Characters In Ant-Man And The Wasp With More Meaning Than You Realized

Characters In Ant-Man And The Wasp With More Meaning Than You Realized


Everything’s personal in Ant-Man and the Wasp. The small-scale superhero movie is a light
and summery story with no real villains, just characters trying to get things done and get
home, sometimes at odds with each other. But while the Ant-Man sequel’s stakes may
be small, the characters themselves have long histories that stretch back decades, and we’re
not just talking about the two with their names in the title. There’s more going on with some of these supporting
characters than you may have noticed, and they may affect the future of the entire MCU. When it comes to Ant-Man and the Wasp, these
are the characters that deserve your extra attention. Cassie Lang Scott Lang’s daughter Cassie is Ant-Man and
the Wasp’s secret MVP. In one of the movie’s most adorable moments,
the 10-year-old makes it clear to her dad that she wants to be his superhero sidekick. It’s a suggestion that Scott brushes off,
at least, for now. In the comics, Cassie does get in on the superhero
game, working both on her own and with the Young Avengers under the names of Stature
and Stinger. Like her dad, she has size-changing abilities,
gaining the power to do so without the help of any technology through her lifetime exposure
to Pym particles. So why does Cassie’s comic book history matter
to the MCU? Well, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige
has openly discussed how the company is “planting seeds” for the Young Avengers’ potential arrival
in the movies, saying, “That’s why we wanted Cassie […] inspired
by her father.” You may see that inspiration pay off sooner
than you think, as Marvel has reportedly cast an older actress to play Cassie in the fourth
Avengers movie. Is this aspiring heroine about to get her
time in the spotlight? It certainly seems that way. Elihas Starr Elihas Starr only appears in flashback in
the Ant-Man sequel, being the bald man who gets blown up in a quantum experiment as part
of Ghost’s origin story. But while he may be a sympathetic figure in
the movie, his comic book namesake is anything but. Introduced in a 1962 issue of Tales to Astonish,
Elihas is a brainiac villain appropriately known as Egghead, a super genius who becomes
obsessed with defeating Ant-Man and the Avengers. You don’t really get any of that in the movie,
though. Instead, Elihas’ animosity toward Pym is transferred
to his daughter Ava, aka Ghost, who has a reflexive distaste for Pym due to what she
sees as his part in her parents’ deaths. That fatherly aspect to Egghead is entirely
an invention of the MCU; in the comics, Ava doesn’t exist. Speaking of which… Ghost Ghost, is one of the more mysterious characters
in Ant-Man and the Wasp. With no time for chit-chat, she’s got an understandable
focus on staying alive and finding a cure for her uncontrollable phasing condition before
it tears her apart. Motivated by survival, Ava’s the most sympathetic
villain the MCU has seen yet. By the time the credits roll and Ghost is
cured, Scott’s casually referring to Ava as the team’s “new Ghost friend”, making her
story feel less like a villain’s tale and more like a backdoor pilot for a whole new
hero. In MCU territory, they call that move “the
Bucky Barnes.” In the comics, Ghost is not named Ava, nor
is she a she. The comic book Ghost, a man whose real name
we never learn, was introduced as a villain in a 1987 issue of Iron Man. Eventually, the character joins the Thunderbolts,
a team of bad guys gone good. Since Ghost survives Ant-Man and the Wasp,
fans are chattering about the possibility of the anti-hero eventually joining a movie
version of the Thunderbolts. While we don’t know for sure if that’s happening,
some of the pieces are in place. In the comics, the team was originally led
by Baron Zemo, a character who appeared in – and survived – Captain America: Civil War. Jimmy Woo Would you believe that FBI Special Agent James
“Jimmy” Woo is the Ant-Man and the Wasp character with the longest comic book history? With the character first introduced in 1956,
it might also explain why he’s such an unabashed square. Woo is such an old-fashioned character that
he predates Marvel Comics as a company, first appearing in an Atlas Comics series about
a Chinese supervillain named “The Yellow Claw.” A name which aged very poorly! “Hey! It’s complicated.” “It is?” “It’s complicated.” When Atlas turned into Marvel, Woo eventually
ended up repackaged as a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent. But Marvel never forgot his Atlas Comics roots,
eventually making him the center of a new team called the Agents of Atlas in 2006, a
squad composed of retro heroes from the ’40s and ’50s. Woo’s quaint style in Ant-Man and the Wasp
seems like a reference to his origins in another era. Being a stickler for the rules makes him a
natural heel in a world where Scott Lang – technically a criminal! – can be among the ranks of the
world’s mightiest heroes. Whale Boat Captain Daniel Gooobler The whale boat captain played by comedian
Tim Heidecker is not a comic book character, but rather a manifestation of a real-life
inside joke. It all goes back to the satirical movie review
series On Cinema at the Cinema, starring Heidecker and comedian Gregg Turkington – a show on
which Ant-Man director Peyton Reed once appeared. Ever since Turkington cameoed in the first
Ant-Man as Scott’s Baskin-Robbins manager, the two co-hosts have been locked in a rivalry
over which of them can appear in more Marvel movies – a competition Tim tied in 2015 by
appearing in Fox’s Fantastic Four reboot. “I completely understand why you would want
to be involved in it, why you would pay the $15,000 to cameo in the movie.” “No. No.” Now that Tim’s lunged into the lead with this
appearance in Ant-Man and the Wasp, the tables have turned on Turkington. The appearance makes for one of the movie’s
most amusing gags, provided you know about the long-running inside joke. Bill Foster Laurence Fishburne’s Bill Foster serves as
an Ant-Man and the Wasp antagonist for about five minutes, with any villainy on his part
coming down to a difference in perspectives. The professor is introduced as a former partner
of Pym’s who worked alongside him on a project called Goliath. But what’s never made too clear is that Goliath
is a former superhero alter-ego of Hank’s, and that – for a while – Foster was Goliath. After parting ways with Pym, Foster gained
the power to grow to great heights himself through his tinkering with Pym particles. He then started a blaxploitation-era crime-fighting
career as the hero Black Goliath in a 1975 issue of Power-Man. Later, after using the name Giant-Man for
a while, Foster would just take the name Goliath. While Foster never goes gigantic in the Ant-Man
sequel, he definitely has the ability to, which may come in handy in the future. This is assuming Bill survived the movie’s
credit scene. With one Ant-Man and two Wasps snapped out
of existence, the remaining heroes probably need all the help they can get. Thanks for watching! Click the Looper icon to subscribe to our
YouTube channel. Plus check out all this cool stuff we know
you’ll love, too!

5 Best And 5 Worst Things About Ant-Man And The Wasp

5 Best And 5 Worst Things About Ant-Man And The Wasp


There’s a lot to like in Ant-Man and the Wasp,
the newest offering from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but it’s definitely not without
its flaws. We’re here to take a look at what worked…
and what might have worked a little better. These are the five best and five worst things
about Ant-Man and the Wasp. Best: Dad of the year Some of the best moments in the film are when
Paul Rudd’s Scott Lang is hanging out with his young daughter Cassie, played by Abby
Ryder Fortson. The chemistry between Paul Rudd and Fortson
is exceptional, with Fortson bantering with Rudd like a seasoned professional. It’s hard to believe the two aren’t actually
father and daughter in real life, and with a relationship this strong to anchor the film,
everything else comes together beautifully. Worst: Previously on Ant-Man… Ant-Man and the Wasp is a sequel to Ant-Man
as well as Captain America: Civil War, so there’s a lot of story to fill viewers in
on. Unfortunately, the first several minutes of
Ant-Man and the Wasp are bogged down by clumsy exposition. From Hank and Hope sitting down to remember
the plot of Ant-Man to Randall Park’s Jimmy Woo rehashing the plot of Civil War and Age
of Ultron, it’s a lot of re-hashing from a writing team that is capable of more interesting
things. Best: Ghost isn’t transparent Hannah John-Kamen’s Ghost doesn’t even seem
to realize she’s a villain, and that’s because her motivation is pretty simple: survive. Her quantum powers are tearing her body apart,
and she doesn’t have long to live. In putting our heroes up against a villain
whose goal isn’t world domination but simple survival, the film feels fresh and distinct
from the 19 MCU outings that precede it. “Who is the bad guy in Ant-Man and the Wasp? Mmmm, we have opponents but not necessarily
villains.” Worst: They can’t all be winners On the other hand, Walton Goggins appears
in the film as a shady black market tech dealer named Sonny Burch, and the role is everything
Ghost isn’t. While Ghost has a compelling backstory and
a clearly defined personality, Burch is about as bland as they come. The film is saved by Ghost’s antagonistic
menace, but it’s hard not to regret seeing Walton Goggins wasted in a forgettable role. Best: Michael Peña steals the show The best heist in the original Ant-Man isn’t
Scott breaking into Hank’s house, it’s Michael Pena’s Luis stealing the show. He shines every time he’s onscreen. “Got their credentials?” “He’s in the system.” “I’m in the system?” “You’re in the system.” “The system?” Pena is once again a standout in a film packed
with memorable actors. His rapport with Michael Douglas’s Hank Pym
is still delightfully awkward, and they even manage to work in one of his sloppily narrated
stories. “I first met Scotty in Cell Block D and I
say ‘I’m Luis,’ and he says ‘I’m scotty, and we’re gonna be best friends.’ Scotty gets out of jail and that’s when he
met Hope and she’s all ‘look at my hairdo, I’m all business.” Wherever Ant-Man goes in the future, here’s
hoping Luis goes with him. Worst: Can Janet catch a break? Janet’s disappearance prior to the first film
pushes Hank into his angry, reclusive state and screws up his relationship with his daughter. Ant-Man and the Wasp has the opportunity to
undo this while giving one of the great Marvel characters her MCU due. Instead, it just trades one trope for another,
making Janet one of the film’s primary MacGuffins. When she finally appears in the end, she gets
maybe five minutes of screentime. Janet – and Michelle Pfeiffer – deserves better. Best: Low stakes, high reward Avengers: Infinity War took the MCU to the
highest stakes the franchise has ever seen, and came on the heels of an Asgardian apocalypse
and a Wakandan revolution. Luckily, Ant-Man and the Wasp gives viewers
a bit of a break from the ridiculous tension of the last MCU movie. The fate of the world isn’t at stake in this
new Ant-Man adventure. At its core, Ant-Man and the Wasp is about
the fight to save the lives of two people, Ghost and Janet van Dyne. It’s a comparatively small story, but just
what MCU fans needed after Infinity War. Worst: Time is money These days, most blockbusters have a run time
of over two hours, even though longer isn’t necessarily better. With comparatively small stakes and such a
simple story to tell, Ant-Man and the Wasp is absolutely a film that would benefit from
a shorter runtime. Even the director himself agrees. “I’m very vocal about the Ant-Man movies being
under 2 hours.” Unfortunately, it comes in at over two hours,
longer than the first Ant-Man film, Doctor Strange, and even the first two Thor movies. You’d think a movie about shrinking heroes
would know that bigger isn’t always better. Best: Laugh it up In the past, MCU movies have had a bad habit
of incessant quipping; even the previous Ant-Man movie did it. “It’s okay!” As funny as Ant-Man and the Wasp is, there
isn’t a single important dramatic moment in the film that gets interrupted by a character
making a joke or a gag going down. Serious moments are given the time to be taken
seriously, and that makes the comedic moments even better. Worst: Character matters The MCU excels at a lot of things, but its
best quality might be its ability to take characters and make them grow organically
from film to film. Unfortunately, this is Ant-Man and the Wasp’s
biggest flaw. Scott might grow as a character, but it’s
literal growth, not emotional. He ends the movie in the same spot he ended
in the first Ant-Man: romantically involved with Hope, and no longer in immediate trouble
with the law. Meanwhile, Hope experiences a significant
life event in her mother returning from the Quantum Realm, but the film never really shows
us what this means for her past the initial reunion. Despite the size-changing, neither character
gets a chance to really change as people. Thanks for watching! Click the Looper icon to subscribe to our
YouTube channel. Plus check out all this cool stuff we know
you’ll love, too!

The Ending Of Ant-Man And The Wasp Explained

The Ending Of Ant-Man And The Wasp Explained


After the soul-rending gut-punch of Infinity
War, Ant-Man and the Wasp is like an afternoon trip to Baskin-Robbins. It’s colorful, splashy, and fun, without too
much emotional weight. “Hiya champ, how was school today?” (laughs) Still, that definitely isn’t to say that everything
got a neat resolution at the end of the movie. True to form for Marvel films, Ant-Man and
the Wasp ends on a slippery slope covered in cliffhangers and unanswered questions. Well, grab some orange slices and watch out
for tardigrades, because we’re diving deep into the Quantum Realm to clear up some of
the nagging questions you might have had after seeing Ant-Man and the Wasp – obviously, spoilers
ahead. Wasp evolution Clearly, the Quantum Realm is a crazy place. We first saw how bonkers it is in the first
Ant-Man, when Scott Lang nearly got lost after shrinking between the molecules of Yellowjacket’s
suit. It gets even worse when Hank Pym takes his
Innerspace bus into the Quantum Realm in Ant-Man and the Wasp. Here’s a rough reenactment: “Here we go!” Once Hank’s in there, he almost immediately
starts losing his mind. Thankfully, Janet shows up just in time to
fix him with her new quantum powers. So… what was up with that? As Janet briefly explained, the three decades
she spent in the Realm forced her to evolve in some strange ways to deal with the madness
of the Quantum Realm. Part of that evolution apparently gave her
the ability to influence quantum particles. When Hank got lost in his own mind, she basically
guided him back to sanity. Quantum healing Most of the story arc involving Ghost, a.k.a.
Ava Starr, deals with her search for a way to cure her quantum phase-shifting condition. Her powers made for some visually amazing
fight scenes, but her character is also in constant pain and inching closer to the grave
with every moment. So that part’s not good. To end her suffering, Ava concocts a plan
to ambush Janet Van Dyne on her way out of the Quantum Realm and siphon Janet’s stored
quantum energy. To do so, she uses a sleep chamber built to
help stave off the effects of her condition, although nobody ever explains exactly what
it is. By all appearances, it’s designed to focus
or manipulate quantum particles. In a pinch, though, it can apparently draw
particles into itself. It turns out that there was no need to fight
about it though, because Janet is more than happy to cure Ava. Infinity fallout In case you still haven’t seen Avengers: Infinity
War, fair warning: We’re about to get into some tiny spoilers here. By the end of Ant-Man and the Wasp, everything’s
been patched up in the Ant-Man universe. And then like a punch to the face, the mid-credits
scene came along to remind us that this happy little Ant-Man universe actually exists within
the big, mean MCU, where Thanos beat the Avengers and dusted half the universe. As the first mid-credits scene shows for an
instant, Hank, Hope, and Janet are now on the list of finger-snap casualties. Shrinking timeline With that major connection to Infinity War,
it’s worth taking a moment to clarify the timeline of everything that happened in Ant-Man
and the Wasp. Despite being released after Infinity War,
Ant-Man and the Wasp takes place before the events of that film. Right before it, by all accounts. The movie doesn’t mention how much time has
passed between the main film and the mid-credits scenes, but however long it was, that time
gap essentially contained Infinity War. When Scott jumps into the quantum tunnel,
Thanos is presumably finishing up his gauntlet over in Wakanda, putting the ending of both
movies at just about the same moment, chronologically. But this connection also leads to some interesting
new developments for Infinity War. Marvel mastermind Kevin Feige has been pretty
up front about that. “Ant-Man and the Wasp also connects directly
to Avengers 4. These characters are gonna be very important
going forward.” If that’s the case, then there’s a good chance
that all the fallen heroes in Infinity War will make a comeback. It could be that Hope, Hank, and Janet – along
with the rest of the casualties of Thanos’ finger snap – weren’t destroyed outright,
but instead transferred into the Quantum Realm. And speaking of that place… Lost in the quantum realm Ant-Man and the Wasp certainly left one of
its heroes in a big cliffhanger. When the Van Dynes disintegrated while Scott
was in the Quantum Realm, he apparently got stuck there. Not only are the people who know how to get
him out gone, but they’re probably also the only people who even know he’s in there. That opens up an interesting possibility:
After spending a long time in the Quantum Realm, Janet Van Dyne learned how to manipulate
quantum particles. If Scott spends enough time sandwiched between
realities, he could feasibly develop the same ability. That would give him a definite upper hand
against Thanos in the future, especially if, as fans have speculated, the Infinity Stones
are somehow tied into the Quantum Realm. Thanks for watching! Click the Looper icon to subscribe to our
YouTube channel. Plus check out all this cool stuff we know
you’ll love, too!

Ant-Man and the Wasp review – LEGO Marvel-thon!

Ant-Man and the Wasp review – LEGO Marvel-thon!


Hello, just2good here, and the Marvel-Thon
is not dead. Here’s my non-spoilers thoughts on the 20th
Marvel Cinematic Univer film, Ant-Man and the Wasp, which just released in theaters
– in July 2018. Honestly, I just thought it was average and
bland. It was my least favorite MCU film since…
well, the first Ant-Man. I mean, Infinity War was such a big movie,
it makes sense to have a small – no pun intended – story and conflicts following it like this
one does. But being a smaller movie, its characters
need to bring you in. And that’s where this film really doesn’t
deliver. The villains are very one note for the most
part, the main heroes don’t have much going for them, the humor falls flat at points. Really, the comedy works best when it plays
with the size ideas, and is worse when some of the side characters just keep going and
going with a joke. However, I think the action and even some
visuals in this movie are some of the best with the MCU. They also really nailed the father daughter
relationship with Scott and Cassie this time around. And while the third act is pretty good, the
first and second acts seem rushed at integral points, and drag out at unnecessary times. I dunno. Like I said, it all just weighs out to an
average movie. Without revealing anything, for the LEGO set,
you guys know that has that superrrr innacurate Wasp. But I was surprised, the vehicle was spot
on to its movie appearance. I have some sets ideas – one for the Ant-Van
Chase they showed in the trailer. Again, not spoiling anything here, it would
be a cool set with a Luis minifigure… anything else I’d say may reveal stuff so I’ll end
it there. I’m not sure I’ll do a spoiler Marvel-thon
for this one, honestly. Keep the comments spoiler free but please
let me know your general thought in the comments below. Am I wrong? Do you disagree? I’ll see you guys later, peace out, bye.

Top 10 Tiny Details You Missed In Ant-Man And The Wasp

Top 10 Tiny Details You Missed In Ant-Man And The Wasp


Hey guys! Welcome back to Top 10 Nerd, I’m Ron McKenzie-Lefurgey. Ant-Man and The Wasp have been out for several
days now, and it’s given nerds around the world enough time to fully absorb it. It’s been quite well received, people, seem
to be enjoying it, but not everyone is able to notice every single detail and reference
found in it. So let’s go over some of the tiniest details. I’ll try to avoid points that we already
talked about in past videos, although there may be some overlap. I’ll also do my best to keep the “Small”
puns to a minimum. No promises. Finally, of course, this list will contain
spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet, you might want to pause here. After throwing us a thumbs up, of course. But if you’re still here, I’ll assume
that you’re ready to rock, which means it’s time for the Top 10 Tiny Details You Missed
in Ant-Man and The Wasp! Number 10: X-Con Security. The Ant-Man movie saw Scott trying to make
the most of his time on house arrest, by creating a security company with his ex-con buddies. Which they called X-Con Security because,
with Marvel, everything must always be on-the-nose. But as it turns out, this idea was first seen
in the comics, albeit with a different name and different employees. Instead of your everyday, run of the mill
ex-con like in the movie, the comics saw Scott starting Ant-Man Security Solutions with the
help of D-list villains, like Machinesmith and Grizzly. They wanted a second chance at life, and Scott
wanted people to work for him, so it was a win-win. At least, until Scott was arrested once again,
and the business was shut Number 9: Who’s the Boss? At one point, Luis is freaking out, worried
that the X-Con Security would fail, and in order to get his crap together, he repeats
to himself “I’m the boss I’m the boss I’m the boss.” And ya know when else we heard this little
Mantra? During Civil War, when Scott was trying to
psyche himself up to go Giant. Of course, I can’t say for sure that this
was an intentional reference, it could just be that the writers love that phrase, or really
love Tony Danzy, but I’m pretty sure this was meant as a nod to the Scott Lang line. Number 8: Similar Openings. One thing that many may not have noticed is
that both Ant-Man movies had pretty similar openings. Both times, saw a flashback prologue, that
showed a younger version of a character, and revealed to the audience what the movie would
be about. In the first movie, it was “Hey guys, look
at this nifty Pym particles, everybody wants them, and oh look, Michael Douglas is young!” And in this one, it was “Oh no, Janet’s
gone, wonder if we’ll be finding her later, and also, Michelle Pfeiffer is young!” Now, it’s true that this isn’t exactly
a unique opening, and it’s a technique used in all sorts of movies, but it’s an interesting
little homage, and a cool way to give a bit of a consistent feel… Or, it’s lazy. Take your pick. Kind of a glass half full type thing. Number 7: Cassie Clues. Fans of the Ant-Man comics will know that
Scott Lang’s daughter, Cassie Lang, would eventually go on to become a superhero herself,
taking on the roles of Stature and Stinger. Well, in the movie, Cassie’s quite young,
so unsurprisingly we didn’t see her jumping into the fray. However, in a heart to heart scene with her
dad, she offered to act as his sidekick. A nice little nod to her comic book heroics,
plus it was just such a cute moment. She’s adorable. That scene with the stuffed animal in the
first movie made me wish she was my daughter. Number 6: The Centurion. In the movie, we were introduced to FBI Agent
Geoffrey Ballard and later learned that he was secretly working for Sonny Burch. But in the comics, Ballard was a CIA agent
who wore a state-of-the-art SHIELD battlesuit. Which was called The Centurion weapons system,
and was created by Sidney “The Gaffer” Levine? So what did he call himself? The Centurion. Nailed it. The suit was really cool though, powerful
enough to fight supers, with a powerful beam weapon strong enough to affect the Vision. He even had a similar double agent status
in the comics. While he worked for the CIA, he was also working
for The Council, which caused him to tangle with Carol Danvers alongside Mystique. Unsuccessfully. Number 5: Altoids. In the film, Ant-Man kept a bunch of emergency
ants in an Altoid container, just in case he needed them. This is, of course, pretty useful, and an
Altoid container makes a very practical carrying case for ants, but it also works on a few
levels. For one, the slogan “Curiously strong mints”
works beautifully, with the small mints packing a surprising minty punch, while the small
Ant-Man packs a surprising literal punch. But it also might be a little reference to
an early Marvel ad, which shows Iron Man advertising for Altoids. If this was an intentional thing by the filmmakers,
then props to them. But it could well be a coincidence. Altoids are pretty popular. Number 4: Clever Girl. Okay, this one blew my mind. I don’t even care that it isn’t technically
a “Small detail you missed”. At one point, Janet refers to hope as “Clever
Girl”, and every nerd and most non-nerds immediately thought “Hey, Jurassic Park
reference!” And it’s true that it might have been. But guys. You know what I learned? That’s like, a super common thing to say
in movies! Total Recall. Jumpin’ Jack flashOliver Another Oliver. It’s ridiculous! And I never knew it was such a trope! Although I gotta say, my personal favorite
is definitely from Hercules. I realize this is barely about Ant-Man and
more about movies in general but I had no idea about this and I needed to tell someone
about it. I hope at least one person was shocked by
this, and I’m not just an ignorant mess. Number 3: The Orb. In one of the adorable Scott and Cassie scenes,
we saw them playing a game of heist. Which is totally a normal thing to do. When he asks her to pull out her Special Contact
to disable an imaginary security system, she pretends that a giant paper plate is a contact,
thus making it like her entire head was an eyeball. Sure, this was pretty cute, but it was also
a super subtle reference to The Orb, a Marvel villain whose head is just a giant eyeball. He hasn’t really come up against Ant-Man,
so it’s a bit of a strange reference and might just be a coincidence, but I’m pretty
sure it was an intentional nod. Pretty sure. Number 2: Luis loves Morrissey. In one scene, we see Luis telling Sonny Birch
and co about his grandma, and how she had a jukebox in her restaurant that only played
Morrissey. For those who don’t know, Morrissey is a
singer-songwriter who was the vocalist for The Smiths, among other things. Peyton Reed, director of the Ant-Man films,
happens to be a big fan of The Smiths; he even played on a Smiths cover band for a while. So, he threw his own obsession into the movie
and made it part of Luis’ character. But this was not just a one-off joke. Those who paid close attention will have noticed
that when Luis calls Scott, his ringtone is, you guessed it, a Morrissey Song, Everyday
is like Sunday. The dude loves The Pope of Mope. Number 1: Quantum realm hints. While nerds around the world have already
been going through the movie with fine-toothed combs, there are certain hints that just can’t
be seen yet. After watching the first Ant-Man movie, many
fans could have sworn that they saw Janet trapped in the quantum realm when Scott went
subatomic, but it took a frame by frame analysis to confirm that she was, indeed, hinted at
in the scene. It has since been confirmed that there are
other hints in the quantum realm scenes of Ant-Man and the Wasp, which means there are
a few secrets hidden away in single frames. We’ll have to wait for the movie to come out
so we can go frame by frame, so it’s not really your fault for missing this detail,
but hopefully, we’ll find out soon! That’s it for today! Hope you guys enjoyed if you did please smack
that thumbs up button and subscribe to Top 10 Nerd for more videos! Let me know in the comments what YOU thought
of Ant-Man and the Wasp! And if you want a sweet playlist to watch
so you can just get nerdy without clicking, check out our Versus playlist on the channel! Until next time, I’m Ron McKenzie-Lefurgey
with Top 10 nerd. Later nerds!

Ant-Man Goes Subatomic – Ant-Man (2015) Movie Clip 4K Ultra HD

Ant-Man Goes Subatomic – Ant-Man (2015) Movie Clip 4K Ultra HD


I’m gonna show you
just how insignificant you are. Cassie! I’m coming! That’s a messed-up looking dog. I’m gonna destroy everything you love. Freeze! S.F.P.D. I can’t break through. It’s titanium, you idiot! – Get her out of here.
– Come on. Sorry, sweetheart. You have to help
Daddy pay for his mistakes. You stay behind me, okay?
Stay behind me. I’m gonna have to shrink between
the molecules to get in there. Get away from us! – Daddy, help!
– I love you, Cassie. Daddy, where are you? You could go subatomic. …go subatomic. Oh, no. You would enter a reality
where all concepts of time and space… All concepts of time and space
become irrelevant. …time and space become irrelevant. Come back, Daddy! …as you shrink for all eternity. Everything that you know… and love… gone forever. Daddy, where are you? Where are you? Where are you? –
Daddy!
– Cassie. Come back, Daddy! Do not mess with the regulator! Daddy! I love you so much. I love you, too. So much. You know,
there’s a big hole in the roof. Sorry. – Is she all right?
– Yeah, she’s fine. Mommy! She’s fine, she’s fine.