5 things ants can teach us about management | BBC Ideas


Ants and human societies
are similar in many ways. They live in communities numbering
from just a few individuals up to many millions. They can build vast empires
that span the world. They conduct diplomacy
with neighbouring settlements. And they can even go
to war with each other. All the ants have just one single
intent on their mind, and that’s the reproductive
success of the colony. Everything that they do is directed
towards that one aim. Most ant colonies consist of just
one reproductive individual – the queen –
and many non-reproductive workers. And the workers
are actually all female. So they’re a vast sisterhood
who does all the work. Now the title ‘queen’ seems to imply
some kind of political authority – that the queen is telling the workers
what to do at any one moment in time, but in fact it’s completely
self-organised. In a colony of ants,
there are no fixed managers. There are no CEOs or presidents. Everyone is working towards
the common goal. If one ant finds a trace of food, that ant will become,
in that moment, a leader, and get everyone else
to come into that food source. But the modern organisation
is obsessed with hierarchy. Obsessed with managers
and where you are up on the scale, which number or paygrade you are. And what happens is
lots of people lower down spend all their time trying to guess
what their manager wants, or their manager’s manager wants, rather than what’s going to work
for the organisation and the people they serve. When an ant encounters a food source,
for example, what it can do
on the way back to the colony is lay a trail using pheromones – and these are just chemicals
that they can lay on the ground so that when others ants come
along and encounter that trail, they know to follow it
all the way to the food. So this simple process
of positive feedback is surprisingly effective
at finding the shortest path. The idea,
borrowing from the ant world, of actually getting the data, making sure you’re capturing it from the very people
who are on the coalface, so to speak, makes tons of sense, because they’re the ones
with the rich qualitative data to be able to feed that back
into the decision-making. We have to be self-organised. We have to allow people to have
their own intelligence and wisdom and organize around a problem
or a project themselves, rather than always waiting for
someone else to tell them what to do, or for a three-year business
planning cycle to take effect. Just as ants respond immediately
to changes in their environment, say the diminishing
of a foraging patch, and adapt really quickly
to that change, organisations must be able
to do the same. If, by looking at ants for instance, it stimulates our thinking about how we might
try to do things differently, then that’s worth it
in and of itself. I just think you probably
want to start experimenting in a quite small and bounded way –
but yeah, why not? Thanks for watching. Don’t forget to subscribe and click the bell to receive notifications for new videos. See you again soon!

FIRE ANTS KILL THEIR FIRST LIVE PREY | Surprising Predatory Reaction

FIRE ANTS KILL THEIR FIRST LIVE PREY | Surprising Predatory Reaction


This is it! Time to witness predation in its purest form. What you’re looking at here is the Phoenix
Empire, my 9 week old fire ant colony that has grown so big now and has become so voraciously
hungry, that I felt it was time for the biggest step of their development, the most crucial
event of their entire lives as fire ants: it was time for them to experience what it
is like to kill live, moving prey for the very first time! Ladies and gentlemen, today the Phoenix Empire
will finally learn what it truly means to be fire ants, here on the AntsCanada ant channel! Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! These fire ants of ours don’t know it yet,
but they’re in for something pretty crazy! You’ll get to see how eager and happy these
fire ants are to kill their first living, moving prey! What happens at the end, though, will surprise
you, as it did me, so do stay tuned for that! But before some of you long time watchers
start freaking out saying “Hey, I thought live feedings are against your ethics!” I must make a correction: I personally choose
not to feed live prey, if I don’t need to, but there are certain circumstances where
live feedings are necessary, for instance, when feeding arachnids, which require live
moving prey in order to trigger their feeding response. Also, when the prey can breed and live freely
on their own in a setup shared by the predators that simply hunt them as they would in the
wild, as is seen in my weaver ants’ enclosure, I also allow live feeding. Or in this case, when we feed our fire ants
here today, I’ve found a neat way to allow my fire ants to satisfy their natural hunting
instincts and put their innate predatory faculties to work, while also being as ethical and responsible
as I can possibly be. You’ll see what I mean soon, guys. But before we proceed to witness our fire
ant colony’s first killing, let’s quickly check in on the Phoenix Empire and see how
they’ve been doing since we last saw them two weeks ago. This will surprise you, guys! Looking into their birth test tube, I was
shocked to see that they’d finally completely evacuated the premises. The water portion had run dry and as expected,
they moved next door into the larger, much more full water test tube. I love that they did this, as this test tube
offers much more space for the colony to grow, and we can now replace their old test tube
with something else. So AC Family, I need your help again. I was wondering: what should we connect to
this new port to replace this empty test tube? Another water test tube? A new sugar test tube with honey perhaps? Their very first true formicarium? Or perhaps a larger outworld? Please take a moment to VOTE here for their
next extension to the City of Ashes. Thank you AC Council for your input! You guys are like the architects of their
ever-expanding city! The Phoenix Empire’s brood pile is so huge
now! The queen, our Ember Empress is nowhere to
be found, as she took a nose dive as soon as the cameras were rolling, into the mountain
of brood to hide from us. Sorry about that, AC Family, but with the
colony growing bigger now, we can expect to see her less frequently. Let’s hope to catch her again soon. The workers have been diligent at feeding
and caring for all the brood and each other. They are now a well-oiled fire ant producing
factory. All of these workers you see here are of the
strong, hardy generation, and all workers coming up will only be stronger and more powerfully
built due to more enriched nourishment, especially from the fresh living meat we’re going to
give them today! As per the old, first gens, known as the nanitics,
the colony’s first worker ants ever, they’ve all but died off now. But check out where they’ve placed all the
dead bodies! Peeking into their AC Test Tube portal this
week, I was surprised to see no ant cadavres in their graveyard. Hmmm… where have they been stashing the
bodies? Well, the colony has decided to relocate their
official graveyard here, into their outworld, at the furthest corner of the Fire Forest. This for sure was a strategic move for the
health and cleanliness of the colony. The AC Test Tube portal is now just a bathroom
site, note the ant poop that looks like flecks of paint. We can expect to see more of such logistic
changes as the colony continues to grow in size and complexity. Alright and now, the moment we’ve all been
waiting for. In nature, fire ants grow into absolutely
massive colonies very fast, which means they are designed to eat a lot! They are top scavengers in the ecosystems
they are part of, and up until now they’ve been fulfilling that natural role by opportunistically
eating the dead insects I’ve placed into their outworld, as well as sucking up the
sugars of their sugar test tube, but nature has also designed fire ants to be top predators. This role is so important, that nature has
equipped them with a powerful stinger which can inject a potent neurotoxin called Solenopsin. It elicits a painful burning sting in humans,
earning these ants the name “fire ants”, but Solenopsin’s alternate purpose other
than defense, is to immobilize prey. We’ll be seeing this at work shortly. Now before, when the colony was composed of
mostly nanitics, the ants were exclusively scavengers not predators, and as we saw in
past videos, they would run in fear from any living, moving prey I tried offering. It’s a survival technique, because back
then, losing workers could have spelled certain death to the colony at their critical beginning
stage. But now that the colony is this big, with
this many workers, all stronger and more capable than the nanitics, I knew the colony was much
more different now, and more like the fire ants we all know in our minds. Now I hate feeding live animals especially
to fire ants because the prey will always lose and I hate watching the prolonged struggle
to the moment of death. But on the other hand, I also knew these ants
might benefit from actually learning to kill something, and might be an important experience
for them. So after further contemplation an idea came
to me. Earthworms! Growing up, I remember it being said that
if you cut an earthworm in half, the two pieces would survive. Well, after researching this up, apparently
this is partially true. If you cut off the tail end, then the earthworm
can survive and grow a new tail. The tail can’t grow a new body, but the
great thing is, the tail is technically still alive and moving, which would be great at
allowing the Phoenix Empire to engage in their first predatory response, as the worm will
definitely be fighting back and react to the ants’ every move. This would be unlike anything the Phoenix
Empire will have ever experienced or eaten before. The fire ants will be able to use their natural
weapons, i.e. stingers and mandibles, to subdue the prey, and we’ll be able to see them
actually swarming, and guys, I loved what the fire ants did at the very end, when the
worm was finally dead! I know you’ll love it, too. AC Family, are you ready? Let’s do this! Here’s the fresh worm tail! And placing it in. Now let’s watch! It wasn’t long before a worker smelled the
earthworm and came to check it out. It then ran back to the nest to inform the
colony of what it found. Soon a couple more ants came to check out
the worm, and the worm coiled back when it felt the ants around it. A third ant came along and immediately delivered
the worm’s first sting. Instantly, the worm coiled and rolled in pain. This act of coiling and rolling only caused
the surrounding ants to go into a greater frenzy, as workers latched on and began to
sting the worm even more. Other workers began wafting the area with
“I found living food! Come help!” pheromone. Back at the nest, workers were being informed
now of the prey in the Fire Forest, and that they needed backup. As more ants began to surround the worm, the
worm continued to coil and roll. This is the biggest creature they’ve ever
come across, and it was moving which is nothing they’ve ever seen before in their previous
food collections, but it was amazing to watch sheer instinct kick in. The ants seemed to proceed cautiously but
eager to get in and kill this thing. I watched wide-eyed the whole time as they
moved in to kill the worm! Eventually, it became evident that that worm
was weakening now and beginning to die from all the fire ant stings. A few minutes later, the worm was completely
motionless and the fire ants had come swarming to begin the consumption process. The Phoenix Empire had made their first kill,
well sorta seeing as the tail was bound to die eventually, but it still allowed the fire
ants to initiate a kill response which is what I wanted them to experience. And guys, this completely surprised me when
I saw it. Check this out! The moment the worm was killed and stopped
struggling, the nest went completely berserk! Workers were running around everywhere like
crazy! Was this what ants celebrating looked like? I’d never seen anything like it. While the worm was still alive, the nest did
not look like this but the moment the worm was dead, the ants were running all around
and some out of the nest in excitement. To say that this dead worm made these fire
ants happy was an understatement. How interesting, right?! The fire ants began to dissect the worm and
bring the pieces back to the nest for further consumption, and look, it seems the news brought
our Ember Empress, the queen out of hiding. She’s going to feast tonight! What surprised me about all of this was that
the next day, the Fire Forest was completely devoid of worm pieces. I figured OK so they dragged the worm into
the nest, but no, there was no earthworm in sight, neither was it in the AC Test Tube
Portal. This to me amazingly meant that the Phoenix
Empire had consumed the entire worm piece in just 12 hours. Now I knew that earthworms left no garbage
behind, unlike insect prey with their inedible exoskeletons which are usually found the next
day, cast off in the colony’s garbage sites. I think I’ll be feeding earthworms more
often now. Overall, I was super happy that the Phoenix
Empire had undergone this natural process of predation. I felt it was an important thing for them
to experience and definitely something I’ll make sure they’ll experience on a regular
basis. What other things would you like to watch
the Phoenix Empire eat and react to? Let me know in the comments section, and though
I can’t promise I’ll feed it live, I’ll definitely try feeding it to them and film
the process as we’ve done in past videos with my previous fire ant colony, RIP FIRE
NATION. I appreciate that a lot of you seem to be
as invested in these fire ants as I am. Thank you so much for supporting them, guys. I do feel like we are caring for the Phoenix
Empire together, and isn’t it funny how satisfying it all is to watch them grow and
give them everything they need to thrive and flourish into the mighty fire ant colony we
know they’re destined to become? It’s an amazing journey of discovery for
sure, and the very essence of ant keeping. Thank you all for watching and loving the
ants! I’ll see you next week on another update
from the Antiverse. It’s ant love forever! OMG! AC Family, look! I can’t believe they’ve arrived! AC Family, wasn’t that cool? So much is in store ahead for the Phoenix
Empire, so if you haven’t yet, SMASH that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON now and hit
ALL so you get notified at every upload, because I believe notifications seem to be broken
but the Youtube support team is on it. Also don’t forget to hit the LIKE button
every single time including now. It would really mean a lot to me. Thank you, guys! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch extended play footage of the epic battle between fire
ants and the worm, as well as awesome scenes of the colony within the nest. Also, just a note: It’s anting season, and
nuptial flights start in the Northern Hemisphere this month! Be sure to visit AntsCanada.com for all your
ant keeping and collecting gear shipped to you in a special package from our ant-loving
facility in the USA, so you can get the most out of your ant keeping experience. We also offer full email support if you need
our help! Visit AntsCanada.com today. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: What do you love about scorpions? Congratulations to Taj Boss King who answered: I love their shape and powerful pincers! Congratulations Taj, you just won a free Ultimate
Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: What is the name of the toxin
fire ants inject when stinging? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to the channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Ants Go Marching | ABC Heroes | Kindergarten Nursery Rhymes For Children

Ants Go Marching | ABC Heroes | Kindergarten Nursery Rhymes For Children


The ants go marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching two by two, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching three by three, The little one stops to climb a tree And they all go marching down to the ground To get out of the rain, BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! The ants go marching four by four, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching five by five, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching six by six, The little one stops to pick up sticks And they all go marching down to the ground To get out of the rain.. BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! The ants go marching seven by seven, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching eight by eight, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching nine by nine, The little one stops to check the time And they all go marching down to the ground To get out of the rain.. BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! The ants go marching ten by ten, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching ten by ten, hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching ten by ten, The little one stops to shout “The End”, And they all go marching down to the ground To get out of the rain.

The Ants Go Marching | Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs | The Mik Maks

The Ants Go Marching | Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs | The Mik Maks


The ants go marching one by one, hurrah hurrah
The ants go marching one by one, hurrah hurrah The ants go marching one by one, the little
one stops to suck his thumb And they all go marching down to the ground
to get out of the rain. The ants go marching two by two, hurrah hurrah
The ants go marching two by two, hurrah hurrah The ants go marching two by two, the little
one stops to look at his shoe And they all go marching down to the ground
to get out of the rain. The ants go marching three by three, hurrah hurrah The ants go marching three by three, hurrah
hurrah The ants go marching three by three, the little
one stops to scratch his knee And they all go marching down to the ground
to get out of the rain. The ants go marching four by four hurrah
hurrah The ants go marching four by four, hurrah hurrah The ants go marching four by four, the little
one stops to knock on the door And they all go marching down to the ground
to get out of the rain. The ants go marching five by five, hurrah
hurrah The ants go marching five by five, hurrah hurrah The ants go marching five by five, the little
one stops to give a high five And they all go marching down to the ground
to get out of the rain down to the ground to get out of the rain

ANTSTORE Reinigung der Röhren in einer Ameisenanlage


Hello and welcome. We
were often asked … … how to clean the tubes in a leaf cutter ants system. In this video you can see how we do it. Leaf-cutter ants can build up deposits in the tubes. Deposits are soil, food residues, dead Ants, excrement or leaves. These leaf cutter ants have put their Fungus in the tubes. It is very important for the colony, so we have to return it to the fungus-chamber. For the cleaning we need a bucket which we coat with oil at the edge. Block the Openings after disconnecting the tubes. Our plug-in system makes cleaning easier. Now we hold the pipe vertically above the bucket. Shake out the Ants, Fungus and garbage. Now we are able to clean the tube with a rag or cloth. You can use a broomstick. We have brushes for small pipes (20-40mm) up to 1 m in length. You can also pull a cord through the pipe and then attach a rag to it. Now we collect the ants and the fungus and put them back in. Now the tubes are clean. Lets connect them again. We hope these tips where useful to you. Thank you for watching.

The Ants Go Marching


The ants go marching one by one,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching one by one,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching one by one,
The little one stopped to suck his thumb And they all go marching down
to the ground To get out of the rain. The ants go marching two by two,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching two by two,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching two by two,
The little one stopped to tie his shoe And they all go marching down
to the ground To get out of the rain. The ants go marching three by three,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching three by three,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching three by three,
The little one stopped to climb a tree, And they all go marching down
to the ground To get out of the rain. The ants go marching four by four,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching four by four,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching four by four,
The little one stopped to shut the door And they all go marching down
to the ground To get out of the rain. The ants go marching five by five
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching five by five,
hurrah, hurrah The ants go marching five by five,
The little one stopped to take a dive And they all go marching down
to the ground To get out of the rain.

How ants get angry: Precise “lock and key” process regulates aggression, acceptance


We’re interested in the underlying basis
of social behavior and in particular we’re focusing down on aggression in this
study. We are really studying the triggers that ants used to distinguish
you’re my friend you’re my nest mate from you’re not. Because defending the
colony for ants is everything. The ants are covered with a hard cuticle and that
cuticle is covered with a greasy hydrocarbon blend that is secreted by
the ants and covers them. They have what we call this coat of many odors. One
particular aspect of this story is this ability to very specifically but very
acutely trigger aggression when necessary.
Our works suggests that aggression is a very specific response to a very specific and
unambiguous trigger. When two ants of different colonies encounter one another
they will grapple each other tending to lock in at the mandibles,
biting, stinging. The ant uses aggression very
specifically but once it’s triggered it’s game on and it’s a fight to the
death.

Weaver Ants | The Guardians of the Canopy

Weaver Ants | The Guardians of the Canopy


hi guys my name is Jordan and in this
video I’m exploring Australia’s topics up in northern Queensland. Here ancient
rainforests stretch as far as the eye can see and are home to an incredibly
diverse range of wildlife. Including one of the most unique ant species I’ve ever
encountered. They are the highly prolific and ingenious Weaver ants. Weaver ants fall under the genus Oecophylla and are found solely within tropical and
subtropical climates throughout Africa Asia and Australia. The ones found here
in Australia are often known as green ants after their vibrant green color. what makes Weaver ants so different from
most other ants is instead of burrowing down and forming their nests within the
ground, Weaver ants form their nests up in the trees. Their homes can usually be
found towards the ends of branches where the fresh healthy leaves sprout. Fruit
bearing trees with broad leaves are favored, but they’ll happily work within
narrow-leaved eucalyptus trees and sometimes will even utilise needle thin
leaves like those from this Beach she-oak. Construction begins with the ants firmly
grabbing hold of a leaf with their mandibles pulling stretching and curling
them into position… Next, the ants do something quite
remarkable they enlist the help of an unlikely ally, their own young. These
small pill shaped grubs are the ants larvae. They’re unable to travel on their
own so the ants carefully carry them over to their worksite. At this point the ants begin to gently
tap their heads using their antennae. This induces the larvae to expel strands
of silk from a small gland underneath their mouths. Normally ant larvae use their silk for metamorphosis spinning a cocoon which
helps protect them as they develop into their pupal form and eventually hatch
as an adult. But in the case of Weaver ants, they use their silken thread to
instead weave leaves together. Creating a super strong binding. Once complete the
ants now have themselves a comfy and safe waterproof refuge, a perfect place
to raise their young and allow their colony to thrive. Younger colonies might
have their nests comprised of just a single leaf curled in half and neatly
stitched together. But as they expand their numbers they gradually create
additional nests. Established Weaver ant colonies may occupy dozens at once, some
with massive nests comprised of hundreds of leaves all clustered purposefully
together. This nest here the size of a beach ball. Other much smaller nests are often
positioned along the perimeter of the colony’s territory acting as outposts.
The first line of defence against intruders, the most common of which being
foreign and colonies. Which may seek to ambush and invade their rivals. This
Vanguard is often occupied by the eldest ants of the colony deemed to be the
most expendable. But it’s not just raiders that the Weaver ants need to
worry about. Here in the dense foliage of the rain forest, plants are constantly
competing with one another, reaching as high as they can to soak up as much
light as possible. So naturally down on the forest floor
not much light seeps through making ground temperatures significantly cooler as ants are cold-blooded animals when in
happening cool climates they aren’t nearly as active limiting their foraging
capabilities and slowing down the growth of their future generations
this gives Weaver ants a significant advantage over the forest ground
dwelling ant species living up in the canopy Weaver ants can stay nice and
warm in the sun’s rays much like a crocodile basking on an open riverbank
the extra heat greatly extends the ants active hours and increases their
productivity but the canopy is ever-changing many
trees lose the battle against neighboring trees which outgrow them
shrouding them in darkness some even become the target of parasitic plants
like this strangler fig which slowly wraps itself around its host restricting
the tree’s ability to grow its dealing their life from above and absorbing up
most of the surrounding nutrients within the soil below so Weaver ants must
actively reposition themselves in order to pursue the sun’s valuable heat the
most successful colonies are often found nearby clearings in the forest alongside
rivers coastlines and cyclone affected areas
where strong winds have torn down temporary clearings in the forest
here along the forest perimeters they’re almost completely unhindered by shade so
the ants can take even better advantage of the sun’s warmth rapidly speeding up
the development cycles of the young helping them grow to enormous sizes some
colonies can be home to hundreds of thousands of ants strong the leaves which form their homes do
inevitably die and crumble into pieces and so must be abandoned for fresh ones
so even in ideal conditions Weaver ants are kept extremely busy constantly
rebuilding renovating and relocating their homes all this hard work requires plenty of
energy which we’ve Rance obtained from two main sources
honey jus and insects honey you is sourced from sap-sucking invertebrates
like these merely bugs here these tiny insects bore their way into fresh plant
stems and leaves and consume their SAP as the SAP is digested they excrete
excess waste in the form of a sugary liquid rich in carbohydrates the perfect
fuel to keep the ever busy Weaver ants going so instead of eating these bugs
themselves the Weaver ants cluster around them waiting patiently for their
sweet reward but most other bugs aren’t so forward-thinking ladybugs love
devouring these little guys the mealy bugs can secrete a powdery wax coating
their bodies which helps discourage their attackers someone but otherwise
they’re virtually defenseless the ants are their real defense as a few of them
feed many others patrol the surrounding area for threats but there are some predators which can
be a much trickier foe to deal with jumping spiders they’re often seen
eyeing off their little friends on their own they’re no match for the Weaver ants
so they must be stealthy and wait for the perfect opportunity to strike if
detected the predator could easily turn into the prey almost spotted the spider
sensibly backs off too risky for this meal weave rants themselves a very
effective predators they have excellent eyesight when compared to most other
ends and can utilize their strong razor-sharp mandibles to great effect
given the chance and they’ll tackle almost anything they find once their
prey is secured each end pulls from multiple directions stretching out and
dismembering their helpless victims so that they can be efficiently returned to
their nests and distributed amongst their corny
a large part of Weaver ants diet are other ants a great source of amino acids
here in the rainforest ants a highly abundant and come in all manner of
shapes and sizes many of the ground dwelling species regularly venture up
into the trees to forage for food but this often means passing through Weaver
ant territory so they must be wary all it takes is a single ant to notice their
presence and soundly along once one ant gets a good grip all it needs to do is
secure their rival down and simply wait for reinforcements to arrive this one on
one scuffle is likely the victims only chance to escape several more quickly follow suit pinning
it down its fate now sealed not only a rival ants and nutritious and reliable
source of food but removing them also reduces competition at the same time any
food that these ants would have discovered and returned back to their
nest now ends up as their own further proliferating their range and dominance the more vast the corney’s territories
the longer distances the ants must cover in order to best utilize the available
resources and to maintain their control over it in dense forests Weaver ants can
easily navigate from one tree to the next thanks to the vast labyrinth of
vines and branches into connecting the canopy allowing them to access and
colonize multiple trees without ever needing to descend the long way down to
the forest floor whilst most comfortable up in the trees
on occasion they will venture down to the ground forage this particular colony
is nested along the beach in and amongst the salt tolerant mangroves regularly
they send out scouting parties during low tide scavenging upon whatever the
water is swept in this gecko here is a notable find and
will be a great source of nourishment for their quarry the answer tempted to
break a park the lizard into more manageable pieces pulling from all
angles some of the ends begin targeting the vulnerable joints slicing into and
spraying them with formic acid this noxious liquid expelled from the ants
abdomens slowly burns and breaks down the flesh within despite the ants determined biting an
acid spring the gecko is proving rather difficult to pour part before the tide
returns it must be either taken to higher ground as is or left behind but
these Weaver ants are more than up to the challenge
they have tiny hooked claws on the ends of their feet giving them incredible
gripping strength even at the steepest and most obscure of angles paired with their ability to work in
synergy with their fellow colony members they are able to accomplish some pretty
remarkable feats hauling our prey much larger than themselves all the way up to
the treetops sometimes Weaver ants will improvise
quicker routes along the way to make their job is a little easier some of
which may at first not even seem possible the path up a low-hanging
branch from the ground below the ants can’t jump or fly across like
other insects mine instead they must build a bridge to close the gap a bridge
made of hands each ant grips on to each other using their mandibles slowly
forming a chain and eventually they’ll link up from
either end and their shortcut is complete such incredible teamwork but
not all members of the colony err is capable of securing prey in traversing
their environment as these answer some rarely venture out from their homes at
all Weaver ants are a polymorphic species meaning they produce different
castes of workers which perform distinct roles within their colony the main cast
are the mages the ones who do most of the foraging in nest building another
first line of defense against intruders the other caste are the miners they look
almost identical to the mages but side-by-side you can see they’re much
smaller in size this cast of worker is assigned to nesting duties spending most
of their time tending to the colony’s developing brood and looking after their
queen the mother to the entire colony quite the accomplishment so that’s we friends there’s such an
incredibly unique and species from the way that they construct their homes from
leaves using their own young as tools to building living bridges to efficiently
scale their surroundings to their brutal yet methodical approach of securing prey
I think what amazes me most is their extreme aggression just slightly
brushing against their nests or a nearby branch is enough to set them into a
frenzy as a defensive response they posture up their bodies and kill their
abdomens over their heads poised to fire out wrapping strings of their formic
acid if this liquid were to get into a potential threat size like a bird or a
lizard it surely made for a great deterrent one of the reasons most other
animals like to give these guys a wide berth next to me dance they’re probably
the most territorial ants I’ve ever encountered regardless I really enjoyed
documenting these guys and exploring the forests which they and countless other
animals call home like giant butterflies and grasshoppers the size of my hand
plenty of other amazing ant species like trap joints jumping adds spider heads golden tailed spiny ants
and lots more the cute little turtles I saw swimming up and down the streams and
the massive saltwater crocodiles hanging out along the estuaries the largest
living reptiles in the world I was even lucky enough to spot three wild southern
cassowaries one of the largest living birds in the world these modern-day
dinosaurs mostly feed on fallen fruit and a highly important seed disperses
many of the forest plants depend entirely on these birds to survive unfortunately they’re an endangered
species mostly due to habitat loss as a result of deforestation
let’s just hope these ancient and incredibly biodiverse forests remain
around for a long time to come sadly Australia has just been hit with
one of its worst bushfire seasons in recorded history which definitely
doesn’t help I’m fortunate to not have been affected
by the fires living here in Melbourne aside from experiencing several days of
thick smoke I could only imagine what it was like
closer to the flames whilst fire is a natural part of the Australian landscape
with some forests actually needing fire in order to reproduce and thrive these
fires following Australia’s 2019 record average high temperatures and low levels
of rainfall burned an unprecedented strength devastating vast amounts of
land and claiming the lives of countless native animals many which managed to
escape the flames had little to no habitats left to them and ended up
either starving or being hunted down by invasive predators like feral cats and
foxes which have an easy time spotting them within the open scorched land
the combination of this extreme heat and prolonged droughts also allowed fire to
reach his way into environments which aren’t naturally adapted to it unable to
fully recover if affected even lush rainforests which
has stood since the Cretaceous period at least 65 million years ago were ablaze
as Earth’s climate changes we can expect to see extreme natural disasters like
these occurring more and more frequently and on even larger scales governments
and policies at least here in Australia really treat environmental concerns
seriously repeatedly dismissing scientific research and delaying the
transition from fossil fuels into cleaner energy production so it’s really
up to us as individuals to take matters into our own hands there’s many places
we can start in reducing our environmental footprint but one of the
most impactful steps we can take is changing something which most of us do
at least three times every day it’s what we eat whilst often-overlooked animal
agriculture is one of the main drivers of deforestation fresh water usage
species extinction and greenhouse gas emissions so avoiding the consumption of
animal products like meat dairy and eggs is a simple way we can all collectively
make a huge difference helping to conserve and restore the natural world
and bring it back to its former glory oh no I don’t know this channel is
almost at a hundred thousand subscribers thank you guys so much for your
overwhelming support over the years when I started making videos back in 2014 I
honestly never expected more than a hundred people to be interested let
alone nearly a hundred thousand it’s really great to see that there’s so many
of you out there deeply interested in ads also a big thanks to my generous
patreon supporters for helping make these videos possible and a special
thanks to my top-tier supporters and Iker Ben Cargill John Overton nicholas
atkins and thomas window now on to the regular giveaway where you
guys get a chance to win one of our specially designed air phones in my last
video on medias I asked what do you find most interesting about them I think what
I find so interesting is the way that they kick box to resolve their
territorial disputes with rival colonies such a quirky yet highly civilized
strategy of success so the winner is Alex Boyd who is most interested in how
medians can predate Australia’s invasive cane toads making them conservationists
ants of sorts and was also fascinated with how medians and sugar ants are able
to coincide due to their opposite foraging hours a great display of how
maidens have their own niche in their ecosystem congratulations Alex you’ve
just won yourself one of our acrylic starter kits for next videos giveaway
we’ll be putting one of our white song starter kits up for grabs which includes
one of our founding size of white or nests along with a bunch of accessories
to enter simply answer the following what do you find most interesting about
Weaver ants is it the way that they stitch leaves together how they build
living bridges or something else post your answers in
the comment section below I’ll pick out a single comment and announce them as
the winner in my next video as always thanks for watching and I hope you enjoy

What makes my new SCORPION Glow in the Dark?

What makes my new SCORPION Glow in the Dark?


OMG! Have I got something that will truly blow
your mind today! Taking a break from the ants for a moment,
I’ve been caring for a certain creature, we’ve never before featured on this channel. You saw the title: a glow-in-the-dark scorpion! But how is this possible, you ask? Yes, it may look fake, but believe you me,
this huge, gorgeous nightlight of a scorpion is very much so real and you’ll be surprised
to learn more about it. No, it’s not radioactive and no I haven’t
fed it something to cause it to glow like this. AC Family, let’s delve into the amazing
world of these ancient, mind boggling arachnids, and meet our newest beast to join the Antiverse,
here on the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! Within this terrarium lives a scorpion that
was given to me as a Christmas present, so it’s waited over 2 months to meet you all. When all the lights go off, we’ll all get
to witness and understand the real magic, how this scorpion can glow, as well as get
to see the amazing new home we’ve prepared for her, so stay tuned until the end for all
that! In the light, our new beast is still nothing
less than impressive! Huddled below the rockscape, beneath this
animal skull, lays our new Asian Forest Scorpion, Heterometrus longimanus. It’s a young female, measuring about 3.5
inches long, and still has another inch or so more to grow. Though she looks scary, her sting is similar
to that of a wasp, and her venom isn’t potent enough to kill a person, assuming they aren’t
allergic, of course. In fact, this species of scorpion is more
likely to give you a good pinch with those powerful claws, known as chelae. You’ll see her use them against me in a
little bit. Her exoskeleton is solid, she’s built like
a tank, and I personally wouldn’t want to mess with her nor touch her. She feeds primarily on insects but can accept
baby pinky mice once fully grown. But first on the agenda, guys, let us all
come as one. AC Council, it is time to give this scorpion
an official name! Please take a moment to VOTE here for her
name, based on name suggestions given by you, the AC Family. Thank you, AC Council for your input. Let’s make her name a great one! Now, something that may surprise you is that
fossil experts in the US recently revealed the remains of what they say is the first
animal that may have ever set foot on land, and turns out it was an ancient scorpion. Scorpions are known to be one of the first
prehistoric animals to have become fully land-dwelling, emerging from the primordial seas hundreds
of millions of years ago, but whether they’re the first animals to wander onto land is still
of much scientific debate. I could see it, I guess! She’s kinda lobster-ish in appearance! Now, you guys will trip out at her face! The anatomy is quite incredible! She cleans herself using her chelicerae, which
also look like a pair of claws that jut out of her mouth area. Talk about Aliens meets Predator, right? She’s cleaning up because she recently ate,
which I know because I see her cricket leftovers nearby. Now, she’s been living here for most of
her life, along with a population of springtails, beneficial mites, and even a strange colony
of ants (not sure how that happened) who all eat up her leftovers. Though she does seem happy in this enclosure,
there is a bit of a problem. She needs more space. This 10 gallon terrarium in which she came
to me has a gorgeous faux rockscape backing that, though attractive takes up a lot of
the floor room. These scorpions naturally inhabit leafy floors
of humid tropical jungles, and therefore need some good wandering room and hiding areas,
not so much vertical climbing space. And so, AC Family, as Creator of Worlds, I
have gone ahead and prepared a great sanctuary for our new beast to live in…. Here! Next to her keep is a land blanketed in a
thick mist. Twice weekly a fog rolls through these territories
to keep the sanctuary humid, perfect for a scorpion like her! The great fog shall dissipate in just a moment,
but it rolls through now in preparation for our scorpion’s grand homecoming. As the mist fades, you can see that we’ve
lushed out the lands with nerve plants, Cryptanthus, green moss, and tropical lichens. A rock cave awaits for our beast to take up
residence in its shadows. I’ve placed it up against the glass so we’ll
still be able to see our beast once she retreats within it. As you can see, this new scorpion garden offers
her much more space than her current home. By the way, if you have a name in mind for
these new scorpion lands, do leave it in the comments, and we can all vote for an official
name for this sanctuary in a future video! Let’s hope she loves her new home! Guys, it’s time to move her in! This move could get scary real fast and I
was ready to be faced with an angry scorpion. I approached the scorpion carefully. My plan was to gently guide her with tweezers
into this container and safely transport her into the new terrarium. Though her sting is said to feel like a wasp
sting, from my memory, wasp stings still hurt, plus those claws are super strong as you’re
about to see. I fixated the container below and behind her
and moved my tweezers gently in front of her. Instantly she struck with her claws, lightly
at first, but the more persistent my tweezers were at not going away, the more she would
meet them full force with a strong pinch from her claws. She wasn’t using her stinger at this point. Sure enough, with enough prodding, she submitted
and turned around walking straight into my container. I popped the lid on and presto! She was safely in. That was easier than I thought it would be. Though you couldn’t tell in the video, her
pinch on the metal tweezers felt pretty strong, and I know it would have hurt had it been
my bare skin! I placed the container into the terrarium,
then opened the lid to allow her to set foot on her new territories! She paused for a moment when she realized
she was no longer in the plain rocky terrarium she had grown used to her whole life, but
in a new place now. She didn’t know it yet, but she would soon
come to love this place and find it much more suitable to her lifestyle. It was then, that she began to stride forward
and crawl right into our rock cave that we made for her! Alright! Success! Our new beast had officially moved in. She’ll continue to burrow and customize
this cave to her liking over time, and totally make it her own. I placed a small bowl inside and filled it
up with fresh water for her to drink when needed. Alright, and now that she’s all moved in,
it’s time to witness what you’ve all patiently been waiting for. Let’s watch our scorpion glow! Turning off the terrarium lights… and voila! Wow! Isn’t that just crazy, guys?! Like a neon greenish-blue creature out of
a science fiction movie, our scorpion glows brightly, very much like a night light! But how does this happen? What’s the science behind the glow and more
importantly what’s it for? Well, the glow is called fluoresce, and scorpion
skin fluoresces once UV light reflects off a substance found in their exoskeleton. It actually happens in all scorpion species,
not just this scorpion. Pretty cool right? They fluoresce in natural moonlight, or in
this case, under a black light tube, situated just above the terrarium. Scientists aren’t exactly sure what the
benefit of having UV flourescent skin is, but there are a few theories. Some propose it helps the scorpions find each
other, others say it protects the scorpions against harmful UV light from sunlight, and
others feel it may confuse their prey once moonlight reflects off their skin, causing
a sort of deer in headlights effect! It’s also hypothesized that the fluorescence
actually helps the scorpions know how much light is outside, so they know only to come
out during the darkest of hours to avoid predators! What do you guys think the glow is for? Either way, it’s a pretty cool thing if
you ask me! Now, I tried to feed our beast so we could
all watch her eat, but every time I was around she was more preoccupied with fighting me
off, than eating, so it failed, but I did release a cricket as a housewarming gift into
her new home, and caught her finishing it off in the middle of the night. I’m happy to see she’s got a healthy appetite! As the fog machine turned on to humidify the
lands, and the mist blanketed the jungle floored territories, it was in that moment, wrapped
up in fog, that I noticed that our scorpion appeared as though she was back in her prehistoric
days, when her ancestors still lived underwater. Seeing her blanketed in the mist like this,
made it easier to envision her marine ancestors still living and feeding in the ocean, at
one point in Earth’s incredible history. It’s amazing how diverse and ever-evolving
life on Earth is, wouldn’t you say? Whether it be caring for ants or arachnids
like this scorpion, I am always humbled by the sheer brilliance, no pun intended, of
Mother Nature’s work. Thank you for watching, guys! I’ll see you all next week! It’s ant and scorpion love forever! AC Family, wasn’t that cool? So much is in store ahead in the Ant Room,
so if you haven’t yet, SMASH that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON now and hit ALL so you
get notified at every upload. Also don’t forget to hit the LIKE button
every single time including now. It would really mean a lot to me, guys. Thank you so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch extended scenes of our scorpion! Just a quick announcement: There’s one day
left! If you’ve wanted to get into ant keeping,
now’s the time! Just use the coupon code “antloveforever”
to get 10% off all AC ant farms and equipment at AntsCanada.com! We ship your ant keeping gear in a special
package sent out of our facility in the USA, and offer full email support if you need our
help. Promo ends tomorrow March 1st so visit AntsCanada.com
now! Nuptial flights start in the Northern Hemisphere
this week and I heard ants have already begun to fly in California! So awesome! And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: What new thing did we discover about
fire ant queens when laying eggs? Congratulations to Alfonso Lopez who answered: We learned fire ant queens extend
their stinger when laying eggs. Congratulations Alfonso, you just won a free
Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: What do you love about scorpions? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free ebook handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to the channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

ANTSTORE Gespräch mit Andrew Stephenson über Blattschneideameisen


Hello and welcome. I’m driving to the airport. But I’m not traveling, I’m picking up someone. He is from Scotland, an experienced antkeeper, who knows a lot about leaf-cutter ants. And I will have a talk with him. Come on, join us. Martin: My guest today is Andrew Stephenson. Martin: Hi Andrew, how was your flight? I had a 2 hour flight from Edinburgh. Everything was fine. Nice that you are here. I am happy that we can talk today. Thank you for having me it’s very nice
to be here. Which was your first ant colony. I did research in University on social insects. I wanted an ant colony so in 1992 I bought my first Atta cephalotus colony from a professor. I kept the ants for several years and the colony got bigger and bigger. One day they managed to escape from the formicarium and leave the house under the door They removed all plants from the neighbors garden and carried them back in. At that point I gave the colony to a zoo because it was too big. That was my first encounter with Atta Cephalotus. lifelong love of them which I’ve pursued
ever since you are also expert for for animals with leaf cutter ants and wise
leaf cutter ants what why you likes us and spits well leaf cutting ants are the
most advanced of all the social insects the the things that they do the way that
they’re cast differentiations the soldiers the
gardeners how it’s all laid out is incredible nobody could fail to be
amazed by what what you see when you look in these displays and and when you
see them in our a big public display in a zoo or a museum and you see all the
different elements of the colony it’s fantastic I mean in the tropics in the
wild you see them and they’ll they’ll travel they’ll travel hundreds of meters
to plan and carry the leaves by and the fact that they’re not eating the leaves
the fact that they’re using the leaves to grow a crop and then to feed on the
crop and all the different elements of that they are fantastic so do you give
them different leaves every day or do you keep on black is that blackberry yes
yes normally we give this loose at this moment it’s very easy to get plans like
it and we use odds of flour from dried flowers
so we have the ant farm for the wall whoa that’s lovely
that’s nice have you seen that before that’s very nice thank you so do you
make here as well so you got CNC yes she amazing that’s beautiful
you tell me that you’re often and and and treated at why what what what us
especial was treated at so the first colony of ants that I bought came from
timid Italian so I wanted to find where they came from so I followed them back
to Trinidad and and from then on pretty much put down roots into the diet I’ve
bought a house there and I spend several months a year and and in fact at the end
of this year I’m going to move to trigger that permanently and lovin
Trinidad and then travel to Europe to do the work that I do
so why Trinidad they speak English they drive an IRA side of the road it’s very
it’s very Yuki friendly into the diet so it’s it’s a nice place to be
my wife is Trinidadian and the children they I have children who are half-turn
Italian so it’s it’s a place that I feel very comfortable and there’s only two
species of leaf cotton and there are artists authorities and academics on
spinosus so in terms of variety it’s not fantastic but in the rest of South
America there’s plenty to see and it’s a good place to travel there from Trinidad
to see all so yeah Trinidad is an amazing place I would recommend anybody
come to another floor yeah and you are also travel in other
countries in which country it was travel so virtually all of the South American
countries but Paraguay is where I’m concentrating now I was there last year
and trying to organize paperwork people work in South American countries is very
very difficult and it’s taken 18 months to finally sort that so I’ll be going to
Paraguay this year to bring back lots of different species and whereas there’s
only two species of leafcutters and Trinidad those 22 species in Paraguay so
fantastic variety including the grass cutting ants which should be really good
to see so yeah I’m looking forward to that and I’ve managed to set up all the
people and need the infrastructure all the things that you need to be able to
go there and get colonies here is a strategy that birds don’t find the nest
that’s the head node not a street you know you see here so and here’s the
answers ended okay so not a lie in your van yes interesting
so then we have here from sauce he drops a mess over borrows so we had here built
nest was calm and and they’ve dug that themselves of the RS that are preformed
you know they’ve got did you got problems with the keeping of leaf cutter
ants and if yes what how did you fix it so we look at two parameters when we’re
setting up we’ve got lines nice even temperature and high high humidity so
when we are setting up our our display in a zoo and we are talking to the
client about about looking at them we see that you have to monitor the
temperature and humidity in the fungus garden so we so the humidity meter
should have a probe that goes into the fungus so you can you can satisfy
yourself it’s amazing how you if you measure the humidity even a little
distance away from where the fungus is it can be completely different so we try
to get them to measure the humidity and the where the funguses and the biggest
problem with the type of display is that if you don’t
have lots of soil in the display which a lot of people don’t want because they
want to see the fungus if you don’t have lots of soil it can be quite difficult
to keep the humidity and the temperature even some things with very small
colonies you don’t hear that there’s a problem until the colonies nearly dead
and the fungus is gone so you’ve got to get it right at the beginning there’s no
time with small colonies to to make mistakes often and so people think that
leaf cutter ants are difficult species they’re not a difficult species if you
if you set it up properly there are only are difficult species of it’s not
correct so taking advice at the beginning from
experts about how to say to up aesthetic colors and do the research make sure
that you do the research to know what you’re talking about I think it’s really
important have an acrylic which you see but what is very popular in the internet
I don’t like it but the customers liked it so we produce this nests do you make
these yes we have obvious glass and then back side we have for acrylic
workshop and we have here and a special ground which saves the water what are
the mmunity what was your biggest adventure or experience about ends the
adventures that you have with ants normally start once you’ve got the ants
and you’ve got to try and move them across the world but recently I was in
French Guiana and I was on this huge mound of artists a Flutie’s it was a
massive big mound and it was quiet because you know they come out at night
and I wanted to see some activity so I stood on the top of the mound and stamp
my feet on it and nothing happened at all and I was kind of confused as to why
they weren’t coming out and I stepped back and all round the outside of this
mound there was lots of tall grass and what I didn’t realize was all the
soldiers all the majors had come out and they were all over the grass and I
stepped back into them and I had shorts oh and I had short trousers on and they
were my legs were covered in majors and covered in blood because they just all
bare and it was a it was a flight a shock and
one of the biggest adventures we did a program for the BBC and the UK called
plan ants and we were asked to go to the tropics and find a million ants in a
colony and bring it back to the UK and film it in our studio and it took us two
days to dig this colony and find the Queen and we were bringing big handfuls
of fungus gardens there was a hundred and sixty fungus gardens that we took
and we had a massive big box off camera and we were preaching all the fungus
into the box but what you didn’t see on the camera was the box was covered in
blood because we had gloves on but within about half an hour the gloves
were all cut to pieces because the soldiers had cut the gloves so we were
we were lifting and putting in but there was blood dripping and as well it was
very very unpleasant yeah yeah it really was but we did it we got the Queen we
found the Queen at the end of the second day we found the Queen and she was she
was in the last fungus garden because they’d obviously moved our there but she
was surrounded by ants so she was about the size of a mouse but with all the
antler and so we knew immediately we found the Queen and we would pick it up
and she was it was huge a big cocoon of ants and we got her so yeah and that
film no I think you can see on YouTube now it’s it’s a couple hours long and it
says a fantastic documentary on leaf covenants camponotus our lovely aunt the
one these are a nice big chunky and quite an attractive and okay and this is
a oneness and some people say with this material it’s maybe the ants can do but
to know we have tested with lots of ants and we have knows much remixes that the
ants cannot cut that is amazing and so this nest is one year old and you see
it’s very clean no never you must clean and to ask the and spring or to the last
box in front of us we have a starter kit a set up which we sell for private
customers and what do you think about this what is your feedback about us well
all the elements that you need are here the the next tank the feeding area and
the waste is it’s all there and it’s so easy to distinguish between all the
different processes you can see them cutting leaves bringing it to the garden
and then taking the waste to the to the waste chamber for our small-scale private collector to have something like
this in their home and to be able to see all the different things it’s fantastic
absolutely fantastic I mean I’m assuming you could extend the walkway if you
wanted to you could have a lot longer if you wanted to have the the feeding area
a distance to the nest you could have that you could take it right in a room
as our as our set office is amazing and the colony of this and there I mean if
you want any proof that this is a good system just look at how healthy that
colony is its enormous it’s one of the biggest a crumber makes colonies I’ve
ever seen when I see your setups and I’ve seen these setups all over the
world because people have come here and bought them and taking them back and
then I’ll go along and see them most recently in our in a zoo and Englund I
saw some of your setups there and they’re obviously functioning very well
and they’re doing you know they’re looking great so we have also option for
a b2b customers they move this way or you can change this the street
it’s ant way Wow open closed systems I like this this is very nice
so you’ve this is glass yes so when you have our species on display
do you have smaller colonies offshore to sail yes so they can say I won best one
and then you can yes our showroom so we can talk with other customers what is
possible aha and really the size of this you could
make this any size depending on what the people want
yeah so Andrew many tanks that you was here I was very happy and I have a small
present for you and not really for you know you can look in the inside Oh Oh fantastic
dry flowers for your ends Wow maybe you can test it I’ve actually never used
these before but I’ve always seen no and I wondered these are great well
leafcutter ants like mowers a red color but you can check it I will check
amazing thank you very much I appreciate Yeah I hope you enjoyed the video. Thank you so much for being there. And I look forward to the next video.