ALIEN or INSECT?

ALIEN or INSECT?


– Oh, oh, oh, oh! Guys, guys, guys,
praying mantis! Now one thing that I
love about these insects is look at that face, looks just like an alien
from another planet. (light jungle music) Pretty cool exploring the
countryside here in Japan, just scouting some location,
ooh, ooh, ooh, look at that! Oh no, it’s a dead
praying mantis, oh, buddy. Ah, I hate to see
when they’re dead. That stinks, there’s a
garden right over here. – Oh, oh, oh, oh! Guys, guys, guys,
praying mantis! Yes! I just saw a dead
one, this one is, this one’s alive.
– Cool! You wanna film a scene? – Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Definitely worth filming a
little segment with this guy. Look at that. – Let’s head right over here.
– Okay. – There we go, alright.
– Sweet! – Awesome.
– Wow! Good timing, rain is moving in. – Yeah, I think we only have
a few minutes to do this, but, yeah.
– Definitely worth getting a little segment.
– You know your mantis facts, right?
– Oh yeah, well guys, we’re just walking
down the road right now scouting locations and right
in the middle of the road is this beautiful,
green praying mantis. Now, we’ve featured praying
mantis on the channel a couple of times, but
never species here in Japan. Now there’s several different
species, that live in Japan, so we’ll have to look this
up to identify it properly, but we just can never
pass up the opportunity to get one of these insects
up close for the cameras and this one is being
incredibly calm, most of the time, they’re
trying to pinch me with those front arms
or trying to fly away, so we figured why not
get a quick little scene with this insect? Now, as you guys know,
all insects break down into three parts, the head,
the thorax and the abdomen, what’s really cool
about praying mantis is look how long that thorax
is just behind the head and then of course you’ve
got this large abdomen, which indicates that
it is likely a female, now the females do grow
larger than the males and as you may know
and if you don’t know, now you’re about to know, when the males and
the females breed, afterwards the females bite
the heads off of the males and eat the bodies, so it’s sort of a cannibalistic
sort of situation, but still pretty cool, I mean, these insects have
a very unique life process and after they lay their
eggs, they end up dying, so we are just at the
beginning of egg-laying season, so this praying mantis doesn’t
have too much time left, but certainly something
still really cool to get up close for the cameras. Now one thing that I
love about these insects is look at that face, looks just like an alien
from another planet, those big, buggy eyes, now they do have
incredible eyesight and as we know, praying
mantis are ambush hunters, because of their color,
they can stay camouflaged in all the plants
where they live and then they wait for
something to come close, lash out with those
front arms, grab onto it, crush it with those
sharp little spikes and then of course eat their
prey, what a cool creature. Now let me turn it like this, you can see on the back
covering the abdomen there, these are the wings and
praying mantis are capable of flying, usually only
for a short distance, they tend to want to
move from spot to spot, more so just by crawling
amongst all of the foliage, but if some predatory threat
comes into the environment, they of course can then
take off and quickly escape. You maybe ask yourself,
well, what would eat a bug, that’s as cool as
a praying mantis? Certainly birds,
different reptiles and even mammals will
take this species. Wow, isn’t he sweet? The one thing that I love
about the praying mantis is how inquisitive and
intelligent this insect seems, look at those big
eyes, always curious, always paying attention
to its surroundings and what you may not know
is the praying mantis are both diurnal and nocturnal, meaning that you’ll see
them active during the day, but also at night. Now the praying mantis is
an opportunistic feeder, meaning it will pretty
much take anything that it can grab on to, even
things bigger than itself, things such as small frogs,
even lizards and small snakes are capable of being
eaten by this insect. Wow, I absolutely
love praying mantis and people oftentimes ask me
what my favorite animal is and as you guys know, it is
the common snapping turtle, but when it comes to insects, the praying mantis has
always been the one, that I’ve been fascinated with ever since I was a little kid. Well, this is pretty cool,
walking down the street, scouting locations
and we happen upon the one and only praying mantis. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. Alright, there’s actually
a garden right over here, she was headed in
that direction, so let’s place her in there and hopefully she’ll find
some cool food to eat. Alright, back into
this garden you go. (light melodic music) – [Announcer] Hey Coyote Pack, have you enjoyed
watching Coyote’s climb up the Insect Sting Pain Index? Learn more about these
thrilling and painful adventures in Coyote’s new book,
The King of Sting. It swarms into book
stores November 27th, but you can pre-order
your copy today, just look for the link
in the description below. – [Coyote] Hey, Coyote Pack, if you thought this
praying mantis was cool, make sure to go back
and watch the episode, where one of these predatory
insects karate chop my nose. Ouch! And don’t forget, subscribe and
click the Notification bell, so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (light jungle music)

TOE-BITER! Giant Water Bug!

TOE-BITER! Giant Water Bug!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
I’m out here in the creeks walking around barefoot
and what do I come across? A toe biter. Ewww. (adventure themed music) Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh, you know
what I just found? You see that, right there? Okay, I am walking around out
here barefoot in the creeks looking for salamanders,
and we stumble upon this. Hold on, let me grab it
really, really carefully. Ugh, oh my gosh, eww. That is a Giant Waterbug. Also known as a toe biter,
because if you walk around in a pond or a swamp,
or in this case a creek and you step on one of these,
you’re going to get a bite that you’ll never forget. This is not something that
I want to be bitten by. Yeah, this is probably
the biggest one that I’ve ever seen. They can actually fly, but
they’re out here hunting around in the creeks for anything
that they can come across. I would imagine that
these can probably eat California Newts, some
of the other salamanders. They will inflict
a bite from this (dramatic guitar riffs)
Oh boy! He just grabbed me with his, his front pinchers there. Gosh, that made my heart jump. He will inflict a bite from
up front that basically injects a venom into
the prey and turns their insides to mush, and then they
drink it up like a slushie. This is one of the
most bizarre creatures that you’ll ever come across. The Giant Waterbug. Ewwww. Alright, I’m putting
him back in the water and I’m getting
my boots back on. Ya know, it’s all fun and games, walking around in
the creeks barefoot until you come
across a toe biter. I think for the rest of the day, these Keens are
staying on my feet. And, if you’re
out there watching and you’ve ever been
bitten by a Giant Waterbug you know exactly why I’m
putting my boots back on. I’m sure a lot of you
are saying “Ah, Coyote, “you didn’t let
that one bite you?” Heh, I’ll get bitten by a 50
pound Alligator Snapping Turtle but a Giant Waterbug? No thanks. Sorry guys. If you thought the
toe biter was wild, check out what else
we found in the creek. And, don’t forget, subscribe
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal sounds)

How Some Animals Engineered Air Conditioning

How Some Animals Engineered Air Conditioning


This episode is supported by Edx. Termites, prairie dogs, and people are all
great builders, each in their own way. And we all share one crucial problem. Put a bunch of us in a closed space, breathing
Oxygen in and CO2 out… and it doesn’t end well. Our tallest skyscrapers and deepest mines
are almost completely cut off from outside air. To keep those inside from suffocating, human
engineers use giant machines to bring in fresh air and pump stale air out. Termite mounds have the same problem. The largest are more than 10 meters high. On a human scale, that’s like a skyscraper
three and a half kilometers tall! Only instead of condos and offices, it holds
one big farm. The termites collect wood, which grows fungus,
that the termites eat. All that fungus and the millions of termites
that tend to it create a ton of CO2, which would suffocate the colony *and* their crops
if it builds up. To keep the air fresh, the whole mound acts
like a big lung. During the day, the sun heats the outer chambers
more rapidly than the core, moving air up the outside and down the middle. During the night, this current reverses as
the outer chambers lose heat to the cool night air. The whole time, CO2 and oxygen are exchanged
through tiny holes in the outer walls. What’s amazing is this is all constructed
without a boss. No central architect designing the structure. Just instinct and cooperation lets termites
build huge ventilation engines powered by nothing but daily temperature cycles. Leafcutter ants farm fungus on massive scales
too. One colony in South America covered nearly
50 square meters and was home to over 8 million ants! But unlike those towering termites, the ant
labyrinth reached 8 meters underground. So how do they ventilate their agricultural
city? Before we answer that, I want you to try something. Take a piece of paper, hold it under your
lips, and let the other end curl down. If you blow only across the top of the paper,
what do you think will happen? The force of the air hitting the paper should
push it down, right? Well watch this. Here’s what’s happening: Air is a fluid. When I force air across the top of the paper,
that stream pulls other air along, due to viscosity, which is like the friction of
fluids. This leaves an area of low pressure behind, and the paper is pulled up to fill
it. This is called the Coandă effect. What does that have to do with ants? Check this out. When a breeze flows over a hill, the air is
deflected over the top. This pulls air along too, just like when I blew over the paper, drawing air out of the ant hill along the
way. The ants build lower entrances nearby, where
air is drawn in to replace it, ventilating the whole colony with a little breeze. Prairie dogs get the same effect from their
mounds. Breezes over taller hills draw air through
the connected tunnel system, keeping the whole town breathing fresh. There’s even a tiny shrimp that uses this
same system to keep fresh water flowing through its burrows. Persian and Egyptian architects have used
similar structures to cool buildings for centuries, but tiny animals beat us to that technology
by millions of years Nature is full of species that build their
environment to suit them, countless expert animal architects. Sometimes, all you need to solve the most
complex engineering problems is the awesome power of evolution, …and that’s a breath of fresh air. Stay curious. Thanks to edX, our non-profit partner for
sponsoring this episode. edX.org is where you can learn for free from
Harvard, MIT and other universities around the globe. If you liked this video, you should go check
out Harvard’s Architectural Imagination course. Led by Professor Michael Hays, this online
course shows you how to look at architecture as an expression of culture as well as technical
achievement. It brings you closer to the work of actual
architects and historians through hands-on exercises and historic examples. edX.org offers university level courses in
everything from artificial intelligence to leadership, data science to robots and cybersecurity. There are even courses from my alma mater,
the University of Texas! edX.org puts a universe of free online learning
at your fingertips. Visit edx.org today and discover the courses
that will keep you learning!

Assassin bugs ambush spiders in their own webs


These lanky insects are called assassin bugs – and rightfully so They ambush their dinner by sneaking up on spiders in their own webs The assassin bug often slices through strands to take the most direct path to its prey, but scientists were stumped Now, a new study reveals how assassin bugs limit telltale vibrations Assassin bugs slowly grasp strands of web with their foretarsi, carefully pull them away from each other until they break, Then they gently release the ends to minimize any vibrations the spider might feel Researchers used laser vibrometry to measure the vibrations caused by this maneuver, and they were virtually undetectable— revealing how these bugs earned their name

12 Strange Insects with Real Life Superpowers

12 Strange Insects with Real Life Superpowers


Top 12 Insects With Shocking and Bizarre Superpowers Number One – Trap-Jaw Ant No known predator demonstrates a faster bite than the trap-jaw ant. The force of this snapping jaw can exceed 300 times the ants entire body weight. The jaw of this ant is so powerful that in the case of an emergency, it can launch itself backwards by pressing its jaw to the ground. Now that’s what I call a perfect emergency escape! Number Two – Singing Penis Bug The loudest animal on earth relative to its body size is the Water Boatman, also known as the singing penis bug. The Water Boatman performs a process called stridulation where it sings by rubbing its penis along abdominal grooves. The resulting melodies can be as loud as an orchestra and can reach up to 100 decibels. Number Three – The Orchid Mantis The orchid mantis often has a pinkish white pattern that makes it blend in with beautiful flowers, specifically orchids, hence its name. The Orchid Mantis which prefers humid and warm environments such as a rain forest, looks black and orange when it’s still young. However, as it gets older, its colors fade to match its surroundings. Number Four – Firefly The Firefly is known for its flashing light and its lantern is very complex. When the special chemicals found in the abdomen meet oxygen, the fireflies belly creates the light with no heat. This amazing light is used to communicate by creating perfectly timed, precise patterns to help find a suitable mate. Number Five – Hawk Moth Caterpillar A particular hawk moth caterpillar from Brazil, when threatened, pulls in its legs and head, inflates its thorax and exposes markings on its abdomen causing it to look like a snake. The brown head of this illusionary snake is actually the underside of the caterpillar. Number Six – The Cockroach Scientists have discovered that the brain of a cockroach contains nine antibiotic molecules that protected from veracious lethal bacteria. These antibacterial molecules are more powerful than the antibiotics we use today and can easily cure E Coli and MRSA, a bacterial infection more deadly than AIDS. Number Seven – Dung Beetle The Dung Beetle is primarily known for eating feces. The horned males of the species are very aggressive and known to fight head-to-head with each other for mates. Scientists found the Dung Beetle to be one of the strongest insects, capable of pulling 1141 times its own body weight. Number Eight – Bombardier Beetle When the bombardier beetle feels threatened, it has the incredible ability to fire hot mixture of chemical solutions strong enough to seriously hurt its enemies. This toxic solution can reach a whopping temperature of 100 degrees Celsius. Number Nine – Darwin’s Bark Spider The Darwin’s Bark Spider likes to build its web above rivers and lakes. It makes some of the strongest and largest webs on the planet and can reach over 80 feet in length. This creepy creatures webbing is stronger than Kevlar and 25 times stronger than steel. Number Ten – Ironclad Beetle The Ironclad Beetle is the tank of the insect world. It possesses the hardest exoskeleton of any arthropod in existence. You will likely need a power drill to get through its shell. Playing dead is another superpower of the Ironclad Beetle. They are so amazingly good at playing dead, that they’re being decorated and sold as living fashion accessories by Mexican jewelers. Number Eleven – Housefly While a flies eyes are immobile, due to their spherical shape and protrusion from the head, they give the fly an almost 360 degree view of the world. Flies can see the world in slow motion, sensing danger long before it strikes and they instinctively move out of the way. This means that sneaking up on one is next to impossible. Once the flyswatter comes into view, it takes the fly just 100 milliseconds to spot it and calculate the exact escape route needed to get away. Number Twelve – Voodoo Wasp This bizarre insect likes to lay its eggs inside a caterpillar. Once the eggs hatch, the larvae feed off of the caterpillars blood carefully avoiding vital organs. When mature, the larvae chew through the caterpillars thick skin while releasing chemicals that paralyze the caterpillar. They cocoon themselves to a nearby branch and the caterpillar now officially a zombie, becomes their bodyguard. It spins an extra layer of its own cocoon and guards the pupae from invaders. The caterpillar stays and guards the cocoons until it dies from starvation. While the Voodoo Wasp isn’t the only wants to gestate its young inside a living host and it’s not the only parasite to affect host behavior, it certainly is the first known insect to combine these two horrific tactics. Thanks for watching! Don’t forget to like and share this video and subscribe for more!

Bugs Eating Bugs Up Close | Insects, Bugs & Scorpions | Love Nature

Bugs Eating Bugs Up Close | Insects, Bugs & Scorpions | Love Nature


To all the different kinds of bugs that live here, the
forest is a giant buffet. (optimistic music) This giant grasshopper is a herbivore. It has the basic insect tool
kit, three sets of mouth pods. It uses sideways slicing jagged mandibles like scissors to cut up leaves. The other two sets carry jaungent
palps that taste the food, before the grasshopper bites into it. This multi-blade, Swiss
Army knife of tools, evolved from primitive legs and with a few minor modifications can be used to tackle many different
items on the insect menu. This African ground beetle is a carnivore. It hunts on the forest floor but it won’t be a high speed chase. It hunts slugs. These defenseless mollusks seem to just wait to get captured. The beetle’s mandibles have pointed tips, more like curved daggers
than scissors perfect for piercing the gelatinous
slug and dragging it off. (anxious music) The mandibles also serve as steak knives. Below the pointed tips, sharp blades chop up slight meat
into bite sized pieces. (eats loudly) Covered in slime, there’s
no elegant way to eat a slug but the little African
ground beetle is no slob, keeping it’s mouth parts and legs clean is vital to its survival. So after it finishes a meal it finds a napkin to wipe itself clean. This bit of leaf will do nicely. Grasshoppers and beetles
use the insect equivalent of knives and forks to cut
and then chew their food. This stealthy assassin bug
prefers to stab and suck. All three sets of mouth
parts are molded into a long sharp beak, or rostrum. Strong enough to puncture
the armor of its prey, in this case, a wandering cockroach. (foreboding music) The beak is hollow. When it pierces the
roach’s tough exoskeleton, it injects a deadly fast-acting poison which dissolves the prey from the inside. Then, with straw already inserted, the assassin bug slurps up
the gourmet cockroach soup. (slurping) This South African rock scorpion isn’t an insect, it’s an arachnid so it starts with a
different basic toolkit. One set of primitive
legs has been transformed into giant claws called pedipalps evolved to grab and hold the
prey using brute strength, though it’s a bit of overkill
on a little wood louse. (creepy music) Scorpions don’t have mandibles, instead, another much
smaller pair of claws, the chelicerae, reinforced
with heavy metals for toughness tear and shred it’s meal before passing morsels into it’s
mouth hidden from view. All arthropod mouth parts
started out as primitive legs but evolution as transformed
those basic jointed limbs into different structures,
from claws to straws. It’s just one of the reasons
for their incredible success.

STUNG by a TARANTULA HAWK!

STUNG by a TARANTULA HAWK!


– If the bullet ant
is the grand finale on my quest to find
the most painful sting in the insect kingdom, the tarantula hawk is
definitely the last act. And right now Mark is
shooting B roll of it inside this little
glass enclosure. And boy, it does not look happy. (intense buzzing) Now they say that the
sting of the tarantula hawk is number two on the
insect sting pain index. It’s like being
stunned with a tazer and they say it puts
you into a state of paralysis for
up to five minutes where all you can do is scream. As you can tell, we’re
pretty excited about this. – [Mark] All right Coyote. (deep breathing) You okay, man? Your heart racing? – A million miles a second. This is the most
nervous I’ve ever been to take a stinger
bite from anything. My hand is shaking. Are you guys all ready? – [Mark] Oh yeah, I’m
ready if you’re ready. – I’m ready, I’m ready. Here we go. I’m Coyote Peterson. And I’m about to
enter the sting zone with the tarantula hawk. – [Mark] Go for it. – One. (exhaling) Two. Here we go, three. (screaming) (drum beat) (roaring) I think we can all
agree that I have done some pretty crazy things. Like the time where
I stuck my arm into the mouth of an alligator, to show you why getting
an alligator as a pet is not a good idea. Ready, everyone ready? Rolling, GoPro rolling. Here we go. One. Two. Three.
(screaming) Ooh yeah, he is into my arm and he is holding on. Then there was the time
I put that same arm into a container full
of blood sucking leaches to show you what it’s like to be feasted on by
one of the world’s most notorious parasites. Look at that. They are all over me. Oh, I can definitely
feel something happening. It feels like sandpaper
grinding against my skin. You guessed it, they
drank a lot of blood. And it’s all about the
amount of anti-coagulant that actually went into my hand. I may be bleeding for
hours at this point. Oh yeah, then there
was that time I took a sting from the velvet ant. Which is ranked as
having the fourth most painful sting in
the insect kingdom. (dramatic music) (yelping) (groaning) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Like I said, I do some
pretty crazy things. But the reason I do
them is so we can learn about these animals, the dangers of their
bites or stings, and so that ultimately
we walk away with a newfound
respect for some of the coolest creatures on our planet. (screaming) Aah! (groaning) Oh that hurts. Ow! Ah! (screaming) Ah, can you see that? (deep breathing) Oh man, this was not a good
idea, ladies and gentlemen. Woo doggy. However, in order to be a
part of these experiments, I have to first get myself
up close with the animals. And sometimes that’s
easier said than done. – [Man] Careful! He’s gonna get it. I think he sees it. Oh. What happened? Go, go, go! (hollering) What’s wrong, did you catch it? – Yeah, I caught it. Oh, but the bad news is, I caught something else, too. – Oh my goodness. That is the worst cholla
spike I’ve ever seen. – Oh, hold on a second. Hold on, hold on, I
don’t wanna get stung by a tarantula hawk. – [Man] They’re
all over you, man. (screaming) – Hold on a second, let
me get this under control. – [Man] Oh my gosh. Did you get the
tarantula hawk, at least? – I did, I did, I caught
the tarantula hawk. – [Mark] You nervous? – [Coyote] Do I look nervous? – [Mark] Yep. – Yeah, guys, I am
the most nervous I have ever been before one of
these bite or sting episodes. As we know, yesterday I
made this awesome catch. I caught a tarantula hawk
and I was so excited. And then I fell into
a cholla cactus. (screaming) And then I realized
what I had done. I set the table for today where I’m going to be stung by a giant spider wasp. Now, the tarantula
hawk is the second most painful sting in
the insect kingdom. The only thing more
painful than this is the bullet ant and
I felt that to work my way up the rungs of
experiencing these painful insect stings, I kind of had to
see what it was like to be stung by a tarantula
hawk before I actually take on the bullet
ant challenge. Woo, deep breath. All right, let’s
bring in the wasp. Oh boy, this is gonna be bad. Oh. – [Man] Oh boy. – Oh my goodness. – [Man] That’s a big one. – That is the largest
species of wasp in the United States,
ladies and gentlemen. Now, you look at this insect
and you say to yourself, tarantula hawk, well
it’s not a tarantula and it’s not a hawk. But like a hawk they
hunt for tarantulas. What these females will do
is fly around in the sky and they can actually
sense chemicals in the air that will tell them where a
tarantula’s burrow exists. They will land on the ground, skitter across, and go
down into the burrow. They will use their front
arms to tempt that tarantula to come up out of its burrow. And that is where a
boxing match begins. The tarantula hawk will
dodge left and right, taunting that tarantula
until it rears up on its back legs and
exposes its fangs. Now, you would think that
tarantula is going to bite down and kill
the tarantula hawk. Not gonna happen. This hawk is so quick, she will spin her
abdomen up underneath the belly of the tarantula, insert that quarter
inch stinger, and the venom will
instantly put that tarantula into a state of paralysis. Now, the tarantula is not dead. It’s just like this. (groaning) I’m in intense pain
and I cannot move. And this, ladies and gentlemen, is where the true
horror story begins. It’s in a state of
paralysis and the female pulls the tarantula back
down into its burrow and there, she proceeds to lay
an egg on top of its abdomen. She then leaves the burrow and the tarantula is left there, still alive and in a
permanent state of paralysis. Eventually that egg hatches, and the larvae then
eats the tarantula while it’s still alive. How’s that for one
crazy horror story? Okay, so they say that the
sting from the tarantula hawk is so painful it
will put even a human into a state of paralysis
for about five minutes. I know what you’re thinking. Coyote, this is
absolutely crazy. Do you wanna know what
Coyote’s thinking right now? This is absolutely crazy. But I think if you
guys are ready, I am ready to be stung
by the tarantula hawk. Here we go guys. Chance, bring in
that butterfly net. I’m gonna lift this up. We’re going to actually
place the capsule inside of the butterfly
net just like that. Lift it up and I have a set of entomology forceps here. See that? And these have a very soft tip. I’m gonna be able
to pick up the wasp with these forceps. What I’m gonna do first
is reach my arm in there and remove the glass capsule. Once the glass capsule’s out, the net will fall
down on the wasp and I’ll be able to insert
the forceps in there, pick up the wasp, and remove it from the net. Okay, ready, here we go. – [Mark] The butterfly
net is here to try to prevent the wasp
from flying away. – Yes. [Mark] Because how hard was it to catch this wasp? – Extremely difficult. We’ve been trying for days
to catch one of these. And it was a very painful
experience to get it based on the fact that I fell into the cholla, okay,
ready, here we go. You ready? – [Mark] I’m ready. – I’m removing
the glass capsule. Trying not to disturb the wasp. Okay, this is good. – [Mark] Part one, successful. – Part one is good, I’m
gonna remove the stick. Stick is out. Okay, now I’m going to
fold this over like that. – [Mark] This is the
last little break between you and being stung, what’s going through your mind? (deep breath) – What’s going through my
mind is don’t get stung right now just through the net. I have to get it perfectly
with the entomology forceps. If I don’t get it
right on its thorax, we can’t make this happen. – [Mark] I don’t know, man, I think you’re kind of stalling. – I’m not stalling. Trust me, I’m not stalling. Oh boy. – [Mark] Careful. Oh boy. – Got it. – [Mark] Oh boy. – [Coyote] That is the
position that we want. – [Mark] Oh boy, okay, so we gotta hurry
up and do this. – That is a perfect
hold right there. Now, before, look how
much my hand is shaking. Hold on. (mumbling) Okay, we’ve got a
really good hold. – [Mark] Wow, look at
that abdomen going. – I got a really
good hold on her. It took me a minute
to get the right hold but the right hold
is what is important. Now, I do have the
glass capsule right here so I’m hoping that I
have the wherewithall after the sting to
quickly pick up the glass enclosure and put it
back over top of the wasp so it doesn’t escape
and we can get some more bebo shots with it. But, guys, do be aware
that if I do immediately go into a state of paralysis, just let the wasp fly away. Don’t try to grab it,
don’t do anything. It will be back into the wild
and everything will be fine. – [Mark] All right, Coyote. You okay, man? Your heart racing? – A million miles a second. This is the most
nervous I’ve ever been to take a stinger
bite from anything. My hand is shaking. Are you guys all ready? – [Mark] Oh yeah, I’m
ready if you’re ready. – I’m ready, I’m ready. Okay, here we go. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the tarantula hawk. – [Mark] Go for it. – One. (deep breath) Two. Here we go, three. (screaming) (groaning) – [Mark] You all right? (groaning) (screaming) – Oh my gosh! Ow! (screaming) – [Mark] Tell me
what you’re feeling? – I can’t move my arm. (groaning) (heavy breathing) That is the most intense
pain I’ve ever felt. Don’t think I can talk. (groaning) (wincing) – [Mark] Are you okay, man? I’m getting nervous. Are you feeling anything like, do we need to be worried? – No, I just can’t move my arm. I think I’m gonna cry. Coyote Peterson doesn’t
cry though, right? (groaning) It is, it’s like my arm
is in a state of paralysis right now. Aah.
(groaning) – [Mark] Do you need anything? – Right there. Oh wow. Oh wow. Aah. Argh. – [Mark] It looks like
your arm is swollen up. (groaning) – Oh, second wave of pain! (groaning) (heavy breathing) It’s actually receding
at this point. Ah, wow. (heavy breathing) That zone right there is
a hot, radiating pain. And you can see the stinger, where it went in right there, that red mark, I’ve read
that it’s like getting tazed with a tazer gun. I’ve never been tazed before, but I can tell you that the
pain is unbelievable right now. All up and down my forearm. Wow, I actually
slightly liken it to the gila monster
at this point, it feels really hot. Really, really hot. Ah, ah hot to the touch. Wow, it’s, push it, see if my arm is warm to you. – [Mark] Oh yeah,
it’s all really, it’s like really hot. – Oh, let me walk
around for a second. Oh. Ah. Okay, okay. Let’s come back
into the scene here. Ah, ah you little bugger. Ah, I am lightheaded
at the moment but the sting from the
tarantula hawk is serious. I can see why it’s
ranked as a two on the insect sting pain index. And at this juncture, I
think it’s safe to say that I have worked
my way up the ladder and I’m ready for the
bullet ant challenge. I know you are all waiting
in anticipation for that one. Trust me, it’s coming. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave. Stay wild, we’ll see you
on the next adventure. All right, let’s
let this go back off into the desert. We safely release
the tarantula hawk back into the wild
and as it flew away I think we were
all a bit relieved that this sting was
over and done with. And while the
impact of the sting and the intensity of the pain was far superior to
that of the velvet ant, it only lasted for
about five minutes. I had no major
adverse reactions, however, my arm was sore
for the rest of the day. And 24 hours later, it looked like a water balloon and it really itches. And I really shouldn’t
itch it but ah, that feels so good. The tarantula hawk is
an extraordinary insect. And while their
sting is powerful, they have no interest
in stinging humans. If you ever see one in the wild, admire it from a safe distance, as you have absolutely
nothing to fear. That is, unless you
are a tarantula. Have you ever wondered
how to properly care for an insect sting? If so, make sure to check
out this behind the adventure and don’t forget to subscribe so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. Oh, that may be the best
feeling I have had all day. (sighing)

Craziest SELF DESTRUCTIVE Animals In The World!

Craziest SELF DESTRUCTIVE Animals In The World!


From bugs that will detach a leg, to ants
that explode, here are 10 self-destructive animals…. 10. Leaf-Footed Bugs One of the main reasons animals purposefully
injure themselves is to escape danger. The Coreidae family of insects, more commonly
known as leaf-footed bugs, do this quite effectively, and it’s actually extremely common for them
to do it to save themselves. Their legs often get caught by predators looking
for a meal, and their hind legs tend to be highly decorated with enlarged femurs designed
to be used as weapons when fighting over a mate or against something bigger. When this isn’t enough, though, leaf-footed
bugs are able to detach their legs- a process known as autotomy. In 2016, a team of researchers collected samples
of nine different species of the insect and found that between 7.9 and 21.5 percent of
them had missing legs. This isn’t proof of autotomy in itself,
so they then took specimens back to the lab where they simulated a predator holding on
to a leg, and saw the bugs purposefully detaching them at the same leg joint. In some species, they found, it’s only the
females that have the ability, but in others, it’s both males and females that use this
as an evasive technique. 9. Crayfish Crayfish are a popular crustacean that are
eaten around the world, but for some, the idea of being on the dinner plate has led
them to extreme measures to get away. In 2018, a video went viral that showed a
crayfish as it was being cooked alive in a restaurant in China. It managed to get out of the water and onto
the side of the pot, before using its claw to sever a damaged limb, and then scuttling
across the table to its freedom. One of the diners adopted the crayfish and
gave it a new home in his aquarium. It’s amazing it survived the ordeal at all! This is, of course, an ability that Crayfish
use in the wild to escape predators or to remove parts of their claws that are no longer
able to function correctly. They are then able to re-grow their claws
over several sheds, to get one that’s almost as good as new. 8. Malaysian Worker Ant All species of ants work together for the
betterment of their colony- whether this be by collecting food, or taking care of the
new generations… But the Malaysian worker ant, that lives in
the jungles of Borneo, has developed a unique way of protecting the others- it can make
itself explode! The species has small mandibles and is unable
to sting, so predators may see them as easy prey. When the ants feel threatened they raise their
rears up as a warning that is filled with a poisonous sac. If the aggressor still doesn’t back off, a
few ants will bite down on it, angle their rears as close as possible towards it, and
flex so hard that their abdomens explode. This releases a bright yellow, sticky, and
toxic substance that apparently smells like curry. This will at least be irritating to the predator,
but in many cases will immobilize the victims and prevent them from causing any harm to
the wider colony. A powerful deterrent!! This toxic explosion also kills the ant who
sacrifices itself to protect its own. 7. Deer Mice Deer mice live across North America, and can
be found across a wide range of habitats- usually choosing to live high up, or in hollow
trees. They have multi-colored tails, and their overall
coloration looks deer-like, which is where they got their name from. They are fairly easy to keep in captivity
because they like to keep themselves clean. Because of this, they are regularly used in
laboratory experiments but are also known carriers of various viruses such as hantavirus
and Lyme disease. The rodents are important prey for animals
like snakes and owls, so have a defense mechanism seen in a few other mouse species- they can
detach their tails. It’s the easiest part of the mouse for a predator
to catch when chasing after them, and field mice are able to shed either part of their
tail or the whole thing. Following the detachment, a partial replacement
will grow to replace lost functionality, but the newly grown one will never be as strong
as its original. 6. Termite Tar Baby Termites are known for their love of chewing
through wood and, in some cases, even concrete…. Something that makes them responsible for
at least 5 billion dollars worth of damage every year in the US alone…. But there are a couple of things about these
insects that you might not be aware of. First is the question of what exactly a termite
is. For a long time, it was thought that they
were related to ants, but recent DNA analysis has shown that they are actually a type of
cockroach- which explains why termites and ants are often seen battling each other. Some species of termite also have an unusual
defense mechanism, known as autothysis. This is a form of suicide for the greater
good, that prevents invaders from causing further damage, and the termites do this by
releasing a tarry secretion. Often, termites will be overrun by ants, and
to prevent their advance, the soldier termites can rupture a gland in their neck, which causes
a very sticky substance to be released. If done within the tunnels of the nest, this
can block the path and incapacitate the ants, meaning that they need to find an alternate
route. It can even prevent any further attack on
the nest because many ants would perish in the attempt, and may decide it’s no longer
worth it. 5. The Brown Antechinus The Brown Antechinus is a small mammal that
can be found in eastern and south-eastern Australia- in regions such as Victoria, New
South Wales, and Queensland. They live in the dense undergrowth of forests
where they use fallen trees to build their nests and forage for food. They typically grow to up to an inch long
and have coarse grey-ish and brown fur. It’s because of their mating habits, though,
that this animal has become one of the most well-known self-destructive species. Females have a breeding season for about 3
months each year, during which they will birth one litter. Often, the females will die after rearing
their first litter, because they become more vulnerable to predators, but they can go on
to survive for two or three years. The males, however, will only breed once in
their lives. It’s thought that a combination of the energy
required to compete with other males for a mate in the first place, along with heightened
levels of stress, cause their immune systems to stop working. They all die in the 11th or 12th month of
their life by parasites in the blood and intestine or liver infections. This actually has an evolutionary reason behind
it because, for all intents and purposes, their genes have already been passed on and
are no longer needed. If they were to survive longer, they would
compete with the newborns and females for food, which would severely reduce the number
of youths that would make it to adulthood the following year. 4. Aphids Aphids live in colonies called ‘galls’ and
are another species that will, under certain circumstances, sacrifice themselves for the
protection of the others. Their main predators are ladybugs, especially
ladybug larvae who love nothing more than to gorge on the delicious aphids. This can prove to be a dangerous move, though,
because when they approach a gall, aphids start to pour out and attach themselves to
the invader by their jaws and legs. They then start to secrete large amounts of
waxy and sticky substances from their bodies, which quickly solidifies and glues the ladybug
to the plant… along with all the aphids. Eventually, everything that has gotten stuck
will die, and the colony will go on to live another day. It’s not just any aphids that exhibit this
behavior, though, as a study has shown that the ones that do this are ‘menopausal’. In other words, they are the elders of the
colony and no longer have the ability to reproduce. In one last act, they sacrifice themselves
to protect their offspring. Invading predators aren’t the only reason
aphids do this, either. Japanese researchers have discovered that
a species of gall aphid will do this when there is a hole in the gall. To prevent it losing its structural integrity,
aphids will cling on to the hole, secrete the sticky substance and turn their own bodies
into a patch to fix it. 3. Salamander Salamanders are lizard-like amphibians that
can be found predominantly across the northern hemisphere, from North America to Europe,
Russia, and China. They live in wet environments, with some species
spending their entire lives underwater, and some have vivid colorings to warn predators
of their toxins, which can be extremely potent. Warnings aren’t always enough, however,
and particularly when laying their eggs, salamanders may have to fight to defend themselves. If things don’t go entirely to plan, they
can surrender their tails to the enemy, which will continue to twitch and give them a chance
to escape. Luckily for salamanders, within hours of this
happening, the cells at the site of the wound begin to rearrange themselves, a cap forms
over the site, and then a new tail begins to grow. This process regenerates everything, such
as tissue and blood vessels, and even nerve endings. This ability isn’t reserved for just the
tail, either. They can regenerate virtually any part of
their body in the same way, even entire legs. One of the most curious things about this
process to researchers is how their bodies know exactly what to grow back. If a foot is missing, only a foot will grow
back- and this suggests some form of positional memory within the cells. They hope that by understanding this process
further, similar techniques could be used in humans to heal from injuries. 2. Ananteris Scorpions Ananteris scorpions are a set of 64 rare species
that can be found in South America. Very little is actually known about them,
except for their unique colorations and a behavior that seems surprising for a scorpion—it’s
ability to detach its own tail. This has been seen in 14 of the species and
is more common in males than females. When they are held by their tails they sever
the high up joints, which releases the tail and allows them to escape. The tail continues to twitch, reacts to contact,
and even attempts to sting. This is, however, a death sentence for the
scorpion. The immediate problem is that it loses its
ability to sting prey, and it’s much more difficult to find food. The other problem is that the part of the
tail that is detached includes part of its digestive system and its anus. This means that once the tail is released,
the scorpion can no longer defecate. They have to stick to small meals and are
only able to survive a few more months- which means they are able to mate again before succumbing
to their injuries. Dark stuff!! 1. Spiders Spiders are the worst nightmare for many people,
and the more you look into their behavior, the worse they seem to become! Take their mating rituals, for example. You’ve probably heard about some species’
cannibalistic tendencies, but things go way further than that. Female velvet spiders, for example, will regurgitate
food for her new hatchlings to give them some initial sustenance, before offering her entire
body to the newborns to feed on. Males have their own sacrificial reproductive
tricks, too, that ensure they are the ones to father the children. They have two organs used for sperm transfer,
known as pedipalps, which they use one after another during mating. Some species will break off these organs while
still inside the female, which forms a copulatory plug and prevents any other males from trying
their luck. Other species, upon using the second pedipalp,
will simply die- and hang off the female in an act which is also effective at preventing
any other potential suitors. Some spiders don’t go to such extremes to
attract a mate. Instead, they provide her with a nuptial gift,
such as severing their own leg for her to feed on. If the taste is to her satisfaction, she’ll
become receptive to their advances and be ready to make spiderlings.

Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look

Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look


Pill bugs…… roly polies….. potato bugs… whatever you want to call them, somehow there’s something less creepy about these guys than other insects. More loveable, or something. Maybe it’s because they’re not insects
at all. Pill bugs are actually crustaceans. They’re more closely related to shrimp and
lobsters than crickets or beetles. Pill bugs even taste like shellfish, if you
cook them right. Some adventurous foragers call them wood shrimp. As early as 300 million years ago, some intrepid
ancestor crawled out of the ocean, sensing there might be more to eat, or less competition,
on dry land.” But unlike lobsters, pillbugs can roll up
into a perfect little ball for protection. If you look closely you can see the evidence
of where these guys came from. Like their ocean-dwelling cousins, pill bugs
still use gills to breathe. True insects — like this cricket — use a
totally different system. See those tiny holes on this cricket’s abdomen? They’re called spiracles. They lead to a series of tubes that bring
fresh air directly to the insect’s cells. But pill bugs don’t have any of that. To survive on land, they had to adapt. Their gills, called pleopods, are modified
to work in air. Folds in the pleopod gills developed into
hollow branched structures, almost like tiny lungs. In a way, the pillbug is only halfway to becoming
a true land animal. Because… they’re still gills. They need to be kept moist in order to work. Which is why you usually find pill bugs in
moist places, like under damp, rotting logs. They can’t venture too far away. Sure, pill bugs look like the most ordinary
of bugs. But they’re much more than that: evidence
that over evolutionary time, species make big, life-changing leaps. And those stories are written on their bodies. Hey, while we’re on the subject of oddball
crustaceans… check out this episode about mantis shrimp. Their eyes see colors we can’t even
comprehend. Their punch is faster than Muhammad Ali’s. And while we have you: Subscribe. OK? Thank you! And see you next time.

English Vocabulary: Talking about BUGS and INSECTS

English Vocabulary: Talking about BUGS and INSECTS


Hi, everyone. I’m Alex. Thanks for clicking,
and welcome to this lesson on talking about bugs and insects. So in this lesson, I’m actually
going to get the help of one of my oldest friends. This is Steve the Spider. We’ve known
each other since high school. We were on the basketball team together, on the swimming
team together. He’s a heck of a chess player. And you know what? We lost contact for a long
time, but he recently found me on Facebook. And I thought, “You know what, Steve? I’m
going to do a lesson on bugs and insects. I think it would be really cool if you
helped me.” So here he is helping out, Steve the Spider. So this is a basic lesson on some of the vocabulary
nouns that we use to talk about different bugs and insects as well as some of the actions
associated with those bugs and insects. So to begin, we have caterpillars. And we
are going to focus on pronunciation a bit on this one, too. So repeat after me, everyone.
“Caterpillars.” Okay. So what do caterpillars do? Well, they make cocoons and become butterflies.
So here is a picture of a butterfly. Do you like that butterfly, Steve? Yeah? It looks
very nice, right? Okay. So here’s a picture of a caterpillar. They make cocoons, which is
the home of the caterpillar before it becomes a butterfly. All right? So caterpillars
make cocoons and become butterflies. Next, we’ve ladybugs. Here is a picture of
a ladybug. Steven has dated many ladybugs in his life. And ladybugs have black spots.
I think it’s the black spots that attract him the most. So they have black spots.
Here’s a ladybug — red ladybug with
some black spots on it. Next, we’ve bees. And bees can sting you.
So this little sharp stinger — it’s called a “stinger” — can sting you. Okay? They can
sting you. So you can say, “I got a bee sting”, or “I got stung by a bee. I was stung by a bee.”
And bees, the sound they make, obviously, is “bzzz”, so we
say, “Bees buzz.” Next, we’ve spiders who are cousins of Steve
here. Spiders make webs.” Steve has made many a web in his life, and he’s going to continue
making webs for the rest of his life as well. So if you’ve seen Spider-Man, you’re familiar
with spiders, and they make webs. Okay? Next, we’ve ants. The same pronunciation like
your aunt, which is you know, the sister of your father or your mother. Ants live in colonies,
so large groups or colonies. And here’s a picture of ants going to their home. This is
actually called an “anthill”, so an “anthill”. Ants live in colonies
and anthills. Next, mosquitoes. Mosquitoes can bite you
and make you itchy. So mosquitoes are the insects that like human blood. And you can say,
“I was bitten by a mosquito”, or “A mosquito bit me.” You can also say, “I have a mosquito
bite.” So if your hand is red and you’re itchy — “itchy” means you want to scratch. Scratch,
scratch, scratch. It’s because you have a mosquito bite. Next, fireflies. Fireflies glow — which means
they give light — and flicker. So when you think of “flicker”, thank of lights that go
on, off, on, off. Okay? So they glow — they give light at night — and they flicker. So
here’s a picture of a firefly giving light. And finally, we have cockroaches, which very
few people like. They have some uses, but — cockroaches have hard shells. So you know,
the back of the cockroach, the shell of the cockroach is very hard, which makes them crunchy
and hard to kill. Depends on the size of your boot. You would never hurt a cockroach,
right, Steve? No, I didn’t think so. Okay. So just to review, let’s do some pronunciation
of all of these insects one more time. Repeat after me. “Caterpillar”. We’ll use the singular.
One more time, “caterpillar, ladybug, bee, spider, ant, mosquito,
firefly, cockroach”. Okay. So if you’d like to test your understanding
of this material, as always, you can check out the quiz on www.engvid.com. And don’t
forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel. Did you subscribe to my YouTube channel, Steve?
Okay. We’re going to go play some basketball, so we’ll talk to you guys later.
See you.