MY FIRE ANTS SET UP SOME NEW “HOUSE RULES” | The Phoenix Empire Laws

MY FIRE ANTS SET UP SOME NEW “HOUSE RULES” | The Phoenix Empire Laws


They’ve got new rules, they count ‘em! Behold the Phoenix Empire, a young fire ant
colony that is growing bigger in numbers by the day. It’s amazing to think that just a few weeks
ago, this fruitful fire ant colony started with just one pregnant queen ant and her eggs. Now, she’s got her own growing army of workers,
masses of babies, and more on the way. But as more fire ant members join this multiplying
army, new rules and colony laws must be set in place if they’re to succeed at becoming
a mighty fire ant colony. These new Phoenix Empire rules which all members
must follow, will truly blow your mind! Welcome to the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! If there’s something ant keeping has taught
me, it’s that ants are so much like humans, it’s staggering. Before us here, lies the simple setup, in
which an intricate city of fire ants is slowly taking shape. You guys will trip out at some of the rules
they’ve begun to establish, so keep on watching until the end to find out what the Phoenix
Empire’s new quote-unquote colony rules are. But first, here is the Phoenix Empire’s
gorgeous, royal queen, whose name is now officially the ‘Ember Empress’, thanks to you guys
who voted for her official name in last week’s video. Now, I can’t figure out if it should be
“Empress Ember” or the “Ember Empress”. Can you guys take a quick moment to vote here
to help decide on her official name? Thank you AC Council for your input. She’s an awesome queen, and has been quite
busy. Have a look. This here is just one section of her impressive
brood pile. You can see eggs, larvae, and pupae. And here is the queen’s newest clutch of
eggs! If you look carefully, you’ll notice that
some of the eggs have already hatched into tiny larvae. Congrats, our Empress! You’re doing great! Now this might be random, but a lot of you
have been asking about the three bumps on Empress Ember’s head, some of you guys even
fearing they were mites. No need to worry, though! Those are actually eyes called ocelli, useful
to the queen during her past nuptial flight, the great night our Empress here left her
mother colony and mated with males from other colonies. Flying and seeking out potential males all
while also trying not to be eaten by predators, requires good vision so having these extra
eyes on top of her head is super useful. They’re kind of like a fire ant crown now,
and those wing scars you see on her thorax, like her royal stripes, earned the moment
she broke off her wings after insemination, marking the start of her journey as queen! Now, with the queen constantly laying eggs,
and all these new babies popping up demanding attention and care, the workers have been
extremely diligent at helping raise their growing siblings, which brings me to the Phoenix
Empire’s first set of rules. Phoenix Empire Rule #1: Arrange the kids according
to age! Like pre-school, you may notice that the workers
have started to pay closer attention to arranging the brood according to life stage and age. All the eggs are bunched together, and stray
eggs eventually get picked up and placed in the egg pile. Same goes for larvae and pupae. As the colony continues to grow and these
brood piles get even larger and larger, segregating the young according to age becomes more and
more important, and here’s why. Each life stage, requires a specific care
regimen and environment. For instance, eggs need to be bunched together
so they better retain moisture collectively plus they’re easier to transport in packages,
in case of an emergency like during an ant-eater tongue intrusion or something. The larvae need to be constantly fed, and
as they shed their skin multiple times as they mature, the workers need to eat the larvae’s
shed skin, as you can see here, in order that it doesn’t just lay around and grow fungus. Speaking of fungus by the way, eggs and larvae
need to be constantly licked clean by the workers, as ant saliva contains an anti-biotic
and anti-fungal which keeps all brood from harmful fungus or microbes. Finally, pupae and pupating larvae are placed
in the warmest portions of the nest in order that they develop as quickly as possible so
they can become adult worker ants faster, and help out! So as you can see, the Phoenix Empire here
is getting really systematic with how they do things, but fire ant youth management isn’t
all. Check out what else the Phoenix Empire had
been secretly planning! So this brood explosion has been the result
of all the food I’ve been providing the colony this week. Peeking into their food chamber, this AC Test
Tube Portal from our ant shop at AntsCanada.com has been fully stocked with goodies. Have a look! Here you’ll see, a hollowed out superworm
piece. And behind it some sweet mango-flavoured jelly. And much like we saw last week, evidence of
these foods can be seen through the larvae’s semi-transparent skin. But with all the eating this colony has been
doing as of late, it made me wonder what the colony was doing with all their waste. Their test tube appeared clean and sterile
as ever. What was the Phoenix Empire doing with their
leftover scraps, I wondered, and where were they going to the bathroom? AC Family, Rule #2: All members of the Phoenix
Empire are to do their business and eliminate at the designated colony bathroom. Behold, the Phoenix Empire’s official toilet. Sounds weird but isn’t that awesome? They’ve chosen a spot right behind the jelly
to poo. If you’ve never seen ant droppings before,
they look like this. Like bird poop, they have a whitish liquid
part and some solid pieces. And what’s totally amazing is they’ve
strategically set up their toilet area at a spot furthest from the colony. It’s a smart toilet location. The poop dries up and isn’t anywhere near
the delicate young and colony’s living quarters. It could just decompose naturally in the corner. I’m not too sure where the queen poops though,
because I couldn’t see any droppings in the test tube and I assume it was too dangerous
for the Phoenix Empire to allow Empress Ember to wander out in to the open, so my guess
is the workers simply carry her royal droppings to dump into the toilet area. It also would make sense that her droppings
would be minimal, as I’m sure most of the material she eats goes towards all the eggs
she’s producing. But guys, bathroom rules weren’t all that
surprised me. Looking around the test tube portal look at
what else I found! Rule #3: All colony garbage is to be dumped
at this place. Beneath the cup of jelly, I was thrilled to
discover the colony’s garbage. Little bits of uneaten superworm and mealworm
leftovers, as well as the meconia or fecal pellets of the larvae, were all stashed here. It’s interesting that they chose to place
their garbage underneath the jelly cup, because it showed that the Phoenix Empire understood
the need to bury their garbage. In nature, burying the colony’s garbage
helps break it down faster, as it becomes more accessible to soil creatures and beneficial
microbes which feast on this ant midden. Cool right? Now there was one last rule the Phoenix Empire
was following, which I found to be the most interesting! I noticed the colony’s water portion in
their test tube was running out, so I connected a new fresh test tube setup to the test tube
portal. Upon discovery, the Phoenix Empire got really
excited and began sending out workers to inspect the new water source and maybe, just maybe,
their future new nest location once their current test tube dries out. But it was at this time, that I noticed the
Phoenix Empire had began to practice something biologists already know ants commonly do. Rule #4: Only the oldest ants are allowed
to leave the nest at any time! Notice how all the workers entering the new
test tube here are dark in colour? Only the colony elders can venture out into
the world outside the nest, while all new young workers are stay-at-home caregivers
and house chore workers! It’s a smart colony rule because this way,
inexperienced or unhardened young worker ants don’t end up getting injured and/or dying
in the dangerous outside world, and those that do risk their lives to gather resources
outside the protection of the nest, are the hardiest, strongest, and most experienced
of the bunch, and if they were to die, at least the young ones within the nest have
the longest lives still to live, and can hold up the fort until the next generation of workers
arrive, and they themselves become old enough to be foragers. Isn’t it amazing how systematic they are
now? I think we’ll start seeing this more and
more, where the bigger the colony gets, the more organized and structured they need to
be. It makes sense. Whether it be ants or people, it seems the
more complex the society, the more complex the rules. It’s this organization that will ensure
colony success. Biologists aren’t sure how the ants know
what rules to establish, or when, but perhaps its a mixture of instinct and collective decisions
made by members of the colony at the right times of colony development. In the coming days, I look forward to introducing
some allies into the Phoenix Empire’s setup: namely, springtails from our AC Nucleus, our
soil creature breeding facility. The springtails will gobble up the ants’
garbage and bathroom deposits! I won’t do it just yet, though as I don’t
want the springtails to compete with the fire ants for food I place inside. I’ll wait for the colony to get bigger and
more aggressive, before I start playing God and introducing other organisms in the mix. I also can’t wait for the majors and supermajors
to arrive, specialized larger workers with massive heads and brute jaw force for cutting
things up and colony protection! They come much later. I can’t wait for the Phoenix Empire to receive
their first official ant farm, outworld, and eventually full blown terrarium. I also can’t wait for the day this colony
becomes big enough to feed some real meat to! Haha! But one step at a time, and AC Family, I must
say, I love that you all are following the development of this very humble fire ant colony
with me, every step of the way, on their journey to becoming the most powerful ant kingdom
of our Antiverse. I’ll continue to film their evolution closely. It’s all very inspiring for me to see, in
a world where ants, especially fire ants, are generally hated and tagged as gross, killed
and exterminated as pests, that at least in this unsuspecting corner of Youtube, ant love
thrives and grows with the power of a Phoenix. Thank you for watching. It’s ant love forever! AC Family, our fire ants are on their way
up, and it’s great you all are part of this journey! So much is in store ahead so if you haven’t
yet, SMASH that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON now and hit ALL so you get notified at
every upload, because sometimes Youtube breaks and doesn’t send out notifications, but
crossing fingers things will be fixed. Also, don’t forget to hit the LIKE button
every single time including now. It would really mean a lot to me. Thank you, guys! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch some extended play footage of the Phoenix Empire
discovering their new water test tube as well as the colony going about their daily activities
in their nest. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: Why does an ant colony need protein? Congratulations to Ruby Raven Gachalife who
correctly answered: Protein helps the larvae grow
and the queen to lay more eggs. Congratulations Ruby, you just won a free
Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: What do you look forward to most
in the Phoenix Empire’s future? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to our channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

STUNG by a GIANT HORNET!


(intense music)
(buzzing) – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to enter
the sting zone with the Japanese Giant Hornet. One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. (suspenseful music) Oh searing pain! Absolute searing pain! (intense jungle music) (lion roars) There are moments
we have brought you on the Brave Wilderness
channel that the world will never forget. (grunts) Oh it’s stuck in my arm,
it’s stuck in my arm. (yelling and grunting) Then there are the moments that we know the
world is waiting for. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to
enter the sting zone with the executioner
wasp, here we go. But before we get there, first, I must face one
more horrific sting. Ah!
(grunts) The Tottori Prefecture is one of the most remote
stretches of wildnerness in all of Japan. And mysteriously hidden deep within it fog
covered mountains, a world of giants stalk
this ancient landscape. For days we searched in
every place possible. Yet much to our chagrin, it seemed as an encounter with
Japan’s most notorious insect would allude us. Then in our second to
last day in country, when it seemed as if
all hope was lost, the very encounter I
had been searching for presented itself in the
form of a giant hornet. (gasps) Hornet, hornet, hornet,
hornet, hornet, hornet, right there, right
there, right there, right on the edge of that weed, look at that, it’s huge, right there, right
there, right there. (suspenseful music) Got it, hornet! Hornet, giant hornet 100%. – [Cameraman] You caught one? – [Coyote] Yes, yes, yes,
yes, yes, hold on a second. Yes, right there, right
there, right there. – [Cameraman] Dude you got it. – Got it, hold on I’m
gonna put this Go-Pro down. – [Cameraman] Wow
that is a big hornet! – Where is it, where
is it, hold on. – [Cameraman] It’s right
here, it’s right here. – Right there, right
there, right there. Let me trap it up against
the front of the net. – [Cameraman 2] Where is it? – It’s tangled up
within all these plants. – [Cameraman]
Mario, look at that. – [Cameraman 2]
Where, where, where? – [Coyote] Look, look, look, it’s biting right
through the net. – [Cameraman 2] You
can barely see it. – Here let’s do this, I
gotta get it in the capsule. – [Cameraman 2] Let’s
get it in the capsule. – [Coyote] Hold on
a second, here, uh. – [Cameraman 2]
Do you need help? – Hold the end of that,
hold the end of that. Ah!
(mischievous laughter) Yeah you guys will be
able to see a lot better if I get it into here,
hold on a second. I don’t wanna get
stung through the net. Okay, opp. (suspenseful music) I almost got it. – [Cameraman] You’re
sure it’s a giant. – I’m 100% certain
dude, it’s huge, there’s no way this
is anything else. Look at it, it’s
biting onto the net. Probably chew right
through there if it could. – [Cameraman] Hasn’t stung yet. – Got it, got it, got
it, got it, got it. – [Cameraman 2] Let’s
take a look at it. – Look at that, that is it, yep. – [Cameraman] You got one! Man! – How about that right? Oh my goodness, look
at how big it is, my hand is shaking. – [Cameraman] How’d you find it? – It was just on top of
the plants, I saw it, it was about ready to
take off and I was like, (gasps) I don’t know if I got
the shot on the Go-Pro, just dropped it into the dirt, I just had to make
sure that I got it. I swiped down right on
top of those plants, got the plants, and got the
hornet at the same time. It is huge. Wow. I guess that’s why they
call it the giant hornet. Man, okay, well, we’re
starting to lose light, but we definitely still
have time to get the scene. Let’s hike back up this
way, find a flat spot. Yes! We have got the
Japanese giant hornet! Man! Ho yeah! (suspenseful music) There it is, the
Japanese giant hornet. And I would say the giant
is an understatement. Not since the tarantula hawk have we encountered a
more intimidating insect. Look at that beast. From its head to its thorax, down its legs, which end
in grappling hooked feet, and then of course, that
enormous pulsating abdomen. Everything about
this creature screams run in the other direction. Yet here we are, on the door
step of the executioner wasp. And what we’re gonna
find out today, is just how painful the sting
of this hornet really is. Now on the insect sting
pain index it only ranks as a two, can you believe that? On a scale of one to
four, this is only a two. Maybe its bark is
bigger than its bite. Or in this case I
should say its sting. Today, I’m going to be stung by the largest
hornet in the world. Alright, what we’re gonna do now is get a couple of
really cool B-roll shots, I’m gonna walk around,
address the Coyote Pack, and then, we’re gonna
enter the sting zone. (deep exhale) I am nervous. The Japanese giant hornet
is considered to be one of the largest stinging
insects in the world. This nightmarish creature is armed with a 6.25
millimeter stinger and it injects a venom
known as mandaratoxin in a high dosage that
can destroy tissue and attack the nervous
system of its victim. And while a single sting
is not likely to be deadly, over 30 people die
every year in Japan from taking multiple stings. (grunts) In most cases, these
deaths come as a result of anaphylactic shock. But no matter how
you break it down, this sting is
incredibly dangerous. (deep breath) That is a big hornet. That is a huge hornet. The biggest hornet on
the face of the planet. And I have a feeling
that the sting is going to be intense. Now it’s rumored that the sting
of this insect can kill you. Guys, a single sting
is not going to kill me unless I go into
anaphylactic shock. Now if you were to be
swarmed by 30 or 40 bees, and be stung repetitively, yes, there is a good chance
that you will die. Now I’ve also heard that
the venom is going to cook a hole in my arm. (deep breath) Not exactly looking
forward to that, but, it all depends on how my
body reacts to the venom. Everybody reacts differently, you guys have to remember that. So, I’m gonna go
through with this. I know a lot of you
are probably running to the comments section
right now saying Coyote you don’t
have to do this, you don’t have to do this, I do have to do this. We have climbed the
insect sting pain index, and this is the only
one guys, the only one that I think we just have to
find out how bad that sting is. It’s so big, it’s such
a dominant character throughout all of
Japanese culture, and certainly when it comes to
the insect sting pain index, I don’t think that we can
leave this stone unturned. So if you guys are ready,
I think the crew is ready. It is time to enter
the sting zone with the Japanese giant hornet. (deep breath) Here we go. (heavy breathing) Warning, never attempt to
recreate the following scene as a sting from the giant
hornet has the potential to be lethal. Alright guys, this is it, the moment that you
all showed up for. Now before we go
through with the sting, first let’s talk a little
bit about the safety. We do have an
epinephrine pen with us. Now a single sting from this
hornet should not kill me. However, like most stings, you can go into
anaphylactic shock. It just depends how your
body reacts to the venom. I should be just fine. I will experience
some pain, discomfort, potentially some pretty
extreme swelling, but I shouldn’t die
from a single sting. I do have my etymology
forceps with me, what we’re gonna do is get
the insect into the net and then I’m gonna
get it under control. Same way we’ve done all the
sting videos in the past, are you guys ready? – Sounds good, are
you ready to do this? – [Coyote] Here we go. – Alright. – Alright, net coming up. This is probably one
of the most risky bits, we do not want to
lose the hornet, and I do not want to
get stung too early. Okay I’m gonna
gently stand up here, put the basin of the capsule
at the bottom of the net, alright, and hornet is
going live inside the net. Let me get the platform out. Here we go, platform
is out of the net. And, come on guy, out you go. And, come on guy, out you go. Alright, hornet is out of
the capsule, there we go. (sighs) Okay, so I’m gonna
keep the capsule close, you guys know the
goal is to always get the capsule back
on top of the insect before it flies away, place that there
for just a second, and now it gets intense. I have to figure out the best
way to pick up this giant. I want to grab right onto
the back of its thorax behind the wings so
I have full control. Alright, you guys
got a good shot? Alright, I’m gonna slightly
have to maneuver myself just a little bit here. Ooo, it is not happening,
this is one angry hornet. Hold on, hold on, got it. (suspenseful music) Oh it’s turning,
hold on a second. (deep sigh) My hand is shaking. (grunts) Control your nerves Coyote,
control your nerves. My heart is racing a
million miles a second and I can’t keep my hand still, I’ll have grab onto
the insect, hold on. Ah, the hornet is actually
biting onto the forceps. (suspenseful music) Okay, I’ve got it, I’ve
got it, perfect hold, that’s what we want. (sighs) Wow, alright, everyone just
take a moment to soak this in, that is an enormous hornet. Look at its abdomen pulsating. You look at the mandibles,
those are used for chomping. I think I may also take a bite
during this video as well, which I’m kind of afraid of, and if you zoom in on the legs, you can see that they
have these little hooks, they almost look
like grappling hooks, and one thing that
also scares me there is the chance it’s
gonna latch onto my arm, and sting more than once. I can’t stop my
hand from shaking. I haven’t been this nervous
since the tarantula hawk. – [Cameraman] Sure
you wanna do this? – Yeah, there’s no
turning back now. Alright, you guys ready? – [Cameraman] Ready if you are. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
Japanese giant hornet. (suspenseful music) One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. (suspenseful music) (loud yell) Oh, the stinger’s
stuck in my arm. (loud grunt) (painful noises) – [Cameraman] How bad is it? – Oh man, wave of
dizziness really quick. (loud yelling) Oh, searing pain,
absolute searing pain. There’s where the stinger
went in right there, did you guys see how
slow the sting was? – I see blood. (painful yelling) Oh my gosh. (painful yelling and grunting) Oh my gosh. – [Cameraman] I know
it’s tough to describe, but you gotta
describe it for us. – Okay, okay, okay, okay. My hand is completely seized
up and locked in place. This is like the tarantula hawk, look at the swelling that’s
beginning to form on my arm, forearm is incredibly total, only about 45
seconds have gone by. – [Cameraman] Careful
not to go over this cliff edge by the way. Let’s move over there. – Back up, back up,
back up, back up. (painful yelling) – [Cameraman] You gotta tell
us if you’re in trouble. Are you gonna be okay? – When the stinger
went into my arm, I had this like wave, like a wave came over me
and I got super dizzy, almost didn’t feel
what was happening, and then the pain just
was like immediate, immediately searing. (slow motion yell) (grunting) – [Cameraman] Look at your
arm, oh my gosh, look at that, look at that. Wow, you are
swelling like crazy. He’s swelling up bad. (loud grunt) Hang on a second, let’s put a circle around
where the swelling’s at to see the progression of it. This is the outer, and then that is the immediate
right there. (loud grunting) – Oh man, not a two, far
surpasses the tarantula hawk. Far surpasses the
tarantula hawk. (grunting) Here, here, here, look at this, if I turn my arm sideways, look at the welt on my. (grunting) Okay, can’t touch near it, sharp shooting pain
if I touch near it. – [Cameraman] Wow. – Oh my gosh. – I [Cameraman] I can
see that your wrist is starting to swell, do you
wanna take your watch off? Need help? – I got it, I got it, I got it. Ah. (loud grunting) No relief yet. It’s just a matter of
harnessing the pain, controlling the level of pain, and, rolling around
on the ground and screaming at this point really isn’t doing me any good. Alright, let’s cut
cameras and come back in about five minutes. Let me get a drink of water. (suspenseful music) – [Cameraman] Alright man, well,
I can definitely see that– – [Coyote] Don’t touch it. – [Cameraman] I’m not,
I’m not gonna touch it. I just wanna show
everyone at home, the swelling has
completely gone outside of these initial marks, I mean, and I don’t think you’re
out of the woods yet, I think that’s gonna
swell a whole lot worse. Yeah, we are only 20
minutes in a this point. 20 minutes since that stinger went deep into my forearm. You can see the discoloration
in my skin there, the massive goose
egg that has formed, the venom has worked
its way up my arm. – [Cameraman] Can
you show us the lump, can you hold you arm up at all? Oh my goodness. Wow. – I’m sure you guys
wanna know how this feels as compared to some of
the other tops insects on the sting index. It blows the cow killer out
of the water, no comparison. It definitely trumps
the tarantula hawk. And we’re talking blood ant, I would definitely say that
at this point it is on par and in just one month, the episode you have
all been waiting for, the sting of the
executioner wasp will determine who the true
kind of sting really is. We’re gonna monitor this
sting for the next 24 hours, and see what happens, I can promise you this much, I’ve got a world of pain ahead
of me for the next few hours. Alright, let’s get an outro and get back down to
civilization, you ready? I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave, (sighs)
stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. Oh that was a bad one. (suspenseful music) The hours following
my brutal sting we’re some of the most
painful I have ever faced and my arm continued
swelling to nearly double its normal size. The trauma that my
mind and body endured, today seemed like a blur, yet when we look back, there is a strange
similarity to the scenario I faced with a bullet ant. Both insect’s stingers became lodged in my arm, and as a result they put me
with a higher dosage of venom than I had originally
intended to take. When I compare the
stings side by side, I am completely
honest when I say that the Japanese giant hornet is an overall more intimidating and overall more painful
sting than the bullet ant. Absolute searing pain. (grunting) – [Cameraman] You alright man? – Yep. There’s no question about it, through my personal experience, the Japanese giant
hornet ranks as a four on the insect sting pain index, and in this very moment, I consider it to be the most
painful sting in the world. But will it be able to
hold onto its prized title as the king of sting? Stay tuned, we all know,
what’s coming next. Hey Coyote Pack, are you excited for the
conclusion to my climb up the insect sting pain index? If so, learn more
about these thrilling and painful adventures
in my new book The King of Sting, it swarms into
bookstores November 27th, but you can preorder
your copy today. Look for the link in
the description below. And don’t forget, subscribe! Then click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on the next wild adventure. I’ve never seen this
species before guys, so we are actually going to
take it back to base camp, we’re gonna have
to look this up. (animal calls)

THE DYING COCKROACH BEGS FOR HELP


HELLO CAN YOU PLEASE HELP ME I NEED YOU TO FLIP ME OVER QUICK BECAUSE I BEEN LIKE THIS AWHILE AND IM HUNGRY I FEEL LIKE IM ABOUT TO DIE HURRY PLEASE I NEED YOUR HELP I PROMISE IF YOU FLIP ME OVER ILL BEHAVE I WILL LEAVE YOUR HOUSE AND NEVER COME BACK PLEASE TRUST ME PLEASE HELP ME HELP ME HELP ME I CANT BREATH I PROMISE I WONT COME BACK ILL TELL MY FAMILY AND FRIENDS NOT TO COME HERE I NEED YOU TO FLIP ME OVER PLEASE HURRY FLIP ME OVER SOMEONE PLEASE HELP ME MY LITTLE LEGS AND ARMS DON’T LET ME TURN OVER IM SO VULNERABLE THIS WAY PLEASE FLIP ME OVER YOU SEE I CANT REACH IM SORRY PLEASE HELP ME HELP ME IVE FALLEN AND I CANT GET UP IM FEELING SICK IM STARVING I MISS MY FRIENDS AND FAMILY OH NO HURRY PLEASE HELP ME HELP ME PLEASE SOMEONE PLEASE HURRY HELP ME FLIP ME OVER PLEASE I DONT WANT TO DIE I PROMISE I PROMISE ILL LEAVE AND NEVER COME BACK IM DYING PLEASE HELP ME IM DYING PLEASE HELP ME

The Cruel Fate of the Zombie Spider

The Cruel Fate of the Zombie Spider


hi and welcome to facts in motion Human zombies are still a thing of fiction, but in the animal world, mind control is actually more common than you might think. But unlike in movies where it’s usually a virus that turns people into the walking dead, in the real world parasites are the most common cause for this phenomenon one example of this parasitic mind control is found in spiders, more specificaly in orb weaving spiders of the genus Cyclosa one of the biggest threats these spiders face is a wasp species of the family of scorpion wasps a parasitoid wasp family that has adopted a very special strategy for reproduction while most wasps practice either mass provisioning, where all the necessary food for each of the offspring is stocked with the eggs in a small chamber, or a progressive provisioning where the larves are fed directly and continually during their development scorpion wasps instead inject the eggs into or on the bodies of living hosts this provides the larvae with a continuous supply of food until they’re big enough to pupate a few weeks later at this point, the hosts usually die and the larvae emerge, and begin their metamorphosis into adult wasps While each species of these wasps are usually specialised on a specific host, collectively, scorpion wasps use a diversity of different hosts with the most common being the larvae and pupae of butterflies, beetles, flies, and other flying insects. But what’s so special about the case of Cyclosa it’s not that the host is a spider, but how the spider is manipulated by the wasp larva and turned into a mind-controlled worker. After the larva spends a few weeks living and growing on the spider’s body and using its teeth-like structure to suck the spider’s blood, it is ready to pupate. At this point, the larva injects a substance into the spider’s body. What exactly the substance is and how it works is still unknown, but its effects on the spider are drastic. After the injection, the spider exhibits a significantly-altered behaviour. Instead of going about spider business, it starts to completely rebuild its web for the wasp like a mindless zombie. First, it removes all spiraling threads that makes the webs of orb weavers so appealing and are normally used to catch the spider’s prey. They won’t be of any use for the larva. The (?) of the webs, however, remain, and even get reinforced with additional strings and then decorated with special-fabric silk that reflects ultraviolet light. This warns away birds and some large insects from accidently flying into the web and destroying it. The improved visibility and increased strength of the web are very important to keep it intact during the larva’s two-week metamorphosis. When the spider’s finished building the perfect nest for the larva, it returns to the center of the web and sits inert, patiently waiting for its own death. With no further use for it, the larva kills the spider and sucks it out completely before throwing its empty shell off the web. Then, it settles down in the center of the web to spin itself a cocoon in which it will transform itself into a wasp within the next 10 to 15 days. The spider’s bespoke creations are, like researchers from Japan found out, not a completely new design by the parasites. Instead, the larvae were corrupting a natural behaviour of the spiders. Spiders which are about to moult bear a very similar one, called the “resting web” that is used as a temporary hangout during its two-day moulting process. But a web that lasts only two days isn’t going to cut it for the larvae, which explains why the threads the spider uses to construct the larvae webs were significantly thicker and tougher, requiring 2.7 to 40 times the breaking force to snap than the threads of a normal web. From an evolutionary standpoint, this makes it relatively easier for the larva. Instead of having to mind-control every step of modifying the sticky web for its needs, it just has to turn on an already existing behaviour program and slightly alter a few variables. How exactly the larva does this is, however, still a mystery. One theory is that the chemicals injected by the larva are similar to the hormones the spider produces naturally before moulting. And that this is what motivates the spider to start building the nest for the larva.

Animals Galore! Episode 5: European Paper Wasp

Animals Galore! Episode 5: European Paper Wasp


Salutations, my friends! I’m Luke Fleming.
On this episode of Animals Galore, we will learn about the first invertebrate
featured on this show; The infamous European paper wasp. This
particular wasp is named Pablo. He has been captured, as in America, he is a
harmful invasive species. These wasps are social insects, ruled by a queen that can
live for up to 12 months! They make their nests out of a paper pulp created when
they chew wood. The nests can reach a diameter of six to eight inches. Unlike
the more aggressive hornets and yellowjackets, paper wasps generally only
attack when they feel their nest is threatened. True or False: Wasps can only sting once. The answer is false. If you said true,
you’re probably thinking of bees. Wasps can sting multiple times, which is why
many people happen to despise them.

Bee waves at toddler that saved its life

Bee waves at toddler that saved its life


this is unbelievable
Abby has been filmed apparently waving at a toddler that saved its life nursery
school people Olivia hi I’m waved hello to the insect which she had just rescued
with sugar and water and was delighted when the insect appeared to return the
way it was the second time in three days the bee had been rescued by the
three-year-old and dad Sam – who were from Oswald whistle Lancashire young
Olivia was delighted and broke out in a massive smile when the bee lifted its
middle leg to wave right back at hear Sam 28 said it’s like she’s made a great
new friend and a couple of people have said it’s like a real-life b-movie it’s
really sweet on Thursday I went to pick Olivia up from nursery and we found this
B on the side of the road we picked it up and brought it home and fed it sugar
and water once it was up and running again we let it out in our back garden
Olivia loved it she was really invested in the bee and interested in helping it
I told her where are we giving it sugar and water to help it in she kept
repeating what I was saying then on Saturday morning she was outside
and she started shouting bee bee it was the exact same on we saw on Thursday and
he was not doing too well we brought it inside and gave it sugar and water again
and Olivia just started waving at it I was amazed when it started waving back I
thought I was seeing things Olivia was so excited and really loved
it when she saw the be waving back and carried on doing it it was a lovely
moment she looks at 4 bees a lot more now Darrell Cox senior science and
policy officer at the bumble bee Conservation Trust said it’s really
great to hear our future generation are so keen to help bumble bees there are so
many things you can do with children safely to further their understanding of
bumble bees and support this species

Please Please the Bees read by Rashida Jones

Please Please the Bees read by Rashida Jones


Welcome to Storyline Online, brought to
you by the SAG-AFTRA Foundation. I’m Rashida Jones, and today I’m going to
read Please Please the Bees, written and illustrated by Gerald Kelly. Benedict was a creature of habit. He liked to do the same thing every day. Every morning he woke up at the same time. Every morning he stretched. He scratched. He yawned a
great yawn. Every morning the bees delivered three
jars full of honey. Benedict ate the same breakfast he’d
eaten since he was just a fuzzy cub:
toast with honey and tea with extra
honey. Next came his daily routine: practicing, perfecting his honey cake recipe,
knitting, and running errands. At night he’d read then have one last
cup of honey tea before bed. Life was sweet. Until one morning… one morning
things weren’t the same. In fact, something terribly un-same had happened. There was no more honey. The bees had
gone on strike! Benedict’s breakfast wasn’t the same
without honey.
Without his honey tea, he couldn’t knit. Practice was dreadful. He didn’t even bother with the errands. Benedict became deeply discouraged. Just then he heard someone say, “Hey, you! In the fur coat!” It was a very small bee with a remarkably loud voice. “We need to talk!” said the bee. “Talk? Hmmph!” grumbled Benedict. “I let you all live in my yard. All I ask is for a few jars of honey.” “You should be grateful. Not go on strike!” “A few jars?” said the bee. “Buddy, we deliver three jars of honey to you every day.” “Every month! Every year! Do the math, Einstein!” “The hive is a wreck!” the bee continued. “It’s all we can do to keep the walls from falling in!” “The roof leaks. Wind blows through the cracks.” “The last three queens up and quit on us because of the lousy work conditions.” The bee showed Benedict the garden. “Look!” the bee said. “Weeds everywhere.” “We have to fly miles away just to find enough flowers to make our honey. So we voted to strike.” “You’re taking us for granted,” the bee declared. “You want honey? Things need to change. It’s up to you, bear.” And with that, the very small bee flew off. The thought of losing his honey sent a chill down Benedict’s spine. He had a lot to think about. “Maybe I’ve been too selfish,” Benedict said to himself. “I never thought about what the bees need.
But how am I going to make this right?” So he did some research. He did a little shopping.
And he did a lot of work. Benedict even learned how to harvest honey. “I suppose it’s a bit rude to expect them to do it all themselves,” he thought. Finally, he was ready to show the bees all the work he’d done. What would they think? He held his breath as he waited. Then he heard the remarkably loud voice of the very small bee… “DROP THE SIGNS, GIRLS! TIME TO GET BACK TO WORK!” These days, Benedict is still a creature of habit.
He still has his daily routine, but he doesn’t take the honey for granted anymore.
He knows his life is sweet… but now it’s even sweeter… for everyone. The end. I really enjoyed this book because it’s all about being able to live with each other, and respect each other, and give and take. Because that’s the best part about being in a community, is being able to live together and have everybody’s life be sweet at the same time. Thank you for watching Storyline Online.
Make sure to watch all our other stories. Keep watching and keep reading!

FIRE ANTS REACT TO THEIR FIRST MEALWORM | ‘NEWBIE’ FIRE ANTS

FIRE ANTS REACT TO THEIR FIRST MEALWORM | ‘NEWBIE’ FIRE ANTS


Ladies and gentlemen, meet the Phoenix Empire,
this 4 week old fire ant colony. Sure, they don’t look like much of an Empire at the
moment, but believe you me, these pioneering fire ants are set to become a great ant kingdom
of immense power and conquest! But in order to get there, the Phoenix Empire here will
need to be resourceful, work together, care for one another, and most of all, collect
all the right foods to nourish the queen and the growing colony! And so today, our fire ants are in for a treat,
as they discover for the very first time, what meat tastes like! Welcome to the AntsCanada
Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to the channel and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! They don’t know it yet, but today is a very
big day for these fire ants. They’re going to get a taste of meat, and even make their
first contact with live prey. Their reaction may surprise you so keep on watching until
the end. Within this test tube we have our humble team:
We have the pioneering generation of fire ant workers, known as the nanitics. The nanitics
work fastidiously, licking clean and organizing all the brood: eggs, larvae, and pupae. And
of course, giving birth to all these ants is the great and mighty queen, the sole egg-layer
of the colony. By the way, guys, our Queen here awaits for
us to name her. Please take the time to vote here for her official name, and I trust you
will make it a good one! Thank you, AC Council for your input. Now guys, look at how amazing this queen is.
Even with workers all around her, she still takes it upon herself to do her part, at helping
raise the young. Here she feeds this larva through trophallaxis, regurgitating what’s
left of her self-made soup, manufactured from her own body tissues. It’s kinda like ant
breast milk, but she’s definitely running dry on it now, as it pretty much substantiated
this entire colony into being. But I find it awesome that the queen is still working
even though she doesn’t have to. Another cool thing! See those little black
rock-like things on the cotton? Those are called meconia. They’re fecal pellets, excreted
by the larvae. So get this! Ant larvae don’t poop for their entire lives, except right
before they become a pupa. From birth, a larva’s food waste collects inside the larva’s body
creating a pellet, a meconium, which is excreted right before pupation, as a neat, compact,
slow-to-mold packet of poop. Can you imagine only pooing once as a kid right before teenagehood,
and it being so compact that it’s rock hard? Welcome to ant infancy, or should I say inf-ANT-cy!
Haha! Ok, moving on… Now the Phoenix Empire here is on a very important
mission at this stage. Their goal: to grow the colony as big as possible, as quickly
as possible! In nature, only the largest and fastest-growing fire ant colonies survive,
and to do that, they’ll need some serious food collection! Last week, we gave them their very first taste
of sweet honey, which the workers gobbled up and distributed to the entire colony through
trophallaxis. It was a beautiful moment to witness. Since then, I’ve been feeding the
colony bits of sweet jelly, which you can actually see through the semi-transparent
bodies of the larvae. Now although these sugary foods provide the
colony with all the essential energy needed to work hard towards their goals, what these
ants are really looking for now is meat! Protein will be the real game changer, and
help the colony truly explode in population. Protein helps the queen produce more eggs,
and helps the larvae grow much faster. And so AC Family, it’s time to give the ants
what they’re looking for. Let’s give them some prey! Behold! What you see here is what will be
the newest addition to their living space. It’s an AC Test Tube Portal from our shop
at AntsCanada.com, a very useful piece of equipment for feeding young ant colonies like
the Phoenix Empire. Though it looks complicated, it’s basically the Phoenix Empire’s new
feeding pit! I’ll need to plug up three of the four holes. And this last hole will
accommodate this test tube adapter with a tiny hole to act as the colony’s new nest
entrance. Don’t worry! You’ll understand once we’ve connected the ants to the setup. And now it’s time to move in their dinner!
This baby mealworm. It’s been pre-crushed to make consumption easier for the ants, and
hang on, all you guys wanting to see the bloodbath of a live mealworm feeding, don’t worry.
You’ll see what the fire ants do to a living mealworm in a little bit. So pre-crushing and splitting the mealworm
so its guts spill out increases the chances of the nanitics getting the goods. It isn’t
recommended feeding a prey item that might injure the nanitics, because at this crucial
point every worker matters and any ants killed during battle hurts the chances of colony
success. OK, so let’s unleash the ants! The plan
was to remove the cotton blocker from the colony’s test tube and attach the test tube
end to this test tube adapter. I did this as quickly and carefully as I could. Done!
Let’s watch! It took a few seconds before curious nanitics
began to wander out onto the bridge of the adapter and finally into the great feeding
chamber. The mealworm lay fresh in its juices. I am certain the ants could smell it. One brave ant steps onto the floor and makes
its way to the mealworm. Oop! The ant smells the carcass and at first shies away, but soon
starts to dine. Excited, it makes its way back to the colony leaving a pheromonal trail,
leading the other ants to the mealworm booty! It wasn’t long before word spread to the
entire colony and ants were all over the mealworm chowing down on the delicious mealworm guts. Back in the test tube, the queen and workers
were getting excited. I’m sure the queen was eager to have her first taste of that
tender mealworm meat! The workers eventually attempted to carry
back the entire mealworm to the nest, but they had problems manoeuvering the mealworm
so they eventually decided to just leave it there and dine on location. Hey, cut them
some slack. They’re noobs! Minutes later, the colony had all returned
to the nest and were busy distributing all the meat they’d consumed, regurgitating
it up for the larvae to eat, which I’m sure they loved! I mean, have a look at this larva
which continued to swallow well after the worker had fed it! And of course, our royal highness too was
fed by her loving workers. And just like that, the colony had consumed their very first protein
meal, which will offer the colony the building blocks they need to explode in population. Several days after this meal, the colony was
nursing a brand new bigger pile of brood: there were more eggs, larvae, and pupae now
thanks to the mealworm meat. More workers had been born. It was awesome to see the colony
so fruitful and prolific! Now if you’re wondering how the Phoenix
Empire would react to a living mealworm, yes, I tried it, but I knew exactly what would
happen. The workers cowered away. They were terrified of it and wanted nothing to do with
the moving mealworm. Again, these are noobs, and I don’t think the aggression so typical
of regular fire ants has kicked in at this point. I feel once the Phoenix Empire grows
in numbers, and this new generation of fire ants, which will be larger and more strongly
built due to being better nourished, will start to outnumber and replace the frail and
timid nanitics, we’ll start to see that savage fire ant aggression we all know and
love… or hate! I truly appreciate that a lot of you guys
seem to enjoy watching the evolution and progress of this fire ant colony from its genesis,
its humble beginnings. I really care about these ants, even if they’re not much at
the moment. Regardless, it’s great that we can watch together as this young fire ant
colony rises to become the mighty empire we know they’re going to be one day soon. And until then, I’ll be sure to film the
entire fire ant journey, and with your help, usher the Phoenix Empire to become the greatest
ant colony in the Antiverse. Thank you for watching! It’s ant love forever! AC Family, isn’t the Phoenix Empire awesome?
I think I laughed when I saw that the nanitics wouldn’t dare touch the living mealworm.
But knowing fire ants, that behaviour’s going to change real quick! So much is in
store ahead so if you haven’t yet, SMASH that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON now and
hit ALL so you get notified at every upload, because I believe notifications seem to be
broken but the Youtube support team is on it. Also don’t forget to hit the LIKE button
every single time including now. It would really mean a lot to me. Thank you, guys! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch some extended play footage of the Phoenix Empire
chowing down on their mealworm meat. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: What is the name of the process of mouth-to-mouth
food transfer in eusocial insects? Congratulations to Atlas Blue who correctly
answered: Trophallaxis Congratulations Atlas, you just won a free
Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: Why does an ant colony need protein? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free ebook handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to our channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and SUBSCRIBE
if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!