Why Cockroaches Are So Hard to Kill – What Can I Do… 2019


They say, if you see a single cockroach running
around freely in the day time…Then you probably have hundreds tightly hidden away in your
homes’ kitchen cabinets, wall baseboards, in furniture, bathrooms, in TV monitors, or
wherever they might have set up shop in your home or dwelling. Cockroaches are like the elite commandos of
the insect world; they are resilient, robust, quick, stealthy and adaptive. They move under the cover of darkness, are
purpose driven and highly motivated .If the cockroach sees you first; it can be extremely
hard to catch and kill. But killing one or a few amongst the growing
hundreds, is only a tiny step towards total victory over a roach problem. A single female cockroach can have 150 offspring
each year. So if left unchecked, a roach problem can
turn into a cockroach infestation in a quick period of time. Getting rid of cockroaches for good will be
difficult, especially if you’re not aware of what you’re up against. Using an aerosol insecticide and spraying
a few confirmed and suspect spots does little, if nothing towards destroying a growing roach
colony. You have to get at the main cockroach nest
with the poison. Roaches thrive in warm, dark, damp areas where
they have access to a food source. They can also thrive in dry conditions, Cockroaches
are scavengers so any fresh or fermenting food such as, fruit or any type of organic
matter will do. Even wood glue or the insulation covering
electrical wires are a banquet for these critters. How do roaches get in your home? Boxes brought home from the a grocery store. A roach can go undetected as it lives between
the cracks and seams of a cardboard box from a grocery store or food plant. Cardboard boxes are one of the most ideal
places roaches like to live and breed. Certain types of cardboard boxes to watch
out for are the corrugated types that usually hold fruits and vegetables mainly. Used furniture A single cockroach can live off the glue of
a postage stamp for about one year. Some coffee tables, couches, countertops,
have some degree of glue in the construction. Cockroaches can thrive and multiply from eating
the glue from these types of furniture. These house items are also prone to having
debris of food crumbs in or around its general area, enough to make them ideal for roaches. So check very well before you buy second hand
furniture off the internet or from containter auctions if you plan to use them in your own
home. Hitched a ride in Roaches can be brought into your dwelling
on someone’s clothing such as a jacket or carry bag, or even, from inside shoes. Roaches commonly will go into warm shoe while
foraging, as shoes are sometimes damp and dark. These conditions are perfect for a juvenile,
foraging cockroach. This is just one of the many ways roaches
get transported to their new homes. However, one roach can’t start an empire in
your home, it takes two or more and the living conditions must be roach friendly. Usually, cockroach nests or roach concentrations
will be found under or in kitchen or bathroom cabinets’, sinks, under refrigerators, or
tucked in open seams or crevices along, under and around a kitchen counter top, where it’s
usually be dark and damp. Sometimes a fresh supply of food is unwittingly
supplied as garbage and organic bins are sometimes kept under sinks in some kitchens, providing
the perfect conditions for the roaches to live and breed. Aerosol Insecticides Generally, there are many chemical and non-chemical
insecticides available on the market that will kill the common cockroach. With the aerosol spray insecticide, the spray
must come in direct contact with the roach before it can kill the roach. Even though roaches leave sent trials for
other roaches to follow, not all roaches will take the same route and not all cockroaches
will need to venture out to look for food. This means in order to be effective using
an aerosol spray insecticide, you must get up close and personal and spray directly onto
the roach or nest making sure that no spot is missed in and around that infested area. Some spray insecticides will last for up to
2 weeks on a surface that has been sprayed however; the effectiveness starts diminishing
as soon as the oxygen in the air begins to interact with the insecticide liquid. Due to government regulations the chemical
formulas used in store bought household insecticides have gotten weaker and less effective in killing
roaches. The effectiveness of store bought insecticides
has diminished over the years. In addition; being millions of years old,
the cockroach is a genetic marvel, one of the true survivor species. Over the years the common cockroach it has
adapted and become more immune to most store-bought insecticides. Insecticide Powder or Insecticide Chalk Powdered insecticides and chalk insecticides
are low poisonous, powerful and highly effective in killing roaches, as well as others critters
such as: ants, lice and louse. This type of insecticide is spread, in the
areas where the roach activity is seen frequently like garbage bin areas, under kitchen cabinets
and also along baseboards. However, you have to be ready and and able
to get down on your hands and knees to apply the product to the areas. When the cockroach comes in contact with the
powder with any part of its body, the insect’s nervous system will fail to function and it
will die within 4 to 10 hours. The exposed roaches will bring the poison
that’s on its body, back to the nest area, and spread the poison through-out the whole
roach colony, which will in-turn, wipe them out for good. The active ingredient in the most of the highly
effective chalk and powdered insecticide formulas is Boric Acid. Boric acid is non toxic, odourless and safe
for the environment, humans and pets. Chalk type insecticide As shown in one of the pictures. Miraculous Chalk Insecticide has been around
since 1987. It’s made in China but can be found in any
of the Asian, markets However; this product has been said to be toxic in large doses so
not the best thing to have around if you have small children or pets. Hiring an Exterminator Hiring a professional pest control company
to come and do the job can be costly. However, there is huge value in spending the
money on getting rid of vermin from your home. The 2 or 3 hundred dollars you spend on a
reputable exterminator is a good investmentif your faceing a heavy roach infestation. EVER PEST EVER Pest Ultrasonic Pest Repelent – is a
fast way to get rid of cockroches and many other pests from inside your home including
crickets, lady bugs, german roach, termite, ticks, garbage bag trash flies, spiders and
bed bugs. One of the most powerfull repellers in the
market that ACTUALLY WORKS! Great Electronic treatment for your home. Your children, dog, and cat can sleep well. Repellant will not bother them The electric
device will give you professional protection, like if you would use bomb, poison, spray
or fogger (which kills pests) Ever Pest Repelant the new natural eco eliminator wich do not
kill the pest but drives them away Have you ever used fly swatter, bug zapper or maybe
any wearable uv or deet bracelet to reject insects? You can say goodbye to them, with an organic,
poison-free and truly efficient solution; The smart device guarantees to keep flying
and crawling visitors out Simply plug it and turn on power; LED Bulb light will turn on
and will start emitting ultrasound waves that pests find incredibly annoying and cannot
withstand; After that they are driven away never to come back. away and never come back You’ll also benefit
from a health stand-point as well having the peace of mind knowing that a cockroach won’t
come running across your counter while your entertaining guests. For more useful information and tips please
like and subscribe.

The Ants Go Marching #2 | + More Kids Songs | Super Simple Songs

The Ants Go Marching #2 | + More Kids Songs | Super Simple Songs


(upbeat music) ♪ The ants go marching one by one ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching one by one ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching one by one ♪ ♪ The little one eats a juicy plum ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching two by two ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching two by two ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching two by two ♪ ♪ The little one drinks some apple juice ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching three by three ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching three by three ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching three by three ♪ ♪ The little one drinks a spot of tea ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching four by four ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching four by four ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching four by four ♪ ♪ The little one eats an ear of corn ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching five by five ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching five by five ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching five by five ♪ ♪ The little one eats a pumpkin pie ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching six by six ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching six by six ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching six by six ♪ ♪ The little one eats potato chips ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching seven by seven ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching seven by seven ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching seven by seven ♪ ♪ The little one eats a watermelon ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching eight by eight ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching eight by eight ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching eight by eight ♪ ♪ The little one eats a chocolate cake ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching nine by nine ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching nine by nine ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching nine by nine ♪ ♪ The little one eats a sour lime ♪ ♪ And they all go marching
down to the ground ♪ ♪ To get out of the rain, yum, yum, yum ♪ ♪ The ants go marching 10 by 10 ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching 10 by 10 ♪ ♪ Hurrah, hurrah ♪ ♪ The ants go marching 10 by 10 ♪ ♪ The little one stops
to shout, I’m full ♪

STARTING A NEW FIRE ANT COLONY | REBIRTH OF THE FIRE ANTS

STARTING A NEW FIRE ANT COLONY | REBIRTH OF THE FIRE ANTS


Last week, we said goodbye to one of the OG
ant colonies of this channel. It was with great sadness that we discovered
that the Fire Nation, my five year old fire ant colony, had died out. But with great endings come new beginnings,
and I can’t wait to introduce to you the heirs to the Fire Nation’s throne. AC Family, today we meet our brand new fire
ant queen and her first pioneering generation of fire ant workers. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL ICON. Welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! Behold! The great successors of the Fire Nation. What you’re seeing here is a new fire ant
queen with her first generation of worker ants. These ants are about to receive something
truly special, so do keep on watching until the end to witness something magical this
colony is about to receive. Now in this test tube setup, we have the queen,
so gorgeous. We also have the first set of workers, which
are known as nanitics. You can also see eggs, larvae, and pupae. Check out that light coloured worker ant which
recently eclosed from its pupal stage. In a few days, it will be moving around like
the other workers, and its exoskeleton properly hardened. I find this fledgling fire ant colony to be
so cute, and I feel they’ll quickly rise in numbers to take their place as the mighty
fire ant colony of our Antiverse. Now, I was thinking. What should we name this colony? Should we call them Fire Nation 2.0 or the
Neo Fire Nation, or perhaps the Phoenix Nation, as was popularly suggested in last week’s
video. Let me know what you think we should name
this great fire ant colony in the making in this ipoll here. Thank you, AC Council for your input. You’ll notice the queen lays super still. She’s actually resting and preserving her
energy, and for good reason. She’s currently not in her best form at
the moment. You see, the queen hasn’t eaten a real,
full meal in weeks and has gone through quite a lot over the past month. So get this, after a queen mates during her
nuptial flight, she breaks off her wings, and goes off to seal herself within a chamber
in the soil, known as a claustral cell. In this claustral cell, the queen does not
eat and subsists entirely off energy stores in her back muscles which previously powered
her wings for flight. She lays eggs and once these eggs hatch into
larvae, she feeds the larvae a self-made nutritious soup, again created from her back muscle stores,
which she regurgitates up for the larvae to eat. The larvae grow, develop into pupae, then
eclose into adult worker ants. So, this queen here is starving. She literally raised these workers and larvae
off her own body tissues this whole time. Sound pretty crazy but it what she’s built
to do. It’s important she doesn’t move around
too much, though. She must preserve her energy at all costs
if she wants to survive to perpetuate the colony. The success of the entire colony now lies
in the hands of the nanitics. The most important first task of these workers
is to wander out into the world, and bring back some food so the queen can finally eat
after all these weeks of fasting, and AC Family, guess what: We’re about to make that moment
happen now. Let’s feed them! AC Family, I can’t wait for us to see this! Using a toothpick I placed a tiny drop of
honey into their test tube setup. Now let’s watch! Instantly a couple ants discovered the honey. Then a third came along to drink. Then a fourth… a fifth… and a sixth came
to drink. A seventh ant came along and an eighth. It was awesome to see that the honey was such
a hit! You also have to remember that these ants
have only known the self-made regurgitated soup from their mother, the queen. I imagine, as great as that must taste, this
honey must truly be blowing their minds right now! Wouldn’t you think? The queen began showing signs of excitement. I think she had been informed that her nanitics
had found something tasty just beyond. A few minutes later, workers with full social
stomachs came back to regurgitate the goods. At first, I saw the workers were feeding other
workers. This process of regurgitation and mouth to
mouth feeding is called trophallaxis, something all eusocial insects like bees and termites
do to distribute food among members of a colony. Then I noticed a worker feeding a larva. I bet that larvae was loving the honey. When the worker was done feeding it, you could
actually see the honey in the larva’s stomach through its semi-transparent body. How neat right? And then finally, a worker moved in to give
their starving queen mother her very first meal in weeks. Just awesome! More and more workers continued to feed their
queen via trophallaxis. She accepted their offerings graciously. For me, watching a queen and nanitics of a
starting ant colony receive their very first meal is truly one of the most beautiful things
to witness in the hobby, one of those ant keeping joys. Over the next few days, I will continue to
offer our fledgling fire ant colony here various small meals, like a cricket leg or a mealworm
head. The days of fasting and subsisting on the
queen’s own body tissues are now over, as the workers will be the ones feeding the queen
and brood from now on. With the queen properly nourished and a growing
army of worker ants caring for her and her future brood, she no longer needs to do anything
else but perform her primary duty of laying eggs. I think it’s super cool for us to be able
to start this awesome new journey with this new fire ant colony of ours. I think it’s extra cool because it’s been
years since we’ve been able to start an ant colony from scratch like this on the channel,
and I think it would be great for us to watch how a massive fire ant colony of the likes
of our late Fire Nation, emerges from such humble beginnings. Given ample food and resources, this species
literally explodes in population, so I anticipate that this colony will need to move out of
here in a week or two. I plan on moving them first into a Hybrid
Nest, and then once they outgrow that, move them into a terrarium perhaps. But here’s the thing about moving them into
the Selva de Fuego, the old home of our Fire Nation. A lot of you spotted that the supermajor in
last week’s episode had a blood sucking mite on it! It freaked me out because it meant that mites
could have been responsible for wiping out the Fire Nation, and not old age of the queen. But, it could also be possible that the blood
sucking mites came after the queen had died and the population started to dwindle and
weaken. Whatever the case, I’m not going to take
risks, and I have decided that I am going to have to ditch the Selva de Fuego and create
an entirely new vivarium from scratch. I still have a few months to plan before this
colony will be big enough to move in a terrarium anyway. Though the past few weeks have been quite
rough, this new fire ant colony brings me new hope. Though they don’t seem like it yet, this
cute ant colony will soon rise to become the savage, aggressive, and powerful fire ant
kingdom we once knew in the Fire Nation, and until then I’ll continue to nurture them
and film their evolution, every step of the way. Thank you for watching. It’s ant love forever. AC Family, are you as excited as I am about
this new fire ant colony? I look forward to building new memories together
with them and learning about them. I wonder if they have a different personality
than the Fire Nation. So much is in store ahead so if you haven’t
yet, SMASH that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON now and hit ALL so you get notified at
every upload, because I believe notifications seem to be broken but the Youtube support
team is on it. Also don’t forget to hit the LIKE button
every single time including now. It would really mean a lot to me. Thank you, guys! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch some extended play footage of our new young fire
ant colony. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: Which was your favourite memory of the Fire
Nation? Congratulations to Patrick Tierney who answered: My favorite moment in the Fire Nation’s
history was when they were escaping their enclosures. Congratulations Patrick, you just won a free
Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: What is the name of the process of mouth-to-mouth
food transfer in eusocial insects? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to our channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

ANTCUBE Ameisenarenen – Arena für Ameisen

ANTCUBE Ameisenarenen – Arena für Ameisen


Hi Guys, do you love to play with such Clamps, too? Everything fits together perfectly. That was exactly the idea for our ANCUBE Arenas. Which Arena sizes and designs are available? First of all we have three sizes of cubes: 10x10x10, 20x20x20 and 30x30x30 cm For more space, the arenas are also available in double length and height. Then there are the flat Arena versions. The flat arena version has better accessibility to the ground. Or you let decoration stick out. The 10 and 20cm depth Arenas have 27mm hole for 3/4 inch … … or M25 screw connection. So you can put together Arenas with the same depth perfectly. The 30cm deep arenas have 50mm holes for larger colonies. We also offer Arenas with the hole centered in the middle hight. These are intended for half-filled with soil applications. Here the ants can dig free. In this case you cn look very well into the nest from below. In addition tu that there is the center design. The center cube has an additional 13 mm holes on the side for feeding. But here is the danger that pets or children accidentally open the formicarium. These here are The “Combi Arenas”. A compact design with integrated farm / nest area. You can fill it with Sand loam for example. When using nestin inserts from cork, plaster or Digfix… You can see this little 8mm gap. This is because these are the same Nests which we made for our ant farms. So you have to fill this gap with clay or something or something similar. All arenas are expandable and have two holes. We have suitable grid-caps and plugs With our different Connectors you can add additional arenas or farms. Here some examples: A Formicarium plug is used for easy closing. If you want to provide ventilation, you can use a grid insert. Use a basin hose connector to connect a tube to the arena. You can also connect several arenas together. We have transparent connections. And many other special connectors. Usually, you would stay at one of the three arena depths 10, 20 or 30cm. But sometimes you want to switch between sizes. This is an example between the size 10 and 20cm. Both have a 27mm hole. But the 30cm Arenas have 50mm holes. So if you want to connect a 27mm hole with a 50mm hole, … … you can simply use a Formicarium plug 50mm with a 27mm cutout. Now you have 27mm holes on both sides. Now you can connect it easy. But there are many other options that we will show you in a separate video. Of course there is alos a frame avalible for every arena size. You can coat the frame from below with escape protection oil, lacquer or powder. Now the Ants are no longer able to walk along the frame. If it is secured this way, you can even keep ants in an open Setup. The Arena covers have 50 mm holes We have suitable lamps, fans, humidifiers, mesh inserts and plugs for all of our covers. As decoration or to hide a heating mat… … we also offer different Photo Backgrounds for different habitats. We were often asked what the difference to a terrarium or aquarium is The first thing you notice is the side holes for the expansion options. An aquarium or terrarium is normally not expandable. In addition, the glass bonds are special. It is transparent, not black, as is often the case with aquariums and terrariums. You can see very well whether ants crawl up the corners. There is no silicone bead inside. Aquariums need them so that they can take the water pressure. Here is hardly any silicone between the glass so that the corners are very close. Some species could bite through wide seams. Our edges are also finer deburred than in an aquarium. Which results in a more precise finish on Top. Everything is as tight as possible. On the Top edge the Arena have a rubber coating. This creates a tight and sealed fit… wich prevents the Ants from escaping. Hey, lets have a look from an Ant perspective. I am in the middle of the colony.The Ants are running around wild here. And from this perspective you can see the breakout protection frame quite well. In this case it is coated with powder. I am not be able to climb up there, And the Ants should not be able, too. Now it is a little to crowded in here.
I get out of here. I hope this was a useful overview to you about the different ANTCUBE Ant arenas. Thanks for watching see you next time!

Group recruitment in golden tail sugar ant

Group recruitment in golden tail sugar ant


Hey I have finally been able to take a video
of my favorite behavior of one of my favorite ant species that you can find here in Australia
in Sydney its name is Camponotus aeneopilosus also known as the Golden tail sugar ant. And you can see on this video that there is
one first ant a small one that is leading a group of workers, so if you count there
are about seven workers only following that first ant the ant leading that group is called
a scout. It forages quite randomely around the nest
and as soon as it finds something it comes back straight to the nest, start bumping into
other workers, and when it feels that other workers are motivated to join her on a new
trip to the food source it stats running away from the nest leaving a very light pheromone
trail that does not last long behind, and the other workers try to follow that scout
using visual informations, so by looking at this ant and using of course the light pheromone
trails that the first worker leaves behind. This behavior is very interesting and it allows
these ants to recruit other foragers very very quickly which is of course very useful
when the resources are scarce. Another advantage of this technique of recruitment
is that by not leaving strong pheromone trails behind them, the other ants cannot use the
trails left by this species to find the same food source. Of course it sometimes happens that the leader
loose a few workers on the way, but they are able to go to the food source very quickly
and that is the essential part for the colony, so it is not such a big loss. In that case, the food source was not very
glamorous, sorry about that, it was hum… bird droppings. It is a quite common food source for ants. As you can see on this video the Camponotus
were not the first one on that food source and you can see the small black ants that
are everywhere here. They are probably Iridomyrmex or Tapinoma
ants. They are very very efficient foragers, which
also explains why it is important for ants like Camponotus to find ways to recruit other
workers very quickly. Thank you for watching I hope you enjoyed
this video.

Ranger Nick: Why So Many Ant Mounds Right Now?

Ranger Nick: Why So Many Ant Mounds Right Now?


[Upbeat Music]
[Dr. Nick Fuhrman/UGA Professor, “Ranger Nick”] Well as we start this new year off, maybe
the holidays have you driving around maybe across the interstate looking out across some
farm pastures and seeing what look like little mounds of soil, maybe fire ant mounds, and
it had you wondering, “Why am I seeing more of them right now? What is the deal with that?” I thought I’d explore that with you this month
and introduce you to somebody who knows quite a bit about this, and that’s Dr. Will Hudson. Dr. Hudson, so nice to meet you. [Dr. Hudson]
Good to see you Nick [Ranger Nick]
I appreciate you spending some time with us today. I want to talk about fire ants, and I want
to talk specifically about a particular mound that we’re standing in front of today. I often see that maybe after a rain at night
or after the temperatures have been maybe a little cooler, I’ll walk out in my yard
and find fire ant mounds that were not there a day or two ago, and I think that maybe I’m
just seeing things. What is the deal with that? Why are we seeing more of those like this
one after a rain at night, after a cooler night? Why is that? [Dr. Will Hudson/UGA Professor of Entomology]
Well, particularly if the conditions have been real hot and dry before that, the rain
provides the ants with the perfect conditions to rebuild their mound. The colony’s always been there, well not always,
but it was there before. [Ranger Nick]
Oh, okay. [Dr. Hudson]
The dirt that you see suddenly pop up is just the dirt that they moved out of the tunnels
and the chambers that are underground where they live, and that’s why suddenly they have
a mound built that wasn’t apparent to you before. The colony itself has been there for months. [Ranger Nick]
Under the soil. [Dr. Hudson]
Under the soil. [Ranger Nick]
I can’t see them, okay. [Dr. Hudson]
They had a mound, but then either they got rained on, or it got stepped on, or it got
so dry that the soil wouldn’t hold its structure, and as soon as the soil conditions are right
they can build that mound back up. [Ranger Nick]
Interesting. And sometimes in South Georgia or the southeast
where there’s more sandy soils, maybe those mounds aren’t as high I guess because the
clumping ability of that soil is not there. [Dr. Hudson]
Right, you can pile clay up higher than you can pile sand. [Ranger Nick]
Yeah. [Dr. Hudson]
That’s the bottom line on that. [Ranger Nick]
Now let’s look at, if you don’t mind, let’s look at this one together. And I just happen to have my son’s little
shovel with me today. Here’s this mound. I’m noticing in this mound all of these little
particles of sand and clay are the same size. You’re saying, thinking to us, that they are
pushing these particles up out of the ground after it rains. They’re cleaning out what has washed down. Is that what you’re saying? [Dr. Hudson]
Right, and they’re not pushing, they’re carrying them one at a time in their jaws. They’ve got no other, they’ve got no pockets,
so they’re carrying them one at a time up there. [Ranger Nick]
Yeah and this, and I can kind of see some holes in there, and I just kind of want to
dig in and see what … and look at this, look at what we’re able to see with these
smaller holes and these tunnels. Now these guys must be down low because it’s
been cooler at night, and they’re down low getting warm. Is that what you’re saying? [Dr. Hudson]
Right, they’ll be up at the top of the mound. If it were a bright, sunny day today they
would probably be up there basking not on the outside but just inside. You can see the tunnels, all of these right
in here are places where they can come up. As the sun warms the soil, they warm up too
because they’re cold blooded. They’re trying to get to a place where the
temperature is most comfortable for them. [Ranger Nick]
Which that’s so interesting, and that dynamic of those ants under the ground, that’s what
I want to talk with you about next is going and looking at the culture of these ants. And I promise I won’t put my hand in there,
but I do want to kind of move some things around with you and see some of those areas
of work. So let’s go there next. [Ranger Nick]
Okay, so we’ve had a cooler night. We’ve had a rainy night. The mound is now showing up outside of the
ground, and I’m looking at this. And Dr. Hudson, we’re looking at this together,
I’m going to just kind of dig into this a little. Before I disturb it too much … Oh my gosh,
and the beautiful caverns. First of all, these little guys with wings,
are they ants? I’ve never seen an ant with wings. [Dr. Hudson]
Well yes. They are ants. Those are the ones that are the, what we call
reproductives. That’s the males and females that will mate. Then the new queens will start the next colony. [Ranger Nick]
Wow, so and they’re mating, but they have to fly to mate? I mean, that’s why they have the wings? [Dr. Hudson]
They fly up into the air. If you see it, it’s usually late in the afternoon,
it looks like a little plume of smoke coming up. [Ranger Nick]
Wow, okay. [Dr. Hudson]
And they mate in the air, and they fall back to the ground. Males die. [Ranger Nick]
Okay [Dr. Hudson]
The females lose their wings and go into the ground and create a small chamber, start laying
eggs, and that becomes the next colony. [Ranger Nick]
Wow, okay. [Dr. Hudson]
That why I say if you’re talking about fire ants, you need to think of it as a colony
not as individual ants. [Ranger Nick]
Interesting. So now okay, so I’m looking at this, and I
know we’re looking up close on the camera too. So we’ve got the ones with wings which we
now know are reproductive ants, but there’s other ones that are bigger, and I see one
moving a little granule of soil. Bigger ones and then there’s smaller ones. Is that an age difference, or do they have
different hierarchy in their family there, their colony? [Dr. Hudson]
Ants as all insects, once they become adults they don’t grow anymore. Their skeleton is on the outside so they can’t
grow anymore, so. [Ranger Nick]
I’ve got to do this. Sorry, I just have to look in here. I have to see what’s going on. [Dr. Hudson]
No, that’s fine. [Ranger Nick]
Look at this. Look at that. [Dr. Hudson]
There are different sizes of individuals. Some of that is related to the jobs that they
do in the colony, and some of it is just variation in size just as people are different sizes. [Nick]
Okay [Dr. Hudson]
So you get some variation that way. [Ranger Nick]
Interesting. Now I would have loved to have talked to some
of these ants today, Dr. Hudson, to find out their perspective on what they think of us
humans disturbing their mounds and everything, but I’ve got to tell you. With a little boy at home and a little girl
at home as well that will soon be walking, we go out in the yard, and we have a thing
of that ant spray that we buy from the local hardware store. Miles and I spray that stuff all over the
mound, and we say, “We have killed the ants.” Then a couple of days later we see them again. What are we doing wrong? [Dr. Hudson]
Well, you saw the structure of the mound. It goes a long way down into the dirt, and
if all you do is spray the surface you’re not beginning to get down to the area where
the money is. [Ranger Nick]
Yeah, yeah. [Dr. Hudson]
Which is you’ve got to kill the queen. If you don’t affect the queen, you can’t control
the colony. So you’ve got to put that insecticide, if
you’re going to treat an individual mound, you have to put it in enough water that it
carries the insecticide all the way down to the bottom of the mound where the queen is. [Ranger Nick]
And how much water are we talking? [Dr. Hudson]
At least a gallon of water per average size mound. [Ranger Nick]
Wow, okay. [Dr. Hudson]
Because there’s a lot of volume of soil in there, and you’ve got to get all the way down
through it. [Ranger Nick]
Okay. Now what if I’ve got a bigger area of land
I’m going to tackle? Maybe the bucket isn’t going to be enough. What do you do then? [Dr. Hudson]
If you’re up to, if you’re over an acre, for sure over an acre, then you need to be using
a bait. If you put it out twice a year … There used
to be a guarantee on some brands that you would have no mounds. [Ranger Nick]
Okay. [Dr. Hudson]
Right? That’s pretty good. [Ranger Nick]
All right, yeah. [Dr. Hudson]
If you’re in smaller than an acre then if you’re treating mounds individually, that’s
a thing for retired people. [Ranger Nick]
Okay….”Laughing” [Dr. Hudson]
Because you’re going to be doing that constantly, and you never win that. [Ranger Nick]
Yeah. [Dr. Hudson]
So you need to treat the whole area. [Ranger Nick]
Excellent. [Dr. Hudson]
And if you treat the whole area with a broadcast spray or spread granules out you can suppress
ants, and suppress is all you’re going to do with that sort of treatment for anywhere
from a few weeks to a couple of months. [Ranger Nick]
Interesting. [Dr. Hudson]
And that’s it. [Ranger Nick]
Well I got to tell you, I don’t know about the folks at home, I have learned so much
about what I’m doing wrong. I’ve learned so much about the culture of
the ant colony. Dr. Hudson, thanks so much for today. I so appreciate it. Such an interesting topic. I can’t wait for the folks at home to see
it. You all know what to do. When you’re at home checking things out online
maybe about fire ants in your area, hop on over to the Farm Monitor Facebook page and
check that out. While you’re on Facebook, check out the Ranger
Nick Facebook page and see what I’ve got going on in my world. Until next time, as I always say Dr. Hudson,
for the Farm Monitor I’m Ranger Nick reminding you that enthusiasm is contagious. So pass it on. You all, thanks so much for watching. We’ll see you right back here again next month. See you. [Fast paced music]

MY GREATEST ANT COLONY DIED | RIP FIRE NATION

MY GREATEST ANT COLONY DIED | RIP FIRE NATION


Last week, during our full ant room tour update
video, we fed my biggest ant colony in the Ant Room, our OG fire ant colony, we call
the Fire Nation, some sweet jelly and an entire cockroach. This was actually the first time I offered
them food on this open rock platform in quite awhile, just so we could see them for filming. Ordinarily, I’d drop their food directly
into the thick vegetation around their mothernest where the ants would finish off their meals
in private. But this feeding would be different, and it
wasn’t long before I noticed something quite strange. This was what the feeding site looked like
several hours later. Usually, the fire ants would be swarming all
over this food, but here as you can see, there were only a few ants. Where did all my fire ants go? And what I saw a few hours after that, brought
a sick feeling to the pit of my stomach. There! Did you see it? Wild feral black crazy ants and ghost ants
were inside the Fire Nation’s territory. This never happens! The territorial pheromones of the fire ants
were enough to scare all feral ants in my home from coming anywhere near this tank. Now, they were seen inside! Something was terribly wrong. What happened to the Fire Nation? Where was my most beloved and biggest pet
ant colony of my entire collection? There was only one way to find out. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL ICON. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! I couldn’t believe what I was seeing! Ghost ants and black crazy ants entering the
Selva de Fuego, the Fire Nation’s massive paludarium kingdom. I even spotted one black crazy ant making
away with a dead fire ant worker! What had happened here? Well, I got to the bottom of it all and I
explain what I believe happened so keep on watching until the end. I couldn’t believe that just a few months
ago the colony looked like this. Millions of ants, swarming above ground, in
celebration of their annual nuptial flight event, where reproductive males and females
hope to mate with those of other fire ant colonies. Of course, seeing as I don’t have any other
fire ant colonies in my room, all the reproductive queen hopefuls and males, ended up not mating
with anyone and dying out within the territories like they do every year at this time. It was shocking to see a colony which I’ve
had for over 4 yrs go from millions to just a few. This fire ant colony was definitely the most
popular ant colony on this channel, and I would say was responsible for taking this
channel and all of us AC Family, where we are toda y. The Fire Nation has accumulated over 153M
views collectively. Their first break out viral video My Fire
Ants Are Planning an Escape currently has over 39 million views. Shortly after, they showed us the savage side
of nature in the video Cockroach Giving Birth While Being Devoured by Fire Ants, which was
featured on Nat Geo and Discovery Channel. Together we watched as the Fire Nation devoured
Donald Trump & Hillary Clinton during US elections season, and showed us the miracle of how they
survive floods by literally creating air chambers using their bodies and by floating on water. They showed us how they amazingly could walk
a tight-rope to get to food across my room. When the channel hit 1 million subscribers,
I tested my luck by placing my honey-covered hand into their nest, at which of course they
riddled me with stings. On Christmas, we gave them a glittering cockroach
christmas tree which they devoured lovingly. Eventually they moved from their formicarium
to this enormous half land – half water simulation of the Amazon River and rainforest which they
dominated and ruled for two very epic years! We marveled at the Fire Nation’s display
of blood and flesh-lust as they tore apart a bird-eating tarantula, a chicken head, a
mouse, a monitor lizard, and even compete with an army of maggots for a decaying turkey
head! They even gave me battle scars on occasion
to remind me that they were an ant colony to be respected. A super organism and force of nature that
wasn’t playing around! We’ve also been lucky to spot, her royal
highness a few times, the Queen of the Fire Nation, whose name is Queen Solis, sole egg-layer
of the colony, birther of this ant army of millions, who once even narrated an episode. There’s no denying that this ant colony,
though the most challenging ants I’ve ever kept, always keeping me on my toes, was also
one of the most amazing collection of animals, I’ve ever had the honour of caring for. And so it was time to get to the bottom of
what had happened to the Fire Nation. It pained my heart to put on my gloves, knowing
that this could possibly be the last time, I’d be arming myself to go into the Selva
de Fuego, the kingdom I had built with my own hands just for them. My heart raced as I stared down at the location
of their mothernest. If the Fire Nation was still alive, they for
sure would be in here somewhere. My mind started to come up with possibilities. Perhaps they had eaten a lot and weren’t
so hungry. But no, that had never happened before ever! AC Family, it was time to get our answers. I went in and removed the driftwood that formed
their mothernest. I looked for fire ants which ordinarily would
be swarming right now as they did the last time I worked in here. And AC Family, what I saw next shocked me
to the core, as the entire life of the Fire Nation flashed before my eyes. Nothing. The Fire Nation was nowhere to be found in
the location of the mothernest. I could see empty chambers which once held
teams of fire ants, brood, and formed the passageways frequented by queen and male alates,
as well as Queen Solis. They were empty now and ghost tunnels. But then a movement caught my eye. It was a lone supermajor crawling around in
the soil. I also spotted a minor worker crawling around
in the empty dirt. The truth made me so sad, but I had to accept
it. AC Family, I’m sorry to say that I believe
the Fire Nation was on its final days. Our Queen Solis, the sole egg layer of the
entire colony must have died and these ants here were the last remaining ants of her final
batch of eggs. I’m so sorry, AC Family. I’ll be honest, I don’t think I ever felt
such sadness over the loss of a colony like I do now. Now that you guys know how epic the entire
four year journey was with this amazing ant colony, you can probably understand why I
cried when I realized I had lost these amazing, amazing creatures. I know, crying over ants. It sounds so weird to new ears but it’s
just one of those things where you need to be there on the whole journey with them to
understand. I felt this was the end of an era for the
entire Antiverse, the end of the most amazing ant colony in the world in my heart. I placed the driftwood piece back in its spot
and left the Selva de Fuego to allow the final workers to live out their final days in peace. The Fire Nation was about five years old,
and though I’ve been saying on this channel that though the workers only live for a couple
months and that ant queens live for up to 30 yrs, I think I failed to clarify that this
was assumed by the ant keeping community seeing as it was recorded in a German laboratory
that a Lasius niger queen lived that long, but the truth of the matter is, there are
thousands of species of ants and we haven’t kept every ant species in captivity long enough
to be able to tell and verify how long the queens of each ant species actually lives. I think the passing of the Fire Nation, assuming
they didn’t die out from some freak disease, has taught us that the queens of Solenopsis
geminata, red tropical fire ants, live for about 5 yrs before passing away. Queen Solis must have died, some time in November. In a typical fire ant queen’s life, during
those five fruitful years she lays millions of ants, spawning hundreds of generations
of workers, creating hundreds of thousands of reproductive ants during nuptial flight
season every year which go on to mate with those of other fire ant colonies and continue
on the species, to complete the circle of life. The Fire Nation’s passing was such a tough
reminder that the Circle of Life is indeed a full circle, and our once booming fire ant
colony was inevitably destined to come to an end and eventually die. Though the passing of the OG ant colony of
the channel was sad, I also realized that we had learned so much from them over the
years, and that they had not lived in vain. Some of the footage and discoveries we made
of their intriguing, secret lives in the soil and water, during the course of the four years
we’ve followed them on this channel, have not been documented by science. By providing the Fire Nation the best possible
care we could give them to live out their best lives, they rewarded us back with such
a wealth of info, discovery, and heart-stopping and adventurous moments, and that to me is
the essence of what ant keeping is all about. I have been contemplating for a long time
about what to do with the Selva de Fuego, now that it was devoid of an ant colony, other
than these feral ants which by the way we need to discourage from being here, so I was
hoping to get your opinions AC Council. Should we get rid of the Selva de Fuego and
rehome all the aquatic life, or move in another of our ant colonies in here like the Golden
Empire or the Titans? Or should I try to find a brand new fledgling
fire ant colony to start all over again from scratch, to be the Fire Nation’s successors,
a Fire Nation 2.0 of sorts. Let me know in this ipoll here. AC Family, this week, I lit a candle on our
behalf to celebrate the life and death of one of the most amazing ant colonies in the
world. Rest in peace to the Fire Nation. Goodbye, my beloved fire ant colony. I’ll miss you greatly. AC Family, it was a tough two weeks for me
when I first noticed the Fire Nation population had dwindled and then later discovered they
had died out, but I suppose it’s all part of the hobby. So much is in store ahead so if you haven’t
yet, SMASH that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON now and hit ALL so you get notified at
every upload, because I believe notifications seem to be broken but the Youtube support
team is on it. Also don’t forget to hit the LIKE button
every single time including now. It would really mean a lot to me. Thank you, guys! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch some extended play footage of some of my favourite
memories of the Fire Nation. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: Which was your favourite creature featured
in today’s full pet ant tour? Congratulations to Alexander Churchill who
answered: I love Jabba the Hutt, the Surinam Horned
Frog. Congratulations Alexander, you just won a
free Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: Which was your favourite memory of the Fire
Nation? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to our channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Ants in Madagascar! | Ants & Canopy Bootcamp 2019

Ants in Madagascar! | Ants & Canopy Bootcamp 2019


Jacob: yeah that was first time I’d used a hand
saw in the tree. They hauled it up to me on the rope and I used that to
cut out a big Camponotus colony. Kind of close to the ground but it’s still
pretty cool. Brian: people go into the forest and they think
“wow, what a beautiful forest” because they see the trees but actually what lives in
the trees just like this amazingly complicated question. It’s a
three-dimensional space there’s insects up there, there’s birds,
there’s lemurs, and we want to know what ants live up there. Why ants? Well, it’s
because they’re one the most dominant organisms in a forest, especially a
rainforest like here in Madagascar, but there are a few people that actually
know how to get up there, so we decided for the first time ever to organize the
training of Malagasy scientists and international scientists to go into the
canopy and explore and discover what ants live up there. Miles: in the summer of 2019
an international team of ant researchers organized an expedition into
Madagascar’s Western dry forests. Their goal: to survey ant diversity high in the
forest canopy while teaching the next generation of scientists. Camille: Madagascar is
home to a tremendous amount of biodiversity with ecosystems ranging
from the montane tropical rainforest to dry spiny thickets
however Madagascar’s unique biodiversity is really threatened by
anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation and biological invasions.
Miles: after arriving in Madagascar the students begin lessons in ant morphology
they also discuss special field collection techniques. The first week
concludes with intensive training with tree climbing experts. Camile: so especially in
islands with such high levels of endemism it’s really important to
protect the biodiversity and create nuanced and informed management schemes
and in order to do that we really need to understand the diversity and the
various ecosystems of Madagascar especially looking into canopy
ecosystems which are typically really understudied but harbor a lot of
biodiversity. It’s really cool for our work to be able to understand the
diversity and abundance of various ant species in the dry forests of Ankarafantsika. Miles: Once their preparations are complete
the team leaves the capital city and heads into the island’s dry western
landscape. Bonnie: The reason we’re trying to assess canopy and diversity is that we
currently only have three sites in Madagascar sampled for ants in the canopy
but we have over a thousand samples for ants on the ground, so the ground nesting
ant fauna is it’s pretty well sampled and described by my colleague Brian
Fisher’s work but the canopy has been neglected so far so our studies
in Ankarafantsika National Park is one of the few that is looking for canopy
ants specifically. Brian: Madagascar is like a continent upon itself there is the dry
forest, the wet forest, the desert – and more so even within a habitat like the dry
forest, almost every forest patch is different we don’t really know what
we’re gonna find maybe we’ll find even something spectacular new but the first
step is just getting to that habitat. We’ll be testing different methods. By
the end of this we’ll probably have a good protocol for how to sample canopy
ants in Madagascar in the dry forest Jen: my name is Jen Schlauch and I’m an ant researcher and
I’m currently quite a few meters up from the forest floor looking for ants.
So I’ve already climbed the tree and I’m attached to this rope here – this is
how I’ll get down – and I’m up here and I’m breaking sticks. I’m looking for ant nests inside.
It’s pretty easy to overestimate how high you are up in the tree so we have
this convenient rope that’s got markings about every meter and I’m gonna lower it
so you can see how high we are. We’re going to start collecting in this tree
at about 17 meters. Bonnie: so at each tree we had one person climb the tree and search
for ant nests in the trees and collect every single ant they find in the tree
so either collect foragers, workers that are just looking for food in the tree or
ant nests so looking for ant nests and dead branches or dead twigs or on the bark.
Jen: a lot of the ants nest inside the dead twigs of the tree. The reason they
wouldn’t nest inside the living twigs is they often still have a lot of sap and liquid
inside them so they can’t nest inside. This is called an aspirator and it works like a
little handheld vacuum. You use your mouth to suck up the ants. Normally this is a
really good collecting method for ants but the ants that live on trees are used to
climbing up vertical surfaces so they have really good grip so these little
featherweight forceps work better than collecting the ants in the aspirator. They’re a little different from normal
forceps because they’re really delicate so it keeps you from squishing the ant when you pick them up Anne: So I’m one of the climbing instructors and I’m up here with Jen
who’s doing her sampling and she is using a lanyard technique to move
herself around the tree and to position herself to be able to break twigs and
look for ants or look for bark. See this green rope that’s attached to me is
going up to my higher anchor point and this is the rope that I move up and down
on but sometimes that rope doesn’t orient you the way that you want to go
to reach a branch or to take a sample so we have a lanyard that we use and the
lanyard can help us twist different ways or move us across to different branches
where we may want to be. And then I was in a really secure position here I can lean
back and I’m right next to the trunk and I could easily sample
things. Brian: Well, the technique is how to go up into the canopy using ropes in a safe
way and then not just get up there but actually to go from branch to branch – you
know like a like a lemur does Jen: So here I have a really tiny yellow ant,
they had a little foraging trail so they would collect a few of them and they’re
so small we’ll need the dissection scope back at the camp to identify them.
Once I collect the ants I put them in this vial filled with ethanol that
immediately kills them. I record where on the tree I found it, whether it was at a
branch or directly off the trunk and how high up I am. Besides ants you can find a lot of other
things up here like spiders just under the bark and little cockroaches and
sweat bees these are in family Halictidae and they like to suck the sweat off your body.
This tree had a couple of different genera of ants. There was the little
yellow one and Tetraponera and maybe two more genera that I couldn’t identify up
here and this is pretty different from some of the other ant communities we’ve
been seeing on other tree species and one thing this project is aiming to do
is compare the different ant communities between the different trees. Miles: While Jen
and the other climbers tackle the canopy students on the ground search for ants
in the undergrowth. Bonnie: We had one person at the same time sampling for ant nests and
ant foragers in the understory. We defined the understory as around a tree
in a radius of about two meters Miles: Additionally they use beat sheets to
collect insects in a wide radius around the tree by striking plants insects fall
onto the sheets and into the collection cups. Bonnie: And then we also baited for ants
and this was done as as a team usually so the students were placing little
sardine baits tied onto a cord that was then hoisted in the canopy and left for
two to three hours and then the baits were recollected and the ants collected
from the baits. Miles: Between the canopy sampling, ground collections, and tree
baiting, the teams collect hundreds of ants each day. They work into the night processing the new specimens. After 10
days the vials are full and the team travels back to the capital city to
begin the next phase of the project. So when the students come back from the
field with all these ant samples that we collected in the field they have a lot
of work to do. So first of all we need to make sure that every sample is accounted
for in our database. The students were taking notes – so-called collection notes –
while they were collecting the ants so they have to type up their collection
notes first and then we merge these into a joint database. Miles: each sample is assigned
a code linking it to a specific tree, collection time, microhabitat, and other
information called metadata. Students also learn about geographic information
systems which they use to map the ant diversity in the park. Miles: once I’m satisfied
with the accuracy of the database and we start on actually mounting and preparing
one ant per collection – that means glued to a tiny little paper point unless it’s
a colony collection then we would also mount the males and the queens and then
they need to identify every ant to genus and hopefully to species if we
have time. So they have a bunch of work to do over the next few days Michelle: It’s really frustrating to pin really tiny
ants especially when they’re like fractions of a millimeter long because
actually the point that you mount the ant on the piece of paper is bigger than
the ant itself sometimes. There’s a genus called Plagiolepis which I think
everyone struggled with. We decapitated some. It was a struggle but we got
through it! Michelle: This week went well. We pinned and
mounted over 600 ants and that encompasses like 16 genera at least.
Camille: Even though studying and understanding ants in Madagascar is incredibly
important for promoting conservation throughout the island, another really
cool feature that this bootcamp has is training the next generation of
conservationists. So it’s really amazing to foster these collaborations with U.S.
and Malagasy students alike and really be inspired by and build upon these
connections to position us well to make conservation impacts no matter what
field we enter in the future. [music]

Ants in Madagascar! | Ants & Canopy Bootcamp 2019


Jacob: yeah that was first time I’d used a hand
saw in the tree. They hauled it up to me on the rope and I used that to
cut out a big Camponotus colony. Kind of close to the ground but it’s still
pretty cool. Brian: people go into the forest and they think
“wow, what a beautiful forest” because they see the trees but actually what lives in
the trees just like this amazingly complicated question. It’s a
three-dimensional space there’s insects up there, there’s birds,
there’s lemurs, and we want to know what ants live up there. Why ants? Well, it’s
because they’re one the most dominant organisms in a forest, especially a
rainforest like here in Madagascar, but there are a few people that actually
know how to get up there, so we decided for the first time ever to organize the
training of Malagasy scientists and international scientists to go into the
canopy and explore and discover what ants live up there. Miles: in the summer of 2019
an international team of ant researchers organized an expedition into
Madagascar’s Western dry forests. Their goal: to survey ant diversity high in the
forest canopy while teaching the next generation of scientists. Camille: Madagascar is
home to a tremendous amount of biodiversity with ecosystems ranging
from the montane tropical rainforest to dry spiny thickets
however Madagascar’s unique biodiversity is really threatened by
anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation and biological invasions.
Miles: after arriving in Madagascar the students begin lessons in ant morphology
they also discuss special field collection techniques. The first week
concludes with intensive training with tree climbing experts. Camile: so especially in
islands with such high levels of endemism it’s really important to
protect the biodiversity and create nuanced and informed management schemes
and in order to do that we really need to understand the diversity and the
various ecosystems of Madagascar especially looking into canopy
ecosystems which are typically really understudied but harbor a lot of
biodiversity. It’s really cool for our work to be able to understand the
diversity and abundance of various ant species in the dry forests of Ankarafantsika. Miles: Once their preparations are complete
the team leaves the capital city and heads into the island’s dry western
landscape. Bonnie: The reason we’re trying to assess canopy and diversity is that we
currently only have three sites in Madagascar sampled for ants in the canopy
but we have over a thousand samples for ants on the ground, so the ground nesting
ant fauna is it’s pretty well sampled and described by my colleague Brian
Fisher’s work but the canopy has been neglected so far so our studies
in Ankarafantsika National Park is one of the few that is looking for canopy
ants specifically. Brian: Madagascar is like a continent upon itself there is the dry
forest, the wet forest, the desert – and more so even within a habitat like the dry
forest, almost every forest patch is different we don’t really know what
we’re gonna find maybe we’ll find even something spectacular new but the first
step is just getting to that habitat. We’ll be testing different methods. By
the end of this we’ll probably have a good protocol for how to sample canopy
ants in Madagascar in the dry forest Jen: my name is Jen Schlauch and I’m an ant researcher and
I’m currently quite a few meters up from the forest floor looking for ants.
So I’ve already climbed the tree and I’m attached to this rope here – this is
how I’ll get down – and I’m up here and I’m breaking sticks. I’m looking for ant nests inside.
It’s pretty easy to overestimate how high you are up in the tree so we have
this convenient rope that’s got markings about every meter and I’m gonna lower it
so you can see how high we are. We’re going to start collecting in this tree
at about 17 meters. Bonnie: so at each tree we had one person climb the tree and search
for ant nests in the trees and collect every single ant they find in the tree
so either collect foragers, workers that are just looking for food in the tree or
ant nests so looking for ant nests and dead branches or dead twigs or on the bark.
Jen: a lot of the ants nest inside the dead twigs of the tree. The reason they
wouldn’t nest inside the living twigs is they often still have a lot of sap and liquid
inside them so they can’t nest inside. This is called an aspirator and it works like a
little handheld vacuum. You use your mouth to suck up the ants. Normally this is a
really good collecting method for ants but the ants that live on trees are used to
climbing up vertical surfaces so they have really good grip so these little
featherweight forceps work better than collecting the ants in the aspirator. They’re a little different from normal
forceps because they’re really delicate so it keeps you from squishing the ant when you pick them up Anne: So I’m one of the climbing instructors and I’m up here with Jen
who’s doing her sampling and she is using a lanyard technique to move
herself around the tree and to position herself to be able to break twigs and
look for ants or look for bark. See this green rope that’s attached to me is
going up to my higher anchor point and this is the rope that I move up and down
on but sometimes that rope doesn’t orient you the way that you want to go
to reach a branch or to take a sample so we have a lanyard that we use and the
lanyard can help us twist different ways or move us across to different branches
where we may want to be. And then I was in a really secure position here I can lean
back and I’m right next to the trunk and I could easily sample
things. Brian: Well, the technique is how to go up into the canopy using ropes in a safe
way and then not just get up there but actually to go from branch to branch – you
know like a like a lemur does Jen: So here I have a really tiny yellow ant,
they had a little foraging trail so they would collect a few of them and they’re
so small we’ll need the dissection scope back at the camp to identify them.
Once I collect the ants I put them in this vial filled with ethanol that
immediately kills them. I record where on the tree I found it, whether it was at a
branch or directly off the trunk and how high up I am. Besides ants you can find a lot of other
things up here like spiders just under the bark and little cockroaches and
sweat bees these are in family Halictidae and they like to suck the sweat off your body.
This tree had a couple of different genera of ants. There was the little
yellow one and Tetraponera and maybe two more genera that I couldn’t identify up
here and this is pretty different from some of the other ant communities we’ve
been seeing on other tree species and one thing this project is aiming to do
is compare the different ant communities between the different trees. Miles: While Jen
and the other climbers tackle the canopy students on the ground search for ants
in the undergrowth. Bonnie: We had one person at the same time sampling for ant nests and
ant foragers in the understory. We defined the understory as around a tree
in a radius of about two meters Miles: Additionally they use beat sheets to
collect insects in a wide radius around the tree by striking plants insects fall
onto the sheets and into the collection cups. Bonnie: And then we also baited for ants
and this was done as as a team usually so the students were placing little
sardine baits tied onto a cord that was then hoisted in the canopy and left for
two to three hours and then the baits were recollected and the ants collected
from the baits. Miles: Between the canopy sampling, ground collections, and tree
baiting, the teams collect hundreds of ants each day. They work into the night processing the new specimens. After 10
days the vials are full and the team travels back to the capital city to
begin the next phase of the project. So when the students come back from the
field with all these ant samples that we collected in the field they have a lot
of work to do. So first of all we need to make sure that every sample is accounted
for in our database. The students were taking notes – so-called collection notes –
while they were collecting the ants so they have to type up their collection
notes first and then we merge these into a joint database. Miles: each sample is assigned
a code linking it to a specific tree, collection time, microhabitat, and other
information called metadata. Students also learn about geographic information
systems which they use to map the ant diversity in the park. Miles: once I’m satisfied
with the accuracy of the database and we start on actually mounting and preparing
one ant per collection – that means glued to a tiny little paper point unless it’s
a colony collection then we would also mount the males and the queens and then
they need to identify every ant to genus and hopefully to species if we
have time. So they have a bunch of work to do over the next few days Michelle: It’s really frustrating to pin really tiny
ants especially when they’re like fractions of a millimeter long because
actually the point that you mount the ant on the piece of paper is bigger than
the ant itself sometimes. There’s a genus called Plagiolepis which I think
everyone struggled with. We decapitated some. It was a struggle but we got
through it! Michelle: This week went well. We pinned and
mounted over 600 ants and that encompasses like 16 genera at least.
Camille: Even though studying and understanding ants in Madagascar is incredibly
important for promoting conservation throughout the island, another really
cool feature that this bootcamp has is training the next generation of
conservationists. So it’s really amazing to foster these collaborations with U.S.
and Malagasy students alike and really be inspired by and build upon these
connections to position us well to make conservation impacts no matter what
field we enter in the future. [music]

Ant-Trax Ant Bait: Product Review

Ant-Trax Ant Bait: Product Review


Hi, I’m Keith with Solutions Pest and Lawn In this video, we’ll talk about this product,
we are going to cover what it is, what its used for, how to get started, where and when
to apply, and the different considerations before choosing this chemical. Solutions Pest and Lawn is a small family
owned business that relies on people like you to succeed. Our goal is to teach you how to treat your
pest problems. If you have any questions, after watching
this video, please email, call, or visit one of our stores and we can help you out. Ant-Trax is an imidacloprid ant gel bait. This product mimics nicotine which is extremely
toxic to ants insects, and it works by interfering with the Ant’s insect’s nervous system. Ant-Trax controls many different species of
ants, but we recommend it primarily for Argentine, Pharaoh, and Black Ants Before using Ant-Trax, be sure to wear proper
personal protective equipment, or PPE. Before application, make sure to wipe down
any surface you plan to apply the product to. This is not only to ensure a clean application,
but it’s also to deny any other food source for the ants roaches, making the baiting process
more effective. Only use soapy or warm water to clean, as
household chemicals and bleach will deter the insects from your bait. Ant-Trax comes in an easy to use pre-filled
syringe applicator. Simply unscrew the cap and screw in the applicator
tip and you’re ready to apply the product.. After cleaning the area, Ant-Trax can be applied
in small pea sized drops in the path of the ants, or in areas they frequent. Do not apply in a line as the ants will only
feed from either end and not the middle. You can also apply a small drop in the
end of a straw and place it in the path of the ants. This can provide a clean and simple way to
bait the ants, and prolong its effectiveness. Apply Ant-trax in any area you have seen ant
activity. Keep the product out of reach of children
and pets. Ant-Trax is effective up until it dries out. We typically recommend checking the bait placements every 14 days to re apply or clean off product that has dried out. Ant-Trax is not an instant kill – once the
insect consumes the bait, it can take 4-6 hours for it die. This helps the product spread, as Ants will
return to the nest and share the bait among the colony, including the queen. Most active infestations cannot be controlled
through the use of one product. Typically, you’ll also need a liquid concentrate,
a granular insecticide, and a fipronil aerosol for complete control. For ants and other insects,For each insect,
we have come up with treatment methods that we guarantee 100% to work. Click the card on the top right to get more
information. Ant-Trax is a slow acting poison. This is so that when the ants bring it back
to feed the colony they will think that it is safe to eat. Because of this, it can take several weeks
to get total control of your ant problem. If you are looking for a faster treatment,
Reclaim I/T liquid concentrate. Reclaim can be used as a barrier treatment outside your home, or in cracks in crevices to repel and kill ants that come into contact with the chemical Solutions Pest and Lawn is a small family
owned business that relies on people like you to succeed. Our goal is to teach you how to treat your
pest problems. If you have any questions, after watching
this video, please email, call, or visit one of our stores and we can help you out.