My Amazing WEAVER ANTS | The Coolest Ants You Ever Did See


Greetings, ant lovers! Welcome to another episode of the AntsCanada
ant channel, a mid-week episode to help you get through your hectic week! Today we look at my extremely interesting
colony of weaver ants, we call on the channel the Emerald Empire. They surprisingly decided to start nest building
this week, so I felt it was a perfect opportunity to create a video on their latest activities! So, if you’re new to my videos, first off
welcome to the channel! Now, the Emerald Empire here is my pet Asian
Weaver ant colony, known scientifically as Oecophylla smaragdina. They are easily the most unique ants I’ve
ever owned because of their nesting behaviours. These ants create huge basket leaf nests in
trees and shrubs. Can you imagine ants that don’t nest in the
ground like most typical ants, but rather that create nests above you in the tree tops? What you see here is that awesome process
now. Every now and then as the ant colony expands
and grows too large for their current nests, the colony will decide that it’s time to either
expand their current leaf nest, or build a new leaf nest. The Emerald Empire here had decided it wanted
to do both. Check it out! This here is their main nest but they’ve decided
to expand with a few leaves pulled in, extending the nest more rightwards. That will be some awesome new space for them,
I think. And guys, if you look a bit further down…
there! You’ll see where they’ve decided to nest build
their next leaf nest! Check this out! Whoa! Ain’t that just awesome, guys? I just love watching them build during this
nest-building process! Now, check out how awesome and organized the
process of nest-building is for these weaver ants! Basically, they divide the tasks up. First, you have workers that act as “brace
ants”. Essentially, workers who bite down on one
edge of a leaf and cling on with their back legs to the edge of another leaf, and in unison
they pull these leaves together. These ants have the hardest jobs because imagine
for a small ant, how much force and strength it would take to literally bend leaves many
times your size in unnatural positions and hold them there until the other workers bind
them in place. It’s mind-boggling when you think of it. And while the leaves are braced together,
that’s when a second team of weaver ants come in. The gluers! Workers use special silk produced from their
larvae to glue these leaves together. This is how weaver ants get their name. It’s kinda like a seamstress going in and
weaving a quilt together, with leaves being the quilt patches. Once this silk dries, it forms a strong, waterproof
wall, strong enough to keep the leaves in position. Now all this energy and work doesn’t come
without a price. This extra work for the colony requires more
food to power their activities, as well as help the larvae produce the extra needed silk. So, there are ants in charge of food collection. Here, some workers have managed to capture
a baby roach nymph, which they hunted at ground level. The Emerald Empire actually shares their home
with a colony of Dubia roaches, and this baby roach will provide a lot of great protein
and nutrients for the colony’s larvae to produce extra silk. They’ve actually been preparing a head of
time and gathering extra roaches days in advance, as you’ve seen in our last episode. Many ants are also at the sweet food station,
gobbling up as much sugar as they can get. Carbs will help the colony work and give them
the energy needed to pull off these huge operations. The rest of the ants simply stand guard with
jaws wide open, to attack any creature or predator that might find this vulnerable time
for the colony to move in and attempt to disrupt their nest building. They should be done all the nest building
by tomorrow. Now, aren’t these weaver ants some of the
coolest ants you ever did see? I think so. The fact that the ants nest build in perfect
synergy like this just blows my mind, and that of biologists, too. We’re not sure how the ants decide who does
what job in this massive cooperative push, but we guess it’s simply the ants communicating
via pheromones what jobs need to be done and in what amount, and at what times. It’s collective ant intelligence at work,
and now you’ve seen it in action. If you wanna watch more of the weaver ants
building their nests, to the sounds of some relaxing music, just click here! It’s a hidden video specially made for you,
guys who’ve watched the video this far. So, thank you, guys for watching! We’ll see you again with another episode this
weekend. It’s ant love forever! Hope you can SUBSCRIBE to the channel, as
we upload a new video on ants and other creatures every Saturday and for now Wednesday, at 8AM
EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more, particularly if you want
more of these mid-week episodes. It’s ant love forever!

The Most Venomous Tarantula in the World

The Most Venomous Tarantula in the World


Speaking of making new terrariums, it just
so happens, another beast has been waiting in the shadows for you all to meet her. Yes, we have a new addition to our ever-growing
AC Antiverse, and she’s one of the most dangerous animals to ever reside in the Ant Room. AC Family, I can’t wait to show her to you. The Nucleus: our creational furnace from which
shall be born epic populations of the needed soil biota for future terrariums. Inside this rather simple glass tank we have
various creatures and microorganisms needed for composting waste products in our terrariums. In the process, they also produce nutrients
for plants. This week AC Family, I’m happy to announce
that we will make our first harvest of bio-active soil culture from the Nucleus to bioactively
jump start a new magnificent creation of a world. Such hardworking creatures, my sacred earthworms,
millipedes, springtails, and isopods… Today I call upon thee to bless some new virgin
soils with your spawn, for this week, I’ll be preparing a new sanctuary for a beast we’ve
never before had on this channel, a creature that is both dangerous and mesmerizing. In today’s episode, I will walk you through
the process of creating a beautiful home fit for this awesome beast of a creature and experience
the heart-pounding process of moving her into her newly prepared sanctuary. AC Family, this whole operation had me shook,
and I’m no arachnophobe but I still felt the fear. The end result however was both ultimate satisfaction
and awe! So without further ado, ladies and gents,
take your seats, and let’s get to know our newest member of the family, who also happens
to be the most venomous tarantula in the world. I’ve been a long time fan of arachnids, and
have actually been keeping tarantulas longer than I’ve been keeping ants. In fact, many of us ant hobbyists also happen
to be tarantula enthusiasts. There’s just something about spiders and tarantulas
in particular that truly fascinate me, even if they don’t really do much, compared to
ants. Unlike ants, tarantulas don’t move around
a lot, are quite low-maintenance, and comparatively don’t need massive enclosures. It’s easy to get one tarantula and suddenly
find yourself collecting them like pokemon. One rose-haired tarantula as a teenager was
all it took for me to eventually own 50 of them. But there was one species I’ve always dreamt
of owning, and it lies here. Hidden within the corners of this arid habitat
is a tarantula that is notoriously known for two things: it’s beauty and it’s venom potency,
and for me, it’s a dream come true to welcome her to our Antiverse. There! See her? AC Family, presenting to you, this gorgeous
Sapphire Gooty tarantula, scientifically known as Poecilotheria metallica. She’s an Old World species, hailing from central
southern India. She also goes by various other names in the
hobby, including metallic tarantula, peacock parachute spider, or peacock tarantula. But what makes her distinct from other tarantulas
in her genus is her vivid blue color with bright yellow patches. Gooty tarantulas are also highly irridescent. I love all the different metallic colors reflected
off various parts of her body when viewed from different angles! Look at how she changes colors here and here
too – a truly magnificent creature. Looking closer, we get a tinge of yellow,
blue, and green. Isn’t she just awesome?! Gosh – many guys I know marvel at cars, but
me, I’d take this gorgeous tarantula over any Ferrari any day! Gooties are special because they are the only
species in the genus of Poecilotheria to have this signature blue color. This girl here is a young Gooty, so she appears
less chromatic and blue at the moment, but I am certain as she grows and molts a few
more times, we will see her colours come into full bloom. So, what do you say? What should we name her, guys? Leave your name suggestions in the comments,
and I’ll choose my top 5 favourites for us to vote on in a future video. Be sure to also like your favourite suggestions
so I can see them. Now let’s talk about venom! While this Gooty tarantula might look beautiful,
she is one dangerous arachnid. It’s reported that a bite from tarantulas
of her genus, cause intense muscle pain, heart palpatations, and effects that can last weeks
even months. Look at those long sharp fangs! A deep bite from those can surely send me
to hospital. I once owned an adult Poecilotheria regalis,
a close relative, whom I was certain was tame and showed her to my classroom in high school. I took her out to handle her like I always
did, but I must have grabbed her a wrong way, because she bit me, but luckily it was a shallow
bite, but my finger remained painfully swollen all day. Though I didn’t have to go to the hospital
nor cry in front of my classmates, I knew I was lucky! Needless to say, utmost care is essential
with these tarantulas and they are not a beginner species by any means. Venom aside, she’s also super fast! She can dash away like lightning, essential
so she could escape predators, if needed! See these cute paws? They are called paw tufts, dense pads of hair. Each individual hair in the tuft is composed
of hundreds of thousands of smaller hairs, which are called setules. They are so small only an electron microscope
can see them. This amazing biological feature allows them
to climb surfaces, even surfaces as smooth as this glass. These spiders need the grip, because they
are arboreal, meaning they live in the trees, where they occupy tree hallows. In these tree hallows they typically create
asymmetric funnel webs. They are a dark-loving species and usually
avoid sunlight whenever they can. She’s actually searching now for a new place
to hide from my camera lights, which is actually great because the new home I have for her
is much more suitable than this home she’s lived in for awhile, and like moving an ant
colony into a new setup, we can use this natural photophobia to our advantage, when moving
her into a new setup. And yes, she definitely needs a more suitable
setup. In case you are wondering about this glass
enclosure, here’s the thing: See, I bought this Gooty tarantula complete with the setup,
and while I appreciate the effort that went into designing it, I knew we the AC Family
could do better. One problem with this current setup is that
it does not offer a suitable hide for her. I suppose selling a tarantula might be hard
if you can’t see it, so the designer and seller decided not to offer it a hide. Now I could have just removed this big driftwood
piece and replaced it with a hide, however the driftwood is completely siliconed to the
glass. And I didn’t think redecorating this enclosure
with the tarantula in it, was something I was comfortable doing, for my safety and for
the tarantula’s. Creating a new home fit for this gorgeous
beast was the best option. But before that, let’s take a glimpse at
a similar creature whose beauty has graced this channel before. Welcome, everyone, to the Arachno Sanctorium,
the lair of the goddess of the AC Antiverse, Azula! As you can see, Azula has fully embraced her
home and has been quite busy. Look at how her profuse webbing has completely
transformed her once green oasis enclosure into this silky white sanctuary. But peeking into the funnel section of her
web, I was surprised to discover that Azula had actually just molted some time today. How cool! See her in there standing next to her shed
skin? She’s now hardening and needs to rest. She won’t be eating for a while until she’s
fully hardened. For those of you who are new, Azula here is
a green-bottle blue tarantula scientifically known as Chromatopelma cyanopubescens. Almost a year after her debut, Azula is doing
great! In her previous episode she was struggling
to get rid of her top carapace shed, but fortunately that eventually fell off, and she’s as gorgeous
as ever, especially now that she’s freshly molted, bearing her shiny blues and oranges,
against black velvet and peach tips. Rest well, my goddess. So as you can see with Azula here, privacy
and a place to retreat is super important to tarantulas. Our new sapphire Gooty tarantula needed a
private space to call her own, which she too could customize using her silk. And so, AC Family, it was time to do what
we do best. I, your Creator of Worlds, had the perfect
home prepared for our new sapphire gooty tarantula. AC Family, behold! I am pleased to present to you Cerulean Hallow,
our soon-to-be home of our gooty tarantula. Let me show you around! Live vein plants and heart-leaf philodendron
adorn the foreground and back wall of the territories. But check out the best part! At the very back and center of her home is
this majestic cork bark which would become her hide. Now if you think it looks cool from the front,
wait until you see what it looks like from the back! But before I show you that, let me show you
how this entire gorgeous terrarium come to life. Here’s what I did. In this glass tank, I first attached this
hallowed cork bark using aquarium-safe, black silicone caulking. Next, I wanted to create a sort of wooden
organic wall of sorts, from which plants could grow, so I smothered the entire back with
the silicone. I also took some wire and attached it to this
silicone wall. You’ll see in a bit how these wires would
help hold decorative sphagnum moss in place. Then I attached these plastic vials, which
would later be used as pots for plants, to the silicone wall and covered it in more silicone. I used a brush to shape and smoothen out the
wall. Next, I took some coco fiber and completely
covered this silicone wall, pushing it in and even throwing some into the hallow, so
to cover up all exposed areas of silicone. You’ll see how awesome this will look once
it’s all done and dried. I let the entire thing cure and solidify overnight. 24 hours later, the silicone caulking was
set. Now check this out, guys! I love this part! I used my vaccuum cleaner to remove the excess
coco fiber from all areas, exposing the organic wall beneath. I find this process so satisfying! There! Isn’t that cool? Now, let’s proceed with the final construction. I poured in a good amount of activated carbon,
which would help remove any toxic metals or chemicals from the soils which could harm
our tarantula or soil life, and speaking of which, after adding some soil, it was time
for some epic bio-activation of this terrarium. Bring in the Nucleus! This rather modest-looking tank contains teams
of creatures and microorganisms capable of turning wastes into amazing nutrients for
plants. If you saw last week’s episode, you already
know the awesome creatures living in here. From earthworms to millipedes, every member
of this soil ecosystem has worked hard to process the wastes I left in this tank. And check out how effective our Nucleus has
been so far. On the left side are new leaf clippings I
put a day ago while on the right, you can visibly see how the wastes I placed last week
are virtually all gone. Though the Nucleus isn’t nearly as developed
as it will be over the next few months, it’s still great to know it’s on its way to becoming
a great source for soil creatures and fertilizer. What you see here in the upper layers of soil
are by-products of creatures we have in the tank. They are totally nutrient-rich. Surely, they along with a handful of pioneering
soil creatures, will help make Cerulean Hallow become a biologically active habitat for my
Gooty tarantula. I scooped up some of the medium, and dumped
it into the terrarium. There! Bioactivation process initiated! Now, it is time to add these cute little plants. Remember the plastic vials we attached? Here’s what they’re meant for. I just added a bit of soil from the Nucleus,
placed our plant inside, packed it in with more Nuclear soil, and voila, we were good
to go. I did the same thing on the other side. Over time these plants will hopefully grow
and root along this organic wall To give Cerulean Hallow that forest look,
I planted clumps of gorgeous vein plants. I really like the colour of these plants,
and love using them for terrariums as ground cover because they grow low to the ground. The attractive pattern of the leaves offers
a good contrast against the coco fiber of the back wall and the rough texture of the
hallowed cork tree bark. To complete the look, I attached sphagnum
moss onto the wall, using the exposed wire we embedded prior. Aside from aesthetics, this moss will help
with holding moisture. Speaking of which, let’s moisten the lands! Drink, drink, drink my precious plants! Welcome to your new home! And that AC Family, was how Cerulean Hallow
was created. From afar, this terrarium really looked lush
and alive, and now to show you what I feel is the coolest part enclosure. The back view! AC Family, check it out! Full visual access to the interior of our
Gooty’s hallow, so we could see her anytime we wanted, and simply cover it all up to keep
it dark when we weren’t observing her, kinda like an ant farm. I added some sphagnum moss to the bottom to
make it more cozy. Cerulean Hallow was now complete, and was
in my mind, the perfect home functionally and aesthetically for our new sapphire Gooty
tarantula. And now, AC Family. The hard part! Moving our new beast in. Arachnophobes beware. What’s about to happen next might give you
a heart attack! Once again, here’s my Gooty tarantula in
her original enclosure. So here was my plan. The goal here was to transfer her using light. Hopefully, if we expose her to lights she’ll
start moving like she did at the start of this video in search of a place to hide. All I needed to do was put the two enclosures
together and pray she wanders into Cerulean Hallow. I opened up Cerulean Hallow. The old enclosure had a section that kind
of jutted out from the front, so I had to make some height adjustments using these bottle
caps so the two enclosures could fit snugly together. And now the moment of truth. I removed the glass wall from the tarantulas
enclosure, and the move was now ready. I took a spot light, and shined it onto the
Gooty. Uh oh! The spider refused to budge. No! The light technique wasn’t working. Oh boy! I was afraid I’d have to resort to plan B,
which was much more dangerous and unpredictable. Here is a wing feather from my parrot’s recent
molt. It’s soft enough to act as a gentle pokey
to get her to move along, but the scariest part was, I needed to go in. There were so many things that could go wrong
with this plan! She could make a dash for it and completely
crawl out of the tank, she could jump onto my hand, sink some fangs into my flesh, race
up my body onto my face, disappear off the table and into my kitchen. I was fully aware that this thing was a venomous,
acrobatic ninja of a tarantula! My heart was pounding as I went in with the
feather. My hand was inches away from her, but I had
watch her like a hawk! As soon as the Gooty tarantula sensed the
presence of the feather, she turned around to face it, and suddenly BAM! She took a strike! Oh my God! She was so aggressive! I was so scared! I moved in with my feather a second time. Don’t worry.. I come in peace. Whoa! She took another strike! But it seemed the feather was too short and
not very effective at getting her to move. I needed to try something else. I resorted to using these long tweezers. I had to be extra careful, though, as I didn’t
want to injure her in any way. Suddenly, she switched composure, and started
to slowly walk away from my tweezers. In an almost magical trance, she headed straight
for the opening of her enclosure and I guided her gently into Cerulean Hallow. I slid the glass door in and the mission was
complete. And like a sight from arachnid heaven, our
new sapphire Gooty tarantula stopped right in the middle of the bark, posing majestically
in all her Gooty glory! AC Family, look at her! She’s the most magnificent thing I’ve ever
seen! It was at that moment, that I also realized
the natural masterpiece that was her colouration. Look at how awesomely she camouflages with
the bark! If I were a bird flying by I would have totally
missed this Gooty. And the cool part was not only could she camouflage,
but she also had the benefit of bright blue and yellow warning markings which she could
flash at any time to advertise to a creature that did discover her, how dangerous she was! Mother Nature had truly made these spiders
living works of art. And in perfect time, our Gooty tarantula climbed
to the top of the bark, and happily crawled into the darkness of her brand new tree hallow,
just as she would have in the wild. AC Family, it seems we officially got the
final approval that Cerulean Hallow was to be her new cherished home. Four days later, our Gooty had settled nicely
into her territories. During the day, she would retreat into her
hallow which was darkened using some black bristol board. In the night, I would sometimes see her emerging,
but tonight she seemed like she wanted to hang out inside her hide. Let’s peek inside. Wow! Guys, look! She had already begun to line the interior
of the hallow with webbing to make it more cozy. I love that she loves her lair! She looks totally comfy in there. Now I tried placing in a cricket which eventually
crawled into her hallow, and I waited and waited, and the cricket even went up to touch
her leg, but she ended up just batting it away. Looks like food wasn’t on her mind at the
moment, which was okay because I heard she had eaten the day I bought her, plus it could
mean that she’s due for another molt soon, which is highly likely because she went from
a fairly dry set up to a now humid one! And as soon as she does molt, I’ll surely
film her new vivid colours which I can’t wait for. I truly loved having this new tarantula join
our growing Antiverse. It was amazing that such a dangerous creature,
also had a calm and collected side. It didn’t make a dash for my face or go out
of its way to sink its fangs into my hand. I was actually surprised the move went as
smoothly as it did. I was grateful to our Gooty tarantula for
being so cooperative. She was beautiful and definitely an animal
that demanded respect. What’s sad is these sapphire Gooty tarantulas
are actually critically endangered in the wild. These spiders come from a small area in India
which is suffering from habitat destruction due to logging and firewood harvesting. Fortunately, however, after 10 years of captive
breeding, thousands of them exist within the tarantula pet trade. If any of you decide to get one of these gorgeous
tarantulas, it’s important to get them from a reputable breeder or supplier, to minimize
supporting any illegal collection of these spiders from the wild. Our Gooty specimen here was captive-born and
raised, and so far has all the qualities of being a very fulfilling pet tarantula… to
watch but not touch. I am totally ok with this though, because
what mattered to me most now, was that the most venomous tarantula in the world was now
the happiest tarantula in the world. Now speaking of painful bites, we move along
now to another kingdom of our Ant Room. A kingdom that I’ve been dying to update you
guys on. Behold the great Hacienda Del Dorado, which
has grown to become an entirely different world from when we last saw it. I can’t wait to show you the progress of the
Jawbreakers, who’ve been living quietly within its soils, along with the plethora of creatures
that live with them! AC Family, did you enjoy today’s episode? Our new Gooty tarantula is a beauty right? I have some epic updates on the inhabitants
of the Hacienda Del Dorado and the Jawbreakers, our trap-jaw ant colony, so hit that SUBSCRIBE
button and BELL ICON for notifications now, so you don’t miss out on the epic stories
of the inhabitants of the Antiverse. And don’t forget to also hit the LIKE button
every single time, including now! It would really help a lot! Also, I wanted to let everyone know that AntsCanada.com
is having its big AC annual holidays Promo: the 20-20-20 sale. That’s 20% off all Hybrid Series ant farms
and gear packs from now until January 2020, plus a free copy of our newly updated “Ultimate
Ant Keeping Handbook,” right now at AntsCanada.com. Click the link in the description to get your
AC ant farm today! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like to see extended play footage of our new Gooty tarantula! She’s truly gorgeous, so go check it out! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What is mutualistic symbiosis? Congratulations to Tanek Gaming who correctly
answered: It’s a relationship between different species
where all parties benefit. Congratulations Tanek Gaming, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What helps a Gooty Tarantula stick to glass? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

iOS 13, iOS 13.2, iOS 13.3 and newer has bugs – How to submit feedback properly so Apple hears you

iOS 13, iOS 13.2, iOS 13.3 and newer has bugs – How to submit feedback properly so Apple hears you


hi everyone Aaron here for ZolloTech and
Apple actually values your feedback and while some of you may say that’s kind of
funny I think it’s pretty true because of two
different things now if you’ve watched any of my iOS update videos or beta
update videos you’ll know that I’m always telling you to report feedback in
the feedback app but the feedback app is only on beta software so in order to
report feedback on maybe an idea you have for a new feature a problem you’re
having or just something else there’s a couple ways you can do that on a regular
public versions of iOS so I wanted to share with you how you can do that and
Apple usually takes this information and prioritizes it and based on the amount
of feedback they get they’ll work on those problems so let me show you how to
do that so if we go into Safari we’ll go to Safari and you’ll see I’m at a
website that says feedback assistant Apple comm now this is one of two ways
you can do this so let me show you what I mean so here we’re at this feedback
assistant and in this one you’ll actually have to log in with your Apple
ID so if you want to provide feedback this way you can just hit this button
here and it says where would you like to start your feedback and then you can
report for Mac OS TV OS iOS and iPad OS and this is more for beta users but you
can use it then go to iOS and iPad OS we’ll wait for it to load and it says
please provide a description title for your feedback so you want to be very
clear in what the problem is let me turn this down a little bit you want to be
very clear what the problem is so for example maybe you’re having and not an
app reload because that’s not necessarily Apple’s issue but maybe
rotation isn’t working on your phone you need to say something along the lines of
phone rotation not working so it’s very clear then you select the problem area
and down here you’ll see a third-party app accessibility and it’s got
everything categorized so that you can pick exactly what it is
everything from dark mode to you’ll see notifications photos you name it it’s in
here then you can tell them what type of issue you’re having you want to explain
it in detail what’s going on and then you can actually attach a file as well
and that could be a video that could be anything else so if you
hit the little button you’ll see you can browse your photo library take a video a
screen capture and show them exactly what’s going on and then you can submit
your feedback and once you do you’ll just have a list so if I go back here
you’ll see you’ll have your list and this is just a beta software
announcement but you’ll have a list here and it will give you more detailed
information sometimes they’ll actually respond and ask for more information so
that’s one way you can report feedback but there’s another type of feedback as
well so if we go to another tab and of course I’ll link these in the
description this one is apple.com slash feedback and if you go to apple.com
slash feedback you can select iphone or whatever your reporting feedback on so
if i zoom in here it’s going to ask for some information your name your email
address your subject and then this is where it’s a little bit different your
feedback type so feedback type could be a feature request a bug report
performance software hardware compatibility or other so a feature
request could be one that I hear all the time is why is the phone dialer when it
rings taking up my whole screen or things like that so many people want to
see that changed I would highly recommend that you just go here and tell
Apple hey I want this feature and then also you can do bug reports so maybe you
don’t want to go into that other app or login you can do this here so both of
these ways are really great simple ways to provide feedback directly back to
Apple and then they can use that feedback to improve their software
despite what many people think there are a lot of people saying there’s a lot of
issues but if you don’t report it through this feedback app or through
those websites Apple has no way of knowing that because they don’t have the
millions of people using their software if their own campus for example so if
your beta testing software that’s the point provide feedback and how it’s
going for you and then if you’re on a public version that’s the only way we
can submit that feedback so I’m actually logged in in a different version of this
feedback app where I submit some issues and I like to submit as many as I can
but I can’t submit as many as you possibly could so I would highly
recommend you go there submit your feedback and hope
we get some of those features and changes that a lot of people want I
think the number one thing that’s requested though is when a phone call
comes in it takes up the whole screen I see that probably at least a few times a
week from many of you either commenting or emailing me directly I see that a lot
so hopefully Apple listens to those requests in that will get them to fix
these issues that I talk about in the videos regularly so make sure you do
that and hopefully this helps if you have any other questions or comments
though let me know in the comments below of course I’ll link this wallpaper in
the description as I always do if you haven’t subscribed already though please
subscribe and hit that notification bell if you’d like to see more of these
videos as soon as they’re released if you enjoyed the video and you’d like to
see more like this please give it a like and I’ll link some playlists as well as
always thanks for watching this is Aaron I’ll see you next time

The Curious Webspinner Insect Knits a Cozy Home | Deep Look

The Curious Webspinner Insect Knits a Cozy Home | Deep Look


Ok, under a log, you uncover a wispy white web. You’re thinking: spider. Not so fast. This maze of woven silk has nothing to do
with arachnids. It’s actually created by a kind of insect
called a webspinner. They’re related to stick insects and praying
mantises. Never heard of ’em? Not surprised. They give spiders a run for their money. Their handiwork is a tent … umbrella … and
invisibility cloak all-in-one. But while spiders produce silk from their
backends, a webspinner’s silk comes from her feet. Yep, her front feet. She intertwines the strands, waving back and
forth, back and forth. She has tiny hair-like ejectors on the bottom
of each foot, which shoot out the silk. It’s the thinnest silk of any animal. The work is painstaking. But the result is pretty cozy – kinda like
a quilted roof. Their home – also known as a gallery – is their
only defense, hiding their soft bodies from predators. There’s also plenty of moss and lichen to
eat inside. So why leave? And if they need to do some housekeeping,
it’s easy to take out the trash. They just stick it to the roof … and forget
about it. The silk also keeps out something they really
like to avoid: rain. Webspinners can easily drown if a downpour
floods their gallery. Luckily, they’ve got exceptional weather-proofing. Water just beads up on the silk’s surface,
like on a rose petal. And that water actually changes the silk,
making the surface more slippery by transforming the proteins. So it becomes extra waterproof. But having silk-slinging front feet has a
downside. Say an unwanted visitor comes along. If they want to get away, webspinners have
to tiptoe to avoid triggering their silk ejectors. Not exactly the fastest runner. So to get away, webspinners dart … backwards,
to avoid getting tangled up. They’re much faster in reverse. Small price to pay for the ability to weave
an entire hidden world. One that will keep the webspinners – and
their young – safe … for generations to come. Hi, it’s Lauren. Music fans – here’s a special playlist for
ya of Deep Look creatures that make music of their own. Also, check out Sound Field, a new show from
PBS Digital Studios that breaks down our favorite songs and artists from all genres … from
Bach to Beyonce. It’s hosted by two amazing musicians, Nahre
Soul and LA Buckner, who even come up with an original song in every episode. Link is in the description. Thanks.

4K CC. Tarantula Hawk Swarm, Catching Amazing Pet Insects & Reptiles  CA NM AZ TX USA Herping HD.

4K CC. Tarantula Hawk Swarm, Catching Amazing Pet Insects & Reptiles CA NM AZ TX USA Herping HD.


Massive swarm Of Tarantula hawks that landed here This thing right here is gigantic and he’s lookin at me That thing is like 2 1/2 inches long wow Jeez that thing is huge That’s the biggest one so far he’s like 2 3/4 inches that last one Haha ha I hope I don’t get stung haha that’s gonna suck Buuzzzzz….Tarantula Hawk flies right past my head WOAH Oh my god That’s a giant Bumble Bee uh uh uh ah he he They are every where

Project Nucleus: How I Create Mini Planets Within Glass

Project Nucleus: How I Create Mini Planets Within Glass


Before we begin today’s episode, I wanted
to let everyone know that AntsCanada.com is having its big AC annual holidays Promo: the
20-20-20 sale. That’s 20% off all Hybrid Series ant farms
and gear packs from now until January 2020, plus a free copy of our newly updated “Ultimate
Ant Keeping Handbook,” right now at AntsCanada.com. Click the link in the description to get your
AC ant farm today! And now enjoy today’s ant episode! After a long and successful day, I looked
down at the clippings and dead tree I had collected from our projects. Ordinarily, I would throw these away, but
suddenly an awesome idea came to me, an idea that I felt could completely change and affect
the lives of every creature and terrarium in the entire AC Antiverse! AC Family, it was time to embark on a new
and exciting biological engineering project! Last week, we had two major maintenance operations
for two of our beloved kingdoms in the AC Antiverse. First, the mystical double floating island
of Avista, home to the Big-Headed ants, you named the Bobbleheads, underwent a serious
makeover, receiving a new island to their open-air ant archipelago. The Red Banyon tree, the Great Tree of Wisdom,
also needed trimming, so I snipped around their sacred tree, which resulted in this
gorgeous well-manicured main island. We replaced a dead tree with a new one, and
gave them a superworm as house warming gift. East of Avista, stands the Canopy of Vortexia. Our tree-top forest home to our aggressive
Weaver Ant Colony, The Emerald Empire. The territories also needed maintenance as
one of the trees had seriously overgrown. It was a scary operation to snip away at the
overgrown leaves and perform general maintenance with weaver ants wanting to attack me the
whole time, but the biggest thing that came out of this was that I also took the opportunity,
to improve the biological profile of Vortexia’s soil life, through the addition of roaches,
superworms and other creatures, and then sealing the entire thing up! It resulted in a clean, healthy, and bioactive
environment, where creatures could eat decaying materials, reproduce on their own, and be
hunted, all inside the Canopy of Vortexia. It was the epic creation of an entire, contained
ecosystem, and the way I saw it, like the creation of a mini-planet within glass. And this gave me an idea. This week, our journey towards creating the
ultimate homes for our ants and other creatures continues, as we launch a super cool, biological
engineering project, I call Project Nucleus, and AC Family, I think you guys will totally
dig it, no pun intended! So sit back, relax and enjoy this week’s
info-packed episode, as I show you how life of a successful vivarium begins, and how I
plan to create mini-planets within glass. In the past few weeks, my recent projects
of making more bioactive terrariums have been undeniably successful, bioactive, basically
meaning throwing in a bunch of different organisms with different purposes into a single enclosed
environment, resulting in a healthier and more dynamic life for our ant colonies, as
well as the fellow tenants living with them. In the case of the Dark Knights a few weeks
back, for instance, a new life with bagworms, millipedes, jumping spider, springtails, isopods,
worms, and who knows what else came with the layer of leaf litter and plants I threw into
their new home, which by the way needs a new name so VOTE here, AC Council, meant that
the ants could truly live like they did in the wild, defending their territory, with prey at their disposal, and home bioactively cleaned by creatures
that would eat their poop and garbage, converting it to fertilizer for the plants
which would go on to produce oxygen for the system, and so on. The partnerships of these various creatures
made for a very self-sustaining, biodynamic world! I thoroughly loved this streak of successfully
creating these super-bioactive terrariums on steroids, which ultimately gave me the
idea to start Project Nucleus. So, what is Project Nucleus, you ask. Well, it goes like this. So you may or may not know, every time I start
building a new terrarium, I either recycle aged terrarium soil or collect leaf litter
from my neighborhood and add it to the soil. I do this because soil creatures, like springtails,
mites, worms, millipedes, and isopods are needed to help breakdown organic waste in
the terrarium. Wilted leaves from plants, exoskeletons and
other wastes from the prey, as well as ant excrement are all broken down by these soil-residing
organisms. Without them, the entire terrarium may rot,
fungus take over, and just lead to a gross terrarium mess. Plus these soil creatures are the missing
link between organic waste and plant life, because soil creature poop from organic waste
contains a tonne of amazing nutrients for plants. The problem with using new soil to create
new terrariums is that they contain only a few of these creatures. It would take some time for a new terrarium
to develop the populations of soil biota, so as a general rule, the older the soil,
the more lush and abundant the soil life is. Now to better understand what I’m talking
about, and appreciate how cool of an undertaking Project Nucleus is, let’s take a look at one
of the amazing ant kingdoms in the AC Antiverse, on which a lot of you have been patiently
waiting for an update. Welcome everyone to the home of the Golden
Empire. This colony of Yellow Crazy Ants, scientifically
known as Anoplolepis gracillipes is one of the OG ant colonies of this channel. They were once a massive glorious colony of
millions but were unexpectedly hit by a lethal plague of blood-sucking mites earlier this
year, which reduced them to several hundreds. I rescued a small population and put them
into quarantine where I treated their vampiric body mites with predatory Hypoapsis mites
harvested from rhino beetles, of all places. And lucky for me, I was able to recover at
least 5 of the 7 queens and rid the colony of the vampiric mites. To rehabilitate them, I transferred them,
into this Hybrid Nest + Ant Tower setup. We even documented the cured Golden Empire
workers, transferring their brood into their new home. What a trip and triumphant day that was! During the mass emmigration, we also noticed
that the Hypoaspis mites were still living with the Golden Empire, assumingly protecting
the colony from future bad mite attacks. You can watch all of this here, by the way. So it was clear that these relationships with
smaller organisms like the Hypoaspis mites were extremely important for the ants’ well-being. And AC Family, you’re about to see how much
these relationships have evolved since they moved in a few months ago, and how it has
helped the Golden Empire flourish! Look! I’m happy to announce that the Golden Empire
is doing great. Here are the queens, who prefer to hang out
in their Hybrid Nest, which has become the main mothernest of the colony. They’ve been laying lots of eggs. Look at those egg batches being carried around
by caring workers. I estimate the colony is well over a thousand
workers now and is about to get even bigger. But what’s more amazing is this, guys! Other creatures are also living in the Hybrid
Nest, in cooperation with the colony. Here are springtails, known in the Antiverse
as the Springcleaners, which help eat decaying material, ant poop, and mold. We also have beneficial mites eating up the
same stuff. But check this out! For the first time on the channel, we get
a glimpse at a species of symbiotic isopods that live with the ants! Isn’t that amazing? The ants don’t attack these isopods, which
are actually crustaceans, who thrive off the garbage left behind by the ants, mold that
might be growing around the premises, and possibly their poop. It’s possible these isopods were living with
the Golden Empire the whole time since the beginning, back when they were still residing
in the Hacienda Del Dorado, but we’ve only been able to see them now due to visual access
of the Hybrid Nest. And that’s not all, guys. I even discovered there are silverfish-type
insects, living with the ants! I don’t know what species these little turbo
guys are, but I am pretty sure, they also have a key role at eating up dead insects
leftovers, ant poop, and fungi. So, guys check out the beauty of how this
all works. The Golden Empire has a system. So like humans, the colony produces garbage,
and like humans, the ants keep the garbage in piles and bury it. They’ve chosen designated areas of the Hybrid
Nest as garbage rooms. They also delegate certain areas for bathrooms. It’s essential especially in an underground,
moist environment for the colony to be as clean and systematic with their waste management
as possible so all hell doesn’t break loose and the colony dies from unsanitation. So once these garbage and bathroom spots get
too soiled and littered, the colony then buries these areas up, and that’s when the clean-up
team of soil creatures take over and work their magic. They’re small enough to fit into the tight
spaces of the buried chambers where they proceed to eat up the garbage and ant poop, and keeping
dangerous fungus that grows on the garbage and poop under control. A lot of you ask how I clean my ant farms,
and well, now you know. I kinda don’t need to, because the ant farms
bioactively clean themselves. The lifeforms take care of the maintenance
like they would in the wild. I just add water and watch it all happen! There’s even a whole other decomposition process
happening at the microbial level. If we were to take a look at a sample of this
ant nest material under a microscope, we’d find a whole other world of bacteria and colonies
of unicellular organisms also busy eating and decomposing organic matter. So as you can see, there’s quite the system
happening here. It’s mutualistic symbiosis at its finest,
which basically means there’s a cooperation between all parties for the benefit of all. It’s amazing to be able to see all of this
in the Hybrid Nest, because you can’t really see it happening in a terrarium, but I assure
you, this is what’s going on underground in all our terrariums, perhaps with different
sets of soil creatures unique to each terrarium. And look, the creatures even migrate and travel
through the tubes to and from the colony’s neighbouring satellite nests. Speaking of which, let’s cover up their Hybrid
Nest and briefly take a look at the Golden Empire’s satellite nest in the large Ant Tower
shall we? As you can see, this is the popular hangout
for the Springcleaners! A tonne of Springtails for some reason love
this place, and seem to be quite busy at the moment working on a leftover superworm. Now wanna see something cool: see this little
contraption with a switch? I turn it on and a light beneath the Ant Tower
illuminates from inside. For those of you who are new to ants, ants
are naturally photophobic which means they don’t like light in their nests, but it is
said that ants cannot see red light, so keeping the ants under red film and lighting them
up with red light, causes the ants to feel like they are shrouded in darkness. And peeling off this red film reveals ants
congregating in one of their chambers. Check out all the tunnels they’ve created
down to the bottom of the Ant Tower! Springtails can be seen frequenting all areas. Now, AC Family, after seeing all of this,
it’s now time to talk about my idea, Project Nucleus! Rich bioactive ant homes like the Golden Empire’s
here don’t happen overnight. The creatures are few at first, usually coming
in with plants, rocks, and soil that you first place into the terrariums and it takes months
to create populations as rich as the one we see here in the Golden Empire, and a good
year for it to really be established. And as you know AC Family, we are always creating
new worlds and vivariums on this channel, and it would be very beneficial to have a
constant supply of soil creatures, to help speed up the bioactivation process in newly
created terrariums. And so, my idea. AC Family, I present to you Project Nucleus. In this glass enclosure, I plan on creating
what shall become the Nucleus of the AC Antiverse, the creational furnace from which shall be
born epic populations of soil biota for future terrariums we make from here on in. If we could create a place where we could
culture soil creatures, a place with aged soil and an established soil ecosystem, then
when creating a new terrarium or ant home, we could simply scoop up a bit of the medium
from the Nucleus, to place into our new terrarium, and thereby help populate the new terrarium’s
soil with its team of soil creatures. One scoop of medium from the Nucleus, would
be enough to bioactivate any terrarium much more quickly than if it were just created
from scratch. Plus the medium produced by the AC Nucleus
would be super rich in nutrients for plants. My plan was for the Nucleus to be a place
where I could take leaf clippings, decaying material or waste, or even dead creatures
from other kingdoms of our Antiverse, and have them feed our Nuclear soil creatures
to be processed back into the soil. Essentially, we’d be creating a composter,
just amped up with a tonne of soil creatures. And so to build this AC Nucleus, we will be
needing various materials. So here we go. First, we need this glass tank, our Nuclear
furnace of soil life culture. Through the glass we’ll be able to see the
activities as well as the progress of the Nuclear inhabitants in real-time. Next, I’ll be adding activated carbon, to
keep the growing medium purified from harmful metals and chemicals which could poison the
populations of creatures living in here. Now, let’s move on to my worst fear in life,
ahem… Worms! I had to face these vile-looking creatures
once more. I began to use my trowel to scoop up earth
from the bag and I was immediately repulsed by these squirming African Nightcrawlers seething
from within the soils. As a scoleciphobe, it was disgusting to see
the worms squirming, but I knew I had to do this because earthworms are good for composting. They breakdown organic wastes and turn them
into valuable compost or black soil, which are great for plants! Plus, populating a new terrarium with its
starting team of earthworms is always a good thing. I placed the soil into the glass enclosure. As time passed, I forced myself to really
look at the worms. Some worms fell and I had to pick them up. Ugh! I had to coach my mind that the worms were
friends and harmless. Mind over matter. Mind over matter. I filled up the tank and pressed the medium
down a bit as I went along. When I had filled it to as much as I could,
I decided to actually pick the worms up and hold them in my hand. Not so bad, huh? Next, I added leaf litter collected from outside. I knew it contained lots of different soil
creatures that would be the forefathers, foremothers, and forehamaphrodites to bring our AC Nucleus
to life. I immediately saw that I’d scooped up lots
of millipedes. I couldn’t touch them, as this species produces
cyanide, so bad for the eyes and enough to make a human sick, but they would be great
at eating up decaying material. And Oh! Look! These millipedes immediately began mating. Wasting no time, I see. Also, I had a handful of leaf clippings from
Selva de Fuego maintenance. I cut these up so they could break down much
more quickly and placed them into the Nucleus, as well. Then I placed filter foam to cover everything
up, to ensure no mischievous fly could enter and lay their eggs inside the tank. We wouldn’t want to repeat the maggot episode
hehe… right? The filter foam also helps keep all Nuclear
inhabitants inside, while allowing the entire system to breathe. After adding all of the components, our AC
Nucleus was complete. Two days later, the Nucleus was already a
happening place. Millipedes were still mating, and I suspect
we’re about to get a booming population of them soon. I was surprised to see another species of
millipede had dug a burrow into the soils. Also, earthworms were seen everywhere! They created a network of burrows. And Oh! I could see worm casts. I also saw that they had dragged pieces of
the leaves into the soils for further feeding. Good job, earthworms! Such hard-working creatures. Not scary or disgusting at all… Sorta. I could also see several awesome mites already
starting to populate the soils. Springtails frolicked their new territories,
as well. And look! A bagworm was crawling along the top with
its constructed home made of debris. I didn’t even know we put a bagworm in there! I’m not sure what else we’ll be finding in
this increasingly bioactive chamber we call the AC Nucleus, but I can’t wait to see how
this soil ecosystem evolves over time, and eventually use it to help speed up the bioactivation
process of the terrariums we make in the future. In fact, I’ve been thinking a lot about all
this focus lately on bioactive setups for the ants and other creatures of the Ant Room,
and I feel AC Family that the AC Antiverse is approaching a new age, where more focus
is placed on creating more hollistic setups for the lifeforms we care for. Before, I used to create homes that would
usually focus most on one creature, one star on a stage, whether it be an ant colony in
an ant farm, or a tarantula in an enclosure. But I’m realizing more and more, after all
these years of keeping ants, that this isn’t the best way to house these creatures nor
appreciate them to the fullest. In order to properly and naturalistically
house them and watch them at their fullest potential, you need to do more than just decorate
their home in a naturalistic way. The key here is remembering the context, in
which the creatures live in nature. The ant colonies we care for and love, are
actually part of an interconnected food web, a piece in a puzzle and to properly house
them and witness them in their truest and greatest form, you need to include all pieces
of the puzzle. This to me means then that there should be
a focus on developing the necessary associated animals like soil creatures in their soils,
as we saw with the Golden Empire, prey creatures living in the territories as we’ve established
with Vortexia, and allow the system to develop a collective biological profile of its own
in an enclosed space, like we did with the Dark Knight’s new vivarium. I caught some surviving darkling beetles,
superworm survivors, mating within Olympus this week. Usually, I’d fish these out and place them
in my superworm bin, but this time, I decided I’d keep them in there. Also, as you can probably imagine, I’m running
out of room in the AC Antiverse, and while our future giant two-story ant room in my
new house is currently being built, I feel this merging of creatures to share a space,
may be a great solution to my now overcrowded ant room. A few months ago, I tried placing one of our
vampire crabs into the Selva de Fuego. Now hold on, before you freak out, normally
I’d never consider this because, in my mind, the Fire Ants as we know are savages, but
I also knew the crab occupies an entirely different niche, and can get away by retreating
underwater, and turns out AC Family, after 8 weeks, the crab is still alive and happy
in the Selva de Fuego. The Fire ants surprisingly don’t bother it,
and the crab goes about its daily activities picking up garbage and dead ants the fire
ants dump into the river, sleeping within the shadowy wet caves behind
the falls, and picking off organic waste and algae off
the rocks. Pretty awesome right? I’ve gone ahead and placed a few crabs into
the Hacienda Del Dorado, as well, where it now resides with a few microfrogs, shrimp,
rasbora fish, and trap-jaw ants. So as you can see, this new era for our Antiverse
and philosophy are both exciting and much more beneficial to the creatures we care for. It means a more deliberate structuring of
their worlds, so that the worlds can feed and sustain themselves, thereby minimizing
my interaction with them for the most part anyway. I realized recently, that as an ant keeper,
caregiver of life forms, and your Creator of Worlds, I’m not keeping individual creatures
in inanimate setups, but rather I’m keeping biodynamic superorganisms. The Selva de Fuego, the Hacienda Del Dorado,
Vortexia, Avista, Olympus… These are all superorganisms, composed of
a multitude of living components that all depend on each other for survival… Little dynamic planets of life in our ever-expanding
AC Antiverse. AC Family, I’ve learned it’s the difference
between just keeping pets and creating planets within glass. Speaking of making new terrariums, it just
so happens, another beast has been waiting in the shadows for you all to meet her. Yes, we have a new addition to our ever growing
AC Antiverse, and she’s one of the most dangerous animals to ever reside in the Ant Room. AC Family, I can’t wait to show her to you. AC Family, did you enjoy today’s episode? What do you think of Project Nucleus? Let me know in the comments. Next week, we meet our newest addition to
the Antiverse, so you know what to do! Smash that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON
for notifications now, so you don’t miss out on who our new dangerous but beautiful beast
is, and don’t forget to hit the LIKE button every single time, including now! It would really help a lot! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like a clue as to who our newest beast is. Maybe you might be able to figure it out,
so go check it out! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Name one of the bioactive creatures found
in Vortexia. Congratulations to Tan Grace Lin who correctly
answered: Millipedes Congratulations, Tan Grace Lin, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is mutualistic symbiosis? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

World’s Most Beautiful Tarantula in Peril

World’s Most Beautiful Tarantula in Peril


Alright, so now we move from the crisis we
had in the waters, to the crisis we have on land. So as you know, Imelda, our bird-eater tarantula
has now passed, and has transitioned back into the earth, but there’s just one problem
with that. As you may recall from past videos, our goddess
actually played an important role particularly for the Fire Nation, and more specifically,
an important role at containing them! I used her ant-proof webbing to keep our fire
ants from climbing out of their setup, but AC Family, now that Imelda the bird-eater
goddess has died, the Fire Nation has rejoiced and taken full advantage of her passing. I usually harvest and install new webbing
every time I notice the barrier weakening, and well, AC Family, it looks like time’s
up. New webbing is due for installment, as the
Fire Nation has managed to tear up the barrier that has kept them captive inside the Selva
de Fuego all this time. In fact, we are now in a grave state of emergency. And so AC Family, we needed a new source of
webbing, and it just so happens, I’ve found the perfect source. A provider of silk many times stronger and
more repellent than that of Imelda’s. She can also produce more of it, in a single
day than Imelda could in a week. AC Family, behold the new goddess of the Antiverse. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL icon, welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! Our new goddess lays motionless on her back,
protected within her silken lair, with her legs dangling in the air. Have no fear, though, for when she has completed
this process, she will emerge with a brand new splendor, colour, size, and tenacity. Tarantulas like most invertebrates do not
exfoliate like we humans do, but instead outgrow their skin in stages, and must shed their
old skin periodically as they grow, and tarantulas like our goddess here, emerge from their old
exoskeletons on their backs. Molting is quite a sensitive and delicate
ceremony for our new goddess, where she is vulnerable to predators, which is why she
does it within the depths of her protective silken temple, where she remains like this
for several hours until the molting process is complete. We can’t rush her through this process, as
it is important she is allowed all the time she needs to molt and harden which can take
a few days to weeks. But there was only one problem with this. The Fire Nation has been mobilizing at escaping
their setup, taking full advantage of the fact that our former goddess’ web barrier
was weakening. Word had spread throughout the colony that,
the time had had finally come for their liberation from the Selva de Fuego, the great paludarium
kingdom they’d called home for generations. The only thing we needed was our goddess’
impenetrable, sticky, and lethal hair-lined webbing to place on all four corners of the
Selva de Fuego to keep the Fire Nation inside their setup, but we couldn’t do this until
her molt was complete and she had completely hardened. But as I watched, our new goddess with her
claws now hooked onto the walls of her funnel web, I knew the molt was near. Only time would tell if it would be on time
before a mass fire ant break out, but little did I know, there was also going to be a much
bigger problem on the horizon. The molt was complete. Our goddess had emerged in one piece, soft
and sensitive, moving her limbs from time to time as her exokeleton strengthened and
solidified in composition. This was her ultimate period of vulnerability
now, but she had nothing to fear, as we would be here to guard her from any harm as she
hardened. Wait until you see what she looks like later
when she’s fully hardened. Her species is known as a green-bottle blue,
and the colours of her new exoskeleton will truly astound you. That coming up in a bit. But guys, have a look at her fangs! They’re still white and soft. As they harden, they will turn black, and
those red hairs, will remain bright so that when she ever assumes a threat pose, the red
will perfectly bring attention to her razor sharp fangs, to anything stupid enough to
get close and attempt to eat or attack her. Though our goddess isn’t deadly to us, she’s
certainly dangerous to most of her natural predators. The next day, our goddess had righted herself
and was sitting quietly in her den, as she continued to harden. Some of you may be wondering where her old
skin was. Well, she had casted it off somewhere nearby
in her den, and the time was nearing for us to be able to go in and pull it out, and also
harvest some webbing to keep our ants inside. One week later… It was a state of emergency! Members of the Fire Nation had already set
up camp inside the LED lights situated above the Selva de Fuego! They were officially broken out and were in
the process of conquering and filling up the first bit of territory space, they’d never
before frequented. The lights were the perfect nest and station
to gather in numbers before the ultimate break out in my condo! This was not only a dangerous security breech,
but it was also, no pun intended, a great fire hazard! We needed that webbing and we needed it now! Thankfully, however, our goddess was ready
for us to move in and harvest. This was the space in which our goddess was
living, the terrarium in which she was raised as a younger spiderling, and in which she
came to us. It was a simple glass space, decorated with
some driftwood vine, coco peat substrate, and a Dracaena fragrans plant. She had chosen to create her funnel web lair
to the right side of this terrarium with the opening towards the top there. But how was I going to go in a harvest this
seemingly complex web structure? Well, the majority of the front of this terrarium
was a single glass pane that slides upward and my plan was to go in and harvest one end
of the webbing first. Alright, AC Family. Are you ready for this? We needed that web now! Here we go! Removing the glass pane. It slid out nicely and surprisingly did fairly
little damage to the silken web retreat of our goddess. My heart was racing a million miles an hour
as I scanned the situation to calculate where I would be making my first cut into her web. I hovered about with my tweezers and scissors. I was afraid that she would have suddenly
popped out to attack me as these tarantulas are extremely fast! I went in for the incision. Suddenly, oh, no! She brushed a cloud of urticating hairs at
me! Although I wasn’t hurt by the microscopic
defensive hairs, it was sad to see her kick it off because she had just molted and I would
have hated to see her bald so soon after molting. She could grow the abdomen hair back by her
next molt, but of course, we’d love to see our goddess fully haired. I went in with my tweezers! Now AC Family, before we go on to harvest
her webbing, take a close look at this! It was her old exoskeleton, a shell of her
old body. Check out that incredible, metallic blue colour
of her legs contrasting the firey peach colour of her mouth! It’s a bit flimsy and hard to handle, but
flipping it over, you can see her metallic turquoise chelicerae which hosted her fangs,
and the hallow combs from which each of her legs slipped out during the molt. I just love looking at tarantula shed exoskeleton! And actually, if you were to take the top
of the carapace which is usually here by the abdomen skin… well, usually somewhere here,
you can piece the entire structure together to make it look like a living tarantula. I also love examining the fangs! It’s probably the only time I’d ever come
close to touching her razor sharp fangs. I’ve done it on more docile species, but I’d
never try on her. But enough playing now. I needed to harvest that webbing! I went in and snipped away as carefully as
I could to extract a piece of webbing. I applied the patch of web to the most problematic
corner of Fire Nation escape. Done! But it wasn’t enough to cover the other corners
of the Selva de Fuego. I needed more webbing, but I needed the web
of her entire funnel to effectively contain the Fire Nation, but see, I didn’t want to
stress our goddess out and cause her to kick off more hair, so my plan was to go in and
remove her entirely so she could feel secure while I went in for the web harvest. I was going to try to move her into this container,
but I knew it wasn’t going to be easy. Here we go, AC Family! Wish me luck! With my tweezers I tried to coax her out of
her funnel and into the container. She took a short burst outward and with my
tweezers I tried to gently guide her into the container. My heart was in my throat the entire time! Here we go. Almost. Oh no! She’s moving to the other side. I blocked her from continuing that way, using
the lid. But with a little bit of careful maneuvering
I was able to get her into the container but not without her attempting to blast me with
a hurricane of urticating hair! No! More hair lost! But this was much better and less stressful
for her while I went in to collect her much needed webbing. What a gorgeous specimen! Now that she was isolated and safe from stress,
I went in to collect the rest of her webbing. It was enough to secure two other problematic
corners from fire ant escape. Thank goodness! Although the fourth corner was left unwebbed,
that corner for some reason was less problematic, so it could wait until she produced more webbing,
so at last, it finally was the end of our Fire Nation escape crisis, but AC Family,
little did I know, it was the revelation of a new one! Watch what’s up ahead. So here we had our goddess’ empty terrarium. It was nice, but if you’ve followed this channel
for awhile, you’ll understand it wasn’t AC Family nice. That Dracaena fragrans plant is a tropical
plant from Africa, and our green-bottle blue goddess, happens to be a desert species from
northern Venezuela. We could provide our goddess something much
better than this. Its current design also made it quite difficult
for us to continually open her terrarium to harvest webbing in the future, so AC Family,
I wanted to give our goddess’ palace a face lift before returning her in, and this renovation
was surely going to get messy. I had some epic plans for the reno. As a safety precaution, I had to put on some
surgical gloves, just in case she had kicked urticating hairs onto the surfaces of the
decor or substrate of her terrarium. This would protect me as I worked around. I then went in and proceeded to gut out the
terrarium of its contents. We needed to make this sacred space, better
suited to her species, more condusive to partial web collection, and of course, fit for a goddess! And AC Family, after some reworking, check
out what the terrarium looked like a couple hours later. AC Family, behold! Arachno Sanctorium, the reconstructed shrine
of new our Antiversal goddess. Isn’t it lovely? Arachno Sanctorium is a cozy oasis haven,
built specially for our goddess, and made to fit our need to harvest silk in a less
intrusive way. Let me show you around this gorgeous plot
of land. I’ve used a variety of different desert succulent
plants and aloe, as well as mosses and lichens, to adorn the arch of driftwood which used
to be part of the old setup. What’s great about these plants is that they
need no water nor sunlight, not even soil. Why? Well, they’re fake, which is great because
real plants need water to survive, and our goddess prefers it dry. And I’ve always believed that as much as having
real plants is beautiful and impressive, in cases like this, practicality wins, and I
truly love the aesthetic feel and energy elicited by this sacred space into which our goddess
shall be living. Now in case you may be wondering why the Arachno
Sanctorium seems a bit on the small side for space, no need to be concerned. Most tarantulas don’t move a lot, and feel
cozier in smaller enclosures. There is enough room for our goddess to set
up palace in this pocket of arid coziness. Speaking of which, AC Family, let’s look at
the Arachno Sanctorium from this side so I can show you why I love this new design so
much for our goddess. My hope is that she’ll create her web bedroom
all through here, and run her funnel down so it opens up and spills out to carpet this
open space here, where it can eventually reach the front glass. It’s this open area here, furthest from her
funnel entrance, where I hope to harvest her webbing in a less intrusive manner, in the
future. This layout also makes it less likely for
her to create her funnel up against the front glass like she did in the old design. Despite the plants being fake and not needing
light, I’ve secured a small LED light at the top to give her territories a beautiful warm
Venezuelan glow. Overall, the Archno Sanctorium was ready to
become the cradle of our new goddess. It was now time to introduce these grounds
to her. Here she was, sitting still and patient in
our container. Let’s move her in. I opened the cover. Now AC Family, here’s where I’m going to ask
you to watch carefully and see if you can spot something unusual. I set the container down in hopes to allow
her to crawl out on her own, but it was at that moment, that my body and breath froze. Time stood still for me, as almost spellbound,
I beheld the magical beauty of our goddess. I couldn’t blink as I was hypnotized by the
gorgeousness of her royal blue legs, which met at turquoise coxae, and carapace, a blackened
velvet base, with peach coloured tips, and a bright rusty red rump, that sported the
fuzz of dangerous urticating hairs, and look, light pink toe pads at the end of each foot. This goddess was easily the most gorgeous
spider I had ever seen in my life. She stood still unmoving in her spot, but
I didn’t care. I just wanted to stare at her forever. Wow! I gotta snap out of this, guys! She has me under her spell. This goddess has got some powers! What do you guys think of this green bottle
blue tarantula? Isn’t she amazing? Has she managed to get you under her spell? Now I didn’t want to stress her out anymore,
and I certainly didn’t want her to kick off any more urticating hair. We needed her to be as calm and relaxed as
possible from here on in. So with my tweezers I gently prodded our goddess
into the Arachno Sanctorium and that, AC Family was when I saw it! Did you? She clung onto the front ledge hiding from
us something that I am sure was causing her a great deal of stress. Had my eyes fooled me? I slowly tried to use a stick to see if what
I’d seen was indeed real. She trembled as she held her pose. My heart was breaking. I tried again but gently to let her know I
was here not to harm her. She reared up then backed up a bit. AC Family, look. Just as I feared. It was no wonder I couldn’t find the carapace
when we were examining her shed. Our goddess’ carapace was still stuck to her! I tried to move in carefully with my stick
to attempt to gently remove the carapace. Suddenly, I found myself in an emergency situation,
a surgeon attempting a delicate impromptu operation. With my stick I tried in vain to at least
flip it off and see if it was even removable. Perhaps it was just hanging by some attached
hair or skin. I then decided I would go in with my tweezers. I gently got under and tried to flip the carapace
off. This did not look comfortable for our goddess. I tried again, but this time much more securely,
and this caused our goddess to jump back and leap away. This told me that the carapace was indeed
attached to a sensitive spot on her new exoskeleton. I felt so bad for her. She begun to spin her immediate area with
silk. Now, I’ve kept tarantulas since I was a 13
yr old boy, and in all my 24 yrs of owning dozens of tarantulas, this was the very first
time I’ve ever experienced a failed molt. According to online forums, some hobbyists
attempt to remove the old skin, but others say not to touch it, and that it will fall
off the next time she molts. I just didn’t want to risk causing a breech
in her exoskeleton at the attachment, which would lead to lethal bleeding, and death. I just felt so bad for our goddess. She continued to spin the territories with
her thick fibres of silk webbing. I couldn’t do nothing, however, so with a
wet q-tip, I went in to apply some moisture at the spot where the carapace was attached
to the pedicle in hopes that it might facilitate its removal. Would she let me? Yes, she stood perfectly still as I applied
the water, and then again… Woops! I accidentally touched her leg. I suddenly felt like I was truly playing a
real life version of the board game Operation! More moisture… She stood perfectly still, as I gently applied
more and more water to the problematic spot. My heart sank as I could see her beautiful
face beneath her old carapace, and it looked to me like she was truly sad, and frightened
for her life. Our poor goddess. Such a beautiful creature going through such
a tough time. I decided to leave her alone now. She eventually made her way to the back of
the Arachno Sanctorium to spin more silk, and rub off more protective urticating hair,
probably to keep us away from her. But there was one last thing I wanted to do. I wanted to add a bit of moisture on this
lower end just in case she was finding this enclosure too dry. I also added a small dish which I filled with
clean water for her to drink when needed. And now all was complete. I replaced the front glass to secure her inside,
and carried the Archno Sanctorium to take its spot in the Antiverse. Over night, I hoped she would continue web-building. And sure enough, the next morning, she had. Have a look! This basic frame work of webbing was the start
of what would become a great web palace. Her old carapace had still not fallen off,
but it seems to not have affected our goddess’ ability to do her thing much, which was good. I tried to appreciate this time of full visibility
because a few days later, this is what the Arachno Sanctorium looked like as of 9 AM
this morning. Whoa! Isn’t it amazing? This web fortress will continue to get thicker
and take on a greater structure in the coming days. From what I can see the carapace is still
stuck onto her. Tarantulas typically won’t eat several days
or weeks after a shed, but when I do feed her and she does manage to eat, we’ll be certain
her old carapace is merely an accessory, like a tiara sitting on the head of the new goddess
of the Antiverse. Her webbing will be valuable at keeping the
Fire Nation within their territories, establishing peace and balance within the Ant Room. Alright, AC Family, I think you know what
is next! What should we name this green bottle blue
tarantula? Leave your name suggestions in the comments,
and as always I will choose my top 5 favourites for us to vote on in a future video. Our tarantula, reigning supreme with her carapace
crown-like halo, is representative in my mind, that the past does not have to hinder one’s
bright future. To me, this tarantula of ours is not only
the goddess of our Antiverse, but also takes the throne as the most beautiful tarantula
in the world. Alright AC Family, what did you think? Do you like our new goddess and her shrine. I sure hope she manages ok with that stuck
carapace. It seems she really loves the Arachno Sanctorium,
though which is great news. But, be sure to hit that SUBSCRIBE button
and BELL icon now so you can keep updated on this tarantula and these epic stories of
the Antiverse, and hit the LIKE button every single time, including now. Also a special announcement! It’s that time of the year again, guys! The holidays are upon us, AC Family, and as
usual, we’ve got a great Holidays Promo for you ant keepers and ant lovers wanting to
get into the hobby this year! Anyone ordering our new Ant Towers, which
are already on sale, or any of our Hybrid Nests or Hybrid Nest Gear Packs, will also
get our newly revised 2019 version of the Ultimate Ant Keeping Handbook, with new and
updated ant keeping info, a huge new section on nuptial flight schedules and distribution
info per species, and tonnes of gorgeous ant photography. Just order an Ant Tower or Hybrid Nest or
Hybrid Nest Gear Pack, add the new e-book to your cart and use the coupon code “antlove2019”
and you get the e-book for free! If you’ve always wanted to start ant keeping,
don’t miss out on this opportunity and check out our ant keeping gear at AntsCanada.com. Just a reminder that this Holidays Promo ends
January 1st, 2019, but you need to order by Dec 17 if within USA, or by Dec 10 if outside
USA, if you would like your package to arrive before Christmas. Give your loved ones something meaningful
and educational for the holidays. Ants will fill their hearts with wonder and
fun. I look forward to you all keeping ants with
me! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would just like to watch extended play footage of our new green bottle
blue tarantula! She’s gorgeous, and you will also be hypnotized
by the footage of our goddess’ splendor and beauty. And before we proceed to the AC Question of
the Week, I’d like to plug my daily vlogging channel, daily vlogs of my journey as a Youtuber
with creatures like my baby African Grey parrot! If you love birds and animals, I’d love for
you to meet my new cute little bird! I’m also giving away FREE round trip tickets
to beautiful Philippines from anywhere in the world you live, so be sure to visit the
channel and subscribe to qualify for the contest. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Why were these smaller shrimp
better suited to this river than the larger ones we initially chose? Congratulations to Ghost who correctly answered: They did not need
brackish water to breed. Congratulations, Ghost, you just won a free
e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why was the Arachno Sanctorium
a better suited home for our green-bottle blue tarantula? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

I Stuck My Arm into Thousands of WEAVER ANTS

I Stuck My Arm into Thousands of WEAVER ANTS


Before we begin today’s episode I wanted to
let everyone know that AntsCanada.com is having its big AC annual holidays Promo: the 20-2020
sale. That’s 20% off all Hybrid Series ant farms
and gear packs from now until January 2020, plus a free copy of our newly updated “Ultimate
Ant Keeping Handbook”, right now at AntsCanada.com. Click the link in the description to get your
AC ant farm today! And now enjoy today’s ant episode! Speaking of trees and being vigilant, making
sure everything was in order, I noticed the Canopy of Vortexia, our tree-top forest home
to our aggressive Weaver Ant Colony, The Emerald Empire was in need of some serious maintenance. First, the piping of the rain system had unstuck
from the glass. Also, the trees have seriously overgrown and
they needed to be cut back big time! But there’s just one problem, the only way
in was to open these front glass doors and well, it seems the weaver ants had decided
to fuse its main leaf nest to the glass. Oh boy! This whole maintenance operation was going
to be interesting! Last week, we had a fun-filled journey exploring
various kingdoms in our AC Antiverse. We visited Pacmania, this moss-adorned home
of our Surinam horned frog. Also, we prepped the moat surrounding Skull
Island, home to our ghost ants. And of course, our biggest accomplishment
last week, we crafted the greatest vivarium we’ve ever created in the AC Antiverse, a
multi-species, bioactive domain for the Dark Knights. These exciting journeys of discovery and adventure
around the ant room certainly don’t end there. This week holds yet again, another exhilarating
episode as we continue to dig deep, climb up, and experience first-hand the marvelous
territories of our beloved ant colonies. AC Family, without further ado, let’s begin
this week’s exploration! Standing tall in our collection of ants and
other animals, here in the AC Antiverse, is the Canopy of Vortexia, home to the extravagant
Emerald Empire. This savage colony of weaver ants, scientifically
known as Oecophylla smaragdina, has shown us their brilliance through the building of
their cool leaf basket nests in the trees, their collection of protein sources, and even
through their apparent understanding of sustainability and growth management of the Vortexian trees
on which they live. It seems that we have seen practically everything
these mighty and hard-working arboreal ants can do. But, this time, I wanted to push the boundary
of what is possible for the Emerald Empire’s housing, and it involves sticking my arm and
even my face into their highly guarded territories. Yup! It’s totally crazy, but hey, someone’s gotta
do it, but don’t worry. I have a plan, so stay tuned for that. But before we get started, for those of you
who are new to the channel, let’s catch you up to speed. In celebration for reaching 3 Million subscribers,
I decided try keeping these highly popular ants in the ant world – Asian Weaver Ants. Native to Southeast Asia, these Weaver Ants
are known for their arboreal life as they build their nest atop trees. To create their homes, they use silk produced
by their larvae effectively gluing tree leaves together. The transpiration from the leaves helps naturally
humidify the insides of their leaf nests, and as the leaves wilt, the ants go on to
create new leaf nests on the same tree. They seem to know when to start new nests,
which they do well in advance before their current nests wilt, and appear to somehow
have a feeling for how much their able to build sustainably so that their host plant
doesn’t die out. They’re surely one of the most captivating
ant colonies I’ve ever kept. Three months after the creation of the Canopy
of Vortexia, this is what the territory looks like now. Look! The trees had overgrown. Seems they had been working on plans for this
money tree to grow much taller and their plant management initiatives have been working! This money tree has grown leaves that extend
up to the top mesh, but here’s the very concerning problem with that: if I leave this tree unchecked,
I know for certain that its force would eventually push through the mesh, destroying the terrarium,
and setting the ants free. Hey, wait a second! Could this be the Emerald Empire’s master
plan of escape? OK not gunna even go there! Also, there were other tuning and maintenance
issues that needed to be dealt with like dislodged piping from the rain system, glass cleaning,
a hanging dead leaf nest which drove my OC mind insane, and this stray plastic cup that
fell from their feeding plate, which I’ve been dying for months to pick up and dispose. Given these major and minor concerns, it was
no doubt in my mind that maintenance was needed, but due to the way their enclosure was designed,
the only way I could get in was by opening these two front glass panels, so going into
Vortexia wasn’t something I could do every day. Vortexia maintenance definitely was something
I intended on doing as infrequently as possible and only when necessarily needed. Now AC Family, check out what else I was thinking
regarding all this! So the Dark Knight’s new bioactive planted
vivarium home we made last week, full of creatures like millipedes, bagworms, jumping spider,
etc living with the ant colony, made for a very self-sustaining ecosystemic environment. So I figured, then, if Vortexia was also made
much more bioactive, theoretically it would mean that I’d have to open the terrarium less
often and perhaps even improve the quality of the Emerald Empire’s life by making their
home much more natural, much more bioactive! And so AC Family, after careful thought, it
was then that I decided, while doing maintenance on Vortexia, it was also time for us to upgrade
the territories a notch, and transform Vortexia into a multi-species, bioactive vivarium. But before I tell you how I’m going to do
that, and what creatures I plan on adding to Vortexia, there was a neighbouring ant
kingdom that was also in need of some maintenance. To the West of Vortexia, sits the mystical
double floating islands of Avista, home to our Big-Headed ants, the Bobbleheads. You, the AC Family, named them after the big
heads of the supermajor workers. Take a look at how some of these supermajors
sport rather comically enlarged heads, compared to the ordinary workers. The big heads specialize in cutting things
up by the way! The great jaw force of the colony! Of the entire AC Antiverse, the home of the
Bobbleheads stands out because it is our only truly open-concept, glass-less ant setup. As you may see here, the potted bonsai plants
are rooted down into the soils which extend into these two jars which hold the island
up. Meanwhile, these jars are placed in the middle
of a glass enclosure, whose short walls are covered in baby powder, thereby keeping the
ants within the premises. From afar, the home of the Bobbleheads look
like floating mini-gardens. A second island is situated there in the back,
but we’ll visit that island in a sec. At the center of the main island grows a bonsai
red banyon tree, that we call the Great Tree of Life. The tree gets its name because it provides
life to the Bobbleheads in a few interesting ways. First, the tree offers the Bobbleheads shelter
as they nest beneath the solid tree, protected among its roots. It also houses herds of mealybugs, which the
ants farm and milk for their sweet honeydew excretions. Finally, the tree also eats up their ant poop,
a great fertilizer! In fact, this partnership between ant and
tree has been going so well, that the tree has grown profusely, and I’ve had to continually
trim the tree back almost once a week. In fact, I am about to do it now. Here we go! I started with the outer leaves. Now, watch this, guys! Every time I snip or fiddle around with their
sacred Tree of Life, the Bobbleheads get super mad! The ants never back down from defending their
precious tree! This has become a weekly ritual now. And oh boy! Here they come! The Bobbleheads came rushing out of their
nest with a sole mission to bite and attack my giant hands from the skies. Sorry Bobbleheads, but this process is essential
for the maintenance of your sacred Tree of Life. Hang tight! Ok, I’m done! Sheesh! No need to get feisty! Now, trimming the tree was not all that needed
to be done. First, the second island’s tree had actually
died. This once luscious bonsai tree of a different
species was now withered and dead. I suppose the species of tree did not fare
well in the semi-shaded conditions of my window, so it died. However, I couldn’t just get rid of the island
because ants were still nesting within its soils, as well. I needed to plant a new tree there to replace
the dead tree, because it does seem trees happen to be the Bobbleheads’ secret to success. I mean, look at how big the colony has grown
over time! You can truly appreciate the sheer size of
the colony every time I water the islands. They always come rushing out with their brood,
and I even get a glimpse of the royal queens surfacing at times. It was clear that this supercolony was now
bigger than ever. And so AC Family, aside from restoring their
second island by planting a replacement tree, I felt it was finally time to also give the
Bobbleheads a third floating island. Back to the Vortexia, I knew making the territories
more bioactive meant introducing more organisms to Vortexia, and so here was my plan! First, I knew I needed to increase the ground
cover vegetation. So I felt this gorgeous-looking heart-leaf
philodendron, scientifically called Philodendron cordatum, one of the hardiest terrarium plants
I know, was perfect. Next, I wanted to add some awesome leaf litter,
scooped up from my neighbourhood. It contained tonnes of springtails, isopods,
millipedes, and beneficial mites that would help breakdown organic waste to help fertilize
the plants in Vortexia. And hey look what else I found: this leaf
litter also contained a miniature species of forest roach. How cool right?! Speaking of which, check out the next creatures
I wanted to add: Dubia roaches, scientifically known as Blaptica dubia. These roaches, as you may or may not know,
are my feeder roaches, meaning I pre-crush them and feed them to various animals of my
Ant Room. But, after thinking about it for a bit, I
figured these roaches would be an awesome addition to Vortexia! They can eat decaying leaves that fall to
the floor, plus possibly the dead leaf nests from the trees. If you wish to know more about these underrated
and seldom recognized Dubia roaches, here’s a video I made about them and their home. Plus, I have been noticing that every now
and then, the Emerald Empire has been catching darkling beetles in Vortexia. The mealworms and superworms that we feed
to our various colonies in the Ant Room are actually larvae of darkling beetles. I guess sometimes the superworms survive my
pre-crushing somehow and manage to escape the deadly mandibles of their ant predators,
seeking out safe locations within the terrariums to proceed with the process of pupation, and
development into these shiny black darkling beetles, and it seems the Emerald Empire has
managed to successfully hunt these survivors at ground level. I’ve actually seen this happen with the Fire
Nation and Dark Knights, as well. Given these past experiences, I figured, why
not try to allow insect prey to populate the floors of Vortexia, reproduce on their own
while eating up decaying matter like they would in the wild, but also provide the Weaver
Ants with a supply of prey items. Now wait! I know what you guys are thinking! Ahhhh AntsCanada has changed his ways! He’s now condoning live feeding! Let’s cancel him! Hold on! I still make it a personal rule to never feed
live prey to animals like ants, that don’t need to eat live prey, because it’s a slow
and painful death for the prey item, but in this case, the prey animals would have a great
chance at escaping and avoiding the ants, by burrowing into the leaf litter or into
the ground, and can otherwise feed, breed, and live normally as they would in the wild. It theoretically would be an equal playing
field for prey and predator, in my mind anyway, so the cruelty factor isn’t technically even
an issue both for the Dubia roaches and darkling beetles living with the Emerald Empire in
Vortexia. The ants could simply wander around the forest
floor below their leaf nests to hunt for prey, which the ants do in the wild. I am sure that the co-existence of Vortexian
prey and predators would make for a very interesting bioworld. So first, I needed to remove this dead tree
on the second island in order to replace it with the new tree for the Bobbleheads. I removed the entire island from the island
network. Taking the island off its foundation base,
you can see that the jar is filled with soil in which the Bobbleheads were still nesting. I knew that removing the tree from the pot
had to be done with the utmost care because surely there were still ants nesting in the
soils. I was already expecting a tonne of Bobbleheads
to come rushing out once I they felt me touching their dead tree. So, here goes nothing! I carefully removed the rock from the island
then proceeded to cut the tree off at the roots, then attempted to firmly but carefully
pull the dead tree from the pot. Pop! The tree broke right off, and I made a bit
of a mess, but thankfully, no ants came boiling out. Perhaps they didn’t care about the tree much
since it was already dead. Good! Now, in its place I wanted to plant this baby
Schefflera plant, which also happens to be the same species as one of the trees used
in Vortexia. I feel this would be a better adapted plant
to the conditions next to my window, seeing as it’s done so well in Vortexia. I planted the Scheflera plant in. OK, so THIS WAS THE CRAZIEST THING I’ve ever
done in my life! I know you’ve heard me say this before, but
No, this is! As you may or may not know, although these
weaver ants don’t have stingers like the Fire Nation, they still possess some powerful mandibles
and a bite from these ladies combined with a painful formic acid spray is enough to make
any trespasser scream! Plus, what made this operation extra scary
was that the Emerald Empire had decided to fuse their main leaf nest to the door of their
terrarium. Could this get any more scary? I worry that as soon as I open this glass
door, it would rattle the nest, setting the weaver ants into an angry frenzy. I needed to prepare myself and make sure I
had a plan of attack. I needed to know what things I had to grab,
cut, pull out, and add before I went in to the territories. There was no time to think as soon as those
glass doors were open! I ran through the motions and checklist of
tasks in my head many times, as I knew it was imperative to get things right the first
time so the tank would be open for the shortest amount of time possible. It wasn’t a matter of if the weaver ants would
be attacking and escaping, it was a matter of how many! So AC Family, here was my plan. Are you ready? So, apparently there’s a superstition or tradition
among mango farmers, who have to deal with these ants when harvesting mangoes. Legend has it that if you whisper to the ants,
telling them that you are a friend and aren’t going to harm them, the ants will leave you
alone and allow you to pick the fruit without launching an attack. If the legends were true, this told me then,
that it was possible to work around these ants as long as I was gentle, and not just
obtrusively moving in shaking things around like a predator. Boy, did I hope I was right and the legends,
true! I put on my gloves and covered my hands and
arms with baby powder. There were ants that were already showing
signs of wanting to tear my skin up at the earliest opportunity. Why so aggressive, ladies? You can even see them here congregating at
the door opening, ready to greet trespassers with mandibles and acid. But I had no choice. Vortexia needed maintenance and there was
no other way. I took a deep breath… and looked down at
the key that would unlock the door. AC Family, behold, the new island I planned
on connecting to Avista. Isn’t it cute? It had three bonsai’d money trees, also one
of the two trees in Vortexia, so it was bound to do well as part of Avista. Green moss grew like a carpet along the front
of the island. I prepared the tray on which the new island
would rest by mixing baby powder and rubbing alcohol and painting it along the walls. Once dried no Bobblehead would be able to
scale these vertical surfaces. I then proceeded to add the two new islands
to Avista and arranged for the driftwood to create the connecting bridge between the three
land masses. And there we have it, Avista is now officially
an archipelago. Aren’t these islands beautiful AC Family? Looking from afar, the islands were a luscious
garden of greenery. I couldn’t wait to watch the Bobbleheads explore
their new territories, and of course, as always, in celebration of their new home, I provided
them with a tasty bite! “Please don’t bite.” I whispered softly, summoning up the most
calming words that came to mind: “Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel…” OK just kidding. That’s not what I said. Ahem… “Emerald Empire, I come in peace. I’m a friend, your Creator of Worlds”. The ants menaced me from the edges, watching
the tape being removed from the doors. “I am not interested in destroying your home.” With the tapes removed, I unlocked the door
and slowly opened one of the panels. Oh, there! The glass panel opened and to my surprise
the leaf nest detached quite easily without too much fuss — thank goodness! While some brave ants decided to wander out
and escape, I decided not to mind them for now, and focus on the task at hand, moving
as slowly and gently as possible. It seemed to be working. The ants weren’t rushing in a mad panic, but
were strangely standing quite still watching me. First things first. I went in and wiped the glass and the sticky
pads of the piping to improve its suction. Reattaching. There! Pipe reinstalled. One task down. Next, it was time to go into the canopy! I went in carefully and snipped away at excess
leaves. It tripped me out to see the weaver ant nests
so exposed to the outside world for the first time since they were moved in. I had to be extra careful not to touch any
of the main branches or groupings of ants. All it took was one startled ant to hit the
panic button, which would set off the release of thousands of angry weaver ants onto my
body and ultimately out into the ant room. Snip, snip. I placed the clippings on the ground. As these leaves decay, they’d contribute to
the bioactivity of the vivarium. This would also make sure that we keep any
weaver ants still clinging on to these leaves. I could feel some weaver ants crawling on
my neck now but surprisingly not biting me yet. They even crawled up my legs. The weaver ants were now all over the immediate
area and on me. The whole time, I felt like I was performing
a complex medical surgery, with guns pointed at me, ready to fire at any moment. I was holding my breath and made sure to be
unwaveringly present in mind and body. My movements needed to be precise and accurate. Every moment was crucial. My heart was beating loudly in my ears the
whole time. I noticed so many ants were already wandering
out of the terrarium, and it was in that moment that I received my very first bite Ahhhhh! The Bobbleheads were biting the superworm
housewarming gift, I gave them with such joy and gusto. It wasn’t long before the Bobbleheads had
discovered the two new islands we had prepared for them. It was so awesome to see! Ants traveled across the driftwood bridge
to check out the new territories they could call home. It was moments like this that made ant keeping
just so fulfilling! Ahhh! I brushed the biting ant away. Despite the bite, surprisingly, the majority
of the ants were still calm. I had to keep going and not be bothered by
the pain. I proceeded to carefully remove the dead leaf
nest and rest it onto the floor. Gosh, I had dreamed of removing this hanging
piece for months, I can’t even begin to describe! Now it was time to add the leaf litter. I made sure that every bit of the ground was
covered in this magical medium sauce teaming with bioactive life forms. I proceeded to add the plant. Then, I dumped the Dubia roaches. I threw in the superworms to join the party. And just when I thought everything was complete,
I remembered there was one last suction cup to restick onto the wall to fixate the pipe. But to reach this, I had to open the other
glass door panel. Now, all of the Canopy of Vortexia was exposed
to the outside world. Reaching deeper into the terrarium to restick
the pipe onto the glass, I found myself face to face with the Emerald Empire, just inches
away from my head! And when I thought that I had experienced
the worst part, there came another big surprise. Another bite “AHHH!” While the Bobbleheads were enjoying their
superworm, another battle was happening. Just nearby the Bobbleheads had seized a trespasser. A wandering weaver ant had somehow managed
to set foot on the new island. Of course, there was no hope for the weaver
ant against the Bobbleheads, who pulled at the weaver ant from all sides and mauled it
to death. A second weaver ant had also been unfortunate
enough to land on the island, and the Bobbleheads were quick to capture it. I suppose the weaver ants managed to climb
up into the lighting fixture above Avista and fell down to their demise into the foreign
ant kingdom. There was just no hope for them though, as
they were greatly outnumbered. The Bobbleheads were indeed savage! Arghh! The Emerald Empire was indeed savage! I had to finish up now! I restuck the last piping found on the other
side of Vortexia, and just like that I was done. I had only been bitten twice during the ordeal,
which is not bad! I sealed the tank up and the mission was complete! I was happy to know that it would be months
until the next maintenance visit into the Canopy of Vortexia was due. And just on time, the great typhoons arrived
to cool off the lands! Over the past 4 days, the Bobbleheads had
settled into their new network of triple islands quite nicely. I ended up swapping out the base to one large
shared glass pan for the two smaller islands, as this was much more space-efficient. My dreams of Avista becoming a huge archipelago
of floating islands were coming true. As were my dreams of Vortexia. AC Family, look! It was now a multi-species vivarium. The roaches lived happily in the forest habitat
provided by Vortexia. They occupied the leaf litter, huddled in
spaces within the driftwood, and even were daring enough to climb up into the treetops
and congregate along the screen mesh. Escaped ants were collected one by one by
hand over the passing days and inserted back into Vortexia. The rest were hunted down by the house geckoes
that run loose in the Ant Room. Speaking of hunting, I did also catch the
ants hunting the roaches. Look at this! They caught a huge adult male! I had no idea they could seize prey this big! Or maybe it had already died and they were
opportunistically making use of the carcass? Whatever the case, now that these tree-dominated
territories of Vortexia and Avista were restored anew, and the ants residing in these lands
we created, enjoying upgrades to their homes, it filled my heart with so much joy. One thing’s for sure, I learned today how
intimately connected my ants were to the trees that lived in their territories, how protective
they were of them, and just how much the health and well-being of the ant colonies inherently
depended on the health and well-being of the plants they live with. Isn’t that something we continue to discover
every time we step into these microworlds of our ants, AC Family? That to truly appreciate one organism, one
must understand the bigger picture, understand how its connected to other organisms around
it, and when you do, understand why its important to tend to, clean up, restore, respect, and appreciate the interconnected-ness of
life and the environment in which it is contained. And due to this great interconnection, Mother
Nature has set up, I learned this week, that in caring for life, we inherently care for
ourselves. After a long and successful day, I looked
down at the clippings and dead tree I had collected from our projects. Ordinarily, I would throw these away, but
suddenly an awesome idea came to me, an idea that I felt could completely change and affect
the lives of every creature and terrarium in the entire AC Antiverse! AC Family, it was time to embark on a new
and exciting biological engineering project! AC Family, did you enjoy this week’s episode? Trees are indeed integral parts of some of
our ant colonies. And like last week, this week’s episode is
in part, the AC Team’s collaboration with Mr. Beast, Smarter Everyday, Mark Rober and
thousands of other YouTubers in their quest to plant 20 million trees by January 2020. So, be sure to be part of the team trees movement,
by visiting TeamTrees.org to help out! It only costs $1 per tree. This simple gesture will make such a big difference
globally! Also, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please
be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button so you don’t miss out on the epic real-life stories
of the ants and other creatures of the ant room, and don’t forget to hit the like button
every single time including now! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like to see some extended play footage of me working within Vortexia,
as well as the aftermath. The new Vortexia is just awesome with all
its new creatures and modifications. Go check it out! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Why do we need to cycle our tank before adding
in our great water beast? Congratulations to 9Hashbrowns who correctly
answered: You have to cycle your tank because if an
animal went inside without cycling it, it would be filled with poison, namely ammonia
from waste. Congratulations 9Hashbrowns, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Name one of the bioactive creatures found
in Vortexia. Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

This Killer Fungus Turns Flies into Zombies | Deep Look


We like to think we’re in control … that
our minds are our own. But that’s not true for this fruit fly. Its brain has been hijacked by another organism
and it’s not going to end well. It all starts when the fly is innocently walking
around, sipping on overripe fruit. It picks up an invisible fungus spore, which
bores under its skin. For a few days, everything seems normal. But inside, the fungus is growing, feeding
on the fly’s fat … and infiltrating its mind. At dusk on the fourth or fifth day, the fly
gets a little erratic, wandering around. It climbs to a high place. Scientists call this behavior “summiting.” Then it starts twitching. The fungus is in control. The fly sticks out its mouthpart and spits
out a tiny drop of sticky liquid. That glues the fly down, sealing its fate. A few minutes later, its wings shoot up. And it dies. Now that the fungus has forced the fly into
this death pose … wings out of the way … nothing can stop it. It emerges. Tiny spore launchers burst out of the fly’s
skin. Hundreds of spores shoot out at high speed,
catching a breeze if the fly climbed high enough. They’re the next generation of killer fungus. It continues for hours, spores flying out. These flies are in the wrong place at the
wrong time. And if spores land on a wing, which they can’t
bore into, they shoot out a secondary spore to increase their chances of spreading. So how does a fungus take control of a brain? At Harvard, Carolyn Elya is trying to understand
that. She thinks the fungus secretes chemicals to
manipulate the fly’s neurons, maybe stimulating the ones that make flies climb. But don’t worry: The fungus can’t hurt
humans. Scientists have tried to harness its power
for our benefit, to kill flies in our kitchens and farms. They haven’t had any luck though. The deadly spores are actually pretty fragile
and short-lived. It turns out, this lethal puppet master does
only what it needs to for its *own* survival. Hi, it’s Lauren again. If you love Deep Look, why not help us grow
on Patreon? We’re raising funds to go on a filming expedition
to Oaxaca, Mexico. And for a limited time, we’re sweetening the
deal with a special gift. Link is in the description. And if you’re craving more spooky videos,
here’s a playlist of our scariest episodes. Don’t watch ‘em after midnight. See you soon.