STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

Rainbow Ant Colony (Part 2)

Rainbow Ant Colony (Part 2)


Hi, this is Jordan updating you on my Iridomyrmex
bicknelli colony. Despite the increasing cold weather here in
Melbourne, this colony has been expanding quite rapidly thanks to that heating mat I
set up for them a few months back. You can see the nest is fairly crowded now.
Here’s the queen right in the middle of the screen. I’m finding it quite difficult to
actually locate the queen now, which shows just how much the colony has grown. I had some good lighting on this shot here,
you can really see the colours of the ants become nicely pronounced. I never realized
until now just how orangey red this species head section is. It’s rather neat noticing
new features on a species I’ve been keeping for almost 3 years now. This colony has actually been a little challenging
to keep recently. I’ve been having a fair amount of ants escaping the out world. At
first I thought it was because they weren’t being fed sufficiently and they were escaping
in order to forage for food. But later I realized this wasn’t the case. I saw the ants actually
carrying brood into the outworld. So what I suspect was happening
was they were scouting for a new nesting space, which makes sense given how cramped they were. After seeing this behavior, I decided to attach
a new addition nesting space, which they quickly discovered and made use of. The new space
is quite dry and warm so most of the space has been used to store their pupae which does
quite well in these conditions. I’ve also added a new out world which is slightly
larger than the last one I had set up. I’ve got a layer or two of fluon around the edges,
which hasn’t been doing the best job in keeping the ants in. So I might have to modify it
a bit to make it more escape proof. But since I added the new nest they seem to be less
interested in leaving, although, occasionally I do still find ants walking around my room
which is a little frustrating. And that’s all the footage I have for now.
I hope you enjoyed this video. Thanks for watching and let me know if you’d like to
see more of these videos.

Bullet Ant Venom

Bullet Ant Venom


– So the other group of ants
[Dr. Corrie Moreau, curator/ants] that we have today are bullet ants.
[Dr. Corrie Moreau, curator/ants] – Why are they called bullet ants?
[Bullet ant, Paraponera clavata] – Well, they’re called bullet ants
[Bullet ant, Paraponera clavata] because their sting is so painful
[* causing excruciating pain, numbness & trembling] it feels like you were shot by a gun.
[* causing excruciating pain, numbness & trembling] – And you’ve experienced
this firsthand? – I have, just once, I’d like
to keep it that way. And so you can see they’re
actually quite tremendous ants, I mean, they’re really foreboding,
[* worker bullet ants are 18–30 mm long] they’re crazy big and they’re cool.
[* worker bullet ants are 18–30 mm long] – Are they the largest ant? – They’re one of the largest ants. There’s another genus called Dinoponera.
[Dinoponera, Dinoponera australis] In some ways larger.
[* females may surpass 30–40 mm in length] Not as painful of a sting, though.
[* females may surpass 30–40 mm in length] This is Paraponera.
[Bullet ant, Paraponera clavata] We’re studying the gut bacteria
actually in this group of ants. But we’re also
interested in the venom. And so what I was telling
you is part of the reason I brought them back
alive is that at one point I had tried to milk them, because
my colleague was like, “It’s because we weren’t sure if
we’d have permits to bring back alive.” – Yeah.
– You can just milk them. So I can show you how
I attempted to do it and I will tell you that it
didn’t work in the end. When I got the venom back
it was actually not usable. But let me grab my equipment. – It’s not every day you get to
milk a venomous ant. At work. – So this is our fancy equipment. So if you think about, like, how they milk the venom
from spiders, right? Usually they just have
them bite something and squirt the venom inside
and it’s the same principle. So again, we just have
our empty tubes, and we have a little
bit of parafilm, right, which is essentially just like
a waxy kind of paper-y thing that we can stretch
across the top of this. And we’re going to get them
to try to sting through the tube and deposit their venom
on the side of the tube. – Wow.
– Yeah. One thing I have noticed is, what’s really interesting
actually, is with these bullet ants, when you collect them in the
wild they’re incredibly aggressive. You disturb them at all, and they
just go into immediate attack mode. In fact in the field, if you
even like blow on them, you can physically
hear them stridulate, which is a way of communicating
between individuals. And now that they’ve been
in the lab for just a few days, they’re actually almost docile. And so I’m curious to see whether
they’ll even sting through this. But we’ll try. Yeah, see, this one stridulates. So now let’s see if we
put her abdomen up, yeah, she is depositing
her sting through. – Oh!
– See that? – Sting it! Sting it! – So you see, she’s got her sting out, this is where I don’t want
to lose control of her. She’ll try to sting through, oh, there, you saw that sting go? That’s huge.
– Yeah. Wow. Focus your anger. – We will try to get another one to sting
– Come on, ladies. – You look like a new victim,
raaah, let’s get her all mad. – Yeaaaah! Oh, she’s stridulating. – She’s actually kinda not
mad as much anymore. – They’re—they’re just
like, they’re like, “Corrie, we wanna hang out,
I thought we were cool.” – I know, that’s probably
exactly what they think. – Like, “Come on, Corrie,” “I read your latest paper about
climactic regional distribution” “of my sister species.” I don’t even know if that’s
what you’ve written about, I don’t even know if that—
those words even make sense. – You don’t read all my
scientific publications? – Um, I probably couldn’t
get through the abstract. Not—not just yours, but most. – I won’t take it personally. Oh, yeah, she’s got a very big sting,
so let’s see if I can get her to— – Yeah. Sting it. – So that’s how you milk a
bullet ant for their venom. So essentially, just getting them
to sting through this material, they have now
deposited their venom all over the top of this
and inside of that tube, so I can just shove
that in there and then take it back
to an analytical lab to look at what are the—what’s
the chemistry within the venom. Now, I’ve already told you that
that didn’t work so successfully, so in a sense, what we need to do
is dissect out the venom glad, and that’s where it
gets a little more tricky, because in this case, you
can see they’re big and— – Cranky. – Cranky. And they
don’t like to hold still. Do this under the microscope. Okay, so now, again, we’re
gonna just pull off her abdomen, oh God, these are some tough ants.
[* abdomen] Even tougher than the bullet ants.
– Wow. – So now we’ve got—
– You did it. – —her body separated
from her abdomen. I wanna just tease apart some
of the parts of the abdomen and then we can usually pull the
venom gland out through the sting. So I’m just gonna start
pulling apart the body, and since I don’t want to
rupture the venom gland, I wanna try not to stab too much. – Yeah, this is meticulous work, dissecting ants.
– Yeah. – What is the smallest ant that
you’ll work on under a microscope? – Oh, I’ll work on anyone. – Even the ones
that are so small that you can’t even see
them on the labels? – Yep, even those. I’ve had to
dissect out their guts, too. – How do you even get
forceps that small? – Suspense, right?
– Yeah, the pressure. – Yeah, nothing like having
to dissect on camera, too. As if it’s not hard enough, right? – Yeah, all the viewers are
at home, quietly judging you. They’re like, “Well, when
I dissected ants last—” – I was thinking they were biting
their fingernails in suspense. – Yeah, that too. – So at the one end, let’s see if I can put it
in a good orientation— you can actually
see the left side, if you look through
the microscope, you can actually see the sting hanging all the way out.
[* sting] – Oh yeah!
– It’s like a giant hypodermic needle. – Yeah. – And then starting at the
other end on the right side, we can actually start to see
those parts of the digestive system. So first you have the crop, right?
[* crop] So it’s that social food sharing organ,
which then transitions into the mid gut and then into what’s called the ileum
[* mid gut, * ileum] and then finally into the rectum,
[* rectum] and then alongside that is where the venom gland sits.
[* venom gland] – That’s amazing.
– Yeah, it’s really awesome. One of the things that’s cool
when you first open them up is that the contents within the gut, you can see fat and
you can see the trachea and all those other things,
and even within the gut, it’s either clear like it
almost looks like water, or sometimes you can see
things that look like waste, but within the venom sac,
it’s actually almost like oil. And so when you burst it,
it’s literally like oil coming out, not like liquid, like, you
know, in the same sense. – Cool.
– Yeah. – Nice.
– So now the question is, are you gonna hold
a bullet ant for 10 seconds? The Brain Scoop is brought to you by the Field Museum in Chicago It still has brains on it.

ANT ATTACK & ECHIDNA (GRAPHIC Content) with Andrew Ucles

ANT ATTACK & ECHIDNA (GRAPHIC Content) with Andrew Ucles


[music with drums]

Continue… Production details>>
UCLES [music with drums] Continues…. Yeah
Jedge yeah
Judge yeah
Judge a All right We’re out here in Australia On the Australian landscape JUdge a all right here a Strap on Strap on the Australian landscape, and We are looking for echidnas also known as the Australia echidnas now these guys here are a small solitary mammal thats’s what we covered in Slacks they’re not venomous be little bit of a prick to catch Yeah its funny because you look at this land scaping well they must be a like a thousand and one places to hide and there literally is but there is a bit of a technique in finding them all it takes is a little bit of intelligence hectates in sixe population numbers in areas rich in dietary sources Territorial but there home ranges often Defined the ant nests now regardless Mission to try and find one try walking around in note the diggings on the ant-man having Target speces if you understand awesome Over 60,000 and in just the one nest and in just 10 minutes of concentrating the killer consumed over 200grams of pure protein by theway he also has to enjoy the rrelentless but but i’ll get to this a little bit later and as the max the kingdom was lined uo the mother mother of monsters in Greek mythology as it was believed to about the tributes of reptiles and mammals so they get good and the mammals so they get good good and mammals so they get good good so good so long all right now just got here is a famous trying to get not yeah for now all right now this is pretty typical i dont have small one you say exactly what he’s doing and is a defense stratgy that you can i will do so soon as i come across a prduct will fox i could be it could be a think i could a dog colud galinha thus is excactly what i’ll start to dig now if you’re going in your backyard easiest way to get one here is like this ready- I up so i you thinking down with his front paws will like this i’ll get my hands down here and start didding I’M trying my hand and that andthat and that come on i dont comin and i flip and under such a soft underneath dont ask me to do this and ready 321 like being cake you ready 321 likebeing cake you are now the echindna right get this now this guy he is a moderate rain you figured what size i like the top of my back or something but now i am on the train is an egg-laying mammal Just like that Platypus the we have here in Australia as well I;Ve there sounds like killing it has been pretty hot tonigh so these egg-laying Mammals right generally what happens is the females oh and covered in stuff is the females a month after mating wwll actually deposit an egg into their patch like a livey leg one and what will happen is 10 days later it’ll hatch if you think of the word pretty quick right but then what wll happen is over the course of about fifty days the yound ones would be suckling from milk pause in patch yeah doesn’t everything now 50 days comes and then guess what she kicks the map and she diggz – she diggz a whole she’s like i have been in whole or worn at your place the younf and then the young ones who stay there from the seven months where you located watch over and if weighing them as well isn’t that right now i’m actually going to be putting putting myself idea you say the kids and got a very long stickly toungue it come with a big advantage when they are fading you know i can go for things like ants and termites which consists largely of their diet but probably thinking how would it be to get DR.Martin it because ican leaving some pretty hard places to get so today i’m going to be seen whats asticky situation i’m goingto get myself into whats a sticky situation i’m going to get myself into so going to get myself into so ar for our try to stick it out for 10 minutes on a ness to give me some sense of an idea of what feeding time is actually a lot for the kidnap with some more place he bar i was ready to take on the challenge i was ready to take on the challenge up ah ahhh ahh ah hhahh ahhhhhhh lots of paaain ouaaahhhhhhh ahhh ahhhh running wildly jumps into water splassshhhh short aahhhh *the ants in the pants* wahahahehehe *blurbs incoherently in content

Q&A – Are ants harmful in a vegetable garden?

Q&A – Are ants harmful in a vegetable garden?


♪♪♪ Are ants harmful in
a vegetable garden? As he takes off his glasses. There are a couple
of schools of thought. You know, earlier we were
looking at some aphids on tomatoes. And ants like aphids. Aphids secrete honeydew. It’s kind of a
sweet, sticky substance. And ants will actually
kind of protect those aphids. And ants are omnivorous, which
means they can be carnivorous but they’re omnivorous. They eat both
plant material and, uh, other insects. So, if they’re eating an insect,
they’re beneficial and you’re probably okay to
leave them there. If they’re eating on plant
material like okra, tomatoes.. Fire ants are maybe an
example that can be beneficial. But if there are so many out
there that they’re bothering you when you’re
picking peas, you know, then they’re not beneficial. So, there are some products that
you can use some of the baits. If they’re bothering you and you
want to get rid of them — yes, you can kill them and there are
products that are labeled for use in home gardens. But I would wait and try to
determine whether or not they’re doing you more harm than good. They may be doing you
more good than harm. And if that’s the
case, leave them be.

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 3)

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 3)


Hi, this is Jordan updating you on my Pheidole sp. colony. It’s been several months since my last update video. Since then the colony hasn’t grown too much. We’ve just come out of winter here in Australia, so the ants have
been in a state of hibernation the last couple of months. It’s starting to heat up
again though, and they’re becoming more active and demanding of food. Last summer this colony grew quite rapidly so hopefully this coming summer will be the
same and I end up with a fairly sizable colony. You can see there’s plenty of brood around. See this
massive pile of larvae here and plenty of eggs and pupae too. You can see there’s quite a lot of soldier ants walking around here. There’s around 40 of them in the colony now. The soldiers just tend to hang around the
nest and hardly ever venture off into the outworld. I think it’s because I normally provide this colony with soft cut up foods, which doesn’t need the
power of a soldier ant to slice up or haul back to the nest. They’re mostly just used
as a sort of living walking food/water reservoir. I can often see the workers
feeding from them or filling them up through the process of trophallaxis. You can
see their gasters are really swollen here. Sometimes even as big as their heads. A couple of months ago I went on a trip
overseas. I spent just over a month in Canada, and if you remember from my last
update, the colony had raised up quite a number of female alates. They ended up
producing around 15 to 20 and total. Anyway, when I returned from my trip all
the alates had gone. So what I suspect happened was they flew of for their nuptial flights. So they would have made their way into the outworld and flown out through the lid which has these little
ventilation gaps. Before I left for my trip I left this window open which is right next to
the outworld. So hopefully the alates made it outside and they underwent
their nuptial flights and started founding new colonies of their own. I’ve never had a colony undergo their nuptial flights like this before. Unfortunately I was away miss out on
witnessing the process, but it’s still really cool nonetheless. So that’s it for the update.
I’ll probably do another one for my Iridomyrmex bicknelli colony next. So look look forward to that and thanks for watching.

The Double-Crossing Ants to Whom Friendship Means Nothing | Deep Look

The Double-Crossing Ants to Whom Friendship Means Nothing | Deep Look


The Peruvian Amazon rainforest is bursting
with life, but it’s a hard place to make a living,
especially when you’re small. Competition… is fierce. Violence and betrayal are everywhere. Up here, in the canopy? These trees have made it. Lots of leaves. Plenty of sunlight. But down here, on the forest floor, it’s
another story. This sapling desperately needs to grow, to
get more sun. And in the meantime, it’s vulnerable. It doesn’t have many leaves yet. Each one is valuable. Losing just a few could be its demise. So this young tree, it’s called an Inga,
enlists bodyguards.. hundreds of them. These big-headed ants swarm over the sapling,
fighting off any leaf-eating intruders, like this caterpillar. The price of protection: a meal: sugary nectar. The tree serves it up in ant-sized dishes
called nectaries. Both the ant and the tree have something to
gain from the deal. This is called “mutualism.” But that only works when both sides play by
the rules. Here’s another intruder. See how the ants rush to meet it? But they aren’t biting or stinging it. They don’t attack it like they’re supposed
to. Instead the ants just… watch… as the caterpillar gorges on the fresh leaves. They’re just letting it happen. Why? Because they found a better deal. See how the ants tap on the caterpillar’s
rear with their antennae? Those two little pits on the caterpillar’s
back are called tentacle nectaries. When the ants tap, the nectaries secrete drops
of nectar. It’s made of sugar that the caterpillar
drained out of the leaf. In exchange for the payoff, the ants give
the caterpillars free access to their so-called partner, the Inga tree. They’ve been bribed. As for the tree? It’s left weaker, a little less likely to
make it up to the canopy. And that’s the sad story of the young Inga. Sold out for a drop of sugar water by a fairweather
friend. You like ants? We got ants. Lots of ants. Winter ants battle Argentine ants with weapons caught on film for the very first time! Leafcutter ants that have been farming since
before we humans walked the earth. All that and more on Deep Look. So subscribe… And thanks for watching.

The Best Natural Remedy for Ants (As Good as an Ant Killing Pesticide that Gets the Queen)

The Best Natural Remedy for Ants (As Good as an Ant Killing Pesticide that Gets the Queen)


Welcome to “Half Pint Hacks” where awesomeness
is our specialty. Today we are making the best natural ant-killing
remedy What’s really cool about this one Alastair? If you light it on fire, it burns green and
yellow. That’s right Alastair — Borax burns cool
colors — but it’s really dangerous, so don’t do that, OK? Let’s just get rid of ants!!! Here’s the thing: Ants won’t eat Borax but,
kind of like us, ants love sugar. We’re going to trick them by mixing it together. Our remedy is simple: half Borax and half
powdered sugar. The ants think this is a tasty treat and it
ends up killing them. Here’s a problem: Kids might think it’s a
tasty treat too. Does this look tasty, Alastair? Yeah, but I’m not going to eat it. Are you going to eat it? Good! But you would
have when you were a toddler!!!! Keep this remedy away from toddlers like Alastair!
The world is a dangerous place enough for the Alastairs out there. All we are going to do is put our mixture
in places where ants like to hang out, but out of reach of toddlers. We are putting it in little disposable cup
lids which we will throw away after this project. We don’t have toddlers around here and Alastair
knows not to eat white stuff out of little lids laying around, don’t you Alastair? That’s it! You’re going to notice a lot less
ants in about a week