Mating frenzies, sperm hoards, and brood raids: the life of a fire ant queen – Walter R. Tschinkel


It’s June, just after a heavy rainfall, and the sky is filling with creatures
we wouldn’t normally expect to find there. At first glance,
this might be a disturbing sight. But for the lucky males and females
of Solenopsis invicta, otherwise known as fire ants,
it’s a day of romance. This is the nuptial flight, when thousands of reproduction-capable
male and female ants, called alates,
take wing for the first and last time. But even for successful males
who manage to avoid winged predators, this mating frenzy will prove lethal. And for a successfully mated female,
her work is only beginning. Having secured a lifetime supply of sperm
from her departed mate, our new queen must now single-handedly
start an entire colony. Descending to the ground, she searches for a suitable spot
to build her nest. Ideally, she can find somewhere
with loose, easy-to-dig soil— like farmland
already disturbed by human activity. Once she finds the perfect spot,
she breaks off her wings— creating the stubs
that establish her royal status. Then, she starts digging
a descending tunnel ending in a chamber. Here the queen begins laying her eggs,
about ten per day, and the first larvae hatch within a week. Over the next three weeks, the new queen relies on a separate batch
of unfertilized eggs to nourish both herself and her brood, losing half her body weight
in the process. Thankfully, after about 20 days, these larvae grow
into the first generation of workers, ready to forage for food
and sustain their shrunken queen. Her daughters
will have to work quickly though— returning their mother
to good health is urgent. In the surrounding area, dozens of neighboring queens
are building their own ant armies. These colonies
have peacefully coexisted so far, but once workers appear, a phenomenon known as brood-raiding
begins. Workers from nests
up to several meters away begin to steal offspring
from our queen. Our colony retaliates, but new waves of raiders
from even further away overwhelm the workers. Within hours, the raiders have taken
our queen’s entire brood supply to the largest nearby nest— and the queen’s surviving daughters
abandon her. Chasing her last chance of survival, the queen follows the raiding trail
to the winning nest. She fends off other losing queens
and the defending nest’s workers, fighting her way
to the top of the brood pile. Her daughters help their mother succeed
where other queens fail— defeating the reigning monarch,
and usurping the brood pile. Eventually,
all the remaining challengers fail, until only one queen—
and one brood pile— remains. Now presiding over several hundred workers
in the neighborhood’s largest nest, our victorious queen begins
aiding her colony in its primary goal: reproduction. For the next several years,
the colony only produces sterile workers. But once their population
exceeds about 23,000, it changes course. From now on, every spring, the colony will produce
fertile alate males and females. The colony spawns these larger ants
throughout the early summer, and returns to worker production
in the fall. After heavy rainfalls,
these alates take to the skies, and spread their queen’s genes
up to a couple hundred meters downwind. But to contribute
to this annual mating frenzy, the colony must continue to thrive
as one massive super-organism. Every day, younger ants feed the queen
and tend to the brood, while older workers
forage for food and defend the nest. When intruders strike, these older warriors fend them off
using poisonous venom. After rainfalls,
the colony comes together, using the wet dirt to expand their nest. And when a disastrous flood
drowns their home, the sisters band together
into a massive living raft— carrying their queen to safety. But no matter how resilient, the life of a colony must come to an end. After about 8 years,
our queen runs out of sperm and can no longer replace dying workers. The nest’s population dwindles,
and eventually, they’re taken over
by a neighboring colony. Our queen’s reign is over,
but her genetic legacy lives on.

TOP 5 Ways to Get Rid of Ants Around Your Home

TOP 5 Ways to Get Rid of Ants Around Your Home


My name is Aaron Massey
from mrfixitdiy.com, and today I’m here to talk
about my Top Five DIY ways to get rid of ants around your home. (lively music) If you own a home,
you’ve likely experienced some unwanted visitors, and
while you might not be able to deter all unfavorable guests as easily, in the case of ants, you can. There are a couple different species that typically invade the home. And even though most
are seemingly harmless, they can still contaminate food, destroy parts of the home, and even bite. So here are a few ways to
get ants out of the house and keep them from coming back. Number five is to make a DIY ant spray. An alternative to an insecticide as well as one of the easiest
solutions to your ant problem uses only a couple of ingredients that you probably already
have in your kitchen. By combining equal
parts vinegar and water, you can create a mixture
that ants don’t like. Spraying the vinegar in
problem areas deters them by disrupting the trails of
pheromones that the ants leave. These trails allow other
ants to follow their scent, which is why you’ll typically
see ants in long trails. Disrupting the scent trail will
help keep other worker ants from finding the trail. However, this solution is temporary and won’t prevent the ants
from coming back long-term. But it can dissuade them from
specific areas of the home if you use it regularly. Remember that the ants
you see in the house are the worker ants so just getting rid of those ants won’t stop
them from coming back. The colony will just keep
sending out new worker ants. Your best bet is to
treat the colony itself, which leads me to number four,
which is utilizing ant baits. Liquid baits are typically
made up of a combination of sugar and borax and are used to initially attract the ants to the bait, and then the worker ants will bring enough of the poison back to
the colony to kill it. I’ve had a lot of success with
these TERRO liquid ant baits, which are available online or
at your local hardware store. These baits typically
attract a lot of ants in the first day or two,
and then after that, I rarely see any. While it’s simple to
set up traps or baits, be careful of this option if
you have small children or pets that might grab or try to play with them. Number three is sealing entry points. One of the most effective
ways to minimize ant problems is to try and minimize
entry points in the house. It’s impossible to seal
off every microscopic gap but addressing as many areas as possible can substantially
decrease infestation. Using caulks and sealants
to fill any problem areas both inside and outside
can help stop the problem before it starts. You can also color match
or paint most caulks so that the fix isn’t visible. Number two is to keep things clean. This might seem like a no-brainer but keeping your house
as clean as possible is one of the best ways
to prevent infestations and keep them from reoccurring. Forgetting to take the
trash out for too many days, leaving food waste in the kitchen, or having exposed dog food
can signal worker ants that your house is prime real estate. Take the trash out frequently,
and keep compost clean, or put extra food waste
down the garbage disposal. In hot and dry climates, ants may be prone to entering the home to find water, which is why infestations
are typically worse in the summer months and in areas with water like bathrooms and kitchens. And number one is to eliminate the source. The most important thing that you can do to keep ants away is to locate
where they are coming from and take care of them at their source. The source could be an outdoor garbage can that’s close to the house
or a bush whose leaves need to be trimmed because the
branches reach right up to your windowsills. Follow the trails to see where
the ants are coming from, and then use some of the other suggestions to eliminate them. Preventative measures are
important to keep them from coming back. You might also consider spraying
a pest preventative spray like Home Defense around
your foundation at least once every few months to keep them
from trying to come back in. Another option is to use
these outdoor ant baits, which you can add around your foundation and attack the ant colony
before they enter your home. So that’s it for this Top Five DIY video. I hope you guys enjoyed it, and I hope it helps you get
your ant problem under control. If you liked this video,
please hit that like button and leave a comment down
below letting me know your best DIY ant infestation remedies to help out other people who
might be having a problem. And if you’d like to
check out more of my DIY and home improvement videos, please consider
subscribing to the channel. And you can always visit my
website at mrfixitdiy.com. Thank you, guys, so much for watching. I’ll see you next time. (tranquil music)

Life of Ants – Part 1 (How Ant Colonies Are Made)


The Life of Ants – Part 1 In cold areas, like winter in the United States, ground can be frozen for several months. It can be a tough location for some animals to live, like ants. But still, you could see some hills still erected and intact. Under the mound, there’s a space protected from the cool weather, where ants sleep. There are lots of passageways and chambers. Ants do hibernate, especially during winter. You would be surprised to know this. There are 12,000 species of ants across the globe and these insects can bring things 20 times heavier that its own body weight. When the temperature increases, these little creatures come up and dwell the standpoint. If you’ve seen a bullet ant, it’s 1.2 inches in length, making it the biggest ant species ever listed. Changes in the weather stimulate ants. And, when it’s hot out there, they come to life. In the forest, some of the ant hills are self-reliant colonies; while others are connected to a wide super colony. The ants are amazing because they can survive the cold season. They have a fascinating central warming method. How is that? The decomposing vegetation that they collected prevents them from chilling inside their nest. Here’s another concept that will marvel you. During daytime, when sun is present and it’s not cloudy. You would see numerous ants roaming around their hills back and forth. You wouldn’t notice but there’s alternation going on there. Some ants from below the surface comes up and those that are on the ground with warm body already goes inside their nest. By this method, the ant with warm body helps in heating their nest. What a brilliant idea, isn’t it? That’s what you call “cooperation”. Interestingly, the ultraviolet rays of the sun protects their body from fungi or illness. What’s indeed exceptional is that there’s a queen inside the hill. Her body is double the size among the other ants. As a queen, she’s the integral member of colony that they are protecting. In an ant colony, typically only one queen can be spotted. But, there would be some instances wherein there could be multiple queens. Each queen will produce eggs that will become the next stage of breeding ants. The only kind of ants that have wings are the males and the queens. Their wings are dedicated to help them perform an essential activity. And, it happens during mating season. On a side note, the worker ants pile up as much food as they can. During the winter, the ants stay inside the hill because the surface is covered by snow. After cold months, the Spring approaches. This season is when you’ll see the surroundings begin showing their wonderful colors. Also, during this period, the ant eggs have hatched already from six weeks of waiting. Typically, when an ant bites you, your skin gets irritated, swell and turns red. It because of the formic acid. Some ants can emit formic acid. It comes out from the tip of their abdomen. When the acid penetrates the shell of an ant it dissolves the surface, leaving the inside exposed to contaminants around. The outer layer of an ant is called exoskeleton. Stay away from ants that can squirt formic acid because when the substance reaches your eye, you will dislike and won’t forget the experience. Do you know that ants quarrel with ants of other colonies? They can detect rival ants from another family by smelling them. Once found out, they will fight with each other and defend their territory. Usually, when one detected a rival ant, it goes back to its territory to call the other ants for a defense. When an ant started emitting formic acid, the rest of the gang smells the substance and they do the same. This usually happens when you disturb their territory. When a group of ants overpowered their rival, they collaborate to end the life of their opponent. When the victim is no longer breathing, they carry the body inside their nest. It has been known that ants eat their own kind. In fact, most types of insects. Actually, if you are in the middle of ant war, you could smell the acid. Interestingly, ant war lasts for more than one week. Do you know aphids? These are tiny bugs and live in colonies as well. Reproducing rapidly, they feed the sap by sucking the plant. Moreover, ants don’t harm nor eat them. Why is that? Aphids are beneficial for ants. Instead of ants eating aphids, ants feast on the honeydew that aphids excrete. The abdomen of an ant is like a sack. They fill it with food they can find around. When their abdomen is already full, they go back to their nest and support the colony for their needs. Speaking of honeydew, it’s vital for ants. Why? According to experts, this substance can help ants to rise heat in their body. Here’s another interesting fact. When you get the chance to see what’s inside of some ant hills, you will discover that it has presence of resin bits. By the way, resin is something that comes out when you break a branch of a cone-bearing tree. The tree uses this substance to protect and cover its injured part. Experts found out that ants are not eating the resins. Instead, they use it against disease. It becomes an antibacterial once the ants mix it with their acid. They need to do it to protect the ant eggs from fungi. There’s really so many things we can learn from ants. When the eggs of ants hatch, the larvae emerge. When they reach adult stage, they create silk cocoons. They are like butterflies that undergo metamorphosis. Now, let’s talk about the males and queen ants. When they become adult, their wings become developed and they will be able to fly and roam outside. When it’s breeding period, both males and queens fly and gather around to do one thing. That is for the males to mate and fertilize the queen ants. Here’s what happens. Queen ants stay on plants and release a substance, called pheromones, that when the male ant smells, they go crazy and become excited to mate. Sad to say, but, when the activity is done, the male ant dies after few hours due to tiredness. Moreover, after the activity and the queen ants get fertilized, they do their best to remove their wings, since it’s no longer needed for the next chapter of their life. They go back inside the chamber and soon they will lay thousands of eggs that will become future worker, male, and queen ants. Please like and subscribe. Thanks.

My Cockroach Farm

My Cockroach Farm


Greetings, AC Family! Welcome to the AntsCanada Ant Channel. If you have a fascination for nature, you’re
in the right place. On this channel, we take a look at the amazing
world of ants, and even explore pet ant keeping, as a hobby. But did you know that a big part of keeping
pet ant colonies, for most people, also involves keeping colonies of other insects? Today, for a change, we will turn our attention
from the ant colonies we all love on this channel, and turn our inquiring eyes toward
the colonies of insects our ants depend on for food. This week, we go from ants, to cockroaches! Feeder cockroaches, that is! Cockroaches, though repulsive to many people
throughout the world, are our ants’ favourite protein food source, and are actually quite
fascinating creatures in their own right. Today we take a look at the two species of
feeder roaches that I breed as food to our 4 ant colonies on this channel, and explore
what their cockroach societies are like. They happen to be two of the most popular
feeder cockroaches for ant colonies and other insect-eating exotic pets. You won’t want to miss all of this amazing
cockroach info ahead, so keep watching until the end. Ladies and gentlemen, let’s put away that
bug spray and explore why cockroaches are also some of the coolest of insects, not just
as ant food, in this episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel! And hit the bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! Cockroaches, they’re perhaps the most notorious
and hated of all domestic insect pests, even more so than ants. They’re associated with being avid carriers
of germs, disease, bacteria, and more. But you may be surprised to know that cockroaches
which belong to the order called Blattodea, are comprised of about 4,600 species and only
30 of these 4,600 species of cockroaches are human house pests. The rest live out in forests, jungles, and
other habitats away from human homes. The two species of cockroaches that I feed
to my ants, which we will look at today, are examples of such non-pest cockroach species. First, presenting my Dubia Roach colony, scientific
name Blaptica dubia. These large cockroaches grow to about 4 to
4.5 cm in length. Their exoskeletons are strong, and the ants
aren’t able to eat them. You can tell the adult males and females apart
because adult males have huge wings while females have what are called tegmina, which
are small wing stubs. Though the males have fully developed wings
as adults, they rarely ever fly. If dropped from a high altitude they could
use the wings to direct their landing but don’t actually take off like most true flying
insects do. Juveniles, as seen here, have a mottled brown
colour. These roaches love to eat fruits. I offer a variety of different juicy fruits. The cockroaches are able to acquire all the
moisture they need from these juicy fruits. I do my best to offer them a variety, because
as you know, your pets are what their food eats, and any nutrients the cockroaches take
in through their diet, ultimately ends up in the bellies of our ants, so gut-loading
the cockroaches using a varied diet is a must. Now, one of the annoying things, we here in
the tropics need to deal with though, are wild ants mooching off the cockroaches’ food
supplies. If you look carefully you will see wild ghost
ants drinking from this orange slice. Hmmm… And here you’ll find a wild black crazy ant. Perhaps I should try applying baby powder
on the outside of these cockroach enclosures. Check out the pattern and colours of the undersides
of these Dubia roaches! I find they’re actually quite attractive up
close. I love watching them eat. If you look carefully at their faces, you’ll
notice that their eyes actually wrap around the entire side of their head. This helps them avoid predators. As a lover of all insects, it is always hard
for me to feed these guys to the ants, but I do know the ants do acquire some great protein
from them. I just make sure to crush them swiftly prior
to feeding to lessen their suffering. Some of you who have seen our previous videos
involving feedings may notice that the cockroaches still move despite being pre-crushed and this
is because nervous cells called ganglia run along the center of their body, which is why
even if you completely decapitate a roach, they are still capable of movement. I usually feed these adults to the Fire Nation,
as the fire ants are able to benefit from their high meat content, as well as penetrate
their exoskeletons effectively. The Fire Nation can fully consume the meat
of 1 adult Dubia roach in a matter of a few hours. One of the most viewed videos on this channel
involved the Fire Nation consuming an adult female cockroach that gave birth while it
was being devoured. In that video you see the babies being born,
and they’re stark white in colour. Newborn Dubia roaches are white, like these
nymphs here. These must have just been born a few hours
ago. Aren’t they cute? What’s interesting about Dubia roaches is
that they are live bearers. A female Dubia roach will give birth to an
egg sack and then pull this egg sack back inside herself and incubate the eggs until
babies emerge, a process called ovoviviparity. A female can give birth to 20-40 live young
at a time. These young shed their skin 7 times, growing
25% each time before reaching adulthood. This sub-adult here is whitish in colour because
it had just molted. As the exoskeleton hardens, it will darken
to its normal brownish cryptic colour. What’s amazing is these roaches can live up
to 2 yrs! They actually make interesting pets, but I
do my best not to get too attached, because after all, they are our ant colonies’ beef! Guys, should we name them? Leave your suggestions in the comments section! Or would giving them an official name make
them harder to feed to our ants. Haha! Now while these large Dubia roaches here are
live bearing cockroaches, and don’t lay eggs, our next colony of roaches actually do lay
egg sacs. Meet Blatta lateralis, Turkistan Cockroaches,
often called red runners due to their quick speed. In the pet trade, they are simply known as
“lats”. These are a smaller species of cockroach. Adult males have wings, just like the Dubias,
but unlike the Dubias, the males are known to actively fly. The females are wingless and are a gorgeous
crimson brown colour. Females lay an egg sac known as an ootheca. Look at these Oothecae laying here. From these will hatch little tiny cockroach
nymphs. I was lucky enough to catch one female in
the process of birthing an ootheca. Check it out! You can actually see her as she contracts
her abdomen muscles to lay the eggs into the open end of the ootheca. This process of depositing eggs into the ootheca
will continue over several hours and she will continue to carry this ootheca with her for
awhile afterwards, until she zips up the open end and drops it. I find the ootheca to look kind of like a
purse. Soon when the babies are ready to emerge,
the ootheca much like a purse will open up from the top and the baby lats will be born. I feed these lats to the Golden Empire, the
Dark Knights, and our new trap-jaw ant colony, the Jawbreakers. Their exoskeletons are a bit softer and are
easier to get into than the Dubias. So what do you say? What should we name this roach colony? Leave your answer in the comments section! Now the only thing I don’t like about this
species of cockroach is they expel a very pungent and gross defensive odour when alarmed
and at times it can be pretty strong. I just hold my breath every time I have to
reach into their enclosure to feed them to our ants. As far as housing goes for both species, I
keep them in a plastic bin full of egg cartons and toilet paper rolls. The environments must be kept relatively dry
to keep mold from growing. I feed them a mix of veggies and fruit and
also offer them dog kibble. Their enclosures must be kept clean at all
times because they can get messy especially when the droppings collect. I feel cockroaches are pretty fantastic creatures
and the more you get to know them, the less disgusting they seem, and the more fascinating
they become. Some people keep these, as well as other cockroach
species as pets. So what do you think? Do you think keeping cockroaches are as cool
as keeping pet ants? If you decide to keep pet ants, perhaps you
might consider feeder roaches, too, as an alternative to crickets, mealworms, and superworms? They also happen to be more nutritious for
ants than those aforementioned. Hope you enjoyed this week’s video AC Family! It’s ant love, and just for this week, roach
love forever! AC Family, were you grossed out or did you
find these cockroaches to be cool? For you AC Inner Colony members, I’ve placed
a hidden cookie for you here, if you would just like to watch the cockroaches in this
video doing their thing with less narration. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
week. In last week’s AC Question of the Week, we
asked: What does “pantropical” mean? Congratulations to Omar Salloum who correctly
answered: pantropical means: distributed throughout
the tropics Congratulations Omar you just won a free ebook
handbook from our shop! For this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is the technical term
for a cockroach’s egg sac? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free ant t-shirt from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel, give
it a thumbs up, share, and leave me a comment if you liked this video. Remember that we release a new ant video every
single Saturday at 8 AM EST. So what do you say? Join our growing AC Family and hit that SUBSCRIBE
button. Why? ‘Cause it’s ant love forever!

Life of Ants – Part 1


The Life of Ants – Part 1 In cold areas, like winter in the United States, ground can be frozen for several months. It can be a tough location for some animals to live, like ants. But still, you could see some hills still erected and intact. Under the mound, there’s a space protected from the cool weather, where ants sleep. There are lots of passageways and chambers. Ants do hibernate, especially during winter. You would be surprised to know this. There are 12,000 species of ants across the globe and these insects can bring things 20 times heavier that its own body weight. When the temperature increases, these little creatures come up and dwell the standpoint. If you’ve seen a bullet ant, it’s 1.2 inches in length, making it the biggest ant species ever listed. Changes in the weather stimulate ants. And, when it’s hot out there, they come to life. In the forest, some of the ant hills are self-reliant colonies; while others are connected to a wide super colony. The ants are amazing because they can survive the cold season. They have a fascinating central warming method. How is that? The decomposing vegetation that they collected prevents them from chilling inside their nest. Here’s another concept that will marvel you. During daytime, when sun is present and it’s not cloudy. You would see numerous ants roaming around their hills back and forth. You wouldn’t notice but there’s alternation going on there. Some ants from below the surface comes up and those that are on the ground with warm body already goes inside their nest. By this method, the ant with warm body helps in heating their nest. What a brilliant idea, isn’t it? That’s what you call “cooperation”. Interestingly, the ultraviolet rays of the sun protects their body from fungi or illness. What’s indeed exceptional is that there’s a queen inside the hill. Her body is double the size among the other ants. As a queen, she’s the integral member of colony that they are protecting. In an ant colony, typically only one queen can be spotted. But, there would be some instances wherein there could be multiple queens. Each queen will produce eggs that will become the next stage of breeding ants. The only kind of ants that have wings are the males and the queens. Their wings are dedicated to help them perform an essential activity. And, it happens during mating season. On a side note, the worker ants pile up as much food as they can. During the winter, the ants stay inside the hill because the surface is covered by snow. After cold months, the Spring approaches. This season is when you’ll see the surroundings begin showing their wonderful colors. Also, during this period, the ant eggs have hatched already from six weeks of waiting. Typically, when an ant bites you, your skin gets irritated, swell and turns red. It because of the formic acid. Some ants can emit formic acid. It comes out from the tip of their abdomen. When the acid penetrates the shell of an ant it dissolves the surface, leaving the inside exposed to contaminants around. The outer layer of an ant is called exoskeleton. Stay away from ants that can squirt formic acid because when the substance reaches your eye, you will dislike and won’t forget the experience. Do you know that ants quarrel with ants of other colonies? They can detect rival ants from another family by smelling them. Once found out, they will fight with each other and defend their territory. Usually, when one detected a rival ant, it goes back to its territory to call the other ants for a defense. When an ant started emitting formic acid, the rest of the gang smells the substance and they do the same. This usually happens when you disturb their territory. When a group of ants overpowered their rival, they collaborate to end the life of their opponent. When the victim is no longer breathing, they carry the body inside their nest. It has been known that ants eat their own kind. In fact, most types of insects. Actually, if you are in the middle of ant war, you could smell the acid. Interestingly, ant war lasts for more than one week. Do you know aphids? These are tiny bugs and live in colonies as well. Reproducing rapidly, they feed the sap by sucking the plant. Moreover, ants don’t harm nor eat them. Why is that? Aphids are beneficial for ants. Instead of ants eating aphids, ants feast on the honeydew that aphids excrete. The abdomen of an ant is like a sack. They fill it with food they can find around. When their abdomen is already full, they go back to their nest and support the colony for their needs. Speaking of honeydew, it’s vital for ants. Why? According to experts, this substance can help ants to rise heat in their body. Here’s another interesting fact. When you get the chance to see what’s inside of some ant hills, you will discover that it has presence of resin bits. By the way, resin is something that comes out when you break a branch of a cone-bearing tree. The tree uses this substance to protect and cover its injured part. Experts found out that ants are not eating the resins. Instead, they use it against disease. It becomes an antibacterial once the ants mix it with their acid. They need to do it to protect the ant eggs from fungi. There’s really so many things we can learn from ants. When the eggs of ants hatch, the larvae emerge. When they reach adult stage, they create silk cocoons. They are like butterflies that undergo metamorphosis. Now, let’s talk about the males and queen ants. When they become adult, their wings become developed and they will be able to fly and roam outside. When it’s breeding period, both males and queens fly and gather around to do one thing. That is for the males to mate and fertilize the queen ants. Here’s what happens. Queen ants stay on plants and release a substance, called pheromones, that when the male ant smells, they go crazy and become excited to mate. Sad to say, but, when the activity is done, the male ant dies after few hours due to tiredness. Moreover, after the activity and the queen ants get fertilized, they do their best to remove their wings, since it’s no longer needed for the next chapter of their life. They go back inside the chamber and soon they will lay thousands of eggs that will become future worker, male, and queen ants. Please like and subscribe. Thanks.

FULL ANT & PET TOUR | Millions of Ants, Tarantulas, Reptiles, Amphibians, Birds, Fish, Terrariums

FULL ANT & PET TOUR | Millions of Ants, Tarantulas, Reptiles, Amphibians, Birds, Fish, Terrariums


Greetings, ant lovers, and happy new year
and new decade 2020! The whole world is starting a fresh new page,
and indeed so is our great collection of ants, creatures, and vivarium kingdoms we’ve all
come to love on this channel. So to start off the year right, I asked if
you guys wanted a full pet and Ant Room tour so that all you watching whether you be a
returning AC Family, or a newcomer could be caught up on all the awesome, beautiful, frightening,
and bizarre creatures living with me under my care. It’s also an update video on all of your
favourite ant colonies that you might not have heard from in awhile, as well as arachnids,
reptiles, amphibians, and birds that have appeared on the channel before, and just a
spoiler, there are even several creatures you guys don’t know about yet! There are also some ant colonies that sadly
are no longer with us, and issues with some that I need to talk to you about! We’ve got a lot of work to do today, and
this episode is full of surprises, familiar faces, and all the nature you guys love in
our usual 4K UHD footage, so grab some popcorn, sit back, and let’s get started with our
exclusive 2020 AC tour of the animals and biological worlds of our Antiverse, here on
the AntsCanada ant channel! Please SUBSCRIBE to the channel and hit the
BELL icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! Starting from the extreme left of the Ant
Room, we begin our tour with one of the coolest of ant worlds, I’ve ever created for one
of the oldest ant colonies on the channel. Behold the kingdom of the Dark Knights, our
OG super colony of black crazy ants. So for those of you who haven’t seen the
Dark Knight’s new terrarium here yet, it’s a multi-species terrarium with millipedes,
spiders, bagworms, and other creatures inside that all depend on each other. The Dark Knights love this vivarium and have
set up their nest within this driftwood hollow. This colony which I’ve owned for about 4
yrs now is unique in that it can self perpetuate pretty much forever, with the colony creating
hundreds of queens which can mate with their male siblings safely without the dangers of
genetic inbreeding happening. They’re an awesome colony that I look forward
to keeping for decades and decades to come! By the way, you guys officially voted and
named this kingdom of the Dark Knights the Dark Forest. Now speaking of multiple queens, we move on
now to the grand palace known as Olympus, home to the Titans, my multi-queen colony
of Asian Marauder ants. These ants are definitely one of my favourites
due to the size of their supermajors which are just massive! The Titans are doing well and have since changed
the landscape and killed off a few plants during renovations. They come to the surface is huge numbers to
feed. I’m thinking of possibly rehoming these
powerful ants into something larger soon. Now let’s move on to one of the newest members
of the Antiverse whom some of you may or may have not seen in a recent video. Welcome to Cerulean Hallow, home of our new
Sapphire Gooty Tarantula. She’s loving her new home and we’ll have
a look at her in a second. The plants within her territories are thriving
well, but she’s killed the ones on the wall. I can tell she’s been busy because she’s
webbed up the entire entrance of her hallow. From the back, we see her there crawled up
snuggly at the bottom. By the way, guys, she needs an official name
so grab your voting fingers and click on this icard here to vote for her official name. Thank you AC Council for your input! Next is a creature I’ve owned for about
2 yrs now but haven’t told you guys about. Sorry, but I was waiting for just the right
time! AC Family, meet my young Mexican Fireleg Tarantula,
known scientifically as Brachypelma boehmei. She’s actually been in the background of
many episodes on this channel and I’m surprised you guys never asked about her. She’s 3 inches long and has a huge appetite! Let’s feed her this superworm now, shall
we? There you go! She’ll grow to a hefty 6+ inches. Though she’s been a silent resident of the
Ant Room for years, she still doesn’t have a name, as well. What should we name her? Leave your name suggestions in the comments. And now moving on to what is arguably the
most famous ant colony on this channel, the Fire Nation, my savage colony of fire ants. I can easily say these stinging aggressive
ants have been the most challenging and fulfilling ants I’ve ever kept through the years. This paludarium created to simulate the Amazon
is called La Selva de Fuego and is full of thick tropical foliage and a river which is
home to a colony of cherry shrimp, snails, mosquito rasbora fish, and even vampire crabs. Mosses have started to grow and attach in
several places! Somewhere beneath all the vegetation the Fire
Nation lives. Today, they dine on sweet jelly and this dead
giant Madagascar hissing cockroach. Now this dead roach came from my new Madagascar
Hissing cockroach colony, yes, yet another colony of critters I haven’t yet shown you
guys on the channel. I’ve owned this roach colony for the past
couple of months now and they’re housed in this simple plastic critter crawler, where
they eat a variety of veggies and fruits. These giant roaches are not to be confused
with my Dubia roaches, which I’ve been using as feeders for years. These roaches don’t have wings, not even
the males. I plan on making them a naturalistic setup
just like Roachella, but perhaps a bit more lavish seeing as I plan on keeping these roaches
more as pets, and perhaps only feed dead members off. Would you guys like to see a video on these
neat hissing cockroaches soon? Next, a couple weeks ago we made this Ant
Terrarium in a Bottle, and as expected the ants have remodeled our masterpiece to make
it fit for an ant colony. The Trap-jaw ants inside are doing super well
and I just love them! This terrarium was the product of a challenge
collab with another Youtuber friend Serpadesign that we decided to do for charity. You guys won’t believe how much the top
bidder donated for this terrarium, and just a hint, it’s about the cost of a car! AC Family, you guys are so generous and make
me proud to have such an amazing caring community! Anyway, watch that video here! Now here’s another thing I haven’t shown
you guys! This is my bog terrarium full of living mosses,
a native tree lichen, vein plants, and Hydrocotyle tripartita plants. This is basically just a plant propagation
tank for my moss, lichen, tripartita, and vein plants. Nothing inside, just plants. I love watching the fogging machine keep the
territories damp. Beside the bog terrarium we have another newcomer,
our massive but docile Chaco golden-knee tarantula. This beautiful tarantula here was a gift exchange
collab with another youtuber friend Exoticslair. She’s been quite busy covering her whole
territory with silk. I can understand why they make such great
beginner tarantula species. She loves being outside in the open and is
pretty friendly. By the way, she too needs a name! Please vote here! Moving on to yet another tarantula, we have
the goddess of the Antiverse, Azula, our Green-bottle Blue tarantula. She’s covered her entire palace now with
a thick blanket of silk where she resides in a back tunnel. When she first came to us sadly, she had a
problem shedding her top carapace giving her a double face look. It eventually fell off, but guys, unfortunately,
it happened again. During her last shed, she failed to shed off
this head piece, but I’m not worried. Like last time, it will likely fall off on
its own. Now moving on to Skull Island, home of our
ghost ants which we acquired for our recent Halloween episode. They come out to feed and boy are there a
lot of them! The ghost ants are trapped on their driftwood
skull island by a moat which contains a snail and shrimp. The tank has been cycling now for many weeks
and is ready to accommodate a water beast. You guys voted for a betta fish to be added
here, so that’s coming up soon! There were also baby tarantulas on the island
which I’m sure are still there somewhere. I just haven’t seen them. Let’s now look at one of the most beloved
ant supercolonies of the channel, the OG Golden Empire, our recovering supercolony of yellow
crazy ants. Now let me be the bearer of the best news
for the year! The Golden Empire is thriving and just exploding
in population now. In case you’re new, they’re actually recovering
from a near fatal infection of blood sucking mites, but I’m happy to announce that there
has been an explosion of eggs, larvae, and pupae. I expect this colony will reach the millions
in numbers they once were in just a few more months. I’ve been thinking though, do you think
we should continue to keep them in an ant farm setup like this so we can still see their
in-nest activities or move them to a terrarium and just watch them above ground? Let me know in this icard here. I like that I can monitor them in their current
setup and they seem to love their formicariums. Speaking of formicariums, we now move on to
my recently returned Asian Bullet Ants. I’ve got two colonies of these, Team 1 which
is doing amazing in their AC Hybrid Nest. As you can see there is a tonne of brood and
a crew of new workers. And check this out! I’ve never seen this species do this before,
but the workers have covered this larvae with soil debris to help give it a lattice work
to spin its silk for the creation of its cocoon. When it’s done, the ants will remove the
soil debris, revealing the finished smooth dark cocoon, like these others here. I had no idea these ants did this! And here you’ll see Team 2, living in their
AC Ant Tower. By the way, about these colonies, I think
I failed to explain in their last video how my plan to keep these ants going would work. The plan was to have these two ant colonies
cross breed so they can continue living on forever, but a lot of you guys brought up
the fact that after a couple generations the colonies would be related and there would
be no more mating. My issue, which I failed to explain properly,
was not so much that the males were unwilling to mate with related females, but that they
were unwilling to mate with females from the same colony, with the same colony scent. That is why I decided a cross-over setup,
where males could cross over to the other side to mate, might actually work at getting
males to mate with females, so long as the colonies stay distinct colonies. Hope that clarifies things better and yes,
a lot of you were correct in saying they would be genetically related after the next generation,
but I think that should be fine, as long as after awhile I add a third colony in the mix
to diversify the genepool. Man, three asian bullet ant colonies? That will be something. Now we move on to the great Hacienda Del Dorado,
which was recently remade into a pineapple beach paludarium. It’s home to our resident trap-jaw ants
named the Jawbreakers and vampire crabs, which hang out in the marsh area. The trap-jaw ants are shy but come out to
feed. I suspect they are mostly nesting here by
the moist marsh. The waters still contain its perpetuating
colony of cherry shrimp, microrasbora fish, and snails. Nearing the end of the Ant Room now, we have
the Triple Island of Avista, the glassless open-concept ant setup of the Bobbleheads,
our super colony of big-headed ants. I love this cute colony! The Bobbleheads are still going strong with
a great appetite, as you can see here where they dine on some chopped up superworm. Check out those supermajors! The plants of the three islands that make
up their archipelago are also growing well! Finally, we come to the Canopy of Vortexia,
the tree top kingdom of my epic, arboreal colony of Asian Weaver Ants we call the Emerald
Empire. These ants of course create their famous hanging
leaf nests which they glue together using silk from their larvae. The Emerald Empire is doing really well, eating
a lot, and they recently built some new leaf nests. The Dubia roaches sharing their territories
are also doing quite well and reproducing on their own, and the weaver ants hunt the
weakest roaches and carry them up to their leaf nests to consume, like they would in
the wild. And guys look! I noticed this week that they’ve begun to
produce male alates. They’re preparing for nuptial flight season! Now you wanna hear something super cool that
I recently discovered? I was surprised to notice an active and thriving
colony of ants living on the forest floor of Vortexia. No, they weren’t pharaoh ants, thank goodness. Now I couldn’t figure out where they came
from, but then after looking closer at the ants, I realized, Hey, these ants are familiar! So guys, remember the colony of free-roaming
ants that lived within the hydration chambers of one of my Hybrid Nests? Well, last I reported they had disappeared
one day. I highly suspect that these ants here are
them! Tracing back I believe the free-roam ants,
moved from their Hybrid Nest hydration chamber, down into my old termite tank, and then when
my termites were murdered off by a terrible invasion of pharaoh ants (and yes, in case
you were asking about the termites, I cover the death of our Terminators in a previous
video), I packed up the soil from the termite tank for future use, eventually using it for
Vortexia, and low and behold, they’re Vortexians now. I suppose they eating the scraps left behind
by the weaver ants and dead roaches. It’s cool that they are like the bottom feeders
of the territories and don’t really bother the weaver ants so much. Amazing right? OK and that concludes the Ant Room, so let’s
move downstairs now… Yup, there’s more! I swear I’m not a hoarder, right? Here of course is my tropical, planted, freshwater
community fish tank. It’s about 5 yrs old now. It contains angelfish, dwarf rainbowfish,
rummynose tetras, Otocinclus catfish, and others. The vegetation is quite lush and I don’t really
do much maintenance on plant grooming. I kind of like the chaotic, wild growth look. I often harvest this big mass of java moss
here attached to this driftwood for my terrariums. Now here’s a couple a lot of you guys have
been asking about: my pair of axolotls living in Axolotland. I’m happy to report, they’re bigger, fatter,
and doing great! I have been hoping they would breed but it
hasn’t happened yet. I also plan on moving them to a larger tank
very soon. They’ve been such problem-free pets! Last week, of course, we saw Carnivora, my
awesome Carnivorous Plant Tank containing pitcher plants, venus fly traps, and some
moss. But it is now undergoing a hibernation period
until March or April. Beside it is Jabba the Hutt, our cute and
fat Surinam Horned Frog. He’s still a bright green colour and eats
a lot! I love how he will croak randomly when he
hears my voice nearby. I’m also thinking of making him a new terrarium
soon. Here’s the Nucleus, which has proven useful
for the creation of new terrariums. It’s my official composter for leftover
fruit peels and organics and breeding chamber for springtails and other soil creatures. I’ve since gotten accustomed to seeing the
earthworms but they still repulse me, but what’s cool is I’ve begun to find populations
of some really neat creatures inside, like these small red critters. I’m not sure what they are. Do you guys know? FInally, we have Ligaya, my dragon aka African
Grey Parrot, a pretty awesome bird, super smart, and can copy messenger sounds now. Haha! Check it out! Also, meet Hope my broiler chicken. So get this: she was supposed to be for a
feeding video for the Fire Nation called Fire Ants vs. dead chick, and my request from the
chicken farmer was to give me a dead chick from his batch so I could feed it to my fire
ants, but there must have been a miscommunication because what arrived at my place was a living,
squeaking chick. Of course, I wasn’t about to kill it so I
kept it and she’s huge now. These types of meat chickens sadly don’t live
long but I’ve been doing some research to try to prolong its lifespan so it can move
in with me on a farm I’m moving to in a year or so. Let’s hope Hope makes it! Here’s Valentino my 5 yr old sorong green
tree python, a stunning snake and super healthy! He is my miracle snake because he came to
me with a severe upper respiratory illness but after medicating him by hand for several
weeks he survived despite the vets saying he had a 10% chance of living. I love him! Finally, here is Crayola, my female veiled
chameleon. She’s about a year old soon and I’ve relocated
her out of my Ant Room and to my balcony where she can get some nice morning sun. She’s much happier here now and appreciates
the breeze and height. And that, AC Family is my complete pet and
ant room tour. Some of you guys may have questions about
what happened to some of the other creatures like the rhino beetles. Well, they sadly passed away of old age as
they don’t live very long. As for the Lumberjacks, my teleporting carpenter
ants, they were doing ok but sadly must have caught an illness somewhere because they stopped
eating and eventually died. For you fans of the Platinum Dragons, I did
my very best to try to grow them in different setups and offer them various diets but they
remained the same size for months. I finally ended up releasing them this week
because I was clearly missing something from their care. Perhaps the species feeds exclusively on the
nectar of a specific type of flower for instance, or must have honeydew from mealybugs. Not sure, but perhaps I’ll try keeping another
species of Polyrhachis again in the future. Unfortunately, die offs and ants that don’t
adapt well to captivity are part of the hobby and though it’s sad, it helps us learn how
to better care for the pets we love. If you’ve been with the channel for awhile,
you know that I always commit 100% to go the extra mile to give my pets more than they
need to live out their best lives. I also have a few people in my life, who help
me with maintenance of all these animals. Without my helpful pet team, I definitely
would not be able to keep all these creatures, and I don’t recommend any of you guys have
this many pets if you don’t have the support for maintenance either. But I think we can all agree that life with
animals, whether tiny or big, is awesome wouldn’t you say?! Do you guys have any pets? Let me know your full pet list in the comments. Now that you guys know all the creatures,
territories, and beasts of my Antiverse, together we are all caught up now and we can start
the channel with a fresh new page! Thank you guys for watching, and be sure to
subscribe to my channel, so you can continue to follow more of the real life stories of
all these inhabitants of our ever-growing Antiverse! It’s Ant Love Forever! Alright, AC Family, once again a HAPPY NEW
YEAR 2020 to you all. After creating this full ant and pet tour
I realized I’m pretty much a zookeeper at this point! But it means a lot to me that you guys love
nature as much as I do and continue to watch my weekly videos. So if you haven’t yet, please do subscribe
to the channel, and hit the bell icon for notifications now, and choose ALL, so you
get notified every time I release these high quality nature videos. Also please remember to hit the LIKE button
every single time! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch some extended play footage of all the creatures
you saw in today’s episode. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: What type of water do our carnivorous plants
need? Congratulations to The Incarnation of Boredom
who correctly answered: They need distilled or rain water. Congratulations The Incarnation of Boredom,
you just won a free Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: Which was your favourite creature featured
in today’s full pet tour? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free ebook handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to our channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

What If Ants Were 10ft Tall?


Ants. Creepy little soil dwellers that will march
into your home if you aren’t careful. There are …. Wait for it…. ten trillion ants on earth…. So….what if they were bigger than humans. Hello and welcome back to Life’s Biggest
Questions, the channel that loves a good old fashioned piece of fanciful pondering! I am your host, Rebecca Felgate, and today
I am asking WHAT IF ANTS were 10ft Tall? Crikey. Before we get into this video, why don’t
you let me know your feelings on ants. Spill tea…although don’t drop the sugar
cube as those ants will be marching away with it. Also while you are down there letting me know
if you’re an ant murderer or not, why don’t you also leave a big beautiful thumbs up on
this video and share it with a friend. Also check out the links in the description
to all of the people that went into making this video and of course stick around to the
end where I will be reading comments from a previous video. ANTS. Now is your last chance to start playing the
game where you count how many times I say Ants in this video. Ready. ANTS. Ants are roughly 1-3 millimetres in length…wee
little buddies. Your average black garden ant, the common
ant, Is around 3 millimetres, with bigger workers reaching 5 millimetres and Queen ants
reaching 6-9 millimetres. The BIGGEST ants in the world are currently
BULLET ants…. Which are about as fun as they sound… These absolute menaces are 3-4 CENTIMETRES
in length, so ten times the size of your average garden ant, anddddd they sting. A sting from a regular sized bullet ant can
last 48 hours. Right right rightttt…. Also, in general, ants are HELLA STRONG. A common ant can lift 1,000 times their weight. This is the equivalent of a human of being
able to lift 75 US Tons, which is the weight of about 12 elephants…or very roughly the
weight of a space shuttle. Soooo, circling back to the whole 10 ft thing…. 10 ft is roughly 3 metres. 3 metres is 1 thousand times the size of a
regular ant…which makes me VERY NERVOUS. Are we going to scale here, too? If regular ants are 10 feet tall, regular
queens would be roughly 20-29 feet tall….and BULLET ANTS would be 98 feet tall and I just
want to cry! Like… many things to say here, but first
thing is first – your garden is about to get WAY MORE CROWDED! Regular garden ant colonies are around 7,000
ants strong…. But they can get as big as 40,000 ants…. Which….AH! Stress! The whole blooming world is going to get far
more crowed. We will be outnumber by giant ants twice our
size 7.5 billion to 10 trillion! That means, if my at times dubious mathematics
serves me correctly, there will be 1 thousand 333 ants to every human. They will be bigger than us, they will be
stronger than us… and… well… they will probably eat us. Ants are omnivores, they will eat plants and
they will eat bugs… right now they are happy to fight little spiders and eat bugs their
size, so they wont worry about us. The Giant Garden ants aren’t event reeealllly
the issue. There are 12,000 varieties of ants and you
don’t want to meet them. YO SOME ANTS CAN FLY AND SOME ANTS CAN STING. Let me tell you about a couple that are already
horrifying before you factor in the whole thousand times bigger thing…. Urrrm FIRE ants… winner winner, honey is
a stinger…we already talked about the dastardly bullet ants… but the real concern is the
BULLDOG ant… the most dangerous ant in the world, official – These can already kill
adults with their venomous bites, soo…you have no chance against one 1000 times bigger
than reg! These live on the coast of Australia, so Ozzie
baes, you better start your antpocalypse plans now, should these red devils mutate! Basically, what we are looking at with 10
ft and taller ants are new apex predators. Maybe they will be the ones pouring hot water
on our homes to get rid of us when we become pests….although… the lack of opposable
thumbs and a prior knowledge of electrical appliances may make that difficult. None the less, ants have existed for around
120 million years. They are a much older species than us humans. 10 ft tall ants would take over the world
with their colonies… imagine the state of the earth with giant ants digging it up. Chaos! The only defence we can hope for is seeking
out each colonies queens and killing them, for we know that the colony falls if the queen
dies…..eventually anyway. BUT getting to her, well, outnumbered as we
are, it would be very hard. It isn’t just humans who are totally screwed
by the existence of giant ants, the food chain would be all off! Ants provide the food source for a lot of
other species in the food chain. Birds would go hungry…. Maybe they will be ant food ….cause…hate
to break it to you, some ants can fly. Listen, I am abouts done with this absolute
horror express of a video, are you? 10 ft ants would be a nightmare land. I’d love to watch a movie about it, I would
absolutely hate to live it. So lets move on with our lives. Thaaanks. Do leave a thumbs up on this video, though. I know Stephen Spielberg is a big fan of life’s
biggest questions, so maybe the like ratio will encourage him to create REVENGE of the
FIRE ANTS… you can have that one for free, Steve… if I can have a starring role that
is! Comments from What if We Stopped Blinking:
Michael Diaz Said: I Couldn’t Stop Blinking Or Stop Think About
Blinking While Watching This Video Idk Why Quazar said:
What if people stopped stealing art? Then there would be no art – art is inspired
by something that already exists in form or concept, and a lot of art, some of the best
art, is created in response to other art. That is like asking….what if we stopped
using the same words as one another? Maci May said: y eyes look like honey in the
sunlight and dark brown in the dark

What Queen Ants To Look Out For Right Now (May 30th, 2018)

What Queen Ants To Look Out For Right Now (May 30th, 2018)


Welcome, AC Family to ANT BITE WEDNESDAYS,
covering the world of ants as they relate to global news, social media, and ant keeping. I’m here to fill you in on what queen ants
to look out for right now if you’re living in North America. If you’re not from North America, stay tuned
I’ll also let you know how to find out what is flying in your continent. This past weekend, I was shocked to meet so
many of you AC Family in Ontario, Canada at our first AntsCanada meet & greet, hence my
hoarse voice today. The ant love was incredible! You came in with ant shirts, test tubes, and
ant costumes! You even brought in queen ants of your own
and were eager to chat about the happenings of the Antiverse. This opened my eyes as to how many of you
actually are into ant keeping and not just watching videos about ants. So, if this is you and you’re a starting ant
keeper, head outside now in the afternoons and keep your eyes on the ground! Right now is the ultimate season for Camponotus
ants, also known as carpenter ants! When you spot a queen ant, place her into
a proper test tube setup, keep her in the dark, and she should start laying eggs for
you in a few days. So many of you have been tweeting me photos
of queen ants you’ve captured asking for an ID and indeed 95% of them are Camponotus ants. I love Camponotus ants because they are large
so they’re quite easy to observe with the naked eye, polymorphic, meaning they have
super majors after about the hundredth worker point, and they are relatively easy to keep. The one downside of this genus though is that
they are slow-growing. Instead of the four week development from
egg to adult worker, it takes 8 weeks, and the queen takes periodic egg-laying breaks. It usually takes two years before you start
to see impressive numbers, but as is essential to ant keeping, patience is a virtue! Be sure to watch our Camponotus Care tutorial
here, with a more in depth look at the genus and their care. In fact, that is an entire playlist to all
my ant tutorials with a full range of helpful ant keeping tips. For those of you who don’t live in North America,
this video will also show you guys in Europe, Australia, and Asia, what ants may be flying
right now in your area! Depending on your location, there are other
species of ants also commonly flying now in North America other than Camponotus, and I
list them there in that video. Did you manage to catch a queen ant yet? If so, let us know in the comments section
the species and your location, so the rest of us AC Family near you, can keep our eyes
peeled! Especially for those of you in South America
and Africa, as I don’t have much data on nuptial flights in these continents! Just a reminder that we also have a tonne
of ant keeping gear at AntsCanada.com for you guys to check out, including specially
made test tubes for queen ants, and a complete e-book handbook guide on ant keeping. And that is today’s Ant Bite Wednesday. See you guys again for this Saturday’s big
episode featuring some alien colonists! It’s ant love forever! Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family!

What If ANTS Were BIGGER?


Greetings, AC Family! Welcome to another mid-week episode of the
AntsCanada Ant Channel! On this channel, I’ve had the opportunity
to take some truly stunning high quality footage of ants and other creatures, and I quite frequently
find myself getting lost in their micro worlds, almost forgetting they are so small when seeing
them so big on screen! And it made me wonder, what would happen if
ants were bigger? Say, human-sized? Well, from an ant nerd’s perspective, I
think I have a pretty good idea as to what theoretically might happen, as there could
be a few outcomes, some of which may surprise you, like can you imagine ants giving us body
massages? I’ll explain how this could happen, and
more in a bit, so before we get into that, be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button with the
BELL icon set on ALL to join the AC Family, and hit LIKE if you enjoyed this video. No let’s get to it! So, check out this super macro footage of
Asian bullet ants, Diacamma rugosum from a recent video. They’re truly magnificent this close, right? Well, imagine you were their size or they
were our size. The first and most obvious answer is, we’d
all be doomed! If ants were human-sized they’d be strong
enough to lift things the size of entire houses, and take down animals the size of a brontosaurus. They’d definitely be preying on our soft
tender bodies, and something tells me our military forces would have to really up our
social protection against the ant beasts sharing the planet with us. Life would be quite different! We’d be hunted, advanced upon by organized
raids, our houses and buildings broken into, and picked off one by one by swaths of these
beasts, who would sting us to death, spray us with formic acid to death, or just stretch
us out by our limbs and take us back to the colony to be consumed alive by their young. Or this might surprise you: they might not
kill us, but instead form a symbiotic relationship with us, where our coexistence can benefit
both ants and humans. Imagine we humans find a sustainable way to
turn their garbage, feces, or leftover meals into edible human food, so having us around
thereby helps keep their nests clean, much like springtails, isopods, and silverfish
do. And in return they, not only NOT kill us,
but they allow us to live with them in their massive mountain-sized, protected underground
kingdoms. Or perhaps we become their hygienists. Imagine if we could pick off body mites from
hard-to-reach places on the ants, in the same way predatory Hypoaspis mites protect our
Golden Empire, yellow crazy ant colony from parasitic blood-sucking mites. Now here’s something way crazy! Imagine ants found our feces or urine delicious…
highly unlikely due to the composition of our wastes, but imagine you’re something
like a mealybug for a sec, who excretes a bi-product ants just love called “honeydew”,
and upon discovering us, the ants start to protect us 24-7, never leaving us alone, ensuring
we breed and multiply okay, relocating us to better living environments if needed, and
even giving us body massages so we eliminate more often, all because they find our pee
or poop delicious. Mealybugs live the high life right? Yes, perhaps all of these are a stretch, but
one thing’s for sure: when you remove scale, and have a look at these incredible creatures
with a more intimate lens, you’ll discover that ants are truly some of the most magnificent
creatures on the planet, worthy of awe and respect. If you aren’t convinced by now, then just
watch a few more videos on this channel. The world of ants will truly blow your mind! Right, AC Family? Thank you guys for watching! It’s ant love forever! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday and possibly Wednesdays now if you guys keep waiting these mid-week
videos, at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to jelp us keep making more, It’s ant love forever!