Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants

Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants


Now speaking of incredible workings happening
underground, there’s a new plot of soil in the Antiverse which houses a few creatures
that I am positive you guys will truly marvel at, creatures that I have yet to feature on
this channel, and I can’t wait to show our new incubating creatures. Please subscribe to my channel and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! AC Family, the utter beasts that lay hidden
within this container were unlike anything I have ever seen before in my life, gargatuans
creatures that I am certain will leave you in awe… either that, or make you grimmace
in disgust! Either way, I can’t wait to show you these
true natural wonders of the animal kingdom, so keep on watching until the end, as we uncover
the secret lives of these major players of the world’s forests. Khepri, Khepri, Ra, Ra, Ra
Soon to be this depicted god. In the soil, they wait and grow,
to become the creatures we all know, Make up more than a quarter,
of all we’ve discovered, In next week’s video,
they shall be uncovered. This was the riddle I left for you guys in
last week’s hidden video for anyone who wanted to take a stab at what our mystery creatures
were, featured in this week’s video, and turns out… Many of you hit the nail on the head, as I
knew AC Family would! Beetles as a group of insects, form the order
Coleoptera with about 400,000 species, making it the largest of all taxonomic orders, making
up a whopping 25% of all known animal life-forms we’ve ever discovered! Can you believe that of all the animals we’ve
ever documented, a quarter of them are beetles? If aliens were to study and survey the animals
of the planet Earth, it wouldn’t be surprising to me if they named Earth “Planet of the Beetles”. So, I’m pleased to announce that the newest
inhabitants of the Antiverse are beetles, but not just any beetles. They happen to be my favourite beetles in
the whole world: Scarab beetles! Scarab beetles, belonging to the family Scarabaeidae,
consists of over 30,000 species of beetles worldwide. Khepri, is an Egyptian god of creation with
the head of a scarab beetle. Chances are you’ve seen a scarab beetle at
least once in your life. Some of the well-known scarab beetles are
Japanese beetles, dung beetles, June beetles, rose chafers, Hercules beetles, and Goliath
beetles. But today, AC Family, the scarab beetles I’ll
be introducing to you are nothing less than epic! But first, the reason they’ve come to the
Antiverse! I opened my superworm farm last week and discovered
that it was empty. All that was left was an adult superworm,
a.k.a. a darkling beetle, but looking at the darkling beetle crawling across my hand, something
came to me. You see I had been thinking of what I could
possibly feed my ants for Canadian Thanksgiving which recently passed last weekend. I wanted to give them something other than
the ordinary superworms they were used to eating, something fatter and much more meatier. So I called up some beetle friends of mine,
and low and behold, so arrived this ominous container, which was allegedly full of fattened,
scarab beetle larvae collected from native forest soils, a beetle known to locals as
“salagubang”, the species: Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, the Siamese Rhinoceros beetle! These beetles can allegedly reach a whopping
length of 3.5–7 centimetres, which is massive. They are sexually dimorphic. The females are smaller, while males are larger
and have big rhino-like horns which can vary in size and shape, used to battle each other
for females and territory. I bet, the larvae of these Rhinoceros beetles
were just fat and juicy, the perfect Thanksgiving treats for my ants. Ahhh! I was so excited and nervous all at once to
peek inside! Upon arrival I immediately opened the container,
and saw the container was filled to the brim with digging medium. But, no… patience… I wasn’t going to harvest the beetle grubs
just yet. I promised myself to wait for Thanksgiving
Day before offering my ants, the fattened feasts they deserved. It was the morning of Canadian Thanksgiving,
and though I live in a completely different country on the opposite side of the planet,
I still celebrate Thanksgiving, and was eager to finally give my ants of the Antiverse their
fat, juicy turkeys, a.k.a. the scarab beetle grubs! But AC Family, I wasn’t ready to see what
I was about to see upon opening their container. Look! Mushrooms had sprouted in just two days since
the container’s arrival. And guys, it turns out those little black
pellets are the beetle grubs’ frass. Their droppings, which are super nutrient
rich for plants and I suppose mushrooms… hey! Did you guys see that movement? There must be a beetle grub now! I took my tweezers and tried to sift through
the soil for a beetle grub. Nothing. Alright, seriously though it’s time to dig
out these scarab beetle grubs! AC Family, let’s do this! I put on some gloves because I was told these
beetle grubs can bite with their powerful mandibles and it can hurt! I carefully sifted through the surface. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t a bit
scared scraping through the soil like this! Suddenly, I hit something! A grub? No, a piece of wood. False alarm! Now, while digging, I decided to also collect
and store some of this frass-filled soil, because I could use it in the future as a
growing medium for terrariums and plants. In fact, you can buy insect frass in bags
for gardening. As mentioned, insect frass is jam-packed with
nutrients for plants. Comes to show you these beetles are super
essential in the forests they are part of as they recycle dead plants to nourish the
living plants. I continued to dig. I wasn’t sure how big these beetle grubs were
nor how many there were, but the whole time my heart was racing! Aside from the fear of being bitten, I’m also
mildly vermiphobic, and the sight of worms or anything worm-like, mini-snakes and legless
lizards excluded, make me shudder, and TBH, based on what I imagined these rhino beetle
larvae looked like, I knew I was going to initially be repulsed at first sight. But before I knew it, something shiny and
white caught my eye. We found one! OMG! Look at it! My jaw dropped to the floor. It was huge, fat, and curled up into a ball. Wow! Look at its body shape, and check out that
red head and massive mandibles. Indeed, it was unlike anything I’ve ever seen
before. I checked the back and underside of the beast. My ants were going to enjoy this giant morsel! It was time to prepare the ant turkey. I washed the grub clean with water, and it
flinched at every squirt, I held the creature in my hand. For such a big and scary beast, it sure didn’t
put up much of a fight. Alright, the grub was now ready for the execution
block. The first ant colony I planned on feeding
was my largest and hungriest of all, the Fire Nation. I knew this beetle grub would be enough to
feed my ravenous colony of fire ants for at least two days. I estimated that this fat larva had the equivalent
of at least two or three cockroaches. And as I do with all prey insects, I was to
put the creature out of its misery before feeding it to the ants. I took the execution scissors, still caked
with the dried blood and guts of previously killed prey insects. My plan was to split it in half so the ants
could easily get into the grub’s insides. Here we go… 1… 2… 3… Sorry, guys. 3! No…. I stood there motionless for a moment. My hand was frozen and defiant, unwilling
to close down. I watched the helpless beetle grub, curled
up in fetal position, awaiting its fate at the blades of my scissors. Ahhhh my heart… I couldn’t… I could not follow through with the execution. I withdrew my scissors and picked up beetle
grub with a heavy heart. I placed it back into the container. What was I going to do? It suddenly was no longer a vile beast to
my eyes, but in a strange way had become… well, cute! AC Family, how about you guys? Doesn’t it suddenly look real endearing to
you. The shift of perception was completely unexpected,
and with this new context, my plans had suddenly changed completely. They were to join our Antiverse as inhabitants. Behold, a simple container I bought from a
department store. It was to become the sacred home and growing
chamber of our rhinoceros beetles. Apparently, these grubs need at least 10 cm
x 10 cm x 10 cm of space, and it is allegedly better to keep the beetles singly because
they may fight and lethally puncture each other with their sharp mandibles. This container was perfect. I also modified the cover to create a much
more open top and airy sides. Next, I had to add the beetle larva’s food. Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, happen to
be notorious pests in coconut farms in the Philippines where I live, as they prey on
the wood and roots of coconut trees, living or decaying, and it just so happens that my
neighbourhood is abundant in coconut trees. So, I took a walk down the street, found a
pile of decaying coconut wood, and harvested this favoured rhino beetle larva food. I couldn’t wait to put our growing chamber
together, AC Family! I placed some decaying coconout wood at the
bottom of the chamber. It was amazing to think that these rhino beetle
larvae actually eat and grow into gigantic beetles, subsisting entirely on decaying wood. This blew my mind! It also meant that the larvae had within their
gut, the necessary microbiota to allow them to properly digest and acquire nutrition from
the cellulose in the wood, much like termites do! Many animals cannot digest this stuff! But these beetle larvae can. After this initial layer of decaying wood
was set in place, next I was going to add their main growing medium. This brick of coco peat, also purchased at
a department store, can be found in most home and gardening stores. It’s really cool, because all you need to
do is soak the brick in water and it instantly expands and becomes great growing medium for
epiphytic plants, and well in our case, rhinoceros beetles! I packed this coco peat into the growing chamber. The beetle larva may also very well, find
this coco peat to be a tasty food, as well. I then added another layer of decaying coconut
wood, then pack it off with another layer of coco peat. And volia our new rhino beetle larva growing
chamber – a dedicated, double food layered catacomb in which the beetle larva can grow
and develop into adulthood in peace. What do you guys think of it? I placed the modified cover back on and proceeded
to do the exact same thing, to prepare 10 other growing chambers. I returned to the container and set the growing
chamber on the ground, removed the cover, and carefully went to pick up the larva we
had found, and place it inside its new home. The larva lay motionless. I admired the neat auburn hairs that covered
the larva’s entire body, as well as those reddish spots running down the body, and that
rear end though, looking crazy extra-terrestrial to me! But it wasn’t long before our rhino beetle
baby began to move, and began to move the soil using its head, mandibles, and front
legs. But watching it burrow now, my initial thoughts
were that it didn’t seem like such an effective burrower. I mean, honestly at this pace, it seemed like
it would take at least a good half hour to get soil-deep! It even strangely began to burrow horizontally. What an ineffective burrower! Have a look! But AC Family, I was wrong! For when it finally found its preferred place
to really start digging, it quite effectively started using its legs, head, and powerful
body muscles to start excavating a nice tunnel downwards. Those hairs seemed pretty good at keeping
soil moved upwards in place, as it continued to dig deeper and deeper. In 5 minutes flat, the grub was completely
concealed deep within the soil. I had to move some soil aside to see it! AC Family, isn’t that incredible? What amazing subterrarean creatures, right? I proceeded to cover it up, placed the cover
back on, and continued to dig out the remaining beetle larvae! I carefully sifted through the soils, I didn’t
want to injure the delicate grubs during excavation. I felt as though their bodies could pop with
a single puncture. Wait! Yes, we found a second grub! I dug some more… a third grub! Alright! This was actually fun! It was like we were digging for gold! I hit something solid and pulled it out. It was a large piece of decaying wood. This was what the larvae were eating in here,
I guessed. I found a fourth grub and a fifth. Woah this one was huge! Could be a male, perhaps! I placed each grub in its own growing chamber,
and boy was it ever satisfying to set each grub in its own, special home we made for
them. Have a look! I felt like we were bees, placing our larvae
into cells in which they were to grow for their whole larval lives, until they emerge
as adults! Each one of these growing chambers had all
they needed to develop into adult rhinoceros beetles. All I needed to do was water them periodically. And look! One grub already blessed its chamber with
a frass pellet. How cute! I made sure to enjoy looking at the grubs
now that they were visible, because I knew that once they were below the surface feeding
on our decaying coconut wood, they would be completely concealed in the soil away from
view. Alright, it was time to keep digging! I wonder how many more were left. I dug, and I dug, and I dug, and managed to
pull out four more huge beetle grubs. Just look at those cute babies. Now I also realized that I should space them
out a bit when setting them down so they don’t bite each other. I placed them each into their own growing
cell. It kinda felt like I was planting a tree or
something. Haha! When I had found the final beetle grub, I
held the huge creature in my hand for a bit. I just couldn’t believe Nature had fashioned
such a spectacular and beautiful creature. I wanted to take a final and good look at
the larva before setting it into its growing chamber. I loved watching it move around. When I was ready, I picked it up. AC Family, I feel we made the right choice
by saving these beetle babies from becoming ant food. Alright, our baby is squirming now and just
wants to be buried. I placed it into its growing chamber and watched
it burrow into the soil. The process took 8 minutes. Eat well, our beloved beetle larva. I can’t wait to see what you look like when
you emerge. When all was settled, the growing chambers
were arranged neatly behind the Plateaus of Gaia. A total of 13 beetle larvae were collected,
so I had to create two more extra chambers. All the larvae had long burrowed deep into
their growing chambers and were nestled deep in darkness, where they would remain for the
next couple of months, feeding on the decaying coconut wood we had prepared for them. So it turns out the larvae are expected to
pupate and emerge as adult rhino beetles by Christmas! Oh man, won’t that be quite the Christmas
gift in the Antiverse?! I have decided to call these incubating beetle
catacombs, the Chambers of Sudan, as a tribute to Sudan, the last male northern white rhinoceros,
who died earlier this year on March the 20th. Though I realize, keeping carnivorous wild
animals like ants, as pets, often requires the killing of living prey animals like beetle
larvae and roaches, but having said that, I am happy we chose life for these beetle
grubs. For Thanksgiving, I just gave my ants some
extra roaches. So, what should we call these new beetles? Leave your name suggestions in the comments
and I will choose my top 5 favourites for us to vote on in a future video. The Chambers of Sudan are placed right next
to my closet, so I will make sure to check on our beetles every day, for on a random
day in December, we, the AC Family, shall be ready and waiting in celebration, for the
arrival of the great rhinoceros beetles into the Antiverse, and boy, do I have some epic
plans when they do! Yes, AC Family! Did you enjoy this week’s episode? I seriously can’t wait for the adults to emerge,
can you? Imagine seeing huge rhino beetles emerging
from the soil. So you know the drill! Hit that Subscribe button and bell icon now,
so you don’t miss out on their grand emergeance, and hit the Like button every single time,
including now. And hey, if you’re new to the channel, and
want to catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story
line playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so
you can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch extended play footage of the beetle larvae! They are incredible creatures to look at,
despite their scary demeanor! And before we proceed to the AC Question of
the Week, I’d like to plug my daily vlogging channel, daily vlogs which have become a full
out bird dad channel, as I am now raising a baby African Grey parrot! If you love birds, I’d love for you to meet
my new cute little bird! She’s quite the character, loves to cuddle,
is quite chatty, and is fun to watch grow up! Hope you can subscribe when you’re there. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What made it easier for
the ants in this video to dig more tunnels? Congratulations to Arnav Singh who correctly
answered: The moisture from the watering made
it easier for the ants in this video to dig more tunnels. Congratulations, Arnav, you just won a free
e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why did we have to separate each beetle larva? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Fire Ants vs. Giant Spiders

Fire Ants vs. Giant Spiders


I noticed the next morning, the fire ants
had been busy cutting out their own path of resistance. The fluon barriers I had placed to ensure
the ants remained secure inside the Selva de Fuego had weak spots. Over night, the ants had figured out that
the corners were easier to cling on to despite the fluon barrier. Oh no! So far, it looked like they hadn’t yet figured
a way to cross the upside down lip. But that’s not all! What I spotted next, caused me great concern. The rains overnight had naturally cued some
guests to emerge from the nests, and there seen on one of the frog bit islands were full
grown male and female alates. We didn’t have the time I thought we had to
prepare. The fire ants were now starting to have mating
flights! What was going to do keep all these fire ants
inside? It was then that a tiny movement in the corner
caught my eye. A tiny spider was lassoing some of the ants
that managed to get too close. At first, I asked myself, how on Earth did
a spider get in here? It must have come in with the plants. But what was more important, was that it was
at that very moment, that a crazy idea came to me, which would offer a great solution
to both my fire ant escape problems. Oh boy, this was about to get interesting. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! So AC Family, I know a lot of you out there
are arachnophobic as it is a very common phobia, but if you’ve read the comments on some of
the other videos of this channel, so many AC Family have expressed that these ant nature
videos helped them overcome their fear of ants, so if they can do it, so can you arachnophobes. If you are one of these arachnophobic people,
while watching this video, do take deep breaths in and out, feel free to press pause whenever
you need to, and grab someone’s arm to watch with you, especially at the ending, because
if you can get over the rather intense scene at the ending of this video, you can say that
you have officially conquered your spider fears. Now about the escaping ants, I know many of
you have mentioned, why not just add a mesh cover to the Selva de Fuego to keep the ants
in? Valid question, but the answer to this is
I can’t add a cover because these ants are small enough to fit through the space between
the glass edge and any cover I put on, and if I were to add some kind of sandwiched insulation
layer to block that space between where the cover meets the glass, the ants would be able
to chew through it and eventually get out. Plus, even with a tight fitting cover, what
about when I have to feed the ants, or do water changes and maintain the river? As soon as I would open that bad boy, the
ants would be ready to break loose. Basically, a cover was not an option, and
a barrier was the answer, even if it had to be a biological barrier. So AC Family, over the years a lot of you
have been asking and waiting for an episode like this, but never had I imagined I would
be in a situation that necessitated the meeting of two of my favourite invertebrates on the
planet in a single enclosure. But today, we were going to attempt the unimaginable. Spiders and ants couldn’t be any more different. Ants are insects, with six legs, they’re social
in nature living in huge groups, and they live in soil. Spiders are arachnids, with 8 legs, most species
of which live in solitude, in webs that they spin. For ants like these fire ants, a colony you
guys named the Fire Nation, their venom is injected from their stingers. Spiders inject their venom from fangs. Both fire ants and spiders however are notoriously
hated and feared by the world, and revered and loved by critter-lovers like us. Today, I needed a safe and ethical way, a
natural way, to keep my fire ants that have surprisingly managed to pass my barrier of
fluon in their newly created rainforest setup called the Selva de Fuego, from escaping into
my home. But it wasn’t only the crawling ants that
I had to worry about; it was also the flying ones. The Fire Nation’s army of reproductives called
alates, young queens and males produced by the main queen every mating season, were growing
in numbers now, ready to start their annual mating flights, to seed the next generation
of fire ants. I was surprised to discover last week that
the Selva de Fuego’s lush, humid, and rainy climate was the cue these reproductives were
waiting for to start these massive aerial breeding sessions. But I wasn’t going to let these fire ant nuptial
flights nor escapes happen. I was determined to use some special eight-armed
forces. My plan today was to release a team of hungry
spiders into the Selva de Fuego to hopefully serve as natural assassins of escaping ants
as well as air control for these flying reproductive ants! The plan was totally crazy, but at this point
I was willing to try anything. It was too late now to move the Fire Nation
back into their old setup. We needed our team of spiders now. So I waited for the dark of night to befall
the Selva de Fuego. Our aquatic creatures were retiring for their
slumber. Our wedded pair of ram cichlids, whom you
guys have officially named Romeo and Juliet, were snuggling with each other lovingly under
the moonlight. Our cleaning team of Corydoras catfish were
fast asleep. The Fire Nation’s night shift workers were
busy going about their various tasks around the kingdom. But what the Selva de Fuegans didn’t know
was that above them, awaited secret teams of skilled beasts preparing for what we will
call Operation: FEAR… Flying & Escaping Ant Regulation. Behold! Our eight-armed forces for the job. AC Family, here I have prepared two teams. Meet Team A, a group of four Neoscona punctigera,
orb weaver spiders. This was a stout team of female assassins
who create impressive orb webs in jungles, which are super effective at capturing prey. They were a perfect size because they were
not too big which meant they might be able to safely touch Selva de Fuego soils without
being noticed in case they need to secure webbing from ground attachments. They wore camo and could blend in perfectly
with any branch, leaf, or rock. Next, AC Family, I’d like you to meet Team
B, the brawn and muscle of our Operation. In the event of Team A failure, meaning death
at the mandibles and stings of the aggressive Fire Nation, or abandonment, or even death
by each other, the plan was to then send in these spiders of Team B. They were also orb
weavers, belonging to the widespread genus Argiope. Unlike the spiders of Team A, these ladies
were giants! And unlike Team A there was nothing discreet
about them. Shiny silver and yellow patterns adorned their
backs, designed to reflect sunlight to attract insects into their grand orb webs. They were scary-looking, except maybe this
one. It seems this spider came to me in the middle
of shedding and had hardened in a very distorted manner. The poor thing. I’m not too sure what I will do with her. All eight of these spiders, by the way were
recruits sent to me by local children here in the Philippines were I currently live. You see a long time popular activity for Filipino
kids for decades has been spider fighting, something my dad told me about as a kid, where
kids would go out and catch these spiders from the forests and keep them in match boxes
until they were ready to be put up against each other on sticks, to fight to the death,
sometimes betting money. These spiders hopefully won’t be killing each
other, though. I hope they will be preoccupied with picking
off the ants. There were however so many uncontrollable
variables I could foresee with Operation: FEAR. First, there was no way to control where the
spiders would build their webs. As a kid growing up in Canada, I used to release
an orb weaver spider at my window sill indoors and they would obediently build a web right
there on my window by morning, where I continued to feed them until they died by Fall. My hope was that if I released four of these
orb weaver spiders into the Selva de Fuego at all four corners of the territories, they
would each build their web on location, and take care of ants escaping at these corners. This was the best case scenario! Second, there was no way to tell if their
webs would be effective at catching all flying reproductive ants or even escaping ants. Third, nothing stopped the spiders from simply
crawling out of the Selva de Fuego and wandering off somewhere in my ant room or even out a
window. Fourth, I had no idea if these spiders would
be able to survive the wrath and blood-thirst of the Fire Nation. In fact, nothing has ever been able to survive
the Fire Nation. In other words, AC Family, this entire thing
was 100% experimental and unpredictable. But, again, I was willing to try it! Here we go. It’s time to release our four members of Team
A at their individual posts within the Selva de Fuego, but first we needed to give the
spiders a leading advantage at the space. We couldn’t have the spiders attempt web building
while fire ants were all around, so I reinforced the corners with baby powder mixed with alcohol
barrier, to keep the ants temporarily off so the spiders could web build undistracted
and in peace. Next, I prepared wire clips from which each
spider’s container would hang. Here we go, AC Family 1 -2 – 3! releasing
our first spider, and then our second. Third, and fourth. AC Family, let’s watch! The spiders immediately emerged from their
containers and began to wander the premise. This spider felt the need to release its built
up feces before embarking on its journey to who knows where. I watched as it came close to a nearby spider
but took another route above it, accessing our rain system. Another spider stationed herself in a discreet
spot along the edge of the tank, where fire ants came dangerously close but didn’t seem
to notice. This spider decided to hang out and clean
itself. Look at that webbing! Can we marvel at this creature for a second. Take a look at her. I find it just incredible that evolution has
created such an animal, living exclusively on webbing produced by spinnerets on the tip
of its abdomen. Spider webs start off as a liquid and solidifies
into a sticky substance when in contact with air. What’s amazing is that this spider can control
the types of silk webbing produced, depending on what the webbing is for. In this case, it’s a life line to hang from. Webbing used for wrapping prey is different
from the webbing used to build webs, which is different still from life line webbing,
like this spider’s here… woops! AC Family, get this! Spiders can create up to seven different types
of silk for different uses, including webbing for pheromonal trails, reproduction where
some spiders create sperm webs, prey immobilization where some spiders squirt and mix their venom
with their silk, guideline webbing to help spiders find their way back to a previous
location, and this awesome thing called ballooning where spiders will use their silk to catch
winds to actually fly them to other locations! Yes, many spiders can fly. Isn’t it mind-blowing to think about how evolution
has produced such a creature? Many ants also produce silk, not these fire
ants of the Fire Nation, but ants that create cocoons, like our Golden Empire, or that build
silk-glued leaf nests like the Black Dragons, but ant silk is nowhere near as versatile
as that of spiders. Humans are studying the chemical make up of
spider silk to better understand how we can improve human items like bullet proof vests. Anyway, this spider eventually went on to
join this stationed spider on the risky edge, to sleep soundly for the rest of the night. It seemed like these spiders were not too
aggressive to each other. The other two spiders kind of just chilled
and cleaned themselves all night, and seemed unphased when the rains came rolling in. I actually tried to stay up all night to watch
the spiders in hopes to film them building their orb webs, but I ended up falling asleep
on the floor. When I woke up, I instantly jumped to check
the Selva de Fuego to see if the spiders had built webs. To my dismay, there were no webs. I saw spider one, two, three, and spider four
was nowhere to be found… oh, never mind. There she is. She didn’t survive the night. Oh boy! This all was going to be tougher than I thought. Later that day, another spider went missing. She must have fallen prey to the Fire Nation,
as well. That afternoon, I decided it was time to send
in Team B. I summoned Team B’s most promising members, and placed them into the Selva de
Fuego. These spiders were absolute giants! I loved watching them for hours as they moved
around the top of the Selva de Fuego. The one thing I did notice though was that
they spent a lot of time, and I mean a lot of time, cleaning themselves. I had no idea spiders were such germaphobes! By night, I saw something really interesting. Check this out. It seemed one of the Team B spiders had set
up the framework for an orb web, but it seemed to be bouncing back and forth. When I looked down to where it had attached
its support line, there was a member of the Fire Nation trying to climb up the web to
get to the spider! You see how fearless the Fire Nation is? Man! Anyway, the spider seemed to be trying to
shake the fire ant off so it could continue with web-building. I was looking forward to finally seeing some
webs by morning. Morning came, and checking the Selva de Fuego,
I saw no webs, again. In fact, I saw no spiders at all, the only
place I did see webbing was outside my window! One of them had managed to find its way out
of my ant room. This unlucky streak continued when I tried
to release our third member of Team B, which I found later under a huge pile of Fire Nation
workers, and well, this deformed Team B member couldn’t even move properly, so I let it go. AC Family, this was the failure of Operation:
F.E.A.R. I felt terrible at all the arachnid lives
we had lost while trying, and what was worse: The Fire Nation had now found a way to cross
the upside down lip. The fire ants were now successful at officially
find their way out of the Selva de Fuego, and I had no way of stopping them now! I had placed a pane of glass I had laying
around, as a last resort at keeping them in, but I knew it would be no use. Soon these free ants would be going back to
the colony to tell them all about this new way out. I panicked and felt defeated. I couldn’t imagine the Fire Nation breaking
loose in my room! And then the unthinkable came to mind. Was I going to have to resort to exterminating
the Fire Nation myself with spray? No! Suddenly, clarity. It was then that I knew what to do, or rather
whom to visit. AC Family, who you’re about to meet now, is
someone absolutely legendary, someone none of you have ever met before, but whom I’ve
known since the beginning of time, well ant time anyway. In watching these ant videos, you’ve all come
to know the queens of this ant room, of our Antiverse, but what you guys don’t know, is
that before the Antiverse ever came to be, there existed the one, a goddess who ruled
this plane of existence. Actually, I’m surprised none of you ever asked
about what lay next to the Fire Nation, what laid beneath the Fire Palace. AC Family, it was time to visit, the goddess
of the Antiverse, who is surprisingly not even an ant. No, the goddess of the ant room is a spider. I approached the goddess’ lair with reverence
and caution. Opening the glass, and AC Family, brace yourselves,
as I present to you, in her splendid divinity, Imelda, the bird-eater tarantula, goddess
of the Antiverse. She has an 8 inch legspan and is a true behemoth. Just do as I say, AC Family and we will be
safe. No sudden movements. Every time I enter this sacred lair of Imelda,
I make sure to always show great respect and reverence in her presence, lest I lose my
fingers. Her water bowl, which I always make sure is
topped off and full, needed some cleaning. She telepathically commanded me now to make
it clean. As you wish, my goddess. I took a deep breath and with my hand slowly
made my way to her water bowl. Got it. Removing the bowl to wash it free of its stains. The next requirement of me was a peace offering
of some sort. I was not allowed to enter her lair without
bearing a gift, fit for a goddess. She waited patiently. I came with the fattest, most delectable cockroach
from my cockroach farm to offer as my appeasing sacrifice to goddess Imelda. I had hoped this gift would suffice. She always loved to eat the male roaches. I approached slowly and deliberately to give
her the cockroach. Oh man! Alright, it seems she’s not hungry at the
moment. I had fed her a few days ago, so I guess she
was still content food-wise. She’ll be eating our gift later, but the good
news is we had her blessing to remain here for a short time. So now, the reason I came here. I needed Imelda’s silk. Tarantulas like Imelda here cover their entire
living space with a thick carpet of silk. On some nights, I will catch Imelda meticulously
going over this entire terrarium with a fresh layer of silk. She blankets the decor, the ground, and even
the glass with this divine mattress. In fact, she refuses to dig tunnels like most
tarantulas and demands that she be kept in a big space like this to treat the entire
space as her cathedral of silk. I’ve kept her in different setups before in
the past, over the years, but she has shown me that she is most comfortable living in
this huge palace of webbing. The reason tarantulas lay down these carpets
of webbing, especially during feeding time is because in their natural habitat ants are
common nuisance, including fire ants. Imelda is also a South American species, and
the smell of feeding time easily attracts a barrage of various ants to her den. This silk makes it hard for ants to invade
and enter her territory, and I was in need of this godly material. I proceeded to harvest this webbing, and using
some glue, I attached it to the corners of the Selva de Fuego. And wanna hear something absolutely crazy? It worked. To my utter surprise, the Fire Ant escapes
stopped. The webbing made it hard for the fire ants
to cross! I couldn’t believe it worked! I resolved to continually harvest sections
of Imelda’s silk and attach it to the corners of the Fire Nation’s kingdom to ensure there
were no escaped ants. Now as for the flying reproductives, another
idea also came to me. Who needed teams of spiders when I had the
best teams for biological control – the ant colonies of the entire Antiverse. So my solution? Black lights set on at night to attract the
flying alates into the adjacent kingdoms of our other ants who would then proceed to have
a feast. I was completely elated that we found a solution
to our fire ant escape problems. It could have been so easy to resort to some
kind of chemical warfare to combat the Fire Nation, but deep inside, I just knew Mother
Nature had an eco-friendly solution to my problems somewhere. I just had to figure it out, and today I felt
as though I had cracked a grand code to a Mother Nature’s rubix cube! And as if Mother Nature was giving us a pat
on the back for all the great work, in the night I spotted something that filled my heart
with such joy and amazement. Romeo and Juliet, were engaging in the ancient
dance performed by ancestors millions of years before them. AC Family, they were spawning… It was absolutely beautiful to witness, and
also assuring because from my research, Ram Cichlids will mate when water conditions are
just perfect! AC Family, brace yourselves, it looks like
we were about to be witnesses to the great miracle of life. AC Family, things are looking bright for the
future of the Selva de Fuego, but honestly speaking next week’s episode was one of the
toughest episodes emotionally I’ve ever had to film on this channel. You will not expect what’s coming up, and
I most certainly didn’t! So trust me on this guys, you won’t want to
miss it, so hit that SUBSCRIBE button and bell icon now so you don’t miss out on this
epic ant story, and hit the LIKE button every single time, including now. AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, for more on the giant spiders in this video. They are just fascinating and awe-inspiring,
and will always be one of my favourite creatures on the planet! Also, I’d like to plug my daily vlogging channel. I upload daily vlogs of my travels around
the world and this particular vlog here is a complete vlog of how I built the Selva de
Fuego from scratch. Go check it out, and don’t forget to subscribe
while you’re there. Alright and now it’s time for the AC Question
of the Week! Last week, we asked: Why does the Fire Nation queen take her time
when moving out of an old nest and into a new one? Congratulations to Kyler Bentley who correctly
answered: The Fire Nation queen takes her time when
moving out into a new nest because she needs to make
sure she knows whether or not the new habitat is
safe. Congratulations Kyler, you just won a free
ant t-shirt from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Name three things spiders
use their silk webbing for. Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free e-book handbook from our shop. Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, & SUBSCRIBE
if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Insect Lore –  Ant Hill Habitat

Insect Lore – Ant Hill Habitat


The Insect Lore Anthill allows you to
view ants as they dig real underground sand tunnels and secret chambers. The
Anthill design features a double-sided viewing habitat, with a wide no tip base
for super stability. It includes a special easy dig sand and a safe escape proof
lid. The fascinating inside/outside cutaway design enables you to watch your
colony of ants forage for food, excavate sand and problem solve. In our fun
instruction guide we explain how to collect our own ants from the garden.
Just make sure that you collect them from the same colony. If the idea of
collecting your own ants doesn’t appeal to you we have also included a voucher
to purchase approximately 10 to 20 ants by post at a reduced rate of
£4.99 which includes postage. You can redeem this voucher on our website. The
live Anthill includes: a viewing habitat, sand and sand rod, a voucher for
approximately 10 to 20 ants and an instruction guide. The Anthill measures 15
centimetres high and we recommend adult supervision with this insect kit.
Enjoy!

Why Are MILLIONS of People Keeping ANTS as PETS?

Why Are MILLIONS of People Keeping ANTS as PETS?


I have a question for you. Have you ever killed an ant? Be honest. Was it death by bug spray? Or the laying down of poison perhaps? Or maybe a massacre by magnifying glass? Don’t worry. We’ve all done it, myself included. But now guys, have a look at this man for
a moment. His name is Milton Levine. In the 1950’s, Milton invented a little plastic
toy enclosure that holds some sand and a little bit of plastic shaped like a farm house. He called this invention an Ant Farm, and
it was designed to house a colony of creatures most of the world normally wants to kill. Ants! Milton was a visionary, and knew there was
something about ants that was totally magnificent and relevant to us people, and you’ll find
out what that is by the end of this video. You’ll also be surprised to know how many
ant farms he’s actually sold to date, and I’ll also be revealing that in a bit, but
first, if you’re new to the channel, you may be sitting there thinking… Gross! Now why would anyone want to keep ants as
pets? At least a dog, cat, or horse can show you
affection right? Fair. Ants can’t lick your face, you can’t stroke
an ant with little tweezers, and you certainly can’t ride them. But what if I told you, pet ants can offer
something so much more satisfying? Most of you AC Family and long time subscribers
of this channel already understand and are deeply infected hard with ant love, despite
you guys proclaiming not even being “insect” people prior to subscribing to this channel. So AC Family, have a seat, because this is
a video particularly for the newbies curiously wandering into this strange part of Youtube. For you newcomers, what I’m about to show
you today will completely change the way you see ants, and by the end of it all, perhaps
the next time you see an ant, you may just choose to not only not kill it, but appreciate
why millions of us in the world, including myself, have decided to keep ants as pets. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! First off, to understand why people keep pet
ants, you gotta take a look at how ant keepers start their ant colony. Basically, it all starts with a queen ant. That’s a queen right there in the tube. She is like the seed of your colony. She lays all the eggs and keeps your colony
going. Every worker ant she lays, only lives for
a couple months max, but the queen, she lives for decades. Word has it, that the longest lived queen
ant on record was close to 30 yrs in a German laboratory. So how do you get this queen? Well, there’s a special season in the year
when new queen ants are available to capture. You see, during the spring and summer months,
every species of ant has its own specific period when they execute an incredible annual
event known as a nuptial flight. During this nuptial flight, young virgin queens
and males, both of which are born with wings, emerge from their home birth nests, take to
the air and mate while flying. They make love in the sky. Imagine that! That love is so fantastic that the males die
afterwards as they’d have fulfilled their purpose in life. Then the now pregnant queens drop to the ground,
break off their wings, and seek a hole in the ground to start their ant colonies. Now as the ant keeper it’s our job to try
to find one of these queen ants wandering around in search of a nesting site. Once you’ve caught a queen, the next step
is to place her into a test tube setup. This test tube setup simulates the little
hole in the ground, called a claustral cell, that she would have created in the wild. Now what happens in this test tube claustral
cell is totally miraculous. Sitting quietly in her test tube setup she
begins her epic journey as queen of her future colony. She doesn’t eat as she’s 100% focused on raising
her first generation of her army. She subsists for a month or even longer, on
energy stores in her wing muscles. Her body becomes a self-feeding, soup-making
machine, as she lays eggs, which hatch into larvae, which she then feeds her self-made
soup, drawing from these wing-muscle stores. The larvae then eventually pupate, and finally
become worker ants. These worker ants are her critical final cry
for survival because they must survive to bring her food, and care for her future young. The success of the entire colony relies on
the effective teamwork of this first generation of ants, known as nanitics. The nanitics are pioneers on a mission, and
are just incredible to watch! They break out of the claustral cell, search
for food, and bring it all home for their single, widowed, and starving mother. So you see? This is better than having a dog or cat or
horse. Ant keepers are witnessing real life ant drama
in a test tube! Now, to all you people who’ve said you’ve
killed an ant before, how does it feel knowing you may have destroyed a single, widowed mother’s
last chance at survival? Haha! So at this stage, things get even more intense,
not just for the ants, but for the ant keeper. Now you have a queen with her nanitics, who
are needing food and space, and this is where the ant keeper gets to play the role of God,
admittedly, another attractive aspect about ant keeping. Me, personally, I’m a benevolent god, and
truth is most of us ant keepers are, so as soon as these nanitics arrive I move them
from a test tube to a full out ant farm, like this. So this section here is the nest part known
as a formicarium, which simulates their inner nest, which I can peek into at will, and this
container section, called an outworld, acts as their outside world. So I as their Lord must give them food, and
I place it into the outworld. The nanitics come and find the food, grab
a bite to eat, then make their way back to the nest, through these cool tubes, leaving
a pheromone trail on its way back, and tell the rest of the nanitics that it hit the jackpot,
and to follow the trail it left to the bounty. Now, guys, here’s another reason why ants
are so fun to observe! You literally get to see from a God’s eye
view, their social media. Yes, ants have social media! Not using internet, but using pheromones,
biochemicals produced by their body. An ant can leave a pheromone in an area with
a specific message, like “Here is food!”, and it’s kind of like posting a tweet! Any ants coming into the area and smelling
the pheromone has the choice to retweet the message, and this continues on an on until
all members of an ant colony are made aware of the original message, even from far away. This is how when you’re eating on a picnic,
it only takes one ant to discover your sandwich before a whole line of ants come marching
in to grab a bite of your goods! In ant keeping you can literally watch messages
make its way back to the colony in the nest, and visibly see the excitement of the ants
that clearly go “Whooopie!” as they dash out to go eat. It’s so fun to watch news spread within an
ant colony. All messages, including messages of danger
or intruder alert spread in the same way! Messages are always traveling through the
members of an ant colony at all times, and the bigger the ant colony the quicker these
messages travel, simply because there are more members to retweet the messages, and
messages trend! Now as you give more food, the colony grows
larger and larger, the queen lays more eggs, and soon, you end up with a massive army of
millions of ants, that you’ve grown from just a queen, kind of like this. In a year or two, the ant keeper now is the
owner of a massive ant city which he/she must not only feed, but also cleanup after. They leave all their garbage at a garbage
site in their outworld which you must clean up regularly, as well as their dead at a grave
site. They establish bathroom areas in their nest
which also need regular cleaning. Ants are quite clean and systematic, and need
to be to survive. If you’re like me, you can get around cleaning
duties by keeping the ants in bioactive vivariums so little critters and lifeforms like springtails
can do the cleaning up themselves, as they would in the wild. As the colony evolves, in some species of
ants, there start to appear specialized workers like really huge supermajors which specialize
in cutting things up, and really tiny minors which are excellent at handling babies. It’s a tiny society, housed within the space
of a table top. Another thing that makes ant keeping so much
more interesting is that there literally thousands of ant species, shapes, colours, and lifestyles
to choose from! Check it out! Have a look at these turtle ants, with these
huge disc-shaped heads which are used to plug the entrances to their nests. Imagine having a door as a face? And check out these dracula ants. These scary-looking ants suck the blood of
their own young by making tiny incisions in their skin, which heal after the adults feed. The adult workers fatten their young with
food so they can produce the blood needed to feed the workers. Mother Nature can be so dark! And check out these leaf-cutter ants, which
cut up leaves from plants to carry back to the nest which they use to fertilize their
expansive fungus gardens, which they feed from. They don’t eat the plant pieces, just the
fungus. They are farmers, and have been millions of
years before humans ever existed. Look at these Pheidole ants, which stroke
colonies of mealybugs until they excrete a sweet bi-product called honeydew. Yes, ants have also been tending and milking
ant cows for millions of years! And some of my favourites, the famous Weaver
Ants, which use their young’s silk to glue massive leaf basket nests together in the
trees. The transpiration occurring through the leaves
acts as a natural humidifier within their treetop, hanging fortresses! Mind-blowing stuff right? But that’s just the tip of the iceberg! There’s more! What’s most incredible is their efficiency. Regardless of how big an ant colony is, every
ant gets fed, no baby starves, they erect massive structures over night, they keep their
living quarters clean, they communicate effectively, and work in perfect synergy. But it requires we humans to keep up with
them! It’s not just a one way relationship. The ants depend on us! The ant colony as a growing functioning city
demands that the ant keeper keeps up with his/her duties, of constantly providing clean
water, food, clean up, ensure temperature and humidity is just right, and protect the
ants from plagues like mites and fungi, and earthquakes, by not shaking the ant farm for
no reason. Which brings me to the final reason, ant keepers
like myself love to keep ants. Here on the channel we have a term called
Ant Love. It’s something that describes that feeling
I’m about to describe now. Ant keeping taps into that very deep desire
in us humans to care for life. We ant keepers are not caring for just a dog,
a cat, or a horse, but an entire nation of individual lives, that give us nothing back
but the sole gratification of knowing we are helping them live out their best lives. This to me is the most important reason for
keeping pet ants, because imagine the young person who masters caring for a little ant
population. Wouldn’t you trust them as adults to care
for our human population? Ant keeping enriches ones worldview, and sets
up the stage for the culturing of future government leaders, engineers, architects, farmers, doctors,
lawyers, all career fields which require some skill set applied in ant keeping in some way,
shape, or form. It’s an understatement to say that ant keeping
has changed my life. I’ve been ant keeping for several decades
of my life now, and it’s opened me up to an incredible world of discovery! This ant Youtube channel here, with one of
the most exceptional communities on Youtube, has almost 3 million ant-loving subscribers. Today I’m the owner of millions of ants of
many species, and I’ve even ended up making ant keeping a business, along with a great
team of ant lovers, and an online shop that sells ant keeping supplies and ant farms worldwide. Now remember the original ant farm by Milton
Levine? Ready to hear how many have been sold? You may be surprised to know that Uncle Milton
Industries Inc, the company of the late Milton Levine, who is now lauded as the godfather
of ant keeping, has actually gone on to sell over 20 million ant farms globally at the
time of his death. Perhaps now you can see what Milton saw to
be so magnificent and relevant in the ant back in the 1950’s. Ants are us. And so the next time you see an ant, instead
of killing it, maybe just maybe you might consider keeping it as a pet. It’s ant love forever! AC Family, did you enjoy today’s episode? It was a little different this week, but I
felt we needed a video to help promote the ant keeping hobby a bit more, which was the
original dream and purpose for starting this channel in the first place. Special thanks to biologist and nature photographer
Alex Wild for allowing us to use his incredible ant photographs for this video. He is my favourite ant photographer and friend,
so check him out at Alexanderwild.com and order some brilliant, high quality prints
of his ants and other insects from his gallery. There is still much more ahead in the Antiverse,
guys so if you’re not subscribed yet, be sure to hit that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON
now so you don’t miss out in the real life drama of the inhabitants of the Ant Room. And don’t forget to hit the LIKE button every
single time, including now! It would really help a lot! Speaking of ants, it’s officially nuptial
flight season in the Northern Hemisphere, and a lot of you are catching queen ants now,
and in case you didn’t know, we’ve got all the top of the line ant keeping gear for you
ant keepers at all levels from beginner to advanced, as well as a tonne of new and exciting
products for the ant keeping community not available anywhere else, so head on over to
AntsCanada.com, and browse through our shop. We ship worldwide, and offer full email support
if you need us. We also have ant colonies with a queen available
in most regions so go check us out and pick up your ant farm kit and ant gear today! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like to watch a playlist of relaxing hidden videos on this channel,
with footage of ants and other creatures to the sounds of relaxing music. Go explore and enjoy nature shot in 4K! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What were the Rhino Beetles competing for
in these Rhino Beetle Games? Congratulations to John McCabe who correctly
answered: The Rhino Beetle Games were for the rights
to breed, shelter, and all the food they need. Congratulations, John McCabe, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is a Claustral Cell? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

What Do Termites Look Like, Panama City, FL – Arrow Pest Service


Hi Im Mack Glover the President of Arrow Pest Service I would like to show you what I found out in the field today so
come along with me let’s go check it out have you ever wondered what termites look like here they are get a good look at them these are
termite swarmers it’s just simply the reproductive form of the termite they
usually swarm out in late fall or early spring time this is where a male and
female pair up shed their wings and go back down to the ground to start a new
colony somewhere else if you see these in or around your home it is a good sign
you might have termites behind your walls doing damage without you know
it call Arrow Pest Service immediately we would love to give you a free consultation and free
estimate so we can ensure that your home your most valuable investment is
properly protected well I hope this video was helpful to you and again I’m Mack Glover the President of Arrow Pest Service give us a call today and ask about our free 58 a point Pest
analysis for your home or office thank you for watching this video and I hope
you have a great day

How to Use PestXpert Home Barrier Insect Killer Concentrate

How to Use PestXpert Home Barrier Insect Killer Concentrate


PestXpert Home Barrier Insect Killer Concentrate
is an insecticide designed for outdoor pest control of over 50 common lawn, ornamental,
and perimeter pests including ants, cutworms, sod webworms, roaches, spiders, flies, fire
ants, fleas, and ticks. The convenient 8 oz bottle covers up to 2,500
square feet for lawn applications and 2,000 square feet for perimeter treatments. PestXpert Home Barrier kills on contact and
keeps working long after the application has dried. To use this concentrate, simply dilute the
correct amount of product for your desired application and water volume in a pump sprayer. Use 1.5 oz per gallon of water to treat ornamental
plants like shrubs and trees; use 2.5 oz per gallon of water for lawn treatments; and use
4 oz. per gallon of water for perimeter pest control around the exterior of buildings. For each of these applications, use 1 gallon
of solution to treat 1,000 square feet. You can also use this product at a rate of
6 oz. per gallon of water to treat fire ant mounds, using about 1 gallon of solution per
mound. Always spray when wind conditions are calm
and rain is not expected for 1 to 2 days. Keep pets and children out of the treated
area during application and until your spray has dried. In order to safely and effectively apply Pest
Xpert Home Barrier Insect Killer Concentrate, please read the entire product label for complete
instructions before using. And it’s that easy with the expert help
from Do My Own dot com! Make sure to subscribe to our channel for
more DIY and product videos!

How do insects become queens or workers?


A honeybee’s fate is decided at birth. The
larvae develop to become a queen or a worker. If you’re born a queen, you get to rule
the hive. But other insects are more flexible. For example, paper wasps and dinosaur ants
are able to switch role from worker to queen at any point in their life and new research
uncovers the genomic basis of this flexibility. Researchers from the University of Bristol,
the Babraham Institute and the Centre for Genomic Regulation studied the insects’
behaviours to determine their roles. To do this, they fitted the insects with tiny paint
spots or identification tags and observed them in their natural environment.
In the paper wasps, as seen here, the queen is identifiable by behaviours such as shaking
the abdomen and aggression to exert dominance. By looking at the genetic makeup of the insects,
the researchers were able to determine what genetic influences were controlling behaviour.
They found very little difference between the roles, which is surprising given that
hundreds of genes are required to determine the difference between queens and workers
in honeybees. The research suggests that there is no single
master gene determining the role of these wasps and ants. Their behaviour is much more
likely to be driven by a subtle network of genes each exerting little effect compared
to the complex regulatory networks found in honeybees.
In these species there appears to be no molecular commitment to one behaviour or the other.
This open genome keeps them responsive and ready for change.
So you don’t have to be born a queen after all…

Have Bed Bugs, Carpenter Ants, Other Insects or Rodents? | Advantage Pest Control Inc.


Are bedbugs, carpenter ants, other insects
or rodents giving you a hard time? Advantage Pest Control is a forward thinking
company that puts an end to your pest problems. A family owned and operated business, we have
over 50 years of collective experience in the pest control business.
How are we different from other pest control companies?
We provide our customers with highly personalized service. We offer competitive guarantees and
pricing, and our environmentally responsible procedures are designed around children and
pets, as well as the highest health and safety standards needed for commercial establishments.
We respect you, your family, your home, possessions and time. We respect your business and customers.
Need discrete professional service? We arrive in unmarked vehicles.
More so, all of our technicians are fully licensed and skilled professionals who look
for cause and prevention, as well as elimination. Here at Advantage Pest Control we actively
focus on integrated pest management techniques and keep an open eye on the latest pest control
technologies. Want to speak to a specialist now? Whether
it’s 8 o’clock in the morning or 9 o’clock at night, we always answer your calls.
Whether you are a homeowner, business owner or anyone else, we have a program for you!
So visit our site at AdvantagePestControl.co or call us at 416-840-4040 and speak to an
Advantage Pest Control specialist today!

Ant War: Battle Of The Three Armies


OMG! AC Family, there has been an ongoing ant war
within one of our ant farm setups, and we had no idea! Returning to my home after being gone for
two weeks, I was shocked to discover that within our Garden of Eden, a large terrarium
that is home to our growing colony of Marauder Ants, a colony you guys have called the Titans,
there has been an epic war ensuing. But not so fast, this was not just any war. This was an ant war, and not what you expect. Today you will see how real ant wars occur
in the wild, as we get a chance to watch for the first time on this channel, not one, not
two, but three different ant colonies coming in contact and interacting with each other. You won’t want to miss this exciting and rare
opportunity to watch what happens when the Titans, our Marauder Ants, are forced to confront
savage Black Crazy Ants, and a third surprise species, which I have never before featured
on this channel. Today these ants all battle over an essential
resource for survival: food, so keep on watching until the end because I will need your advice
on what to do. Time to explore the rules of ant war, AC Family,
in this action-packed episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please subscribe to my channel, and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Tired of nature channels not showing nature
shows? Just watch this channel. Enjoy! Welcome to the Garden of Eden, the site of
much drama and turmoil, life and death of creatures of different kinds. In fact, that story of this terrarium, which
used to be home to my late bearded dragon, is so twisted and epic, we concluded that
my bearded dragon’s ghost haunted it. We called it the Dragon’s Curse. But hold on, if you’re new to the channel,
don’t get confused by this paranormal talk. This is a science channel but I do suggest
you watch our last update on this terrarium for their complete story which I will place
in an icard here so you know exactly what this terrarium and its inhabitants have been
through. Essentially, the ant colony that lives here
now, our beloved Titans, has had quite a tough time. Before two weeks ago, we questioned whether
or not the Titans were even alive, but happily, upon some weed trimming, we discovered that
the Titans indeed were strengthening their numbers secretly underground after all this
time. We were super delighted at this news because
it meant that these massive territories could finally be home to one of our resident ant
colonies. But it seems, unpredictability is a frequent
guest here in the Garden of Eden, for though it felt like a chapter was finally closed
in the Saga of the Dragon’s Curse, a new one just opened, and I feel this is a twisted
one which we will have to follow for awhile. Giant exoskeletons of superworms lay stripped
of its meat in a clearing within the Garden of Eden, and here are some of the Titans now,
patrolling the area, perhaps snooping to see if there was any superworm meat left on site. I was happy to see that the Titans were eating
well while I was away. My house keeper has been diligent at providing
the Titans with a good variety of cockroaches, superworms, and sweets. I was excited to feed them tonight. I wanted to see our Titans emerge in all their
majestic glory. The Titans are truly a prized ant colony on
this channel. They’re unique because they are polymorphic
ants, meaning among the many smaller workers, they also have walking among them massive
supermajors, which specialize in cutting up food and enemies. They’re native to Southeast Asia, and as a
species are known to be difficult to keep in captivity, but it seems today we’ve been
doing a pretty good job at providing this epic colony what it needs. I placed a cut up cockroach into the Garden
of Eden, and here, AC Family, is where I was about to witness an ant war. At first the cockroach lay there, waiting
to be discovered by one of our Titans. The smell of its freshly spilled roach blood,
called hemolymph, filled the surrounding area, a definite draw for any nearby Titan. Let’s watch what happens. Yes, a Titan inspects the cockroach. As soon as it identifies that this huge roach
is food, it will head back to the colony and let them know about it. But then, suddenly, appeared an ant that completely
shocked me! It was a black crazy ant! What? Where did this black crazy ant come from and
how did it even get in here? And then appearing on site, was another ant
I had never seen before! AC Family, this tiny yellow ant seen here
is the world infamous Pharaoh Ant, Monomorium pharaonis. Now how did this ant get in here? So many questions, but I sat quietly and watched
closely. Our Titan, the black crazy ant, and the pharaoh
ant inspected the cockroach carcass, and soon would flee back to their respective colonies
to inform their families of their find. Watch what happens. I will not cut the video. Look at how long it took for the first fleet
of ants to arrive. Enter a mob of black crazy ants! This was insane! Look at how many of them there were! They began to pour in in droves, clamouring
about in hopes to taste that sweet cockroach meat. Following their trail, I was surprised to
discover they were coming out from the shadows in this driftwood piece. Wherever they were coming from, it seems this
cockroach was now theirs. Or was it? AC Family, keep your eye on any one black
cazy ant worker. In almost an instant, our Titans arrive on
site and completely drive out the Black Crazy Ants, biting and pulling on their antennae. Perhaps it was hard to see because if you’re
not used to seeing ants, our Titans and the Black Crazy Ants look the same, but let’s
watch that again in slow motion! The cockroach is covered in black crazy ants
and then suddenly, the Titans arrive and show the black crazy ants, who’s boss of the Garden
of Eden. Isn’t that just crazy?! What we just witnessed here was our Titans
whooping some serious Black Crazy Ant butt! The Titans were filing in now from this place
in the driftwood. It seemed this cockroach carcass was officially
property of the Titans. As the Titans proceeded to enjoy their meal,
what interested me now were our black crazy ant guests. Where did they come from? I watched as some black crazy ants circled
the periphery as the Titans feasted, trying to get near, but still keeping their distance
like careful cowards. It seemed they knew to stay away from the
Titans. For sure, these black crazy ants had moved
in from outside. They must have been a savage colony who entered
my home, discovered how habitable the Garden of Eden was, and decided to move their colony
in and setup camp somewhere at this location within the driftwood. Not to be confused with our own Black Crazy
Ants, the Dark Knights, who live securely still in their two story setup nearby. These black crazy ants in the Garden of Eden
were alien ants, ants from the outside. In a previous video, we saw that the Dark
Knights were able to escape this terrarium despite a layer of baby powder barrier, by
gripping on to the corners of the tank. So this is probably how these savage black
crazy ants got into the Garden of Eden. As for that random Pharaoh Ant, I’ll get to
that later, but what was super intriguing to me now about all of this was it seemed
the newly moved in savage black crazy ants were not an immediate threat to our Titans. As I continued to watch them, it seemed the
Black Crazy Ants were respecting the Titan’s command for space. Now as a general rule in ant keeping, you
should never mix two ant colonies together, especially two different species of ants,
as it would result in ant war, but it seems in this case the two separate colonies have
learned to share the space, and they’ve established a sort of pecking order. It appeared as though our Titans were the
alpha colony, and these savage back crazy ants were subordinates. Perhaps our Titans were like lions in the
Serengeti, and the black crazy ants were like hyenas, waiting for our Titans to finish before
having their fill. I could understand this, as black crazy ants
seem to be a bit less aggressive than most ants and can even be kinda dopey. The Titans on the other hand were a fierce
species, and were now sending in some majors, not supermajors yet, but majors none the less
to help with cutting up the cockroach carcass. Now check this, AC Family. I decided that I needed to test this theory
of ant alphaism. Had the ants truly established a sort of pecking
order? Were the ants truly forming a truce or understanding
and willing to share the space. The reason why these were critical questions
was because, I didn’t want our Titans to be in danger, in danger of being out-competed
for food, out-competed for space should the black crazy ant colony grow, and/or even killed
by the black crazy ants, because just a reminder, it was a savage black crazy ant colony that
murdered our Jawbreakers in the past in one fell swoop! Wouldn’t it be the biggest plot twist of the
century if these savage black crazy ants were the murderers of our Jawbreakers?! OK that’s too much to think about now. It was time to test to see if our Titans were
indeed the alphas of this land. I placed in a second cockroach into the Garden
of Eden, this time closer to the driftwood where the Black Crazy Ants were emerging from
earlier. If this second cockroach would be overtaken
by the Titans, it would mean that these Black Crazy Ants indeed were no threat to our Titans,
and their presence was nothing to be concerned about. A black crazy ant approached the cockroach
and it soon left to tell the colony even carrying a piece of the roach back. I watched as some Titans wandered close to
the cockroach. Ideally, I wanted the Black Crazy Ants to
find the roach first, and then see if eventually the Titans would overthrow them, as they did
with this first cockroach. It wasn’t long before the Black Crazy Ants
came rushing in. It was truly amazing to think that just inches
away from each other, two separate ant colonies were feeding, and not warring. I was particularly interested in the space
between the Black Crazy ants and our Titans. There seemed to be an understood border now,
where the Titans seemed to stay on one side and the black crazy ants on the other. There was no fighting at this border. It was just respect. What did all this mean? Could these two ant colonies be respecting
each other’s space? Or could it be that the Titans were allowing
the Black Crazy Ants to eat their fill because they felt they had enough with this first
cockroach? Could these two colonies be friends? So many questions! I knew I just needed to wait for the answers,
but what I didn’t know was that what was about to happen next would leave me with more questions. 3 hours later, I came back to a shocking discovery. The Titans were still working on their cockroach,
but as for the second cockroach… it was completely covered with Pharaoh Ants! What?! Where did the black crazy ants go, and where
did all of these pharoah ants come from? Unreal! So this is the very first time, we’ve ever
featured Pharaoh ants on this channel. They may be small, but they’re a force to
reckon with. First off, look here. This larger ant is a queen, and so is this
one. In fact, pharaoh ants are polygynous like
Black Crazy Ants, meaning they have many queens in a single colony, in fact, Pharaoh ants
may have more queens to workers than Black Crazy Ants, which means these colonies reproduce
super fast. I tried to follow the trail of Pharaoh ants
to see where they were coming from, and yup, it seemed they were all breaking and entering
from one of the corners, completely crossing the baby powder barrier. So that one sole Pharaoh Ant worker we saw
at the beginning of this video actually made the long trek back to its colony wherever
it was and brought the whole gang into the Garden of Eden to feast. So far it seemed they stole the bounty of
the Black Crazy Ants and not our Titans. This so far was a good sign. I wondered how long this three ant species
interaction had been going. I wondered if all these Pharaoh Ants would
also decide to move into the Garden of Eden seeing as they now knew it was good hunting
ground for food. But most important of all I wondered, if these
two savage colonies were endangering our Titans. I decided to come back later and see what
would happen. I returned to the Garden of Eden at 3AM. AC Family, are you ready for this? The second roach was still covered in Pharaoh
ants, and as for our first cockroach, also covered in Pharaoh Ants! Uh-oh! What did this mean? Did the Pharaoh ants end up driving out our
Titans? Or were the Titans simply finished with their
meal and so they allowed the Pharaoh Ants to have their fill? I spotted a Titan nearby and it looked as
though it was being bullied or chastised by the Pharaoh Ants. There were Black Crazy Ants also present,
and they circled the periphery not getting too close to the Pharaoh Ants’ meal. So here’s where I need your help AC Family? The Titans are no longer alone. There’s an active Black Crazy Ant colony that
have setup camp inside the Garden of Eden, and there is also now a persistent and scary
Pharaoh Ant colony that enter and exit the Garden of Eden freely. Who knows if they plan to also move in. So my questions are as follows: 1) Do you think we should be concerned about
the safety of our Titans? 2) Do you think the Black Crazy Ant colony
is a threat? 3) Do you think the Pharaoh Ant Colony is
a threat? and 4) If yes, what measures should we take
to ensure our Titans remain safe from these savage ants from the outside? Let me know your thoughts in the comments
section. AC Family, once again the fate of our Titans
lays in your hands. I don’t know what is next for our Titans,
but it seems their next chapter has just begun, and the Saga of the Dragon’s Curse continues
on in our Garden of Eden. I am eager to see what comes next. If you’re not SUBSCRIBED to this channel yet,
do hit that Subscribe button and click the bell icon, too, so you can keep updated on
this unfolding epic ant story. Until next week, AC Family, it’s ant love
forever. Alright, AC Fam, isn’t this all just insane? This ongoing Dragon’s Curse Saga is too epic. Nature truly keeps us on our toes! Now AC Family, it seems this new savage Black
Crazy Ant colony and the intruding force to reckon with, the Pharaoh Ants, will be new
ongoing colonies on this channel so they will also each need names. Leave your name suggestions for the black
crazy ants and pharaoh ants in the comments section and I will choose my favourites for
the AC Family to vote on in a future video. AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would just like to watch some extended play footage of the three ant
colonies in this video to the sounds of some relaxing music. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week. Last week, we asked: What is the name of the order
to which woodlice belong? Congratulations to Clash who correctly answered: Isopoda Congratulations Clash you just won a free
ebook handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Name one thing black crazy ants and
pharaoh ants have in common? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free ant t-shirt from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, & SUBSCRIBE
if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Insect Pest Control : How to Get Rid of Ants in Your House

Insect Pest Control : How to Get Rid of Ants in Your House


I’m Trevor with Monster Pest Control located
in American Fork, Utah. We’re talking about how to rid your home of insects. This topic
is how to rid your house of ants. How to get rid of the ants in your home. A couple of
things, quite often when you start seeing ants in the kitchen area, they’ll be coming
up through corners or edges, through the windows, places like that. So what I like to do is
I always like to make sure that there’s no food out, everything is covered. But with
the food here, if they don’t have time to clean up, there’s other methods and other
ways of getting it. You can use a little bait trap setting those in different areas such
as like that, that they’ll come in. There’s liquid bait, there’s like different gels that
we can go up around edges and corners. Another way too, is by getting all the baseboard areas
down low where you find the ants and spraying them in those areas. We could also get the
window seals also to get rid of them. But there’s so many varieties of areas. You don’t
want to seal up one area and block them in there. It takes some time to get rid of the
ants, so make sure that you clean off the dishes, make sure everything is kind of put
away, cleaned up so that the person can take some time. I like to use what we call an inside
outside method, and I use two different materials. One for the inside, one for the outside, and
it works within just a few days to get rid of the ants. There’s so many varieties of
ants out there that there’s many different methods that we just don’t have time to tell
you about the different ways of taking care of the ants in your home.