Insects for Children

Insects for Children


– [Narrator] Insects. (upbeat music) Ant. Ant. Fly. Fly. Caterpillar. Caterpillar. Butterfly. Butterfly. Wasp. Wasp. Beetle. Beetle. Dragonfly. Dragonfly. Mosquito. Mosquito. Bee. Bee. Grasshopper. Grasshopper. And ladybug. Ladybug. Thanks for watching.

Eli the Aardvark | The Ant and the Aardvark | Pink Panther and Pals

Eli the Aardvark | The Ant and the Aardvark | Pink Panther and Pals


(trumpets) HUH? WHAT? (whistling) OH, I HEAR WHAT
YOU’RE SAYING. “SOME COCONUT CREAM PIE
AND A TALL COCONUT SMOOTHIE.” COCONUT, OH, COCONUT. AND YOU’RE SAYING,
“I’M A TASTY LITTLE ANT.” NO, I’M SAYING,
“HEADS UP.” OKAY, SO MY SNOUT
MAY BE OUT, BUT THERE’S ANOTHER WAY
TO CATCH THAT ANT. TRA, LA, LA, LA, LA.
I LOVE BLUEBERRIES. OH. YOU GOT
A LOT OF NERVE GETTING BETWEEN ME
AND MY “ANT-PETIZER.” HUH? WHAT? WHO DO YOU
THINK YOU ARE? ALL I KNOW IS
I’M BLUE AND I’VE
GOT A HEADACHE. SO NOW YOU PRETEND
YOU HAVE AMNESIA? YOU DON’T EVEN
HAVE A BUMP
ON YOUR BIG HEAD. (bell dings) AM I AN AARDVARK? YOU ARE A NUISANCE,
A BUTTINSKY, AND A WASTE OF
A PERFECTLY
GOOD BOULDER. BUT I’M BLUE,
JUST LIKE YOU, AND I HAVE A SNOUT
FOR CATCHING ANTS, JUST LIKE YOU. YOU MAY BE BLUE
AND YOU MAY HAVE
A SNOUT, BUT YOU…YOU… WHOA, WHOA, WHOA. YOU HAVE A SNOUT
THAT WORKS.
IT WORKS! WHICH IS GOOD
FOR AN AARDVARK. SO I AM AN AARDVARK. OF COURSE
YOU’RE AN AARDVARK. JUST NOT
A VERY GOOD ONE. BUT I CAN TEACH
YOU TO BE A GREAT
ANT CATCHER LIKE ME, BROTHER. BROTHER! (clattering, glass breaks) YOU’RE WEARING
MY PANTS? YEAH, AND THEY FIT
GREAT, BROTHER. OKAY NOW, REMEMBER
THIS IS MY ANT. BUT SINCE YOU
NEED TO LEARN, YOU TURN ON THE SCHNOZ,
AND I’LL DO THE REST. YOU GOT IT, BROTHER. OKAY, GET READY, AIM… AIM… NOW! (frog ribbits) IT’S COMING! NOW! (gulp) (frog ribbits) OKAY, YOU BLOW
DOWN THIS HOLE, HE COMES OUT
THAT HOLE, AND THEN I WILL
FILL UP THE HOLE
IN MY STOMACH. YOU GOT IT, BROTHER! YOW! WOULD YOU
LOOK AT THAT. ELI’S DRESSED UP
LIKE AARDVARKY. IS IT HALLOWEEN? ‘CAUSE IT LOOK LIKE
IT’S HALLOWEEN. I BETTER RUN OUT
AND GET SOME TREATS. NOW! PRICES ARE FALLING. HMM. GO HURRY TO GET
BEST CHEAP PRICES ON FURNITURE
AT CARPET BROTHERS! (frog ribbits) AARDVARKS ARE VERY
RESOURCEFUL, ELI. TRY, TRY,
AND TRY AGAIN. THAT’S AN
AARDVARK’S MOTTO. HIGH-FIVE, BROTHER. NO. YES! JUST SAY YES! WITH NO MONEY DOWN! (frog ribbits) OKAY, ELI, LET IT BLOW! (trumpets) WHAT’S GOING ON? SOMETHING STUCK
IN THERE? IT’S A POP FLY OUT
TO CENTER FIELD, AND COUGAR’S GOT IT. HE’S OUT. (frog ribbits) ALL BETTER,
LITTLE BROTHER. BROTHER?
WHAT’S GOING ON? WHY DO I GET THE FEELING
THIS IS NOT HALLOWEEN? NOPE, BUT YOU HAVE
BEEN TRICKED INTO
BEING MY TREAT. ELI! NO, WAIT, ELI!
THIS IS ALL WRONG. YOU’RE AN ELEPHANT.
YOU DON’T CATCH ANTS. I’M AN AARDVARK,
AND I’M BLUE. HMM,
JUST AS I THOUGHT.
BLUEBERRY. ELI, HOW’D YOU
GET THAT LUMP
ON YOUR HEAD? I DON’T REMEMBER. A-HA!
SHAME ON YOU, AARDVARK. DON’T YOU KNOW
ELI’S GOT AMNESIA? HE NEEDS AN ICE PACK, AND YOU’VE GOT HIM
TRYING TO ICE ME! SHAME ON YOU,
AARDVARK. A-HA! NO, SHAME ON YOU, ANT,
FOR LYING TO
MY BROTHER LIKE THAT. HE… HE SAYS
YOU’RE NOT
MY BROTHER. OF COURSE
I’M YOUR BROTHER.
AND I HAVE PROOF. AW, SEE, ANT? WE’RE BROTHERS. AW, BROTHER.
IT’S BLUEBERRIES, ELI. ARE YOU CALLING
MY BROTHER A LIAR? NOBODY CALLS
MY BROTHER A LIAR. YIPE! (screams) NO! THAT’S IT. THAT ELI GAVE ME
SUCH A HEADACHE. I THINK I’LL
RETURN THE FAVOR. HEY, BROTHER, THAT ANT YOU WANTED,
I GOT HIM. HUH? ANT? ANT! GOOD WORK, ELI!
YOU’RE A GREAT AARDVARK. I’M COMING, ELI.
I’M COMING. OH. H-HEY. WHY AM I ALL BLUE? ELEPHANTS AREN’T
SUPPOSED TO BE BLUE. ELEPHANT?
NO, NO, NO, NO. YOU’RE AN AARDVARK.
WE’RE BROTHERS.
REMEMBER? LOOK, YOU CAUGHT
THAT ANT. DID YOU HIT
YOUR HEAD
OR SOMETHING? JUST ‘CAUSE ELI’S BLUE
DOESN’T MEAN
HE’S AN AARDVARK. YEAH.
DID YOU HIT YOUR HEAD
OR SOMETHING? NO, YOU HIT YOUR HEAD.
I MEAN, I HIT YOUR HEAD. I MEAN, STAND STILL
SO I CAN HIT YOUR HEAD. HEY, ELI, WHAT DO
YOU SAY WE GO FOR
A DUNK IN THE POND? YOU CAN WASH THOSE
BLUEBERRIES RIGHT OFF. THEN YOU WON’T LOOK
SO AARDVARKY. (jackhammer hammering) (heavenly music) GOOD MORNING, PINK. HOPE THAT THE DAY
FINDS YOU WELL. HO, HO, IT LOOKS LIKE
IT’S GOING TO BE
ANOTHER SCORCHER. ICE CREAM? INSPIRED CHOICE, SIR. NOW FINDING YOUR ROUTE. RIGHT. WE’RE OFF, THEN. APPROACHING YOUR
FINAL DESTINATION. YOU HAVE ARRIVED. PINK LEMONADE SHERBET? OH, WHAT AN
EXCELLENT CHOICE, SIR. THAT CERTAINLY
BRINGS BACK MEMORIES. AH, YES. MY FATHER
WAS A COMPASS, YOU KNOW, AND HE JUST LOVED
PINK LEMONADE. (electricity crackling) (jumbled speech) WHERE AM I,
DEAR BOY? ICE CREAM? OH, DEAR, NO, NO, NO. MY BABY DESERVES
SOMETHING MUCH HEALTHIER. UH, NOW, UH,
LET’S SEE HERE. AH, NOW A
HEALTHY SMOOTHIE WOULD BE JUST THE THING
FOR MY LITTLE POPPET. NOW LET’S BUCKLE UP. YOU CAN NEVER
BE TOO SAFE. OH, JUST LOOK
AT GRANNY’S
LITTLE PRINCE. LET’S GET GOING,
SHALL WE? (tires screeching) (blowing whistle) (tires screeching) HELLO, DEAR. I’D LIKE TO ORDER
AN EXTRA-LARGE RAZZAMAGOGO
OMEGA GAMMA THREE-B
HAPPY TILAPI FIBRO BLASTER, WITH EXTRA BROCCOLI FOAM
TO GO, PLEASE. BOTTOMS UP, DEAR. NOW, ISN’T THAT
SO MUCH BETTER
THAN ICE CREAM? AH, WHAT A LOVELY DAY. AH, THIS DRY HEAT
DOES WONDERS
FOR MY COMPLEXION. DON’T YOU… ICE CREAM?
THAT’S A GREAT IDEA,
BROTHER. (engine revs) WHAT ARE WE WAITING FOR? TIME TO PUSH IT
TO THE MAX, BROTHER! PEDAL TO THE METAL! (screams) WHOO-HOO! (siren wails) HERE COMES
OUR SHORTCUT, BROTHER. THIS’LL SAVE US LOADS
OF TRAFFIC TIME. TO THE EXTREME! (siren wails) AAH! YEE-HA! WHO NEEDS A HIGHWAY
WHEN WE CAN GO MY WAY? NOW THIS IS MY KIND
OF TRAFFIC. RIGHT TURN COMING UP. HA HA! HA HA! HA HA! (tires screech) I COULD HAVE SWORN
IT WAS AROUND HERE
SOMEWHERE. WHOA, WHOA,
WHOA, WHOA. WHOA, WHOA,
HEY, HEY. WHOA,
TAKE IT EASY,
BROTHER! HEY, WHOA, WHOA!
UH-OH! (panting) (yawns) (growls, barks) (barking continues) (barking) (whistles) (meows) (triumphant music) MM-HMM. MM-HMM. (bell dings)

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

Quittin’ Time | The Ant and the Aardvark | Pink Panther and Pals

Quittin’ Time | The Ant and the Aardvark | Pink Panther and Pals


(slamming noise) AH-EE!
AAGH-EE-EH!
AGHH! (humming) (light festive music) ♪ ♪ (suspenseful music) ♪ ♪ (sigh) AARDVARK! UH, WHAT? WHAT’S THAT? WHAT THAT? THAT! OH, THIS? IT’S, UH…
IT–WELL, IT’S,
UH, WELL, UH… IT’S TO CATCH YOU! AW, MAN!
CAN’T YOU LEAVE ME ALONE
FOR ONE DAY, AARDVARKY? OOH, YOU’LL NEVER
GET RID OF ME, EH. YOUR TINY BRAIN
IS NO MATCH FOR
WHAT I’VE GOT UP HERE! WHAT YOU GOT UP THERE
IS A LOT OF ROOM. AND MY TINY BRAIN
TELLS ME IT’S
34-B TIME AGAIN– AARDVARK COMING
FROM THE NORTH
WITH A BUTTERFLY NET. YOU KNOW THAT MOVE? OH, YEAH?
WELL, YOU DON’T KNOW
THIS ONE. 14-C,
OVER-THE-HEAD LUNGE. TRY THIS ONE
ON FOR SIZE. 26-B?
FOOT FLAPPER SMASH? OH, THAT IS
SO OLD SCHOOL. WELL,
YOU HAVEN’T SEEN– 86-L,
ANT-SMASHING HOEDOWN, PARTNER. WELL, YOU–
(stammers) I SEE ALL–
I KNOW WHEN YOU– HMM. I CALL THIS ONE 75-S,
FRUSTRATED AARDVARK. I SEE ALL-
-I KNOW WHEN YOU HAVEN’T–
I SEE ALL– SEE YOU IN THE BLUE,
BIG BLUE! HEY ANT,
YOU’VE NEVER SEEN
MOVE 43-C! LOOK AT ME! JUST LOOK AT ME,
I’M A HIGH-FLYING ANT! WHOA,
LET’S TRY THAT AGAIN. HUDDLE! HEY, ANT,
WHAT DID I TELL YOU
ABOUT YOUR TINY BRAIN? YOU’LL NEVER ESCAPE
MY SUPER FLYING SKILLS.
UH-OH. (crashing noise) (birds chirping) MAYDAY, MAYDAY. (distant thud) I’M HURTING IN PLACES
I DIDN’T KNOW
I HAD TO HURT IN. AT LEAST MY
TOE DOESN’T– AGH-EE-EE-EH! (throbbing noise) AGH-EE-EE-EH! WHOA, WHOA, WHOA! I’M SO STRESSED OUT,
I’M IN PAIN, I CAN’T CATCH THAT ANT…
I’VE HAD IT, I QUIT! THERE’S A MILLION THINGS
I CAN DO BESIDES
CHASING THAT ANT. IT’S NOT LIKE MY WORLD
REVOLVES AROUND HIM. WELL,
MAYBE A LITTLE. I JUST HAVE TO THINK,
THINK, THINK, THINK. THAT’S IT! TO GET
MY MIND OFF THAT ANT
I’LL COLLECT STAMPS. (birds chirping) (crickets chirping) (birds chirping) (crickets chirping) (rooster crowing) (yawn) THINGS ARE NOT RIGHT
IN THIS LITTLE ANT’S WORLD. SEEMS LIKE WEEKS
SINCE AARDVARK’S
TRIED TO EAT ME. (licking noise) (humming)
♪ LICKING AND STAMPING
IS SO MUCH FUN ♪ (humming)
♪ I DON’T NEED ANTS
OR ANYONE ♪ (humming) UH, HEY, AARDVARK. WHERE YOU BEEN? THE JUNGLE HAS BEEN
AWFUL QUIET WITHOUT
YOUR SCREAMS OF PAIN. (chattering, humming) (clears throat) WHAT’S UP, AARDVARK? OH, I’M SORRY, ANT.
WERE YOU TALKING TO ME? I’M SO CAUGHT UP
IN MY STAMP COLLECTING HOBBY
THAT I DIDN’T NOTICE YOU. STAMP COLLECTING, HUH?
OOH, LOOK! THERE’S A PRETTY ONE.
ANT-ARTICA. OH, WAIT, I’VE BEEN THERE.
OH, IT’S SO COLD. OOH,
AND THERE’S ARG-ANT-TINA. OH,
THEY HAVE A DELICIOUS
ROASTED PIG THERE. MM-MM-MM-MM! (crunching noise) AND DON’T GET ME STARTED
ON THESE N-ANT-TUCKET BURGERS!
AND IN ANT-WERP, CHOCOLATE FUDGE SUNDAES. I WISH I WAS THERE RIGHT NOW. (trembling) THAT’S IT!
I’M THROUGH!
I CAN’T TAKE IT ANYMORE! I NEVER WANNA HEAR
THE WORD “STAMPS” AGAIN. HEY, I HAVE A PACKAGE
I NEED TO MAIL. ANY OF YOU’S GUYS
HAVE A STAMP
I COULD HAVE? HEY– (arguing over each other) I NEVER KNEW
STAMP COLLECTING WAS
SUCH A DANGEROUS HOBBY. (birds chirping) ONLY WITH OTHER
STAMP COLLECTORS. YOU KNOW,
I NEVER REALIZED
THIS IS A VERY RELAXING GAME. PLAYING THROUGH.
OH, YOU REALLY
SLICED THAT ONE, AARDVARK. (giggles) EH! (clattering noise) FINALLY, I’M GETTING
MY PACKAGE MAILED. OH, GET ME OUTTA HERE! I’M AFRAID OF THE DARK. YOU GOTTA WATCH
THOSE SLICES. YOUR SWING
NEEDS SOME WORK TOO. (humming) THAT’S IT! EVERY TIME
I TRY TO GET THAT ANT,
HE GETS IN MY WAY. OOH, I CAN’T TAKE IT!
WHAT ARE YOU DOING? THAT’S THE
TROUBLE-MAKER. WHOA, UH, UH, MR–MR. GORILLA.
WOULD-WOULD YOU LIKE
TO PLAY THROUGH? (growls) GET HIM! (growls) (blows) (fast-flying sound) OOH, UH. (long groan) YOU NEVER KNOW
WHAT YOU’LL LIKE
UNTIL YOU TRY IT. COME HERE, MY PRETTY. I’VE GOT YOU! (chuckles) (groans) IT MUST BE VERY DIFFICULT
FOR YOU TO FLUTTER, WITH ALL THAT
EXTRA WEIGHT ON YOU. AGH! (crashing noise) AGH-EE-EE-EH! (groans) WHAT DEATH-DEFYING HABIT
HAVE YOU TAKEN UP THIS TIME? BU-BUTTERFLY HUNTING. MUST BE SOME
RARE BREED
OF BUTTERFLIES. BIG, STRONG,
ANGRY, UGLY ONES. THAT’S IT, ANT!
I’VE HAD IT WITH STAMPS, GOLF, AND BUTTERFLIES
THAT LOOK LIKE RHINOS! I UNQUIT. OH, NO! 18-A, AARDVARK
CHASES ANT, ANT RUNS IRIS OUT.
YIKES! I WILL GET YOU, ANT. NO YOU WON’T.
BUT I NEED THE EXERCISE. BRING IT ON,
BIG BLUE. COME BACK HERE! BRING IT ON. (laughing) (film reel rolling) (vaudeville upbeat music) ♪ ♪ (claps) (soft fluttering noise) (slaps) (film reel rolling) (vaudeville upbeat music) ♪ ♪ (trumpeting laughter) SHH! SH. (trumpeting laughter) (vaudeville music) ♪ ♪ (grumbles) MM! MM. (laughing) (trumpeting laugh) (laughing) (trumpeting laugh) (laughing) SHH! (trumpeting laughter) (growls) (slapping noises) (trumpeting laughter) (vaudeville music) ♪ ♪ (loud inhale) (windy blowing) SH. (growls) (grunts) (low grumbling) (vaudeville music) ♪ ♪ (smacks) (thud) (door slams) (upbeat music) MM-HMM,
MM-HMM. (vaudeville music) ♪ ♪ (trumpeting laugh) SH. (trumpeting laugh) (groans)
(struggled fighting) (grumbles) SH. (Pink Panther
theme vaudeville) ♪ ♪ (chomping) SHH! (gulp) (chewing) (vaudeville music) ♪ ♪ (chewing) (growling grumbles) (Pink Panther
theme vaudeville) ♪ ♪ (frustrated grumbles) HM? (groan) HM? (frustrated grumbles) (crashing noise) (birds chirping) (trumpeting laughter) (frustrated grumbles) (birds chirping) (confused grumbles) (frustrated yell) (angry yelling) (bell ringing) (vaudeville music) ♪ ♪ (trumpeting laughter) (woozy calliope) (trumpeting laughter) (crashing noises) (trolley bell ringing) (frustrated grumbles) (vaudeville music) ♪ ♪ (suspenseful music) (boing) (thud) (audience laughing) (cheers and applause) (laughing) (Pink Panther vaudeville) ♪ ♪ (Pink Panther theme) ♪ ♪

Winter is Coming For These Argentine Ant Invaders | Deep Look

Winter is Coming For These Argentine Ant Invaders | Deep Look


Once upon a time, the Argentine ant seemed invincible. Why? Well normally, ants in different colonies
of the same species fight each other to the death for territory and food. But take an Argentine ant from a colony in
Japan, or Spain, or from your kitchen, put ‘em together and… Nothing happens. They recognize each other by smell. Just like
these nest mates. Worldwide, Argentine ants act like a huge,
international super colony. Countless nests, each home to hundreds of
queens, producing millions of highly disposable workers. Massive Argentine ant super-colonies are spreading
all over the globe, overwhelming local ant populations. They can take down much bigger ants. Like
this harvester. The tiny Argentines throw themselves at their
enemy. Exhaust her. Then slowly pull her apart. They seemed unstoppable. But there’s more to this story. The Argentine ant has an Achilles heel. At Jasper Ridge, near Stanford University,
Nicole Heller has been tracking ant populations since the late 1990s. She wanted to know, how long would it take
for Argentines to completely overwhelm the native species here? One year? Five? But it didn’t happen. To her surprise, one native species was actually
thriving behind enemy lines. The winter ant. Winter ants aren’t much bigger than Argentine
ants. They aren’t much stronger. But they have a secret weapon. Put Argentine and winter ants together near
something they both want, like this cotton ball soaked in honey. See how the winter ant aims its abdomen at
the Argentine? And that little white dot appears right at the tip? And how the Argentine scurries away? No one had ever seen this before. In fact,
as far as we know, this is the first time anyone’s caught it on camera. No one knows yet what exactly it is, but this secretion can repel, even kill, those Argentine workers. At Jasper Ridge, this little drop has been enough to halt an implacable invader’s march toward world domination. Hi, it’s Amy. See how these ants all tap
each other when they go by? Well when ants touch antenna, they’re not
just exchanging information…they ARE the information. They switch jobs based on how
many other ants they run into doing the same thing. Join our ant army. Subscribe. Tap that button and we’ll let
you know about our next episode. Thanks for watching!

How to Make an Ant Farm

How to Make an Ant Farm


How to Make an Ant Farm. Why buy an ant farm? It’s simple and fun to make one from a few
items you have lying around the house. You will need A 1-liter plastic bottle A 2-liter
plastic bottle Scissors Black construction paper Tape Blu-Tack adhesive Ants Dirt or
sand A funnel Gloves A shovel A jar Paper towels or old nylon stockings A rubber band
A pin or needle Cotton balls and food for your ants. Do not put fire ants in an ant farm! Step 1. Cut the mouths and necks off both bottles. Wrap the outside of the smaller bottle in
black construction paper, and secure the paper in place with tape. Put Blu-Tack on the bottom of the wrapped
bottle, and place it in the middle of the larger one. Step 2. Pour the dirt or sand through the funnel into
the space between the containers. Stop about a half inch before you reach the
top of the 1-liter bottle. To make your ants more visible, use dark soil
for light-colored ants and sand for black ants. Step 3. Decide what type of ants to keep. The best source is your own backyard. If you can’t find suitable ants, order some
from a mail-order supplier. Step 4. Put on the gloves and use a shovel to transfer
part of an anthill to a jar, or place the jar near the anthill with a bit of fruit inside. Capture 50 to 80 ants, and try to capture
a queen; without one, your farm will only last a couple of months. The queen is larger and longer than the other
ants, and will be surrounded by many other ants. Wear gloves: Ants will bite to protect their
queen. Step 5. Pour the ants from the jar into the soil in
the 2-liter bottle, and quickly cover the top with a paper towel or old nylons. Secure the lid with rubber bands. Poke air holes in the larger container’s cover
with a pin or needle, making sure they are too small for the ants to crawl through. Step 6. When you’re not looking at the ants, cover
the outside of the farm with another piece of black construction paper, secured with
tape, to simulate an underground environment. Don’t keep the farm in direct sunlight. Move the ant farm as little as possible, or
else the tunnels the ants will begin to build could collapse. Step 7. Once a day, soak a cotton ball in water, take
the cover off, place the cotton on top of the dirt, and cover the farm back up, allowing
the ants to get drinking water. Feed ants small pieces of fruit and breadcrumbs
dipped in sugar water or honey. A teaspoon of food is enough for 20 to 40
ants every two or three days. Did you know The queen of one African ant
species enslaves another species’ colony by tricking them into capturing her.

Why Fire ants move into yard –Fire ant Control

Why Fire ants move into yard –Fire ant Control


Here we have an example of a fire ant
colony that’s moved in underneath the roots of this plant the homeowner keeps this plant and this whole
bed more moist then the yard generally speaking to the wants to keep the plants
alive in the flowers blooming problem is that really attracts fire ants from many different locations around the home they’re all throughout this area the soil is very loose and allows them to set up camp in bring their
eggs to the surface so the sun will warm them if this area dries out or if the
colony splits the new colony will bud off possibly move into the house for additional moisture.

(Crazy Ant Song – Turn ON Annotations) External Ant Anatomy – AntsCanada Tutorial #24

(Crazy Ant Song – Turn ON Annotations) External Ant Anatomy – AntsCanada Tutorial #24


Welcome ladies and gentlemen to the AntsCanada Ant Anatomy Lesson 101… Here we go!!! Let’s start with the head, known as the prosoma Fastigium, clypeus, eye, discal clypeus, premalar space, and gena Frontoclypeal suture, clypeomalar suture, scape, and frontal carina Frontovertexal corner, and medial clypeal carina, clypeal flank, Here’s the antennal condyle, and there’s anteclypeus, mandible built like a tank Torrulus, temple, vertex, maxilar and labial palp, and the occular sulcus, submentum, prementum, occipital carina, inferior tooth, ectal surface… Now let’s move on to the Mesosoma… Dorsopropodeum, neck, and pronotum, anteropropodeal process posteropropodeum, and mesonotum, and the mesonotal process, yes! lateropropodeum, lateropronotum, the dorsolateral margin There’s dorsopronotum, propleuron, propodeal spine, and katepisternum The pronotal lobe, metapleural gland scrobe, metacoxae connect to trochanter Anepisternum, metapleuron, procoxa, mesocoxa, the prefemur Moving on to the leg and Metasoma Tibia, femur, and tibial spur, double claws they will hook you alive There’s the tarsomeres, aka the tarsal segments numbered, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Nodal truncation, the petiole, waiste segment found just in wasp, ants, and bees The hypopygium, pygidium, epipygium make up their hinies The cinctus, and opisthogaster, and here we have the metasomal post tergite, Here is the sternopostpetiolar process, and the metasomal sternite Let’s look at the queen with parts workers don’t have… Two tiny eyes on the frons of the queen, are called lateral ocelli, foveola, and costula, median ocellus the name of the middle eye There’s the scutum, scutellum, and the prescutellum is also known as axilla, transcutal suture, and scutoscutellar sulcus, caudal metasoma Wing scales and two pairs of wings, four wings in total with every queen and male alate, Here’s the parapsidal line, and the strigae, foveae/foveate, the striae or striate, antenna, rugocostae/rugocostate, and some have a stinger The End

How much weight can an Ant carry? | Fact – 22 | #facts

How much weight can an Ant carry? | Fact – 22 | #facts


It’s interesting fact time. At the end of this video you will learn something about the strength of an ant that will blow your mind. Are you confused? Did you know that ants can lift and carry
more than 50 times their body weight? If you know something more about this fact, leave a comment on our video and join in the fun.

Seriously, None of These Are Ants | 8 Ant Mimics

Seriously, None of These Are Ants | 8 Ant Mimics


[intro ] Ants are one of the most abundant organisms
on land. They’re found practically everywhere. But not everything that looks or acts like
an ant/is an ant. They’re… ant-posters. Charlat-ants. Ant mimics. Mimicry is a pretty common ecological phenomenon, and it works in a lot of different ways. Sometimes it’s defensive, sometimes aggressive. Sometimes it’s all about how you look, and sometimes it’s all about how you act. There are a bunch of different kinds of mimicry, and most of them don’t have hard and fast
lines between them. But these creatures have mastered practically
all of them — in order to look like ants. To start off with, let’s take a look at
the jumping spider Myrmarachne. Instead of the usual squat and stout form
a jumping spider might take, these little guys have evolved some extreme
body modifications. They’ve turned super long and skinny, all
the better to mimic an ant. The males of some species take it even further, evolving mouth-parts large enough to resemble
a worker carrying cargo. They’re so big, in fact, that the spider
can’t get venom through its fangs anymore. This kind of body modification is impressive, but also not super uncommon when dealing with
ant mimics. There’s even a name for this phenomenon: the Scrabble-winning word myrmecomorphy. As for why this spider would evolve to look
like an ant, it’s an example of what researchers call defensive or Batesian mimicry. Ants, though small, can be intimidating. Various species can be aggressive or bad-tasting, and can come equipped with biting jaws, venomous
stingers, or even sprays of acid. And they can use pheromones to summon more
ants. Whereas spiders are predators, but they’re not usually well-equipped for
defense. They don’t have armor plating or thousands
of nestmates to call on. There are a lot of animals that might think
a spider makes a pretty good snack, like birds, wasps, or even other, bigger species
of spider. Which means it might be safer to look like
an ant than a spider. These ant-mimicking spiders back up their
myrmecomorphy with behavioral mimicry too. They wave their front legs like antennae. They run zig-zag like ants. They even maintain this ruse when hunting. Instead of leaping at prey, they run up and
tap it, like a curious, harmless ant would. Then they strike. By doing this, they keep themselves safe from
those other spiders and birds, who might prefer not to tangle with the whole
biting, stinging, swarming ant business. There are species of katydids and cicada-like
insects called planthoppers with similar strategies. But those are still arthropods. Much stranger are the plants that have been
hypothesized to mimic ants in a similar way. We know that some plants mimic insects, like the bee orchid that tricks bees into
pollinating them. But scientists in Israel have also suggested that dark spots and flecks on plants such
as cocklebur and passion flowers might be ant-mimicking defenses against herbivores. But defensive mimicry isn’t the only way
to pretend to be an ant. An interesting possible case of mimicry comes with some species of spider wasps in Australia. Back in 1969, a scientist in Australia was
out looking at a bunch of small, metallic blue ants running about in the sand,
when he noticed one was walking oddly. On closer inspection, he also noticed two
little nubbins — wings. Or the vestigial remains of wings. Which would be unusual on a worker ant. And its “waist” didn’t look right either. This wasn’t an ant, it was a wasp. Now, wasps already kind of look like ants — they’re distantly related — but the lack of wings and exact color match made it seem like an almost perfect mimic. At first blush, you might call this another
example of Batesian mimicry — an organism mimicking a more harmful one
for defense. But here’s the thing: the wasps aren’t
defenseless They have powerful stingers. So their mimicry isn’t a bluff to make them
seem more dangerous than they already are. There’s another type of mimicry where two harmful species look similar to
each other, and both benefit because the overall signal
is stronger. It’s called Mullerian mimicry. It’s like how both wasps and bees carry
black-and-yellow warning colors. In this case, the wasp seemed to be sharing
Mullerian mimicry with the ant. Either by bite or by sting, predators would learn not to mess with little
blue scurrying things. That said, Mullerian mimicry of ants seems
to be mostly limited to… other ants. Evidence of this beyond a handful of possible
examples is a bit sparse. So far we’ve seen how spiders, insects, and maybe even plants use ant mimicry to keep
themselves safe. But some mimics don’t just try to pretend
to be an ant. They’re out to exploit — and even eat — the
ones they copy. Consider the somewhat uncreatively named large
blue butterfly, a species found throughout Europe. Like all butterflies, they start their lives
as caterpillars. But these caterpillars spend almost no time
eating leaves. Only about two weeks after hatching, the caterpillar goes down to the ground and
waits to get found by red ants. The ants, thinking it’s a lost ant grub, take it back to the nest, putting it in with
the other grubs. There it gets waited on and fed by the nurse
ants, mooching off their food. Some species are more aggressive, feeding on the real ant grubs. The caterpillars don’t even try to look
like ants. Instead, to pull off this con, they use chemical
and acoustic mimicry, mimicking the smell of the ants and the sounds
of their queens. This is a kind of reproductive mimicry — when mimics exploit the host to aid in their
reproduction. The most famous example is probably the cuckoo,
a bird that lays its eggs in other species’ nests. As for what the butterfly gets out of it, ant nests are well-defended, generally free of predators, and have a stable
environment. Not a bad place for a squishy little caterpillar
to grow up. Over the course of a year or so, the caterpillar will stay in the nest, growing
up big and strong at the expense of its hosts, until it pupates and emerges unharmed as an
adult. Another example of mimics flying under the
radar are the beetles that evolved to look like
ant butts. This beetle, called Nymphister, was only described
in 2017. They get around the forest floor by latching
onto an army ant’s butt as they’re moving. Curious researchers noticed that an ant they
were observing had… two butts. This may be an example of tactile mimicry. The beetle feels like the ant. Its size, shape, and shell texture all match
the ant, so other workers don’t notice. We’re not sure how the ant doing the carrying
feels about it. And we don’t know why they do this, though there are other piggy-back parasites
out there that can use the ants as protection or a way to get to new food sources without
doing any work. Army ants are fearsome, with colonies that number in the hundreds
of thousands of workers They nest only temporarily, going out in group
raids to capture prey like other ants, insects, and even small vertebrates. They’re just not something you want to mess
with. But for those who can, a colony of army ants
can be a resource in disguise. Enter the Aleocharinae, a group of rove beetles. They’re tricky to find out in the wild. Which could be because you have to go looking
for them in swarms of army ants. But they’ve evolved into superlative ant
mimics. Their waists have narrowed, their legs have
lengthened, and their antennae have even developed the
signature ant “elbow”. They even smell and act like the army ants, going so far as to lick and groom “other”
worker ants and even participating in raids. But they’re not there for defense. When the beetles get hungry, it’s the ants’
hard-won food — or even their young — that the beetles go for. This is known as aggressive mimicry. In aggressive mimicry, the mimic passes itself
off as something harmless in order to trick its prey into letting down
their guard. This seems to be a successful strategy for
rove beetles in particular. One 2017 analysis found it may have evolved
at least 12 different times in different species of rove beetle. But not all aggressive mimics have to change
their entire bodies to trick their prey. Check out this species of crab spider. Found in Thailand, India, and China, adult spiders prey on weaver ant workers. The spider’s strategy is to behave like
a dying or struggling worker. Other workers draw near to see what’s wrong. Then the spider pounces and runs away with
its victim. This is another example of aggressive mimicry. By doing this, the spider can get an easier
meal. Finally, remember those jumping spiders that
pretended to be ants for defense? One species in particular, the black-footed
ant spider, uses its mimicry in an even more interesting
way. Because it might have both Batesian, or defensive mimicry, and aggressive mimicry. It lives around Lake Victoria in Africa, and its preferred diet isn’t ants or bugs. It’s the squishy, nutritious eggs of other
jumping spiders. Problem is, it’s hard to get to the eggs without running
afoul of the adult spiders, who could attack the ant spider. But ants will attack and even eat these other
jumping spiders, so the spiders have evolved to be able to
watch for, recognize, and run away from ants. And the black-footed ant spider has evolved
to take advantage of this behavior. It shows up at its intended spider victim’s
nest pretending to be an ant. The other spiders, mistaking it for an ant,
will run away, letting the ant spider move in and eat the
eggs and young before the other spider realizes it’s been
tricked. So the ant spider has Batesian mimicry — the spider’s mimicking a scarier animal
in order to not get attacked — but it’s using this trick in order to trick
its prey, which would count as aggressive mimicry. It’s both a defense and an offense, an incredible example of how nuanced mimicry
can be. Life has found ways to use mimicry for virtually
every application we can imagine. In fact, ant mimicry alone is estimated to
have evolved at least 70 times. In many countries, more than 1 percent of
all spiders are ant mimics. If that seems like a lot, well, it’s estimated that ants may account for
a quarter of the biomass of animals on our planet. So if you’re looking for a crowd to blend
into, ants are a good option. It’s a big crowd to get lost in. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow, and thanks to one group of people who don’t
resemble ants at all, except in the sense that they are both numerous, and stronger
in a group. Yes, it’s our patrons. Thanks for everything you do! If you want to get involved, check out patreon.com/scishow. [ outro ]