the yard of an 87 year old woman and she can’t mow or weed whack around her garden because of these little ground wasps which are Yellowjackets so I’m gonna do something different here I don’t normally use pesticides or insecticides anywhere on my own property but I had to do something definitive in this case and I did use pesticide here now it comes in a powder form this is the one-pound Delta dust and here’s the jar it is an insecticide but as insecticides go this is a very low-key Delta Mathurin point zero five percent now for those of you you’re curious about what that is that’s the same stuff that’s put on many dog and cat flea collars so it’s considered extremely safe for mammals extremely safe for people unsafe for things like these Yellowjackets now what I want to do here is because they activate when there’s vibration somebody walks by rides a mower by uses a weed whacker I wanted to get them boiling out here and I want to see really what the population is in the ground as it turns out this is a very large nest of Yellowjackets now for those of you don’t know Yellowjackets will come out in groups like this they’ll cling to your pant legs and they will steam you multiple times while they hold on and they stay in groups so Yellowjackets are very annoying and when it comes to very young people or pets or in this case an elderly woman they can be actually dangerous and I can put someone to shock so we’re dusting them up here with the Delta dust now throughout this test I used about 50% of this one-pound container I did not buy aspirator that some people use I recommend that you really don’t need that you can just cut the tip off of the bottle here and puff it right in and I found that it’s gonna give it a nice long even puff it carries quite a distance down this hole so I consider it to be probably the most effective for circumstances like this now something I do want you to notice this is not what I would call a knockdown pesticide so you’re not gonna go up to a nest of Hornets with this Delta dust and puff it and expect them to fall out of the sky and dial around you what they do do is fly out in every direction these wasps were flying a hundred feet or more as they came out of course they flew all over me I am wearing protective clothing and I also am wearing a respirator as a precaution even though the danger levels are extremely low when it comes to the risk to people so again Delta matheran is the active ingredient Delta dust is the product and what I’m showing you here is a condensed five-minute review of what actually took place over a twenty five minute time frame what I did notice is the wasps came flying out and they took off and flew to nearby trees they flew into grapevines they go in every direction so if you’re gonna walk out here without protection and puff a bunch of Delta dust into a hole you need to be prepared to get under cover somewhere you need to have some protective clothing they are going to come out now remember I did thump the ground and I agitated them a little bit if you just walked up and sprayed the dust in there I suppose the response would be much reduced but I like to get them active because I want those that are in deep shelter to come out and get through this dust and get it all over them and then I want them to carry that throughout the nest and what we’re finding is out of preservation they come out and fly away and don’t return now what was curious to the Scouts those foraging wasps that have been out are constantly returning they don’t seem affected by the dust at all and they bomb right into the hole and then ultimately they’re going to die so it’s a slow process now some people say just get a hose and get some soapy water and pour it in there well the way they construct these underground tunnel systems they’re at multi levels and if the ground is pretty absorbent which this is it’s a garden area the water that you pour in is going to miss their primary brood chambers which is what we really want to get with the desk so soap and water might be a temporary fix to knock him down it would not kill the nest unless you did it multiple times and of course covered and buried them until they died this way it works definitively their neurological systems here are going to be knocked out by this Delta matheran and as of this morning so we’re talking about 18 hours after I did this she does not see a single wasp going in or out of this hole so I would say that it worked extremely well so as a knockdown immediate killer it is not a success but as a definitive killer if you have overnight if you have plenty of time to work with it and you don’t mind that they are going to fly out while they’re covered in this powder it’s a very very effective and what I consider to be a very safe pesticide Delta dust so thanks for watching and I hope you benefitted. hope you benefited

MONSTER BUG WARS | Blood on the Forest Floor | S2E2

MONSTER BUG WARS | Blood on the Forest Floor | S2E2


The bug world is not for the feet-hearted. From the shadows, assassins strike without warning. They’re fast and they’re deadly. You can be impaled, clubbed or torn limb from limb. It’s no exaggeration beside that, this is the insect equivalent of sharp jaws. Death can be instant or drawn out. But it’s coming. (Music) The bug world is full of spies. With a license to kill. In this deadly game of high sticks espionage, any branch or leaf might be. Bug. When a hooded mantis and the Brazilian wandering spider go for the jug-killer. It’s all cloak and dagger. In the jungles of Central America, some of the deadliest predators are masters of the skies. From above or behind, the hooded mantis looks just like a leaf but if you’re a prey and it’s whirring above you, about ready to strike, it looks more like a king cobra, and its bite is just as deadly. Not only is it invisible, the hooded mantis makes other bugs disappear. Like all good spies, the hooded mantis excelles and surveillance. Two huge compound eyes, if the mantis stirious scopic vision and excellent view to a kill. It also deploys two extra long antennae, each lined with tens of thousands of highly sensitive kilo receptors. Free of debris, they pick up the fatest and the transmission. The antennae are consolated detecting chemical and physical information especially when the mantis is sizing up an opponent or prey. This is particularly important when it reaches that stage for the mantis can’t risk taking her eyes off the opponent in case they suddenly launch an attack them their own.

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)