STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)

Bushbaby Snacks on Insects

Bushbaby Snacks on Insects


(hooting of nocturnal animals) – [Narrator] But the flood
also creates problems. As it arrives, it isolates one
kind of small primitive ape on whatever termite island
they happen to be on. These temporary prisoners
rely almost entirely on the insects that the flood
forces to the high ground, and they do that with special adaptations. They have huge eyes that
are locked in position, so big, in fact, that to move its eyes, it has to move its entire head. (slurping, smacking) It’s effective, they can see and leap around a very complex
world in the high trees, and to help, they urinate on their hands for that extra stickiness. (chirping of nocturnal animals) Their tools work well for them as they navigate their
isolated tree-top realm. (very light eerie music)

Act Wild for Lord Howe Island Stick Insects

Act Wild for Lord Howe Island Stick Insects


>>The Lord Howe Island’s stick
insect was thought to be extinct until a handful of survivors
were discovered clinging to Ball’s Pyramid just
off Lord Howe Island. A single pair was
brought to Melbourne Zoo where the invertebrate
team managed to literally bring the
species back from the brink.>>So from the single pair that
was removed from Ball’s Pyramid in 2003, Melbourne Zoo has bred over 9,000 Lord Howe Island
stick insects to date. The size is quite remarkable
on these animals as well. An adult can weigh
anywhere up to 25 grammes. The young start out bright
green, and then they turn to a mottled green
and then brown. And that’s when they start only
coming out at night to feed and to mate and drink and things
like that in their glass houses that we have set up
here at Melbourne Zoo. [ Music ] The Lord Howe Island stick
insect hatching video that I did took me quite
some time, about two weeks to actually finally
get it in the end. It was just a matter of getting
some eggs that were close to hatching in that time, and
then the success was there. And next thing that you know I
am videoing this newly hatched animal coming out of the egg, and that was purely
amazing to watch. [ Music ]>>Lord Howe Island’s
stick insects, like some other stick
insects, are able to breed without the need for males. This is called parthenogenesis. When they do this, the offspring
will be entirely female and essentially clones
of their mum.>>The Lord Howe Island stick
insect was thought to be extinct for nearly eighty years. And the main reason for that
was in 1918 a ship ran aground on Ned’s Beach on
Lord Howe Island. It was stuck there
for nine days, and in those nine days ship
rats or black rats had escaped onto Lord Howe Island. And they found the Lord Howe
Island stick insect very tasty indeed. And by the 1920s, 1930s
they were presumed extinct on Lord Howe Island. We are now able to breed them
successfully, and we are able to transport lots of eggs
and young to other zoos and breeders around the world. Being an invertebrate keeper at
Melbourne Zoo, it’s very lucky that we have been able to hold
such an interesting species like stick insects, something
again that was thought to be extinct on the planet. What you can do at home is
to look after invertebrates. You can also keep
stick insects yourself. They are fascinating
animals to keep. There are lots of species that you can actually
keep at home as pets. And one day soon with a lot
of luck and support we hope to get these stick insects back to their rightful home
on Lord Howe Island. [ Music ]

The Billion Ant Mega Colony and the Biggest War on Earth

The Billion Ant Mega Colony and the Biggest War on Earth


In nearly every corner of the earth, ants wage war against each other. Their weapons are what nature gave them. Some have strong armor, deathly stingers, or sharp mandibles. And then there’s this
tiny and not very impressive ant, but it rules the biggest empire any ant has ever built. A colony spanning continents and fighting wars that leave millions of casualties. Let’s take a look at this unlikely warrioress, “Linepithema humile”
the Argentine ant. ♫ Kurzgesagt intro music ♫ This story begins in the floodplains
around the Paraná River, in South America, It’s a crowded ant megalopolis where dozens of ant species fight for dominance, including fire ants, army ants and the rather unimpressive Argentine ant. It measures only 2 to 3 millimeters in length and with its small mandibles, it’s surprising that it survived among its buff competitors. Their homes are equally unremarkable. Their colonies range from fairly small to very large
and could be found anywhere: Under logs, in loose leaf litter
or the former colonies of other ants. Here, Argentine ants prepare their most
effective weapon against their competitors: bodies. Most ant species have
only one queen to produce ants, while Argentine ants went all-in on numbers. For every 120 workers there’s one queen, laying up to 60 eggs a day. So their colonies grow fast and have millions or billions of individuals. Teams of queens and workers frequently branch out and found new colonies. But this strategy has a downside:
As colonies grow and produce a lot of offspring, mutations occur and new colonies adapt to new environments. Their DNA slowly changes from generation to generation and differences accumulate. So after a while the ants that left the colony will become more like distant cousins and start to compete with their mother colony. In their native South American range, this is how Argentine ants behave. Within their colonies they are very cooperative
and well-organized, but they fight vicious wars against other Argentine ant colonies and other ant species With equally strong opponents on every side, the Argentine ant became extremely
aggressive, fighting for every inch of ground. But it could never dominate its neighbours…
until humans showed up. We did what humans do and transported things around the world by ship. On one of them, a few Argentine ant queens hitched a ride as stowaways from South America to Madeira and New Orleans. The Argentine ants suddenly found themselves in a strange world. Instead of being surrounded by deadly enemies, they found only victims ⁠—
nobody could fight them effectively. Because only a few Argentine ant queens
were introduced to the outside world, the resulting colonies had very low genetic diversity. On top of that, the introduced Argentine ants kill up to 90% of their queens every year. Fewer queens, less genetic variation. So, as these colonies spread across the landscape, ants that left the colony were no longer
considered distant cousins. As a result, the new colonies form not opposing but cooperating parties called “supercolonies”. This is a very uncommon
strategy in the ant kingdom, only a few of the 16,000 ant species have evolved supercolonies. A supercolony was established on the
West coast of the USA and became a base for the tiny ants’ global conquest. Today, the Argentine ant inhabits the Mediterranean zones of six continents and many islands. This one supercolony was especially successful, establishing sister locations in California, Europe, Japan, New Zealand and Australia, forming one massive intercontinental megacolony of Argentine ants. This makes them the largest society on Earth,
more numerous than even the human one. But their success has changed the ecosystems they invaded. California is a perfect example of this. In their greed for more territory, the invading Argentine ants have overrun and replaced 90% of the native ant species, including several species of Californian carpenter ants. Although carpenter ant workers are giants, their colonies have only between 3,000 and 6,000 individuals and stand no chance against an expanding supercolony of billions of Argentine ants. Argentine ant workers attack by wiping toxic chemicals on their victims which irritates the enemy and marks them as a target for other Argentine ants. When they attack, the Argentine ants wash over their victims, clinging on to their opponents in groups
and pulling apart their limbs. It doesn’t matter how many of them die ⁠—
there are always more. Once the colony is overrun and exterminated, the Argentine ants feed on their victims brood and take over their home and territory. The Argentine ants’ numbers allow them to hunt down and devour such an excessive mass of different insects that over time some species disappear
from the ants’ territory completely. Argentine ants don’t care about working
with the local flora and fauna, they consume them and move on. And, if their next stop happens to be human property, they will rudely make themselves at home there too. They forage in dumpsters, bowls of pet food and sneak into kitchens to claim leftovers. Not just our homes: our gardens and
fields are also impacted by Argentine ants, since they tend to hordes of aphids as their cattle. The aphids feed from plants and produce a sweet honeydew, which they trade with the ants for protection. Since the ants have no major enemy to fear in their new homes, the aphids thrive and ultimately kill the plants they live on. So, on top of being a major disruption
for the ecosystems they invade, they are also a huge pest for agriculture. But the rule of the Argentine ant is being challenged. Parts of the super colonies have broken off and become their own empires. A merciless civil war has broken out. For example, the Lake Hodges Supercolony has been fighting against the Very Large Colony for years in San Diego County. A massive war is going on over a dynamic front line stretching over kilometers, an estimated 30 million ants die here each
year. On other fronts, an old acquaintance from the Parana River has risen from the shadows Red imported fire ants, which were accidentally introduced from their
old home to the coast of Alabama, Not only are the red fire ants fierce fighters
and more than able to deal with the Argentine ant, they are also able to form
super colonies themselves. Now the old wars from their distant home have been
taken to a foreign battleground. In the southeastern US the super colonies
clashed fiercely. The Argentine ants found themselves outgunned by the fire ants. The fire ants major workers are more than twice the size of the
Argentine ants and wield venom-injecting stingers, even though the Argentine ants
fought fiercely, the fire ants were too much for them. After countless lost
battles the red imported fire ant exterminated the Argentine ants super
colony from much of the southeastern US. This is one territory lost but the
Argentine ants will fight on. This amazing network of cooperating super
colonies is the biggest success in their history. And they’ll not give it up because of a small defeat. They will stand their
ground against any enemy that might arise. No matter if it’s on the Paraná River or on one of the large battlefields across the world. ♫ Background music winds up ♫ These videos were developed with the support of ‘Curiosity Stream’, a subscription
streaming service with thousands of documentaries and non-fiction titles. Kurzgesagt viewers can visit curiositystream.com/kurzgesagt to get a free 31-day trial to watch films like “Big World in a Small Garden”, a
documentary that takes a close look at the world of insects around us or other
documentaries by the likes of Stephen Hawking, David Attenborough, and many more, all available for offline viewing. Once your trial is over, the subscription
is only 2 dollars 99 a month. Curiosity Stream was founded by the same people
who started the Discovery Channel, with documentaries, spanning science, nature,
history, technology and lifestyle. It’s a great way to binge watch fun videos while accidentally learning things. Thank you so much to our friends at Curiosity Stream for supporting our ant’s obsession and making ant-bitious projects like this
possible, stay tuned for part three and visit curiositystream.com/kurzgesagt for your free trial. *Kurtzgesagt duck quacks while floating through space*
♫ Outro music ♫

LET’S BUILD ANT NEST!

LET’S BUILD ANT NEST!


As promised today, we are building nest for the ants. In case you need a reminder this is the lasius niger colony, and I have seen comments from people that are telling me that it is in fact not pronounced “ni-ger”, but “ni-jer”. But no, that’s not the case if you are using the Latin pronunciation that it is pronounced “ni-ger” not “ni-jer”, and I know that niger also means something else. But if someone thinks that it is offensive to pronounce the niger just because of that other word and is ridiculous and the fact is It’s not the word that is offensive. It is what you mean behind that word, that is what should offend other people not the word itself. Words should be harmless, thoughts on the other hand that’s the other part. Also I saw a lot of comments of you asking me to do natural Outworld for them, and of course I will do that but the reason why I’m keeping them in this plastic tub for now because I wanted the colony for grow because having a small colony in a big Outworld it’s really not ideal. So first we will make the outworld Brick and then once they actually transfer their colony inside We will make an outworld for them, more natural outworld, and that will be some other video. So the things you need for this type of nest. This will be the first time that I am doing this. So this is not a straight how-to video by now most of my knowledge I already shown in the video so everything new that I’m doing it is just me learning new stuff and at the same time you learn from my success or mistakes or whatever. We all learn together That’s the point so the stuff needed white on brick plexiglass sheet some tubes And that is all for materials, now the tools that you need You need the silicone, silicone that is safe for aquariums That’s the best way for you to find the silicone just make sure that it is good for Aquariums because then that means that it doesn’t contain Fungicide, you see Fungicide fungicide you want this sign or just written aquariums something like that you will need some sandpaper Drill with drill bit that it is big enough for tube actually, it should be the same size and What else? You need scalpel, I mean cutting knife for cutting the plexiglass you can also Cut it with a jigsaw or circular blade. Whatever you have I will also need something like this so I can Trace the knife. A pen so you can draw the nest Scissors for cutting the pipe why tongue is really soft material so for carve it the best thing to use is the flat screwdriver Unfortunately you put different kinds of bits on this screwdriver But unfortunately all of them are in the new space, so I don’t have that but I will use some other stuff Don’t know how that will work, but we will see and that is basically it, so let’s draw the nest first first First I will draw well where my pipe will go I mean tubes also watering holes and from there just Be creative, I guess I don’t know whatever works. I guess so now we need to carve that actually I will extend these tunnels I I just don’t know how easily I will be able to carve it. I actually have the This type of screwdriver you see it is not flathead but It should also work and before making a huge mess. I will do that inside of this tub. Let’s carve! Actually, let’s do a time lapse of that. This was a fun trip you see I didn’t really I don’t know I guess it is fine It’s not a big colony, so it should work. Maybe I should show it on this camera better now you see we have this big chamber and this even bigger chamber or the two entrances and This chamber and this tunnel I don’t know it should work out. Now, I will drill it and then I will need to connect these two tunnels with the drill tunnel hopefully the brick won’t break, brick won’t break. Oh yes, and I figured out that this flat knife for food was the best for carving at least from stuff that I have here Let’s do this. *drill* *Drill* *DRILL* *AND STAHP* Okay. One hole, second hole *drill* *Drill* *DRILL* *DRILL!* *DRILL BABY DRILL!* *AND STAHP* This is really easy to drill. Now I will just drill here to connect the holes and here Yeah, the tunnels are connected See? Have nice tunnels now I also need a watering holes. I will use this a bit narrower drill bit just to measure so I don’t go too far I need to put something to mark it. You don’t want to drill through the brick, so it is good to know how deep you can go There we go we got holes all the holes that we need now I need to sand the surface for that I have this, but I’m not sure if that will work here You’ll see With that done I’m going on my balcony to blow all this dust Because it needs to be super clean before you use the silicone to connect the plexiglass All clean now we need to cut the plexiglass to size, so let’s We will measure that I dropped it. I will use this for straight line Oh,this is super dull look it broke in super weird way This is the easiest way of cutting the plexiglass if you don’t have any other tools the cheapest way You see it just snaps we need to Apply silicone along all these edges, so it will hold the plexiglass and ants won’t be able to crawl outside you need to be aware that silicone is not the ideal of thing ideal way of connecting the Plexiglass because it doesn’t hold it that well. It will work here, but you need to be aware of that You can easily pull it off if you apply enough force so you need to be careful But if you don’t mess with it it will work. Just fine, so just apply a bead of silicone Make sure you do the full circle and that there are no gaps between the silicon remove the protective layer and just Put it on top Press really good So everything sits nice and tightly and just visually check that There aren’t any gaps you see all the silic nature if you will be able to see it on the video but all the silicon is Connected in one big circle there aren’t any gaps that’s important remove all the Excess silicone or you can just leave it to dry and cut it later it is up to you now before we let it dry One last step we will need the tubes so take two tubes Or as many holes you made under on the white tongue and cut it to the size that you like Make sure that you have tubes that you can connect like these two you see I can make the connection So when you want to extend it to another out world or wherever you can always connect the tubes like this That’s also important, so I will just put Small amount of silicone small amount on silicone and smear it across the tube tube one Tube two and now in theory it should just go inside Yes perfect This is why you want your drill bit to match not too big not too small But the same size, and now we just need a bit more silicone to make sure that there is no there are no any gaps There we go all the silicone work is done now We need to let it cure and also I will need to drill holes here for the syringe So just tiny holes that fit my syringe, and that’s it, but I will do that once this is cured Yeah, that will work There now we will let cure for 24 hours, and we are back let’s see how it looks I mean it should look completely the same, but anyway here is the tubes are set The front lid is set now as I said to drill the holes But first just finished feeding the tarantulas, and I have a lot of molts on and aromatisse molted Ascunta golata sling This is if you tell Amira molted that is really cool hmm Which one was this the seriously forgot what species this was Alright so this one is hero, bra He’s Vietnam blue, and this was and this is lost Eudora defeats Alice. How can I forget so quickly? Funny back to the nest to drill the holes now I already prepared small drill bit as I said this will be just for just for the syringe And now to fill the less protective layer with this Now it’s all nice and clear now to attach it with this Outworld first. We need to make holes I mean one hole on this out well Cut the pipe for For the out round and small parts of this pipe that I will use to connect pipe from out rod with the pipe from nest Like that now I will drill hole somewhere here oh I blew it I blew it This was really sloppy look what I’ve done That was such an amateur mistake, but oh well it happens Now you see these two are connected and now I will silicone this part Just to be sure that it is sealed and connected properly. I’ll actually Take this this fresh test you that I made the last last video This will be their water source not really that practical though, maybe I should just leave it in the enclosure And while I’m silicon this we have first end Going through the tube, but he’s going back. He didn’t went too far. Okay now This is silicon and I should fix the tubes then I messed up you see what I did total chaos oh We have second dent, but he’s also going back So let’s now wait for the first ones to go through I wonder how much time will that take or now they are just Figuring out what the hell is that tube and why it’s here, no is this one going in Yes, no Going oh I Guess we need to give them time now, but Everything is set up look at this. I didn’t even notice. I don’t know how far he went, but he’s heading back now Or not. He can’t reload this idea. He’s going back. Oh look another one. What is this? They were inside after all so again soon one will reach the colony. Let’s just wait and see who will it be although I don’t think that we will be able to recognize it later what I wanted to do. What are the white tongue? I’m not sure if I know how to do this. I guess they just pour inside I Guess the tip where is the expedition now I’ll just put the camera here and wait for them No we had one enter here we see it we had one look at it the Explorer first one to explore the new nests Awesome I always forgot to mention the name of this car They are called and like this It was the name suggested by one of the subscribers and all of you pick that one So yeah now the end plant is got its brand-new nest so what I need to do I need to shine bright light here and cover this nest and Eventually they should move everything in this new nest in theory they should move But I noticed that they are really tolerance to light. They don’t really care, so I guess this was all for this sweet Deal we have two new one came inside and the other left funny. So this was all for this video I hope you enjoyed it if you did thumbs it up and comment something if you want to support this channel even more there is A patreon page if you’re new to this channel make sure shows so make sure to subscribe apple every Monday, Wednesday and Friday See you again soon, right?

The World’s Most Dangerous Ant  – Bulldog Ants – One Minute Nature Show

The World’s Most Dangerous Ant – Bulldog Ants – One Minute Nature Show


Native to Australia, bulldog ants are some
of the meanest insects alive and, according to the Guinness Book of World records, the
world’s most dangerous ant. I mean, just look at this thing! Those jaws are terrifying! But that’s not all. They’re highly aggressive, have a venomous
stinger on their butt, and some species can even jump! So you really don’t want these critters in
your home. While bullet ants have the most painful insect
sting, there are no records of bullet ants killing people. However, the same can’t be said for bulldog
ants. Between 1980 and 2000, six people died from
bulldog ant stings. That’s because bulldog ant venom often causes
severe allergic reactions. The venom is potent, but the allergic reaction
is deadly. But that’s all for now, so tune in next time
for another episode of One Minute Nature Show!

This Killer Fungus Turns Flies into Zombies | Deep Look


We like to think we’re in control … that
our minds are our own. But that’s not true for this fruit fly. Its brain has been hijacked by another organism
and it’s not going to end well. It all starts when the fly is innocently walking
around, sipping on overripe fruit. It picks up an invisible fungus spore, which
bores under its skin. For a few days, everything seems normal. But inside, the fungus is growing, feeding
on the fly’s fat … and infiltrating its mind. At dusk on the fourth or fifth day, the fly
gets a little erratic, wandering around. It climbs to a high place. Scientists call this behavior “summiting.” Then it starts twitching. The fungus is in control. The fly sticks out its mouthpart and spits
out a tiny drop of sticky liquid. That glues the fly down, sealing its fate. A few minutes later, its wings shoot up. And it dies. Now that the fungus has forced the fly into
this death pose … wings out of the way … nothing can stop it. It emerges. Tiny spore launchers burst out of the fly’s
skin. Hundreds of spores shoot out at high speed,
catching a breeze if the fly climbed high enough. They’re the next generation of killer fungus. It continues for hours, spores flying out. These flies are in the wrong place at the
wrong time. And if spores land on a wing, which they can’t
bore into, they shoot out a secondary spore to increase their chances of spreading. So how does a fungus take control of a brain? At Harvard, Carolyn Elya is trying to understand
that. She thinks the fungus secretes chemicals to
manipulate the fly’s neurons, maybe stimulating the ones that make flies climb. But don’t worry: The fungus can’t hurt
humans. Scientists have tried to harness its power
for our benefit, to kill flies in our kitchens and farms. They haven’t had any luck though. The deadly spores are actually pretty fragile
and short-lived. It turns out, this lethal puppet master does
only what it needs to for its *own* survival. Hi, it’s Lauren again. If you love Deep Look, why not help us grow
on Patreon? We’re raising funds to go on a filming expedition
to Oaxaca, Mexico. And for a limited time, we’re sweetening the
deal with a special gift. Link is in the description. And if you’re craving more spooky videos,
here’s a playlist of our scariest episodes. Don’t watch ‘em after midnight. See you soon.

STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)