Would you eat insects to save the world?

Would you eat insects to save the world?


Depending on who you ask,
insects are either gross or fascinating As it turns out,
they’re also incredibly nutritious surprisingly delicious and there’s a chance they could help to
alleviate world hunger and climate change Already about 2 billion people
regularly consume insects as part of their diet Beetles, caterpillars, bees, wasps and
crickets and grasshoppers are by far the most popular They’re all packed full of
protein, mono saturated fats, vitamins, minerals and fiber. Grasshoppers have as much
protein as ground beef, for example and per gram locusts contain as much
protein as lobsters, shrimp, squid and mackerel However, there’s an abundance
of insects all over the world and we could use them to feed
millions of starving people as well as ourselves. As insects are also
evolutionarily quite distant from humans they are also thought to be far less
likely to spread diseases that will affect us unlike conventional livestock Normally cattle require a lot of
food and water to maintain them and a majority of their body masses
aren’t actually edible However insects take far
less resources to grow and we can eat almost every part of them Traditional livestock also accounts for
18% of our greenhouse gas emissions If the world farmed more insects for food our carbon footprint would shrink dramatically So, chomping on a cricket and help fight against climate change too You probably think that the
texture and taste of bugs is unappetizing Weirdly, a loss of our food already
contains bug fragments Up to 1% of regular chocolate can contain tiny bug bits and there can be up to 50 aphids
per 100 grams of spinach Who knows? Maybe a sauteed spider or
barbecued beetle is tastier than you think

5 CRAZIEST INSECTS FIGHTS CAUGHT ON CAMERA

5 CRAZIEST INSECTS FIGHTS CAUGHT ON CAMERA


5 Insane Insect Fights
Hi guys! Insects are the largest and the most diverse type of animals on Earth. 1.5 million
of different kinds of insects inhabit our planet. They may be found in all environments:
they reside on the ground, in the sky and water… Often insects get mixed up in mortal
combats and even wars. Pretty much like humans do. Insects are very sophisticated killers.
Its always fascinating watching them fight. And that’s why now you are about to see
5 epic insect battles of all times. 1. Mantis VS Scolopendra
When you look at mantis you kind of think that it`s from outer space or a creature from
a horror film. Most mantis have elongated bodies that are very different from other
arthropods. It s got very flexible triangular head that almost spins on its axis, allowing
spotting approaching enemy even from behind. Some mantis grow up to 17 cm. long.
When mantis encounter their enemies, they first try to scare their opponent. They rise
in a frightening pose, spreading their wings like a kind of hand fan. They expose their
grasping legs pulling up bottoms of their bellies. Such pose usually accompanied by
a scary organic sound. If opponent seems bigger and stronger mantis prefers to fly away. But
when it feels its dominance or chances seem equal it often wins the battle.
Scolopendra. There are about 600 types of these predators. They are classified as centipedes
and the biggest specimen can be up to 30 cm. long. Scolopendra has one significant nuisance:
when disturbed these animals can cause inflammatory skin diseases. Scolopendra is a night predator
and it doesn’t feel comfortable in open space in broad daylight. Most scolopendra
are great runners but there is also a giant type that runs significantly faster than others
of its kind do. They mostly hunt for small invertebrates underground:
Larvae, earthworms and beetles but scolopendra gigantean can catch and kill a small reptile,
a frog for example, a mouse, bird, or even a small snake.
Let the battle commence. Opponents converge and both wait for a better
moment to strike. And the mantis strikes first! We are witnessing the fierce, mean battle.
Chances seem equal. One wrong move and the mantis is defeated. Scolopendra can now enjoy
a pleasant dinner. 2. Hornet VS Scorpion
There are 20 types of hornets known to man. The majority (12 types) lives in the South-East
Asia. The biggest type Is the Asian giant hornet. It can be almost 6 cm. long.
Fully grown hornets mostly feed on insects. They settle near bee houses and can do a lot
of damage killing honey bees with their sting or with their jaws. Their big and poisonous
stinger allows them attacking almost any insect in their habitat. Grasshoppers, wasps and
locusts do not have a chance against these merciless killers. The only ones who can confront
these flying monsters are the Asian bees. That is if they strike collectively. They
surround the hornet, trapping it in a kind of bee-sphere. The vibration inside the sphere
creates high temperature that could be almost 50 degrees. It is that heat that kills the
hornet. Scorpions are one of the most ancient arachnids
known to man. It can be found in many completely different parts of our planet. There are many
types of scorpions. Biologists discovered at list 1750 kinds. But only 50 of them are
poisonous and dangerous to men. Their body length varies from 1.5 to 20 cm. They can
be of almost any color. There are green, brown and even black scorpions.
Lets take a look at the fight between the hornet and a small scorpion. Hornet strikes
first. It doesn’t seem like the scorpion is ready to fight at all but it has no choice.
It tries to hit the hornet but there is not much luck there. After a while scorpion starts
using its claws. Useless. Hornet is set to win the fight. After a few more moments the
scorpion is defeated. Well, that was a small scorpion. In the future
episode you will see hornet fighting against the Emperor scorpion.
3. Hornet VS Tarantula Tarantulas are venomous and hairy. They belong
to the family of spider. Tarantula`s size varies from 2.5 up to 10 cm. They can swing
their legs as far as 30 cm. Females are always bigger and their weigh can reach whole 90
gram. They have large, deadly 1 cm long fangs. During their lifecycle tarantulas change their
natural chitinous “armor” that covers almost entire body of the spider. They feed
on smaller insects and even amphibians. Sometimes they hunt frogs.
Ok, let’s take a look at the merciless fight between the hornet and the tarantula they
call king baboon spider. Unlike the previous video this hornet doesn`t seem that active.
It`s like he`s not even trying to protect himself against the spider. Although if there
was more space to operate, we might have seen a whole different kind of battle. The spider
bites the hornet dealing a lot of damage. The cold-blooded spider slowly finishes his
prey. 4. Spider VS Scorpion
When spiders and scorpions collide, the later usually wins because of it`s heavy armor.
Spiders just can`t bite through scorpion`s protective layer. Scorpion in it`s turn easily
pierces spiders with its deadly tail. But if the spider happens to be a lot larger then
the situation changes drastically. Take a look at this unfortunate scorpion and his
massive opponent. This scorpion shouldn’t have come where he is no wanted.
5. Scorpion VS Sun spider As you already know, if a scorpion and a spider
are the same size then the scorpion would always win. But there is one exception. Sun
spider. Those spiders go by many names. Camel spider
is just one of them. Some of them are 7 cm. long! Its cephalothorax, which is his body
and head has a dismembered structure. It has two bulging eyes. They have powerful jaws
and ten legs. Sun spiders are typical predators and have
abnormal voracity. Despite the fact that these spiders are not venomous they can attack and
kill larger animals. They mostly feed on insects. Their usual diet are centipedes, termites,
scorpios and spiders as well as small rodents. Larger specimen also hunt lizards and small
birds. When up against each other, sun spider does
a very slimy trick. It pretends to run away making scorpion chase it. But the chase doesn’t
last long. The sun spider turns around swiftly and strikes the scorpion before it has a chance
to bounce off. Spider hits the deadliest part – scorpion`s tail. Now the scorpion is disarmed
and seems to be no longer dangerous. But it isn`t over just yet. The scorpion tries to
shake off the spider and release his tail from the spider`s grab. It`s useless. Sun
spider holds it for a few minutes. When scorpion loses all his power, the spider begins devour
his inattentive opponent. Do you guys wanna know about the black widow`s
fighting technique? Well then don’t miss upcoming episodes, press the like button and
subscribe! That`s all for now folks, thank you so much for watching, bye-bye!

How To Treat Vaginal Yeast Infection At Home | Natural Remedy

How To Treat Vaginal Yeast Infection At Home | Natural Remedy


Yeast infections are about as common as creeping on your ex’s instagram page. This topic is repeatedly googled as most of us are ashamed to admit we’ve been visited by the yeaster bunny, and this one ain’t bringing no marzipan eggs. So let’s lay out the big ‘Y’ bare on the table because there’s a lot we need to discuss. Yeast Infections are caused by the overgrowth of Candida Albicans, which sounds like a wizarding name from Harry Potter, only it isn’t half as magical, because it refers to the overgrowth of a fungus living in our vagina which results in irritation, inflammation, itchiness, and also painful discharge. You can develop the yeasties from uncontrolled diabetes, hormonal imbalances, sex, and even a reaction to certain antibiotics. While there are a gazillion over-the-counter solutions people are turning to trusty ol’ coconut oil! Coconut oil has been used for centuries and studies show that it’s antibacterial nature is what kills the fungi. Get em’ boy! To treat it, get pure organic coconut oil and look for the 100% surety mark. The real stuff won’t smell too coconutty. Wash and dry the affected area thoroughly, apply an oil soaked cotton ball to the infected region and leave on for 20 minutes! That’s a good amount of time to kill so make sure you grab a magazine, or hey! just resort to instagram, you’ve still got that ex to stalk! If you aren’t a 100% sure that what you’ve got is a yeast infection, are already on medication for it, or getting it too frequently, we do not recommend glazing your privates like a takeaway doughnut, so do this under the right circumstances! So if you’re friends ask you why you’re walking funny, bravely tell them who’s come a-knocking because chances are, their remedies are even better than the one we have here! Until next time, stay tuned and stay Glamrs.

Infections and Birth Defects (NIH, 1966)

Infections and Birth Defects (NIH, 1966)


[A woman walks up to a medical clinic.] [Narrator:] Today in the United States, one pregnancy in five fails to produce a living, healthy child 126,000 mentally retarded children are born each year. Millions more suffer from various defects. Infections are among the preventable causes of abortions, stillbirths, and damaged infants. Research on the relationship between infections and birth defects is the major assignment of the Section on Infectious Diseases, Perinatal Research Branch, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness. The section works directly with other institutes, including Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Child Health and Human Development, all within the federal government’s Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. A number of infections can cause abnormal pregnancy outcomes. These include rubella, cytomegalic inclusion disease, rubeola, mumps, herpes simplex disease, western equine encephalitis, chicken pox, smallpox, gloxinia, polio, hepatitis, Coxsackie B virus, influenza, syphilis, tuberculosis, toxoplasmosis. The Perinatal Research Branch serves as research headquarters for 14 medical centers throughout the nation which participate with the Neurology Institute in the Collaborative Perinatal Research Project, a study of birth defect causes. This young woman, Mrs. Owens, represents one of 50,000 mothers who, with their infants, are taking part in this collaborative project. In addition to infections, genetic, obstetrical, and other perinatal factors will be considered in the study. Mrs. Owens will give blood at intervals to aid in the study of infections of pregnancy. Her child will contribute smaller amounts of sera at specified intervals. Each time Mrs. Owens’ blood is taken, 40 ml is collected in two 20 ml vacutainer tubes. The specimens provided by Mrs. Owens are allowed to clot at room temperature. Then, placed in a refrigerator overnight to provide maximal retraction of the clot. This procedure allows the technicians to obtain a maximal yield of serum, that fraction of the blood containing the reactive particles to be studied. Tubes are ringed to loosen the clot prior to separating clot from serum in the centrifuge. Specimens are spun for 15 minutes at 2,000 revolutions per minute in a refrigerated centrifuge. [Samples are removed from the centrifuge.] Next, a technician employs a 20 or 25 ml pipette to pull the serum from the two tubes into a single container. [The technician examines the solution inside the long glass tube.] The serum is then transferred to four 1 gram vials. The contents of each vial can be used several times for different tests. The blue line indicates a critical 3 ml mark. If filled beyond this mark, the vial might break during freezing or thawing. Packets of sera are stored at minus 15 to minus 20 degrees centigrade. Cartons are filled with the packets. Fifty pounds of dry ice will keep the specimens frozen for four days, even at summer temperatures. Shipments are made to the Serum Center, Section on Infectious Disease, Bethesda, Maryland. The specimens are logged in by coding clerks at the Serum Center. Each specimen is checked for quantity and quality. Good quality frozen serum is straw-colored. Records are prepared. The packets are placed in aluminum trays, then they are stored at minus 20 degrees Centigrade in one of the four Serum Center freezers. More than one million specimens are available for testing. Priorities for study are determined at staff conferences. For example, during the German measles epidemics, rubella virus was investigated extensively. As a result of the staff conference, statistical personnel using the records in the Serum Center, select the sera of patients to be tested. A tally sheet prepared after the selection enabled personnel to locate the sera. The vials to be tested are taken from their trays, placed in polystyrene blocks and transported to the laboratory. These lightweight polystyrene blocks, tailored to the needs of the section, each hold up to 200 vials. A micro-technique has been perfected to simplify, extend, and speed up the testing. It employs smaller tools, smaller test amounts, yet gives reliable results. With countless blood tests to perform, ordinary procedures would not be feasible. When the vials of sera have thawed, an automatic diluting machine mixes one part of thawed serum with three parts of saline. The dropper takes up the serum, then flushes it out with the saline. In preparation for the test, each cup in this disposable plastic plate receives a drop of saline solution. Long-handled loops calibrated to pick up .025 ml of solution are dipped into the various sera specimens. Several loops can be handled simultaneously. Each contains a different specimen. One of the loops holds the solution made from the sera contributed by Mrs. Owens. The stylus of each loop is rotated in the fingertips to ensure good mixing. The loops carry solution from one row to another for serial dilutions. Specific antigen is added by pipette. A drop measures .025 ml. Mumps antigen, for example, is added. By using different antigens derived from various microorganisms, the section is testing for more than 100 infections, which are of importance to man, to determine to what extent they may contribute to birth defects. The red line marks a serum control which receives no antigen. This will pick up false positive reactions. Few false-positive reactions occur. Next, complement is added to the antibody/antigen mixture. Complement is a substance that takes part in the reaction of antibody with antigen and provides an indirect measurement of the reaction. The plates are refrigerated at 4 degrees Centigrade for 16 to 18 hours. This gives time for the fixation of complement, if any, to take place. If Mrs. Owens’ sera has mumps antibodies, evidence that she has been exposed to this virus, the antibodies would react with the antigen. At the same time, complement is being fixed, or used up as part of the reaction. Next day, sensitized sheep red blood cells are added with a .05 ml dropper. They will provide a way to detect whether complement remains in the test solution or has been fixed. The plates are sealed with a press, taken to a 37 degrees centigrade walk-in incubator, and placed in the shaking machine for 15 minutes. After shaking, the plates remain in the incubator for an additional 30 minutes. A sedimentation period of four hours at room temperature is routine to allow any red cells that were not broken up, or lysed, by unfixed complement to settle. A centrifuge speeds up the process of concentrating intact cells. The test plates are ready to read. Infection is evident when the reaction between antibody and antigen fixes complement, then complement is not free to lyse the red cells. As a result, the positive test appears as a button of red cells. In a negative test, there is no such accumulation of intact red cells. They are broken up, and the liquid appears pink. The more diluted samples had less antibody and a less-apparent button of red cells. In a positive test, the button is decidedly visible. The data on infections is a vital part of the mother’s history. Other variables, such as age, number of previous pregnancies, manner of delivery, also are recorded. The IBM cards become masses of information to be fed into modern electronic computers. These can give answers in days that formerly would have taken months to acquire. The computers enable scientists to correlate millions of bits of information…to view related events from new perspectives. However, the judgment of highly trained investigators is essential in analyzing this data on birth abnormalities correctly. The section of infectious diseases conducts a number of related studies employing a variety of test methods. For example, the fluorescent antibody technique permits the viewer to see fluorescent-labeled antibody attached to specific antigen. Ultraviolet light excites the fluorescence. Literally, spotlighting the reaction. Tissue cultures of placenta and cord are studied to detect pathogenic effects of viruses. A characteristic pattern of cell destruction identifies certain viruses. Animals are studied, including ferrets, and monkeys. Pregnant Rhesus monkeys are injected with rubella virus or other agents to determine at what stage in development of the fetus effects might be observed. An infant monkey is delivered by cesarean to see whether virus can be recovered from organs or if defects are occurring. Mrs. Owens and other mothers participating in the study, the laboratory workers, hospital and clerical personnel, special testing procedures, all are a part of the research story on infections and birth defects. The accomplishments of this research and of the overall perinatal studies will become part of medical communications useful to family doctors, obstetricians, pediatricians, and other specialists throughout the world.

Ant colony raids a rival nest – Natural World – Empire of the Desert Ants – BBC Two

Ant colony raids a rival nest – Natural World – Empire of the Desert Ants – BBC Two


The corral colony sins in a raiding party It’s a fast coordinated attack The smaller colony doesn’t stand a chance The spoils of war are dragged out into the sunlight Not everyone gives up without a struggle But resistance is futile in the face of such overwhelming odds Nothing is left behind Eggs larvae workers pupae all carried back to the corral nest Loaded with honey, the repeats are the most valuable plunder of all Some are dismembered and drained underground Others are dragged to the surface and hauled back to the victors nest But they can be a real challenge to maneuver across no-man’s land This is how most clashes between honey ant colonies are played out Invariably the winner is the one that has the superior numbers Sometimes captured broods are added to the victorious colonies nursery to be raised as their own But not here not today Everything pillaged from the raided nest is processed for long-term storage The difficulty with captured honey pots is getting at the honey The workers are forced to chew through the body Removing the head and thorax leaving behind an open barrel to be drained at leisure The raid couldn’t have come at a better time It’s filled the corral colonies Ladas ensuring its 2000 inhabitants Will be well fed through the approaching winter But just as importantly a rival nest that could have threatened the Queen’s reign has been eliminated

Magnetic Termites: Leading You Out of the Australian Outback

Magnetic Termites: Leading You Out of the Australian Outback


Hi Guys. I am Trisha with Insectopia here to talk to
you about magnetic termites. These termites build tall mounds that some
people say bear a resemblance to headstones. They build them in plains and they all face
the same direction. Mostly North-South, which is where they get
the name magnetic. But why in the world would they build a mound
that is 9-12 feet high with a North/South axis of 7 feet, and an East/West axis of only
3 feet? The leading hypothesis for their North/South
orientation is, temperature control. In the early morning the termites spend their
time on the east wall to warm up. By noon, when the day is hottest and the sun
is directly overhead in the Australian Outback, the termite mound is thin so the mound does
not have a large amount of surface area that the sun can heat. As the day is ending, the mound can pick up
enough heat to make it through the night. How does this help you? Well, now with the knowledge that the termite
mounds are built North to South. The next time that you are lost and wandering
around the Australian Outback and you run into one of these mounds, you will have a
50/50 shot at picking North instead of walking around completely lost. Before we dive into this mound, I want to
clear up a common misconception. Termites are eusocial cockroaches. Let’s try to clear this up a little, termites
are a kind of cockroach and are closer related to grasshoppers, praying mantids, and walking
sticks than they are to ants. This has to do with termites having an incomplete
metamorphosis and ants having a complete metamorphosis. Now, let’s look inside of this mound. In each mound there are varying ages of individuals
from eggs to adults and the individuals are specialized for different jobs. These special groups of individuals are called
castes. The 5 castes are: queen, king, soldier, worker,
and reproductive. The life cycle of a termite mound goes something
like this: The queen lays every egg in the colony and
is the mother to every individual in the colony other than the king. The eggs are cared for by the workers. In fact, the workers do all of the hard work
in the colony. They clean and repair the nest, gather food
and water, care for the young, construct the tunnels and galleries, and control the numbers
of soldiers and reproductives by killing and eating them based on chemical cues. The workers are very busy. Every single worker in the termite mound is
a nymph and most of them will stay nymphs for their entire life. These insects never molt into adulthood! It is as if most termites live in Peter Pan’s
Neverland. The lucky few individuals that come into adulthood
turn into either soldiers or reproductives. The soldiers have large mandibles and it is
their job to protect the colony. The reproductives gain wings and will wait
around in the colony until the external conditions are right so that they can go on a mating
flight. On a mating flight, a reproductive female
and a reproductive male will mate and become a king and queen. They will land on the ground and shed their
wings. The queen will find an ideal location to start
a colony. At that point, it is the king’s job to tend
for the colony and the eggs until there are workers to do these jobs. The king will stay by the side of the queen
in her chamber for the rest of his life. The queen will become as large as a human
index finger and lay an egg every 3 seconds. She actually becomes so large that she is
no longer able to move or leave the chamber that she is in. The workers will carry the eggs to another
chamber and care for them. This is how the cycle starts anew. These are real life pictures of the magnetic
termite’s mounds. This is what a termite looks like in real
life. On the left you can see an egg on the right
you can see a worker. On the left you can see a soldier and on the
right you can see a reproductive. On this final slide you can see a queen. Thank you for listening! If you have any questions about magnetic termites
or a thought on which caste you would be if you were a termite, let us know in the comment
section below! Make sure to like, comment, and subscribe
for more videos like this one. I will be posting videos frequently. Come and check out our next epic insect tale.

Greek Weekly Words – Bugs and Insects

Greek Weekly Words – Bugs and Insects


hello my name is Eleni and 52-degree
quickly worlds together so let’s discover together what is the
theme for this week bugs and insects Melissa B yes in Greece we have a lot of
medicine so we had a lot of bees because we have a lot of bees we are eating a
lot of honey a pv acumen polis mary says drama polymerase in eleven
I love bees Miramichi and there are a lot on the countryside of Greece they
bite you too much and so I’m a little bit scared of the red ants that Coquina
media Kate Amara Mir media the red ant and the black ant kunape mosquito during
summer i suffer from mosquitoes cata TV RK – kal aquario Ipoh pharaoh Apodaca
nokia in greece we have a lot of mosquitoes cats Areva cockroach so
increase we are doing twice a year we are doing this asking for a professional
antique cockroach or Hakan we can call it just to disinfect all the building
via forest or on local my apollomon see to act eerie oh it’s polka the Kias Lajo
yet scott Erebus Pascal it’sa ladybug when I was a
children I love ladybugs until one day I just crush one in my
hand so since then when I see our ladybug I’m just keep some distance so
basically some pastelito a pathologist in a polymer face upon McCrea the
ladybugs are sweet or are very beautiful from a distance thank you very much for
watching us you can let your comment if you want to tell us to share with us
what is your preferable insect or which one you are afraid of and if you want to
learn more Greek words please check out our website in Greek bored 101.com thank
you very much for watching us bye

About termite damage to structural timbers

About termite damage to structural timbers


These are eastern subterranean swarmers. These are the caste of termites that people see when they have a termite problem. Termites live a cryptic life and the only caste you’ll see outside of the galleries are the swarmers or slates. Termites swarmers differ from carpenter ant swarmers, or any other ant for that matter, as they have wings of equal length

Most DANGEROUS Bugs Around The World!

Most DANGEROUS Bugs Around The World!


From bullet ants to mosquitos, here are 9
of the deadliest insects in the world! Those deeply afraid of creepy crawlies beware! 9. Bullet Ant Known as the World’s Most Painful Insect,
getting bitten by a bullet ant is something you never want to experience. Native to the rainforests of Central and South
America, the small but powerful bullet ant is also known as the hormiga veinticuatro
meaning the “24-hour ant” which refers to the full day of pain that follows after
being stung. Only a little over an inch in length, it is
hard to believe that their sting can feel like getting shot with a bullet. Dr. Justin Schmidt, an entomologist and research
director of the Southwest Biological Institute in Tucson Arizona, invented the Schmidt Sting
Pain Index (SSPI) which categorizes the level of pain felt when stung by wasps, bees, and
ants. He let himself get stung by all kinds of insects
in order to rank their sting. He said that it really felt like getting hit
by a bullet with waves of burning pain that were absolutely excruciating and went on for
hours. The good thing is that it is a localized effect
and this sting does not directly affect your heart or lungs, so you won’t die from it
but it will hurt like a bi-atch. These ants are greatly feared across the rainforest
by people and animals alike. However there are several indigenous tribes
that use these ants in their initiation rituals. Young boys wishing to be seen as men by the
tribes must endure placing their hand in a woven glove filled with these ants. They must endure getting stung repeatedly
for at least ten minutes. If that wasn’t enough, the boy must sometimes
go through over a dozen of these rituals! None of them suffer long term effects although
the trauma may last forever. 8. Japanese Giant Hornets The highly aggressive and territorial Japanese
giant hornets are infamous for their painful sting and fearsome nature. A subspecies of the Asian giant hornet, these
monsters are much larger than normal hornets and are known to hunt and consume up to 50
unfortunate honey bees a day. As if honey bees didn’t already have enough
problems… The creatures which are rapidly becoming a
pest have now made nests in France and England and due to poor shipping practices, are spreading
across the globe. Their venom is known to destroy red blood
cells and those with allergic reactions are especially at risk of death. The Japanese giant hornets kill 30-40 people
in Japan alone every year, and send hundreds to hospital. Its venom attacks the nervous system and damages
the tissue of its victims. The stings can also cause renal failure. The giant hornets are attracted to human sweat,
alcohol, and sweet flavors and smells. They are especially sensitive when animals
or people run and they will start to swarm and attack. Some victims have required hundreds of stitches
and numerous dialysis treatments to survive and are still are left with deep scars. These hornets have lead to government initiatives
to destroy the nests in Japan and China, and maybe they have the right idea? These aggressive insects are pretty scary. 7. Fleas The hidden villain of the famous black death
that ravaged Europe during the Middle Ages, the flea feeds on blood and can spread diseases
to animals and humans. Capable of leaping 150 times their own height
they can move from animal to animal to consume 15 times their own body weight every single
day. The bubonic plague was spread by fleas carrying
the disease on-board infected rats and some estimates say it wiped out close to 2/3rds
of the population of Europe at the time. Though some might say that is was not the
fleas but the infectious bacteria they carried which made it difficult for the creatures
to feed. Therefore they would regurgitate infectious
materials on the host. In fact, the disease still survives in many
flea infested parts of the world, though it is much more easily treated today. Though the black plague changed the entire
face of Medieval history, modern fleas can still infect humans with diseases such as
typhus and are still common among the quickly breeding rat populations. Flea bites can cause disastrous allergic reactions
on both pets and humans alike due to the saliva that they leave behind after the attack itself. In most cases the only real stress is avoiding
the very itchy swollen bite marks and dealing with the infestation quickly as fleas can
lay over 50 eggs in a single day! 6. Tarantula Hawk Wasp This insect is the only other bug to reach
a 4 on the SSPI scale along with the bullet ant. The tarantula hawk is a solitary wasp that
wanders around looking for tarantulas. The goal of the tarantula hawk’s sting is
to get a predator such as a bird or a lizard to let it go. The pain from a tarantula hawk is like getting
shocked with a high-voltage electric line in a wind storm. The super intense blast is meant to surprise
and the pain only lasts for about 3 minutes. It might seem like longer if you are screaming
in agony but after a few minutes, it is suddenly gone. However if you are a tarantula, this sting
will not only shock but paralyze. The wasp will then lay a single egg inside
the tarantula’s body. When the larvae hatches it will began feeding
on the tarantula, avoiding vital organs for as long as possible so the tarantula stays
alive. For the rest of us, tarantula hawk wasps rarely
sting without provocation but geez, nature you scary! 5. Botfly The botfly though rarely fatal, makes this
list for the parasitic horror show it unleashes on it’s mammal victims. Last chance to preserve the innocence of your
dreams as the human hunting botfly allows its eggs to grow in human skin which burrow
deep and eventually develop into larvae which can be felt under the skin. They do this by catching a mosquito as host
and then implanting it with the bot fly’s eggs, which when they go to feed on a mammal
(and in many cases human), the eggs fall into the open wound. This insect horror show can cause the victim
to feel the larvae within the skin, squirming when their airway is blocked. Thankfully this species have the decency to
not have too large populations and live in many parts of Central and South America. They are usually treated with petroleum jelly
over the wound, which suffocates the invaders so that they can be removed with tweezers. Only one type of botflie routinely targets
humans but others can as well, though they usually target the intestines such as the
ones that specialize in horses. Some other animals can become easily infected
by the bacteria or other conditions and die soon after. 4. Killer Bees Widely known and feared, the Africanized honey
bee or killer bee has certainly earned its fearsome reputation. Though their sting is just as deadly as an
average honeybee, they are supremely aggressive, sending many from the colony to repeatedly
sting any perceived threats. In fact, they are so relentless they will
sometimes completely abandon the hive as the entire colony pursues an enemy, leaving the
nest completely unprotected. Deaths from bee swarms are disturbingly more
common in this species of bee. They were created in the 1950´s when Brazilian
scientists cross-bred the southern African honey bee with the European honeybee in an
attempt to create a bee that was more suited to the South American climate. Some bees were accidently released into the
wild in 1957 and had no problem breeding and multiplying throughout the Americas. They have since bred with many other colonies
of bees and are beginning to spread across North America as their African honeybee DNA
allows them to quickly build hives and grow their population. Unfortunately they have also inherited the
aggressive personality as well. These killer bees have been know to respond
viciously to simple things such as noises and even vibrations from vehicles, equipment,
and pedestrians. The good thing is that as bee species continue
to decline, more bees are good news for the flowers of the area. 3. Kissing Bugs Not nearly as innocent as they sound, the
kissing bug is incredibly deadly because of its tendency to spread the terrible Chagas
disease to human populations. Infected with a parasite that causes the disease,
they feed on blood during the night and at the same time transfer the parasites to humans. They get their name from their tendency to
bite humans near the blood vessel-rich areas of the eyes or lips, though this typically
isn’t the kind of makeout people are looking for. A little larger than the size of a penny,
they are mostly found in warm climates, such as the Southern US. I used to live in Florida and saw these all
the time but I didn’t know they carried diseases! The chagas disease that they spread has two
distinct stages, the first in which common symptoms such as muscle aches, rash, vomiting
and other such symptoms may or may not manifest. The second is the chronic stage, which affects
30% of the infected and can cause enlarged heart, and heart rate conditions. Good news is that this stage can take years
to develop, sometimes close to twenty, so if you can make it you’re laughing as you´ve
outlived your attacker by at least twenty times as they tend to have a one year lifecycle. If you suspect you´ve been effected there
are support centres to which you can send the bug if you can find it to ensure proper
treatment. 2. Locusts The name locust summons images of swarms of
flying insects that raze everything in site until only nothing is left. This plague however is all too real. They are very similar in many ways to grasshoppers
though their tendency to gather in large groups is what truly makes them a menace. The main damage isn´t directly to humans
ourselves, but a huge swarm can descend on a farm and devour everything in sight. Crops, grass and even clothes can disappear
forever within the giant cloud and lead to mass starvation for the communities affected.These
clouds can stretch hundreds of miles across and consume millions of pounds of plants every
day, in a vicious feeding frenzy made up of billions of locusts. Their telltale buzzing sound is the fear of
farmers the world over, yet many quickly scramble to construct large fires as the smoke can
debilitate a swarm. Interestingly, the locusts are a delicacy
in some parts of the world and their bodies can help make up for the lost food they consumed. Considered a natural plague by some the desert
variety is especially known for destroying the little crops that can be grown and are
known to move large distances in search for food. In fact one particular swarm was noted for
traveling all the way from Northern Africa to the island of Great Britain! 1. Mosquito The bane of fishing and camping trips alike
this seemly minor annoyance is in fact not only the most deadly insect but one of the
most deadly creatures on the entire planet. They accomplish this by spreading diseases
such as Zika, West Nile and Malaria where they can cripple a human population, especially
in areas where medical treatment is unavailable. Interestingly mosquitos feed mostly on plant
nectars but the females use blood to help their eggs grow and can consume up to three
times her own weight in blood to nourish them. Though this blood is easily replenished in
most working bodies, the diseases that the mosquito can spread are numerous and deadly. They are attracted to and lay their eggs where
there is still water, such as flooded sinks or buckets and can locate human targets by
sensing the Carbon Dioxide we exhale. They can even sense our body heat to know
exactly where to draw blood! At around 210 million years old as a species,
they have been feeding on Dino-DNA long before humans ever entered the scene. In fact, Alexander the Great was believed
to have died of malaria which is famously spread by mosquitoes and kills more than a
million people a year. As it turns out dragonflies may be our best
friends as they hunt hundreds of the mosquitos per hunt and some places even release them
into the wild as natural mosquito control. Thanks for watching. What insect are you the most afraid of? Be sure to subscribe and see you next time!

5 Most Beautiful Insects You Won’t Believe Are Real

5 Most Beautiful Insects You Won’t Believe Are Real


5 Beautiful Insects You Won’t Believe Are
Real. Number 5. Dactylotum bicolor looks like it’s one of
those “paint-by-numbers” projects with all those amazing colors! In reality though, it’s called a Rainbow Grasshopper
or Painted Grasshopper. Native to the United States, Canada and northern
Mexico, this grasshopper grows to an average length of about 20 mm (0.8 in) for males and
35 mm (1.4 in) for females. It is mainly black with distinctive reddish
and yellowish markings, a pale green prothorax and pale green wingpads. The tibia of the hind leg bears six to eight
spines, and this species does not develop wings and is unable to fly. Number 4. The spiny Flower Mantis, or Pseudocreobotra
wahlbergii, is a beautiful and colorful flower mantis with natural range in sub-Saharan Africa. They are white with orange and green stripes,
and as adults they have a beautiful patch of color on their wings that looks like an
eye. An easy way to tell males from females is
to look at the length of their wings: A female’s wings will reach to the end of her abdomen,
while a male’s wings will extend past it. Number 3. There are a number of Ruby-tailed wasp species
that look very similar and are difficult to tell apart. They’re all beautifully coloured, with red,
blue, green and bronze metallic colours. These wasps are solitary, meaning they don’t
live in large social nests. Being barely 10mm in length, they can be difficult
to spot. You can often see them running restlessly
over walls and tree trunks, constantly using their downward-curving antennae to pick up
the scent of their host insect. As a parasite they require another species
for part of their life cycle, Chrysis ignita mainly parasitizes mason bees and other solitary
bees. Number 2. Maratus speciosus, sometimes called the coastal
peacock spider, is an Australian species of jumping spider. They are only known to inhabit the vegetation
of the coastal sand dunes of southwestern Western Australia. Like other Maratus spiders, the males of the
species engage in a courtship display during which they raise their third pair of legs
and their abdomen, presenting their colorful opisthosomal plate
to potential female partners. Unlike other Maratus, however, the males of
this species have a set of bright orange hairs (setae) along both edges of the opisthosoma
which only become visible during this display. Number 1. Greta oto may sound like the name of a silent
movie star from Eastern Europe but is in fact the scientific name for one of the most exquisite,
and little known, species of butterfly on the planet. This butterfly’s claim to fame is that its
wings, spanning up to six centimeters, are almost completely transparent. That’s right, you can see just about right
through them. The common English name for this remarkable
butterfly is glasswing, which in itself speaks volumes about the appearance of this small
but unusual insect. However, it takes the romance languages to
step in and give the butterfly the name which, for many, suits it best. The Spanish name for the glasswing is “espejitos”. Literally translated, this means little mirrors. Just a glance at the insect in question and
one can imagine the thrill of pleasure when the moment of inspiration that came to its
Hispanic name giver.