Mating frenzies, sperm hoards, and brood raids: the life of a fire ant queen – Walter R. Tschinkel


It’s June, just after a heavy rainfall, and the sky is filling with creatures
we wouldn’t normally expect to find there. At first glance,
this might be a disturbing sight. But for the lucky males and females
of Solenopsis invicta, otherwise known as fire ants,
it’s a day of romance. This is the nuptial flight, when thousands of reproduction-capable
male and female ants, called alates,
take wing for the first and last time. But even for successful males
who manage to avoid winged predators, this mating frenzy will prove lethal. And for a successfully mated female,
her work is only beginning. Having secured a lifetime supply of sperm
from her departed mate, our new queen must now single-handedly
start an entire colony. Descending to the ground, she searches for a suitable spot
to build her nest. Ideally, she can find somewhere
with loose, easy-to-dig soil— like farmland
already disturbed by human activity. Once she finds the perfect spot,
she breaks off her wings— creating the stubs
that establish her royal status. Then, she starts digging
a descending tunnel ending in a chamber. Here the queen begins laying her eggs,
about ten per day, and the first larvae hatch within a week. Over the next three weeks, the new queen relies on a separate batch
of unfertilized eggs to nourish both herself and her brood, losing half her body weight
in the process. Thankfully, after about 20 days, these larvae grow
into the first generation of workers, ready to forage for food
and sustain their shrunken queen. Her daughters
will have to work quickly though— returning their mother
to good health is urgent. In the surrounding area, dozens of neighboring queens
are building their own ant armies. These colonies
have peacefully coexisted so far, but once workers appear, a phenomenon known as brood-raiding
begins. Workers from nests
up to several meters away begin to steal offspring
from our queen. Our colony retaliates, but new waves of raiders
from even further away overwhelm the workers. Within hours, the raiders have taken
our queen’s entire brood supply to the largest nearby nest— and the queen’s surviving daughters
abandon her. Chasing her last chance of survival, the queen follows the raiding trail
to the winning nest. She fends off other losing queens
and the defending nest’s workers, fighting her way
to the top of the brood pile. Her daughters help their mother succeed
where other queens fail— defeating the reigning monarch,
and usurping the brood pile. Eventually,
all the remaining challengers fail, until only one queen—
and one brood pile— remains. Now presiding over several hundred workers
in the neighborhood’s largest nest, our victorious queen begins
aiding her colony in its primary goal: reproduction. For the next several years,
the colony only produces sterile workers. But once their population
exceeds about 23,000, it changes course. From now on, every spring, the colony will produce
fertile alate males and females. The colony spawns these larger ants
throughout the early summer, and returns to worker production
in the fall. After heavy rainfalls,
these alates take to the skies, and spread their queen’s genes
up to a couple hundred meters downwind. But to contribute
to this annual mating frenzy, the colony must continue to thrive
as one massive super-organism. Every day, younger ants feed the queen
and tend to the brood, while older workers
forage for food and defend the nest. When intruders strike, these older warriors fend them off
using poisonous venom. After rainfalls,
the colony comes together, using the wet dirt to expand their nest. And when a disastrous flood
drowns their home, the sisters band together
into a massive living raft— carrying their queen to safety. But no matter how resilient, the life of a colony must come to an end. After about 8 years,
our queen runs out of sperm and can no longer replace dying workers. The nest’s population dwindles,
and eventually, they’re taken over
by a neighboring colony. Our queen’s reign is over,
but her genetic legacy lives on.

Ant Infestation: How To Prevent the Invasion

Ant Infestation: How To Prevent the Invasion


Ant Infestation: How to Prevent the Invasion You’re in an uncomfortable state when you feel that there’s an ant in your clothes. Usually, you’ll do your best to get rid of it. Ants can be seen everywhere. They are normally around places where there’s food and water. Also, you can spot them around crevices, openings, and gaps. Are you ready to face ant invasion? Ants typically invade homes and yards. Others regard ants as pest. Others utilize chemical pesticide as solution to eradicate ants. But, for me, it’s not a good idea because the said chemical is harmful to humans as well. If you need to solve ant issue at home and you are looking for a safer way, there are natural solutions you can take. 1. Sour Fruit Juice Interestingly, ants hate the smell of grapefruit, lemon, and orange. In fact, cleaner that has scent of lemon may also work. Citric fruit scent makes ants to lose their sense of trailing. With citric fruits, ants will have difficulty in spotting food presence. 2. Sliced Cucumber Like sour fruits, the smell of a sliced cucumber discourages ants. If you will use fruits to dispel ants, make sure to remove the fruits after a few hours . Do you want to know why? This is to avoid attracting cockroaches. You can dispose the fruits, let’s say after three hours. 3. Peppermint Do you like pepper? Some people utilize peppermint essential oil to resolve their ant issues at home. With a few drops of the oil in the cotton ball, it serves as an alternative to drive away pesky ants. There are also some soaps with peppermint scent that you can use for this reason. 4. Cinnamon Cinnamon can be beneficial as it serves two reasons for you. Number one is it can make your house smells good. And, number two is it can shoo away ants. In the market, you can find it in oil, stick, and powder form. Believe me, when you sprinkle this spice on areas where there are ants, expect that these insectes will run away as they despise the smell of it. 5. Remains of Coffee After Brewing I also brew coffee. After brewing coffee, the remains are called coffee grounds. You can use these against ants. To make it more effective, mix it with peppermint and you will never be disappointed to deter ants in your area. 6. Tansy Flowers Ants hate the flower of Tansy plant. That being said, some households grow this plant in their area. Moreover, others prefer to have this plant in a pot and place it near the door to forget about the hassle that ants can bring them. 7. Fossilized algae Fossilized algae can be made to become fine oxide powder known as diatomaceous earth. According to experts, this substance is safe for humans if it’s purified. But, the fossilized algae is not good for insects, particularly for ants. Diatomaceous earth works perfectly when dry. Thanks for watching. Please like and subscribe. Take care.

What If Ants Were 10ft Tall?


Ants. Creepy little soil dwellers that will march
into your home if you aren’t careful. There are …. Wait for it…. ten trillion ants on earth…. So….what if they were bigger than humans. Hello and welcome back to Life’s Biggest
Questions, the channel that loves a good old fashioned piece of fanciful pondering! I am your host, Rebecca Felgate, and today
I am asking WHAT IF ANTS were 10ft Tall? Crikey. Before we get into this video, why don’t
you let me know your feelings on ants. Spill tea…although don’t drop the sugar
cube as those ants will be marching away with it. Also while you are down there letting me know
if you’re an ant murderer or not, why don’t you also leave a big beautiful thumbs up on
this video and share it with a friend. Also check out the links in the description
to all of the people that went into making this video and of course stick around to the
end where I will be reading comments from a previous video. ANTS. Now is your last chance to start playing the
game where you count how many times I say Ants in this video. Ready. ANTS. Ants are roughly 1-3 millimetres in length…wee
little buddies. Your average black garden ant, the common
ant, Is around 3 millimetres, with bigger workers reaching 5 millimetres and Queen ants
reaching 6-9 millimetres. The BIGGEST ants in the world are currently
BULLET ants…. Which are about as fun as they sound… These absolute menaces are 3-4 CENTIMETRES
in length, so ten times the size of your average garden ant, anddddd they sting. A sting from a regular sized bullet ant can
last 48 hours. Right right rightttt…. Also, in general, ants are HELLA STRONG. A common ant can lift 1,000 times their weight. This is the equivalent of a human of being
able to lift 75 US Tons, which is the weight of about 12 elephants…or very roughly the
weight of a space shuttle. Soooo, circling back to the whole 10 ft thing…. 10 ft is roughly 3 metres. 3 metres is 1 thousand times the size of a
regular ant…which makes me VERY NERVOUS. Are we going to scale here, too? If regular ants are 10 feet tall, regular
queens would be roughly 20-29 feet tall….and BULLET ANTS would be 98 feet tall and I just
want to cry! Like… many things to say here, but first
thing is first – your garden is about to get WAY MORE CROWDED! Regular garden ant colonies are around 7,000
ants strong…. But they can get as big as 40,000 ants…. Which….AH! Stress! The whole blooming world is going to get far
more crowed. We will be outnumber by giant ants twice our
size 7.5 billion to 10 trillion! That means, if my at times dubious mathematics
serves me correctly, there will be 1 thousand 333 ants to every human. They will be bigger than us, they will be
stronger than us… and… well… they will probably eat us. Ants are omnivores, they will eat plants and
they will eat bugs… right now they are happy to fight little spiders and eat bugs their
size, so they wont worry about us. The Giant Garden ants aren’t event reeealllly
the issue. There are 12,000 varieties of ants and you
don’t want to meet them. YO SOME ANTS CAN FLY AND SOME ANTS CAN STING. Let me tell you about a couple that are already
horrifying before you factor in the whole thousand times bigger thing…. Urrrm FIRE ants… winner winner, honey is
a stinger…we already talked about the dastardly bullet ants… but the real concern is the
BULLDOG ant… the most dangerous ant in the world, official – These can already kill
adults with their venomous bites, soo…you have no chance against one 1000 times bigger
than reg! These live on the coast of Australia, so Ozzie
baes, you better start your antpocalypse plans now, should these red devils mutate! Basically, what we are looking at with 10
ft and taller ants are new apex predators. Maybe they will be the ones pouring hot water
on our homes to get rid of us when we become pests….although… the lack of opposable
thumbs and a prior knowledge of electrical appliances may make that difficult. None the less, ants have existed for around
120 million years. They are a much older species than us humans. 10 ft tall ants would take over the world
with their colonies… imagine the state of the earth with giant ants digging it up. Chaos! The only defence we can hope for is seeking
out each colonies queens and killing them, for we know that the colony falls if the queen
dies…..eventually anyway. BUT getting to her, well, outnumbered as we
are, it would be very hard. It isn’t just humans who are totally screwed
by the existence of giant ants, the food chain would be all off! Ants provide the food source for a lot of
other species in the food chain. Birds would go hungry…. Maybe they will be ant food ….cause…hate
to break it to you, some ants can fly. Listen, I am abouts done with this absolute
horror express of a video, are you? 10 ft ants would be a nightmare land. I’d love to watch a movie about it, I would
absolutely hate to live it. So lets move on with our lives. Thaaanks. Do leave a thumbs up on this video, though. I know Stephen Spielberg is a big fan of life’s
biggest questions, so maybe the like ratio will encourage him to create REVENGE of the
FIRE ANTS… you can have that one for free, Steve… if I can have a starring role that
is! Comments from What if We Stopped Blinking:
Michael Diaz Said: I Couldn’t Stop Blinking Or Stop Think About
Blinking While Watching This Video Idk Why Quazar said:
What if people stopped stealing art? Then there would be no art – art is inspired
by something that already exists in form or concept, and a lot of art, some of the best
art, is created in response to other art. That is like asking….what if we stopped
using the same words as one another? Maci May said: y eyes look like honey in the
sunlight and dark brown in the dark

Bee Beard GONE WRONG!


– [Coyote] I am
getting nervous now. – [Chris] No turning
back now buddy. – [Cameraman] You alright? – I’m getting stung a lot. Alright, gotta get ’em off. – [Chris] Go ahead
and just jump. Real hard. – They’re all on my face. My eyes! – [Narrator] From high in
the sky, the Sonoran Desert looks like an endless
expanse of rocky terrain that is speckled with cacti. Hidden amongst this
unforgiving environment exists a world of animals, many of which can be
difficult to spot. However, today is going
to be a little different, as instead of looking
for the animals, they’re literally going to be
placed right in front of us. Or in my case,
directly on my skin. – That’s a lot of bees. – [Narrator] With the goal
to prove that honey bees are not just out to sting
you, or so I thought. The crew and I headed out
to Life’s Sweet Honey Farms where I will be
working alongside bee specialist, Chris Britton. Chris and his team
specialize in safely removing bee swarms from
residential areas, honey farming, and per my
special request, bee beards. – [Chris] This
the craziest thing you’ve done this
morning, Coyote? – [Coyote] Sure is. Other
than shave off my fur beard. – [Narrator] Ah yes, the beard. I’m sure you were wondering, Coyote, what in the world
happened to your fur beard? Well, the answer
to that question is that I shaved
it off to make room for the nearly 3,000
European honey bees that will soon be
swarming all over my face. Get ready for the newest trend in facial hair
fashion, the bee beard. The following scene was
filmed on private property and under the supervision
of bee specialists. A single sting has the
potential to be fatal. Never approach a bee
hive in the wild. – Okay well, we’re gonna
start the preparation here. Chris is actually going
to apply Vaseline, you said to my nose, and
my ears, and near my eyes, so that the bees don’t go into these holes
in my face, right? – Well, you’re either gonna
look homeless with a beard or we’re gonna look like
a nice manicured beard. So this is a pseudo-queen. This is basically a
queen pheromone lure. So this is what’s going
to push those bees to actually gather somewhere because they’re actually looking
for that queen pheromone. They’ve been
separated for a while, so this is what’s gonna
actually hold them on your face. Okay, so we’re gonna put
this underneath your chin. – [Cameraman] So this is
gonna be the attractant. – This is the attractant. – Alright guys. Well I think we have reached
the final moment here. It’s either back out
or get covered by bees, and I don’t think there’s any
backing out at this point. I have the pheromone
attached to my chin. Got a GoPro here,
GoPro on my shoulder, both of your cameras going. Now wait, wait, wait, wait. Before we go through with this,
how do I get the bees off? What if something goes wrong? What do I do? – Good luck, man. I’m just gonna drive away. (Coyote laughs) Nothing’s gonna go wrong when
it comes down to the bees. If they get to the point where they are
stinging excessively, you can just shake
off real quick. – Put these in your pocket. – Epinephrine pens. Just in case this
really goes wrong. I am getting nervous now. Now I’m getting nervous. I’m Coyote Peterson and
I’m about to take on the bee beard challenge. Are you ready? – [Chris] Yep. – Okay, let’s do this. – [Chris] No turning
back now buddy. Come on girls. Come on girls, up you go. – [Cameraman] How you
feeling now Coyote? – It’s a lot of bees. It’s tough to talk. – [Cameraman] There’s a
bee right on your nose. – I feel it. – [Cameraman] That’s
a lot of bees. Are you feeling nervous? Have you been stung yet? – No stings yet. – [Cameraman] That’s good. That
means you’re remaining calm. – My leg is shaking. Stung on the lip. – [Cameraman] It’s stuck on you. You alright? Be brave. – My neck is consumed. – [Cameraman] I’m gonna
take a couple steps back. I just got stung. Right in my hand. I didn’t realize we were getting swarmed by bees this morning. – There a lot of bees on me? – You got it. You got this. – Getting stung a lot. I’ve gotten stung
about six times. Ow, my neck is
getting stung again. – This is what we
start with right here. We just get more for the
bees to start on him. Then what they’re gonna do is they’re gonna
emit a pheromone, and it’s a location pheromone, and those bees are just gonna
start basically migrating. So now I can actually just
basically hold this right here and they’re gonna all
start marching up, watch. – Are all the bees out? – [Chris] No. – My lip is swelling up. – [Chris] You’re alright. – [Cameraman] You definitely
have a full neck of bees. – I can feel them all. – [Cameraman] Are you
still getting stung? – No, not right now. – [Cameraman] So what is Coyote- – It stung the lip again! Same spot. It’s really starting to hurt. – [Cameraman] Wow, Coyote there. You are just
covered in bees man. – It’s actually turning
out pretty well. – Lip! Alright, I think I
need to get them off. – Are you okay or
you want them off? – It’s a lot of pain. – [Cameraman] But
you’ve almost got it. You’re so close. – Go ahead. – [Cameraman] You
got it, you got it. Power through, you got this. You already got
stung, you can do it. – My eyes. I’m getting stung a lot. Alright, gotta get ’em off. – [Chris] Go ahead
and just jump. Real hard. You
just knock ’em off. – They’re all on my face. My eyes! – [Cameraman] You alright? – Smoke me, I’m
getting stung a lot. – [Chris] You got
stung quite a bit. – There’s one on my hand. – [Cameraman] Oh yeah. I guess
he just stung you big time. – [Chris] You got
stung a bunch bud. – Can I walk away? Oh man, my face hurts. – [Cameraman] You
should see the sting you have in your neck. – Oh my gosh. – [Cameraman] Are you okay? – Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. – [Cameraman] Is your
tongue swelling up? The tongue is the indicator. – No, not yet, but
my face is on fire. – [Cameraman] Oh man, okay. I think we’re good now. It’s only a couple bees
and they’re just following the pheromone on your face. Hold on, you still got
stingers all in your ears. Oh my gosh. Let me see if I
can get them out. – Dude, I got stung
like so many times. All of a sudden, all at once
they started stinging my face. And on my ears. – [Cameraman] I wanna get
the stinger out of your ear. – [Chris] You okay bud? – Sorry, I was just
getting a lot of stings. – No, it’s fine buddy. You got ’em through your
shirt and everything. For some odd reason,
all of the sudden, they started just absolutely
going to town on you. You can see, look
at that right there. That actually literally… – [Cameraman] It drew blood. – [Chris] Yeah, it got
blood to the surface. You just got stung like 40
times in the face by honey bees. – [Cameraman] 40! I don’t think that was
supposed to happen Chris. – [Chris] I don’t know why. I wasn’t getting all blasted up. I mean, I got stung
like once or twice but he was literally
just getting beat up. – Oh my gosh. Dude, my face is in so
much pain right now. – [Cameraman] You alright? How’s the tongue? – Really, really painful. My tongue is not
swollen but my entire, my lips, I can’t feel my lips. – [Cameraman] Where’s Mario at? – [Chris] He’s
over there filming. – [Cameraman] Hey, tell
him to come over here. – [Chris] Hey Mario. – [Cameraman] Mario! – [Chris] He’s probably
covered up by bee sounds still. – [Cameraman] Come over here. Was it worth it? – Oh man, I can see
my lip in the lens. – [Cameraman] You don’t wanna
look at yourself right now. You don’t wanna look
in a mirror right now. – Well, I guess I better
give you some sort of outro of where I can’t talk
’cause I find that my lips are not working
properly at the moment. – [Cameraman] Alright,
I’m gonna try to be calm. Alright, go for it. – I’m gonna be calm. I think based on
the look on my face, the bee beard is not
the new fashion trend. I lasted for about
a minute and a half with my face covered
in around 3,000 bees. Once they started stinging my
lips, it got really painful. They were swarming
around my eyes. I was getting stung on my hands, on my arms, on my
forehead, on my ears, but it was definitely the lips as you can see from how
swollen they are right now that were the worst. I’d definitely say
that the bee beard was an experience
worth experiencing. So far I haven’t had any major
adverse allergic reactions other than just this
localized swelling on my hands and on my face. – [Cameraman] (laughing)
You can hardly tell. – You think this looks okay? – [Cameraman] You
can hardly tell. – I can tell you guys are
having a real hard time not laughing while we’re
trying to get this outro. We counted around two dozen
stings on my body at this point. My lips are swelling up. My eyes swelling up. As you see, the drool’s
coming out of my mouth. But I’m Coyote Peterson,
and that was the bee beard. Be brave. Stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Oh, that’s painful. – [Narrator] When it
was all said and done, we counted a total of 32 stings that spanned my face,
lips, ears, neck, and arms. The neurotoxin of the
European honey bee is very specialized
and is notorious for causing extreme
localized swelling. For me, this began immediately, and despite the
disfigured, lumpy, baked potato look of my face, I actually handled the
venom very positively, and within 48 hours, was
completely back to normal. – Now the guys have
their bee suits on and they’re gonna put the
bees back into their hives. So far, about 30
minutes have gone by. No anaphylactic shock
so I should be just fine other than the fact that my face looks like the face
of the elephant man. Now I can see in the
reflection of your glasses, it is not pretty. It is not pretty. – [Narrator] If you were
wondering how this compared to the single sting
from a bullet ant, I can honestly say it was worse. As compared to the warrior wasp, I guess we will just
have to wait and see. If you thought wearing a beard of European honey
bees was intense, wait until you see what happens when we go up against a
swarm of 30,000 killer bees to extract some wild honey. Don’t forget, subscribe so
you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)

STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

ANT ATTACK & ECHIDNA (GRAPHIC Content) with Andrew Ucles

ANT ATTACK & ECHIDNA (GRAPHIC Content) with Andrew Ucles


[music with drums]

Continue… Production details>>
UCLES [music with drums] Continues…. Yeah
Jedge yeah
Judge yeah
Judge a All right We’re out here in Australia On the Australian landscape JUdge a all right here a Strap on Strap on the Australian landscape, and We are looking for echidnas also known as the Australia echidnas now these guys here are a small solitary mammal thats’s what we covered in Slacks they’re not venomous be little bit of a prick to catch Yeah its funny because you look at this land scaping well they must be a like a thousand and one places to hide and there literally is but there is a bit of a technique in finding them all it takes is a little bit of intelligence hectates in sixe population numbers in areas rich in dietary sources Territorial but there home ranges often Defined the ant nests now regardless Mission to try and find one try walking around in note the diggings on the ant-man having Target speces if you understand awesome Over 60,000 and in just the one nest and in just 10 minutes of concentrating the killer consumed over 200grams of pure protein by theway he also has to enjoy the rrelentless but but i’ll get to this a little bit later and as the max the kingdom was lined uo the mother mother of monsters in Greek mythology as it was believed to about the tributes of reptiles and mammals so they get good and the mammals so they get good good and mammals so they get good good so good so long all right now just got here is a famous trying to get not yeah for now all right now this is pretty typical i dont have small one you say exactly what he’s doing and is a defense stratgy that you can i will do so soon as i come across a prduct will fox i could be it could be a think i could a dog colud galinha thus is excactly what i’ll start to dig now if you’re going in your backyard easiest way to get one here is like this ready- I up so i you thinking down with his front paws will like this i’ll get my hands down here and start didding I’M trying my hand and that andthat and that come on i dont comin and i flip and under such a soft underneath dont ask me to do this and ready 321 like being cake you ready 321 likebeing cake you are now the echindna right get this now this guy he is a moderate rain you figured what size i like the top of my back or something but now i am on the train is an egg-laying mammal Just like that Platypus the we have here in Australia as well I;Ve there sounds like killing it has been pretty hot tonigh so these egg-laying Mammals right generally what happens is the females oh and covered in stuff is the females a month after mating wwll actually deposit an egg into their patch like a livey leg one and what will happen is 10 days later it’ll hatch if you think of the word pretty quick right but then what wll happen is over the course of about fifty days the yound ones would be suckling from milk pause in patch yeah doesn’t everything now 50 days comes and then guess what she kicks the map and she diggz – she diggz a whole she’s like i have been in whole or worn at your place the younf and then the young ones who stay there from the seven months where you located watch over and if weighing them as well isn’t that right now i’m actually going to be putting putting myself idea you say the kids and got a very long stickly toungue it come with a big advantage when they are fading you know i can go for things like ants and termites which consists largely of their diet but probably thinking how would it be to get DR.Martin it because ican leaving some pretty hard places to get so today i’m going to be seen whats asticky situation i’m goingto get myself into whats a sticky situation i’m going to get myself into so going to get myself into so ar for our try to stick it out for 10 minutes on a ness to give me some sense of an idea of what feeding time is actually a lot for the kidnap with some more place he bar i was ready to take on the challenge i was ready to take on the challenge up ah ahhh ahh ah hhahh ahhhhhhh lots of paaain ouaaahhhhhhh ahhh ahhhh running wildly jumps into water splassshhhh short aahhhh *the ants in the pants* wahahahehehe *blurbs incoherently in content

The Double-Crossing Ants to Whom Friendship Means Nothing | Deep Look

The Double-Crossing Ants to Whom Friendship Means Nothing | Deep Look


The Peruvian Amazon rainforest is bursting
with life, but it’s a hard place to make a living,
especially when you’re small. Competition… is fierce. Violence and betrayal are everywhere. Up here, in the canopy? These trees have made it. Lots of leaves. Plenty of sunlight. But down here, on the forest floor, it’s
another story. This sapling desperately needs to grow, to
get more sun. And in the meantime, it’s vulnerable. It doesn’t have many leaves yet. Each one is valuable. Losing just a few could be its demise. So this young tree, it’s called an Inga,
enlists bodyguards.. hundreds of them. These big-headed ants swarm over the sapling,
fighting off any leaf-eating intruders, like this caterpillar. The price of protection: a meal: sugary nectar. The tree serves it up in ant-sized dishes
called nectaries. Both the ant and the tree have something to
gain from the deal. This is called “mutualism.” But that only works when both sides play by
the rules. Here’s another intruder. See how the ants rush to meet it? But they aren’t biting or stinging it. They don’t attack it like they’re supposed
to. Instead the ants just… watch… as the caterpillar gorges on the fresh leaves. They’re just letting it happen. Why? Because they found a better deal. See how the ants tap on the caterpillar’s
rear with their antennae? Those two little pits on the caterpillar’s
back are called tentacle nectaries. When the ants tap, the nectaries secrete drops
of nectar. It’s made of sugar that the caterpillar
drained out of the leaf. In exchange for the payoff, the ants give
the caterpillars free access to their so-called partner, the Inga tree. They’ve been bribed. As for the tree? It’s left weaker, a little less likely to
make it up to the canopy. And that’s the sad story of the young Inga. Sold out for a drop of sugar water by a fairweather
friend. You like ants? We got ants. Lots of ants. Winter ants battle Argentine ants with weapons caught on film for the very first time! Leafcutter ants that have been farming since
before we humans walked the earth. All that and more on Deep Look. So subscribe… And thanks for watching.