Finger Family Song – Bugs With Matt | Nursery Rhymes, Children’s Song | Learn English Kids

Finger Family Song – Bugs With Matt | Nursery Rhymes, Children’s Song | Learn English Kids


Wooah! 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 It’s the five finger, bugs finger family. Wow! Cool! Dream English Kids Hi, friends. Are you ready for the Bugs Finger Family song? Here we go! butterfly finger, butterfly finger Where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? butterfly, butterfly caterpillar finger, caterpillar finger,
where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? caterpillar, caterpillar ant finger, ant finger, where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? ant, ant grasshopper finger, grasshopper finger,
where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? grasshopper, grasshopper spider finger, spider finger
where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? spider, spider Great job! Let’s sing the
family finger song one more time. Here we go! butterfly finger, butterfly finger, where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? butterfly, butterfly caterpillar finger, caterpillar finger, where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? caterpillar, caterpillar ant finger, ant finger, where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? ant, ant grasshopper finger, grasshopper finger
where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? grasshopper, grasshopper spider finger, spider finger,
where are you? Here I am. Here I am. How do you do? spider, spider Great job! That was fun! What was your favorite bug from the video? Was it the butterfly, the caterpillar the ant the grasshopper or the spider? Let us know in the comments. goodbye, see you, thank you, goodbye Dream English Kids Let’s have a look at
another song.

The Rise of Fentanyl: Drug Addiction On The I-95 – Two Years On

The Rise of Fentanyl: Drug Addiction On The I-95 – Two Years On


# Oh, say can you see…? # Get him on the ground. HE GROANS
Get him on the ground. Sir! It is the number one public health
challenge of our time. Sir! Pulse. MAN CONTINUES TO GROAN It’s not a poor people thing
any more, it’s not a inner-city ghetto drug any more,
it’s everywhere. It’s hard to even recognise some
of these people when they’ve lost a lot of their humanity down here. Tomorrow’s not a promise. It’s not heroin that’s
killing our people, it’s fentanyl. MUSIC: Star-Spangled Banner I’m not going to die from this. Like, I’m not.
Not going to die from this. It was like, we went from
20 overdoses to 80 overdoses in the matter of a month and we
were like, “What the hell happened?” # In the land of the free… # I feel like it’s a waste
of my life, it’s a fucking
waste of everything. # And the home of the… # I would say that fentanyl
is the Horseman of the Apocalypse, and it’s the one named Death. # ..brave. #
SIRENS WAIL For decades, Interstate 95
has been notorious for its role in the illegal
drug trade in America. Stretching from Florida to Maine,
this corridor gives cartels easy entry to major cities. We first met Anna two years ago. She was a new resident on Baltimore’s backstreets
of addiction. A lot of people walking by. All right, come on… SHE YELPS Do not do that! Dude, you scratched me! Are you OK? Little bit of a rush? Anna was recently released from jail
after serving two weeks for prostitution –
which means two weeks on no heroin. What time is it? And since then,
she claims to have only taken pills. What time is it? Is there something in it?
Barely. If you want it, I’ll go grab it… The last two years,
I guess nothing’s changed but everything’s changed.
I know that sounds really weird but I’m still down here, I’m still jumping
from house to house. I’m still with the same guy. I feel a little trapped. I’m scared to shoot up again
but I know eventually I probably will if I stay down here. I’m not sure
if I see my future right now. I mean really when
I think about it, I don’t know what I’m going to do in three years,
I don’t know what I’m going to do tomorrow, I don’t know
what I’m going to do in an hour. I mean, all I can do is hope
that I’ll do the right thing, you know, and not
what I’m doing now. This is gang-run west Baltimore, the epicentre of Baltimore’s
opioid epidemic. Patty, a former addict,
formed Angels of Addiction just after her son died
of a heroin overdose. Here, walk on my feet. A lifeline to the lost,
she has fed and clothed addicts and their families
on these streets for years. Any time, 24/7. I lost my only son in 2002,
and God blessed me with many, many children and
it’s an honour to serve them and they’re very precious people,
a lot suffer from the disease of addiction, it’s a very big
problem, an epidemic here. I could never count throughout
the years how many people that I’ve helped or known
that have died from this disease. At least 100 people
in the last few years. It’s sad because they’re my… You know, next time we come,
somebody might say, oh, so-and-so didn’t make it. That happens often. Especially since this
fentanyl has been out. Fentanyl is very dangerous,
because it’s stronger than the heroin and people are
overdosing on it and it’s, you know, really scary and very
alarming and we’re… We’re losing a lot of people. I chase fentanyl,
I chase carfentanil because it’s the only dope
I can feel any more. But it is a big problem,
because it’s so powerful, people that have been clean
for years and just recently decided to relapse, erm, they end up OD-ing. You know,
off of a half or a quarter pill. That’s what it is, it’s not heroin. I used to get high,
I don’t get high no more. I’m just addicted to the cut,
fentanyl. They stick it in capsules
and then you stick it in your arm,
not knowing what you’re getting. And it could be a little bit
of nothing or a whole lot of too much. And I’ve had friends drop… Several, more than several, handfuls, that have had
a little bit too much. Every day coming down here,
seeing my friends, I would hear about one of them
overdosing or dying. It’s very dangerous and
it’s killing a lot of people. The sickness of addiction
is when you hear people overdosing and dying, the addict wants to know,
where’s that stuff? Because they want the stronger,
longer-lasting stuff. But they don’t realise
that that’s that next hit, that may be the last. The bottle’s empty. Thank you, ma’am. I appreciate it. Probably nine out of ten people
do fentanyl and don’t even know it. None of us know what we’re doing. A lot of the people that we know
either died or moved or went to jail. Some go to rehab
but they always come back. Everyone out here
is hooked on fentanyl. It’s not really so much the heroin,
like I said, it’s not even in it. The fentanyl’s what
everybody’s into it now. I said I’m not going to leave
my boyfriend ever. And if he’s down here,
I’m down here. Either he goes to jail,
or I go to jail, we’ve never been clean together
since I’ve been with him. Well, since we’ve gotten high. She said she hasn’t used
no needles, so I’m proud of her, she’s been doing good. But she always threatens me,
so that’s her threat, and that would make my heart,
I told her it would break my heart. We meet Anna as she searches
for her morning fix. Addiction seems to be fighting back. Hi. Hiya. Hiya. Yes, I’m fine,
you don’t have to ask. SHE MUMBLES I’m fine. How was your night? Great! Tell us what happened?
Nothing. The last thing I feel like doing
is fucking talking right now. Yeah, I’m still here. Anna and Dave squat in abandoned
houses, moving frequently to avoid being found by landlords or police. The landlord actually ended up
coming while we were inside so we had to hurry up and go hide
in one of the rooms and then escape out the house
when he wasn’t looking. So I again got
interrupted on my sleep. What did you spend your money on? I got a pill, he got a pill
and then we each bought crack after we got our deal. That we needed, like gas and stuff. What were the pills? I don’t know, dope? What else? Then you said you had to go
get some more money, how did you do that? Go and get a date. Anna prostitutes herself
for the money needed to buy drugs for herself and her boyfriend Dave. It never ends, you know? I wasn’t even
planning on going outside. It’s just that we didn’t
have any money. So because of that,
it took me for ever to get a date. What time of day were
you out trying to get a date? It was night-time. What time of night? Something like five in the morning. But I didn’t go until
like one in the morning. I can’t remember,
but I usually go in and out, I don’t just… What I mean is I usually go outside,
I’ll get a date then I hurry. Get the money, either rob them
or just do a super date and come back home and then
I go back out, before morning. Or it depends, sometimes I
don’t even know I want to do drugs and we hang out. Most people, when they are 23,
have a goal in life, have wishes, desires. Do you have any? No. I don’t plan no more. Why not? I guess because it’s like
too late to fix. Anna still claims that
she has not injected heroin since her release from jail. Her body tells a different story. She heads off in search for a place
to stay for the night. But that wasn’t her first priority. I was just sniffing it just to try
it and make sure the powder’s… Like, heroin’s bitter,
but fentanyl has kind of like got a sweeter taste to it. Anna is back in the
full grip of her addiction. I don’t know how to live
in any other way no more. Am I wrong? Like, we don’t know what else to do,
do you understand? Like, when people break their arm
and legs, they need rehab to walk. Like, we need rehab to learn
how to live, like all over again. Name’s Nathan O’Brien. I’m from Kentucky. My name is Olivia Light,
I’m from Ojai, California. My name’s Ed, I’m from
New Haven, Connecticut. I’m Johnny Montasanno,
I’m from Long Island, New York. My name’s Al, I’m from Ocean County,
New Jersey. My name’s Joe Wilkins,
I’m from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. My name’s Tommy,
I’m from Birmingham, Alabama. My name’s Millie,
I’m from Currituck, North Carolina. I’m addicted to heroin.
I was addicted to heroin and prescription opiates.
I was addicted to heroin. I struggled with heroin
for four years. I’m a recovering heroin addict. I struggle with prescription
pills and heroin. My addiction was
pain pills and heroin. I struggled with heroin. Over the course of the last
two years, I wouldn’t say that it got better. I would say that it’s gotten worse. We see more and more patients
coming in that have experienced multiple overdoses
prior to coming in. I really don’t see an end in it. I don’t see it getting
better at all. Jodi has dealt with the
opioid crisis since she was a child. Her mother is a lifelong addict. And she now runs an addiction
recovery centre in Florida. This addiction changed me
from being a talented, ambitious young kid into basically a degenerate,
just a shadow. It took my family,
my friends, my freedom. It took everything. My addiction took my self-worth,
my dignity, my self-respect. My health, my friends and family,
my education, money. What are they going to do with me? I couldn’t get a job,
I couldn’t keep the job. Most of my family members
consider me dead. I’m thankful that we have a place
where patients can come, seek help in a safe environment to start working on the reasons
why they turn to drugs. But every single day
it’s a multitude of new people. It’s like the floodgates have opened
and it’s just non-stop. I’ve been clean
for four and a half years. And two months,
I’ll have five years. Currently, I’ve been clean
over 100 days. Just over one year. I’ve been clean for,
the 23rd of this month, it will be 60 days. Since March 20, 2017. I mean, the date resonates
in my brain, March 19, 2016. That’s when I got clean
and it wasn’t easy, but it was the most glorious
experience of my life. Brittney seems to have travelled
a long way from her days of addiction. But the beaches of Jacksonville,
Florida are only a couple of hours’ drive from Orlando,
where Jodi first introduced us to Brittney two years ago. When Brittney admitted to
The Recovery Village, she absolutely was
ready for treatment and admitted the fact
that she had an addiction problem. She had OD’d several times –
very, very close calls – and she was ready. I’m addicted to heroin. SHE SOBS I want to stop, but I can’t. It’s that right here – I remember
thinking how would it feel if my mother would have seen me
at her kitchen table, where, you know,
I grew up eating at. I don’t know, it’s just when
you’re in addiction, you don’t care. Find the Narcan, find the Narcan. Seeing that video, watching her at this table… ..and nodding off as they call it, nodding and falling asleep and then pretty much
drooling, it was horrible. It was really devastating
to see that. I was sick for three months,
like, throwing up constantly. I thought it was a bad flu. I got all these different
tests done, one of them was a pregnancy test. I remember her coming back
and telling me, “You’re positive.” And I was like,
“I’m positive for what?” And she told me I was pregnant
and I immediately started bawling. Brittney had a baby girl,
beautiful, sweet baby girl. Say cheese, baby, say cheese. And about a month after that,
sadly, Brittney relapsed again. And this was very devastating. My mom… Me and my mom got in a
fight earlier in that morning. My mom said some things
she didn’t mean and I was already in a very bad mental place. I went out to get formula
and ended up at a gas station and an old dealer ended up
being at that same gas station. Ended up purchasing a bag,
but I came home and we had a nice dinner, held my baby,
I sat right here. We had been sitting
here at the table, chitchatting and the baby
was snoozing. Brittney had asked me, that
she wanted to go to the bathroom. So the baby started
waking up and I held the baby. Then Brittney was in the bathroom. I remember sitting on the toilet
and talking to my mom from the living room. And I snorted the whole bag. My mom’s in the other
room with my child and, and I just kind of nodded off
and I felt OK for a little bit. And my mom’s voice got distant
and then everything went black. And I had the baby in my arms
and I go into the bathroom and she is passed out, gurgling
and drooling from the mouth, leaning against the wall,
sitting on the toilet. Um… It was devastating, it was scary. I had to get her to wake up
and I ran into the living room, the baby was sleeping again. I put her down in her little bed
and ran back into the bathroom shaking and screaming at Brittney
and smacking her on her face to try to get her to come out of it. And she’d finally came out of it,
I’m at the same time trying to call 911. And came out of it to my mom
holding my baby in her arms, on the phone with paramedics,
trying to bring me to. I just felt nothing but anger. Anger, frustration again, and I really, I was so angry at her,
so angry and so hurt, and so confused how
she could do that. I did not know what happened. But once I started
putting things together, I was just kind of
in disbelief at myself. So… I wasn’t thinking about my daughter,
I wasn’t, I didn’t care about my mom or how she felt. I just felt so depressed. And not good enough,
like, I just felt like my daughter didn’t deserve me.
She deserved better. I felt like my mother
could raise her, I mean, it’s just… But, yeah. You just don’t think
that they’re going do this again, especially now,
especially with a baby, especially knowing
that you have that beautiful little baby, how could do you this? This drug pulls them in,
like none other. It steals their dreams,
it steals their lives. It’s almost stole my grandbaby’s
mother from us again. I’ve told Brittney that one
of the saddest things I would ever have to do would be to have to tell my granddaughter about her mother, that her mother was an addict,
and she tried very hard to get past this addiction,
but was unable to, and died from it. In 2017, we had just under 72,000
Americans die of drug overdoses. Jay, Jay look at me. That’s a phenomenal number. It’s almost hard to imagine. Has he taken drugs or anything?
I have no idea. It is the number one public health
challenge of our time. Opioids are now the biggest
drug epidemic in American history. The number of deaths from
opioid abuse have skyrocketed over the past 15 years… Killing tens of thousands
of Americans every year. That’s more deaths than
from car accidents and from guns. Emergency services overwhelmed. Another family burying a loved one. She overdosed in her car,
while her two-year-old daughter was in the back seat. CHILD CRIES CHILD SOBS In certain age groups,
between 25 and 34 in the United States,
20% of all deaths are due to opioid overdoses. Of that 72,000, the majority
are opioids and the majority of the opioids are the synthetic
products, such as fentanyl. Fentanyl is taking the opioid
epidemic to a new level of urgency. Fentanyl, a drug more
powerful than heroin. It’s 50-100 times
more potent than morphine. Fentanyl’s so potent, you could die
with the syringe still in your arm. It’s so potent,
so incredibly potent, that it only takes a few
milligrams to cause a death, and now we see fentanyl lacing
not only the heroin supply, but we see it in cocaine and
methamphetamine, in all sorts of drugs because
it’s dirt cheap. If heroin’s the devil, to continue with
the biblical analogy, I would say that fentanyl is
a Horseman of the Apocalypse and it’s the one named Death, because it just brings death. All right. Yeah, if you just go
straight here I’ll show you some of the more affected areas. Kensington is Philadelphia’s
Ground Zero for opioids. And it has just been
declared a disaster zone. Dan’s family has also
battled with addiction. He now fights on behalf
of those still struggling. I mean, this becomes
what the neighbourhood is. You see, most people around here
you’re going to see are high. You know, so the neighbourhood
is almost entirely consistent of people who are abusing. Can’t walk through
this neighbourhood without being offered drugs. It’s hard to even
recognise some of these people, it just seems like
they’re in a jungle. And they’ve lost a lot
of their humanity down here. Heroin’s been in Philadelphia
for decades, this is not a new story. It’s just that recently the death
toll has gotten so out of hand and the farther you look,
the more you realise how truly desperate things have become. I believe in 2016
we had 272 homicides and over 900 overdose deaths. Last year we had around
300 homicides and 1,200 overdosed. So it went from being
three times the murder rate to four times the murder rate
in one year. If you look at the charts
of what opioids are killing people or what drugs are killing people,
in recent years fentanyl has just taken off
literally just like a rocket, but now because of, you know,
how deep some of these people are in the throes of addiction
and how high their tolerance is, fentanyl has become introduced
slowly into the mix so that people can get high again,
because what some people don’t realise, is that a lot
of these people who are using drugs on a regular basis aren’t
necessarily using it to get high, they’re using it to maintain
their addiction, make their headache go away, to sort of regulate. Any amount of fentanyl would kill
most people who aren’t addicted almost instantly. If it continues to get worse,
like, where does it go from here? I am a heroin user. I’ve been using heroin
for about 20 years. Alex is just one of the 70,000
active heroin users currently living in Philadelphia. This ain’t no life for nobody,
I mean. This is like the bottom
of the barrel right here. This ain’t for nobody. I don’t wish this on my worst enemy. I generally have to score about
six times a day to keep myself well, just to be able to function, really. It’s all it comes down to,
just to be able to function. I hope that it’s fentanyl
because I’ve been doing it for quite some time, and heroin
that’s actually heroin will not get me well. My body actually
craves the fentanyl. It’s different,
it’s a different high, it’s a different feeling and I’m not
really sure what the difference is between the heroin and the fentanyl. I don’t know. But, it’s what my body
craves and without it, I’ll be just as sick as I am now. I feel like it’s a waste of my life. I mean a got a lot of people
in my corner who care about me, a lot of people in my family
that love and care about me, and want to see me do well,
and I’m not doing nothing except sticking a needle in my arm,
every day, all day long. Waste. Waste of time, waste
of energy, waste of money. It’s a fucking waste of everything. It’s just a waste. In need of a place to sleep
Alex heads to an abandoned house that he and other addicts
sometimes use to crash. What’s going on? Not too much. It makes me do things
that I normally wouldn’t do. Lie. Manipulate. I’ve never been like the person
to lie and tell stories, and to, you know,
try and get over it, I was not like that. But my addiction has
definitely made me that way. Makes me feel alone,
it makes me feel vulnerable. Makes me feel scared. Makes me feel unsure
of what my purpose here is. Manchester Fire And Emergency. Request for an ambulance
at Manchester. It’s the Shell gas station,
the patient is in the bathroom. She has overdosed. It’s going to be for
a female in her 20s. My caller states he went into clean, found her overdosing in the bathtub,
she was not conscious. The caller states
that she has overdosed, the patient’s going to be just
outside the church on the side. Where are the people located? She said they’re in
the middle of the street. Two people are overdosing. For a male in his 50s found
unconscious, not breathing. There’s a needle next to him. 35-year-old male.
He is not conscious, not breathing. Overdose. I don’t know what to do!
Stop talking for a moment. I don’t know what’s happening
to this generation, you know, I look out my window, you know, I’m like looking at Ground Zero,
for the United States, for fentanyl,
you know, and fentanyl dust. It’s like what the heck am I seeing? Truck 1811 – response. Outside of 340, 340 Hanover Street
for a man down, possible overdose. SIREN WAILS We went from 20 overdoses to 80
overdoses in a matter of a month and we were like,
“What the hell happened here?” Why did it hit us? Because of synthetic
heroin, it was fentanyl. We don’t have a heroin problem,
we have a fentanyl problem and we really realised that
back 2015, when we got hit so hard, but we’ve been chasing it
ever since, to try and get ahead of this and it’s really tough
to get ahead of something like this. I talk to these guys all the time,
when I’m down here, I’m pretty invested in my personnel
and I worry about what they do. I go to a lot of the calls that they
go on because I just want to see how they’re,
you know, handling things, and make sure that… I know there’s going to be some
compassion fatigue, it’s really… It’s really difficult to see this. I mean,
when I grew up in the Fire Service we never saw this much,
you know, you know, death. He’s not unconscious,
but you don’t really know, you know, when he used, you know,
what’s going to happen. They don’t want to hit him
with Narcan right away, because if they do,
he’s going to be sick. Right now they want to get
him out as, you know, as slowly as possible, so what
they’re going to probably do, is we’ll get him in the back of the
ambulance, get him to the hospital, and get a monitor on him and probably give him some Narcan
via an IV and so on. All right, Dale, we probably
should go to the hospital, get you checked out there. Oh, I don’t think I need to go
to on the side hospital. Well, yeah, you’re not… All right. Give me your hand there,
we’ll take you, we’re going to walk you back here. Tell us what happened. This gentleman was seen
on the sidewalk, unconscious, with very limited breathing,
and had just done heroin as he reported. He was actually one of the honest
ones where he admitted to doing it. Sometimes they come up
and they don’t admit to doing the heroin and, or fentanyl. And this time he did and we know
we’ve got to take him to the hospital to have him checked
out and have him not lay down somewhere elsewhere no-one
can find him and him passing away. You go on calls like that,
in this neighbourhood, and it’s a lot,
it’s the aftermath of – you ask them where the needle is. “I threw it in the street.” OK, well now, where is it?
Who plays with it? Is it an adult that picks
it up and throws it away? Or is it a child that plays with it? Then it turns into he said he did
half fentanyl, half heroin, mixed in a bag. So the little baggy
that he has, where’s that? He probably threw it on the ground. A kid plays with that,
sees it, is it candy, whatever? It’s that whole,
from my personal stand point, it’s frustrating,
because you see it all the time, every single day. Since this crisis has hit,
we go out on these types of calls over and over and over
again, all day long. So 10% of the overdoses that we get
called to for an opiate, that results in death. So how did you make it over here?
You just walked over? Yeah. Yeah, have you
ever overdosed before? Doug, can you get up? OK. You gotta. You can’t stay here! Dude, we were talking
and having like a full conversation and you just fell asleep
like, mid conversation. Douglas has obviously
overdosed on opiates. He admitted to using
fentanyl, so, yeah. This guy needs help. He needs somewhere to go,
and you know, and like I told him, it’s like there’s help
for him, you know. It’s, but it’s getting
to these people, and you know, hey, I don’t judge you people
but you don’t know where they came from, you don’t know what kind
of trauma was in their lives, so, he needs help
more than anything else. He’s sick. So… With no increase in
budgets or personnel, Manchester Fire Department now
spends 70% of their time responding to drug-related calls. Layla. Layla. Layla. Wake up. We got here, the police
officer came by the park, was doing some surveillance. Gentleman here saw her passed out, called 911, unresponsive,
we came here. She showed
all the symptoms of an overdose. Right away we administered Narcan,
started breathing for her. He’s going to give her another
Narcan, so this will be the
second one that we put in, She didn’t
respond to the first one. So we’re going to put
in a second one. If this one doesn’t work,
they’ll probably do an IV and then put it in that way. Narcan is used to block the effects
of opioids in an attempt to reverse overdoses. Now they’re going to put
the Narcan in by IV, because the two nasals got her
to come round a little bit but not fully, so… There we go. Hi, Layla! Careful, Layla. It’s just unfortunate, you know,
daytime at a park, you know. You know, you think you’re going
for a walk in the park, you know,
the next thing is an overdose, so… If this crisis right now don’t worry
you then there’s something wrong, you’re not paying attention to it. Every day,
people are out on the highway, driving down that I-95 quarter,
to the source city or source cities where these organisations
have these drugs readily available. It’s all day long,
it’s Monday through Friday, and on the weekends
and it’s night-time, daytime and during business hours,
the product is always available. But look, New Hampshire,
as of this morning hasn’t had a heroin overdose death. It’s not heroin
that’s killing our people, it’s fentanyl,
and it’s changed the game. It’s cheap, it’s easy
to manufacture for these cartels. They don’t want to worry
about opium any more, they don’t have to
worry about the plant, sun, water, how they’re going
to grow these, growing cycles, they don’t worry about any of that,
they can mass-produce this stuff in the same labs
that they have set up, that they’ve used, you know,
when they were making methamphetamine or any other drug,
and they’re able to manufacture it faster, and cheaper. Working with local law enforcement,
the DEA has identified dealers operating from a park. He’s getting into a blue BMW. He picked up. He’s looking around. The blue BMW is leaving. So you can see how this works,
we’re set up in the park, we’re sort of
at a position where we can see what’s happening,
we see customers coming in. He’s coming to the park. They’re getting served,
they’re getting back in the car. Our guys are calling it out
to the surveillance units, the surveillance units are taking
them away to a place where, whether it’s in New Hampshire
or Massachusetts, we can safely
make these traffic stops. Straight ahead. OK, we have another
New Hampshire customer, guys. Another
New Hampshire customer arriving. A vehicle possibly going on 95. We’re up here in New Hampshire now,
we just stopped a car that we saw it pick up from that same park,
and this woman too had the stuff stuffed inside of her body cavity. She’s pulling
it out for the troopers. Here’s the evidence here
that they just removed from this female here
on this traffic stop. Again, fentanyl,
driving up into New Hampshire to pollute our communities. The cartels will never change
what they’re doing. They have found an avenue
now with fentanyl, where they can make so much money. The other thing is we’re seeing,
and this really frightens me is, the dealers are now mixing
fentanyl with everything. We’re seeing an increase
of fentanyl mixed with cocaine, Fentanyl mixed with methamphetamine,
and if you think about it, it doesn’t even make sense,
because really they do opposite things in the body
and in the brain, but to the dealer they almost look at this
fentanyl now as a magic dust that’s just a money maker. They think if I just put
a little bit of this in there I’ll be able to spread that product
further and make more money. So they’re trying to figure out
how to get that recipe to the right point, where they can
still addict everybody, but have them come back
as much as they can, and that’s really
what’s happened here. They’ve killed more people
than war has. I like the person I am today. I used to hate myself. When we met Steven,
I didn’t know him previously, he didn’t want to hear
anything about recovery. He didn’t want nothing
to do with the conversation, even though he was kind
and sweet and respectful. I knew he just wanted to get up
and go get high that day. He had it written all over his face. I’ve seen it. I’ve seen that scene, like,
and it disgusts me how I looked. Couldn’t even keep my eyes open. I couldn’t form a sentence. Slurring, and like,
I believe I was very close to overdosing that day. Runs my life. I don’t need it
but I feel like I do. Never could get enough of it. And it just… It kind of just fed itself,
it just took everything from me, and I, and I gave it, I gave
it everything I had, willingly. It kinda took control. I’m not the same person,
you know what I mean? I’m not that person. I believe drugs, heroin especially,
completely changes who you are. It will make you do things
that you never thought you’d do. Make you into somebody
that you’re not, you know. Steve had hit rock-bottom
and just accepted an offer from Jodi to leave Pennsylvania
for the first time in his life, and fly to Florida for treatment. Hi, Jodi. Hi, Steven, how are you, dear? How you doing? I’m good. I’m so glad you made it.
How was your trip? Good? OK. Feeling OK? Yeah, sure. I wasn’t… But I know it’s not too late,
that can still make it right. What I told them. After three months in rehab,
Steve left Florida clean and in search of a new life. One without the temptations
of America’s opioid crisis. Steve and I have kept
in touch here and there, throughout the course
of the last two years. I know that he’s still clean
and sober, I know that he’s living in Kentucky,
you know, I haven’t spoken to him on the phone. SHE KNOCKS ON DOOR We just text every couple of months. Oh, my God! Hi. Oh, how did I know he had
some tricks up his sleeve. Hello.
Oh, hi, how are you doing? I’m good. How are you?
I’m good! Oh, my God,
look how healthy you look, boy! You look amazing. Yeah? Uh-huh.
I’m glad to see you. I’m glad to see you. Oh, that’s awesome,
that’s such a surprise. Come check out the house.
All right. Sounds great. So you left Florida,
went back to Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh area. Yeah. And wasn’t going to work or… I had an opportunity to move here,
and I kind of jumped on it, you know what I mean,
for the first time in my life I was able to just pick up and move. Before, I was so afraid to leave. You were afraid to leave
what, afraid to leave? I was afraid to leave the area
I was in because I didn’t know where to get the next one, cos I wouldn’t know where to get it
if I left. Right, it was the… Right, so the drugs kept you captive
in so many different ways. Yeah, yeah, it kept me there,
in the same area. Now, I had the freedom
that I didn’t have to stay around the area,
because I didn’t know where I was
going to get the next one. Does it exist here? Like, it technically
exists everywhere? It exists. It’s everywhere. Right, so,
I mean, it’s happening here? It definitely is here,
I’ve seen it a little bit. I know an addict when I see one. It’s definitely here. You have to go looking for it.
If I wanted to find it. It doesn’t come knocking
at your door or drop you off like a pizza, right. Yeah, like back
home, it was right in your face… Sure. ..and it came and found you. I really like it here. It’s really nice.
I feel better than I’ve ever felt. I don’t remember a time where
I felt this good about myself. Two years ago, I couldn’t even
dream that I could be here, doing what I’m doing,
and as happy as I am. If there’s one individual – Steven –
who I know that we had a hand in saving his life, it’s worth it. Nobody’s life’s better
than someone else. We all deserve a chance. At success. And to live.
Just some of us have lost our way. It’s not a poor people thing
any more, it’s not an inner city ghetto drug any more,
it’s everywhere and it’s killing people left and right,
every single day. Something’s got to be done. It’s got to change. What’s it going to take?
You know what I mean? Someone can see the power like that,
losing their child too it. Before they open their eyes to it? Like, something’s got to give now,
or there, eventually, there’s going to be no coming back from it. I just hope we haven’t
reached that point already. My story doesn’t end here. This isn’t the last time
anyone’s going to see me. Just I…
I’m not going to die from this. Like, I’m not.
Not going to die from this. I want my daughter to be proud
of me, and I want my… I want people to be proud of me. You know, I want
to be proud of myself. If I was your mother right know,
what would you want to say to her? Oh, mom, I’m sorry. I know, I mean, I can’t tell her, “Hey, wait, couple more years I’ll
get better,” I can’t tell her that, I don’t know. That’s what sucks about this. Tomorrow’s not a promise. For her or for me. Oh, my greatest hope
is that I can beat the addiction. That I can just go
back to being Alex, that I can be a good son,
good brother, good father, that’s like my greatest hope. That I can beat this,
walk away from it, and just not look back. We lost contact with Alex,
so went back to search for him. But he was nowhere to be found. # Gave proof through the night # That our flag was still there # O say does that
star-spangled banner yet wave # O’er the land of the free # And the home of the… # ..brave? #

The real war on drugs: America’s opioid epidemic | Foreign Correspondent

The real war on drugs: America’s opioid epidemic | Foreign Correspondent


What did he take? I don’t know… I don’t know sorry. Okay let me get my gloves on. I’m going to hit him with Narcan, okay? What’s his name baby? It’s a deadly addiction claiming more lives
than car crashes or even gun violence. Where’s 108? Tear open package and remove pads. It is now safe to touch the patient. Start CPR. More than 900 Americans from all walks of
life now die each week from opioid drug overdoses. It’s a national crisis triggered by pain
killer pills. What I want the American people to know, the
Federal Government is aggressively fighting the opioid epidemic on all fronts. Two million Americans are now addicted to
prescription or illicit opioids – four times the number of twenty years ago – and a brand
called Oxycontin led the way. That drug just about wiped this county out. It was so powerful. There are more injection drug users in San
Francisco, than there are high school students. The scale of it is absolutely huge. It’s block after block after block of people
of all ages, races and gender in various stages of addiction. Some looking like they’re right near the
end of their journey, others just starting out to go down the same dangerous road and
I have to say it’s really confronting seeing so much of this. On the streets of New York, protestors are
clear on who to blame for the opioid crisis. The Sackler family are American Establishment. They built a $13 billion dollar fortune upon
their private company Purdue Pharma. Purdue created Oxycontin, a highly addictive
prescription painkiller. It’s an opioid, double the strength of morphine. People die. Sackler’s lie! The Sackler’s are big philanthropists, donating
millions to America’s prestigious museums and galleries. I was addicted to Oxycontin. They were trying to say that it was for peace
of mind and social calm. I took it for those reasons and I ended up
locked in my room for three years. Renowned photographer, Nan Goldin, leads a
campaign to shame these grand institutions into rejecting the Sackler dollars. We’re here to call out the Sackler family
who’ve become synonymous with the opioid crisis. We’re here to call out all the museums who
allow the Sackler name to line their halls, tarnish their wing, who honour the family
who made billions off the bodies of hundreds of thousands. Inside the Sackler funded Guggenheim Museum,
a reminder of a boast by Purdue President Richard Sackler that Oxycontin would generate
a blizzard of prescriptions and billions in profits. And the Sackler’s continue to profit off
the bodies of four hundred thousand people. The elusive Sackler’s never speak to the
media. But now, across America, the victims are coming
for the family in a fight back that could become the biggest class action in US history. We have to bring down the Sackler family. They should be in gaol, next to El Chapo. Deep in the Appalachian Mountains of West
Virginia rise the town of Welch. Capital of McDowell County, one of the poorest
in the country. McDowell leads the nation in per capita overdose
deaths. About 20% of the community is addicted to
pills, heroin, alcohol or ice. The abuse is largely hidden behind crumbling
facades. There’s a burnt out building there… used
to be a school building. McDowell County was a thriving county at one
time, early 50s and late 60s and even in the 70s when I graduated from high school in 1973. Anyone could get a job anywhere that you wanted
to with the mining industry. Martin West is County Sheriff. This former miner witnessed the decline of
the local coal industry and downward spiral. The County has probably torn down hundreds
of houses that have become dilapidated and people have moved out and left, went to other
states and other counties. A part time missionary who served in Haiti,
is now trying to save his own community. People wouldn’t think that this is America. No. Honestly, it’s like being in Haiti. It’s been pretty bad. You couldn’t find a job and people turned
to drugs and alcohol because they were overwhelmed with the depression and the mental anguish
that they were suffering. It’s just like the pharmaceutical company,
a billion dollar industry, they find depressed areas and they know lots of people there got
problems and then they introduce them to this and that – pills and drugs of any type. And that’s what they do. Patients in pain often have problems finding
effective relief. Purdue aggressively exploited this ready-made
market with its new high potency pain killer, Oxycontin – even giving out free starter
packs. Less than 1% of patients taking opioids actually
become addicted. What was an end of life medication, was at
the Sackler’s direction, dispensed for everything from emotional distress to bad backs. This medication does not turn you into a zombie. It has turned me into an active person again. I got my life back. Now I can enjoy every day that I live. I can really enjoy myself. I am kind of ashamed of it but I’m honest
enough to say, yeah I’ve been down the beaten path before. I’m trying to clean up and I have been for
a minute now. Just trying to do better and stay that way. A month out of rehab and Rocky Kuhn is determined
to break the grip of addiction that’s devastated his family. My mother, of all people, my mum, she did
it. She battled it. She was a… a lot of the doctors they’ve
been getting arrested for writing prescriptions and my mum’s doctor was one. My mum died. She died in a car wreck but addiction was
her best friend. I know me personally I didn’t do drugs. My mum died, my life fell to pieces and I
jumped headfirst into all of them. Rocky grew up in a neighbouring county. It wasn’t just at home but at school too
that he was mourning the casualties of Oxycontin addiction. In my graduating class, probably a third of
them are dead already. I’m just thirty-three years old. There’s no sense in it. It’s all drugs. It’s fed into the community that’s just…
we didn’t have a chance. None of them, nobody had a chance. It’s just addiction is a real thing. I started when I was twelve. I had five state championships, Tri-State
Golden Gloves Championship. Rocky’s dad, a local schoolteacher, put
together this boxing gym to get people off the street and away from poverty and drugs. Redemption in the ring. This is my world. I love this place. I love boxing. It’s a way of talking. It’s one way of getting to know somebody,
when you throw hands with them and you earn respect. Other places that I used to live in, I find
the trouble. And at least here, I’m on my skateboard
or I’m in the gym or I’m working out, you know and it’s something more productive
than street life. Just down the road in the town of War, is
one source of McDowell County’s misery. We had a drug bust up here about a couple
of weeks ago, we arrested about eight and every time we get out like this and go up
and down the different areas of the county, people will come up to me and want to give
me a drug tip. But the biggest dealers were legal, pharmacies
like this one, dispensing massive quantities of what derisively became known as Hillbilly
Heroin – in total, 12 million pills were dumped in a county of only 20,000 people – pushed
by compliant doctors and pharmacists. These are the small operations, they call
them pill mills and they were closed down because of the situation. We’ve had several of them within McDowell
County and this is one of them. They’re wanting to make the money fast and
see how much damage they can do is what my observation of them is. Sheriff West is furious that it took 15 years
before tighter controls were finally imposed on Oxycontin. In 2007 Purdue was fined $880 million dollars
for misleading doctors and patients on the drug’s addiction risks. By then, it was too late. That drug just about wiped this County out
it was so powerful. And it was the talk of the town and the talk
of the county, the talk of the state. And every night on the news you’d hear of
someone dying in the state or in other states because of Oxycontin. And it was so addictive and they knew that,
the pharmaceuticals knew that. Welch has been ground zero of America’s
opioid crisis for about 2 decades now and while it’s slowly strangling the life out
of towns and cities like this, it’s also spreading like wildfire right across the United
States. On the other side of the country, in one of
the biggest, most vibrant and best prepared cities with a long history of harm reduction,
they’re being swamped by the next wave of this crisis. San Francisco. Liberal. Rich. Tech capital of the world. Despite decades of experience in progressive
drug treatment, forged at the height of the AIDS crisis, the city’s buckling under the
weight of addiction. Downtown injecting drug user numbers have
tripled since the crisis first struck far off Appalachia. Though harm reduction programs have kept the
death toll lower than other cities. Don’t try this at home. There are more injection drug users in San
Francisco, about 25,000, than there are high school students – 16,000. And just a couple of blocks from here is probably
the highest level of population that we see in street use in heroin and homelessness. Inside City Hall there’s growing fury at
the Sackler family and their pharmaceutical company, Purdue. City Attorney, Dennis Herrera makes a direct
link between pills and heroin. Absolutely. I mean if you look at it, four of five injectable
drug users started on getting opioids, whether it be Oxycontin, prescription or non-prescription
pill taking. So there is a direct correlation between the
two. How much of a burden is this on your community
trying to deal with the mess of this opioid crisis? It’s incalculable. It’s hundreds of millions of dollars that
the taxpayers of San Francisco are forced to expend because of in some, at least to
some degree, for problems created by others. In terms of effort, we have been a pioneer. In terms of result, demonstrating the magnitude
of the problem, we have been overwhelmed. San Francisco has no joined 1600 other cities
and counties in suing Purdue Pharma and 8 Sackler family members who profit from the
company. It makes sense that we would use the full
power of our legal arsenal to make sure that those responsible for creating this epidemic
are held to account. The family itself from Purdue gets about,
I think it’s a billion dollars a year that inures to them in terms of payments that go
to the family as a result of sales of Oxycontin. That’s extraordinary! A lot of money. So they’re profiting while much of the rest
of the country is suffering. I think that’s a fair statement. On the streets, George has been living rough
for a while. He now shoots up heroin, but says nearly everyone
in this alley got their first taste with Oxycontin. Probably everybody started like that. Because that’s how you’re introduced to
the drugs you know is by pills. And little by little it’s like your money
gets tight, and you’re just like well where, where can I get something close to this but
cheaper? And then heroin, you know? I do sort of think that those pharmaceutical
companies do play a big role. That’s why my mom always used to tell me,
don’t trust doctors. They’re not your friend. You know, these doctors here are not anywhere
near your friend. Did your family contact you at all? What? Remember I helped you get shoes one day with
your mom. Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Police here know the users. They have to balance treating this as a health
crisis, as well as a criminal problem, aware that George is battling to pay the multiple
daily hits of Mexican heroin. It’s just like a dime, you know ten bucks. You know ten bucks will get you, you know
a cool high. On a daily basis I probably spend like $50
to $80. It’s clear that addiction doesn’t discriminate. All over America it’s going on right now. And it’s all the youth, you know, is being
hooked on this shit. I just think it’s embarrassing you know
other countries aren’t going through this. There’s still poverty, a sense of desperation. There’s still public drug dealing and drug
use. San Francisco based drug expert, Professor
Dan Ciccarone travels the country, mapping the wreckage of the opioid crisis. He’s tracked Oxycontin use morphine to a
second wave of heroin injecting and now into an even deadlier third wave, a synthetic opioid
called Fentanyl, coming in from Mexico and China. Fentanyl’s about 40 times as potent by weight
as heroin. And so because of that sheer potency, we’re
concerned that it’s too much for the typical human to consume, therefore a higher risk
of overdose. There’s also a new, a fourth wave if you
will coming up right behind the opioid crisis which is stimulants. East Coast cocaine, West Coast methamphetamine,
we’re seeing a lot of new meth users out here. They’re mixing meth and heroin. I think we’re about half way through it. And I know that’s terrible bad news, but
if you see the rate of decline now, we are seeing a levelling off in the pill overdose
death, we are seeing a levelling off of heroin only overdose death. The Fentanyl curve is still going up. It’ll take ten years to get to baseline. George may not have that long. He’s graduated from pills – to heroin mixed
with meth – that’s now laced with Fentanyl. The daily fix has become a raging habit. Whoever is putting that shit into all the
drugs is smart because Fentanyl’s very addictive so if you spike that shit in very drug, every
user’s gonna feel it. You wonder why you keep coming back so quick
to get a hit, it’s because of the fucking Fentanyl in that shit, you know? That’s why I know I’m coming back every
thirty minutes for this shit. Because I could get high and go about my day,
but now it’s like that’s just calling me you know? It’s like you know it’s like a real, it’s
a fucking, like a King Kong on my back. We’ve been in all of these hotels here. We’ve taught people overdose prevention,
we’ve done HIV tests. Paul Harkin is another who knows these streets
better than most, delivering syringes and disease tests to the homeless. Like in the city there’s about a 122-ish
of these single room occupancy hotels, you know low income, some people are only allowed
to stay for 90 days. He’s a Director at GLIDE, a social justice
movement founded by the United Methodist Church, that for half a century has been saving lives. Organisations like GLIDE Harm Reduction are
absolutely what’s required to get us to begin to dismantle the war on drugs and start
to treat drug users with compassion and with evidence based intervention. From the last numbers we have were 2017 I
believe there was 72,000 overdose deaths nationally. I mean it’s just an incredible volume of
mostly preventable deaths. And our people in harm reduction know that
there has always been an opioid crisis in other communities and what we’ve seen here
is the changing demographics where more white people are being impacted by this. On any given night, we’ll give out maybe
3,000 to 5,000 syringes to people who inject drugs. Usually we give maybe 7 or 8 NARCAN kits for
people to prevent overdose. So the purpose of what you’re doing now
is to stop the spread of disease primarily. That’s the primary thing you know but, you
know what I’d say that’s part of it, but I’d say also part of it is just connecting
people. Then when the FDA started to clamp down on
Oxycontin, what we saw then was a lot of people who had developed the habit of having to switch
to heroin and we saw a sort of explosion of people looking for heroin and then subsequently
fentanyl. We’re seeing more fentanyl enter cuts in
the drugs and overdose deaths this year are going to be up. I’ve OD’ed several times and I’m still
here. You know I’ve tried to hurt myself a few
times too … I’ve been through it. Alicia has been using drugs for decades and
knows the reality of that deadly shift. Right now I’m really struggling right now
because I’m out here by myself. My family members now… they won’t hardly
talk to me too much anymore because of where I’m at and what I’m doing. Just across town, GLIDE’s gospel choir reaches
out to San Francisco’s elite. Love is the answer. They mingle with America’s most famous recovering
Oxycontin addict, former Democratic Congressman, Patrick Kennedy. Son of a late Senator, nephew of an assassinated
President. He deploys the political star power of the
family name. There’s no question that this was a drug
that knew no socioeconomic, gender, background. It really was meant for anybody who was unsuspecting
and if that person also had a high propensity for addiction as I did, then it was off to
the races the moment it was prescribed. Love is the answer. They over marketed a clearly addictive drug
called Oxycontin, knowing full well that it was addictive, much like the tobacco industry
knew for generations that cigarettes were addictive but refused to acknowledge it. Tonight is about fund raising for hospital
beds to treat those felled by the spin cycle of drug addiction, mental illness and homelessness. If it’s good enough for cardio vascular
disease, if it’s good enough for cancer, it ought to be good enough for mental illness
and addiction which affects every single family in this great country of ours. Thank you very much. It’s a test Kennedy says the Trump White
House and Congress are failing miserably, allocating barely 20% of the funds dedicated
to fight HIV at the height of the AIDS crisis. I was serving on the President Trump’s opioid
panel on recommendations to fight this epidemic and I was shocked knowing as we all do, that
President Trump comes from a family that has been impacted by alcoholism and addiction,
that he would not take this historic moment and really run with it. The well-heeled crowd dig deep, a half a million-dollar
pledge here, a million-dollar donation there. Patrick Kennedy wants billions more from the
Sackler family and Purdue Pharma. There is no doubt in my mind that we’re
going to get a tobacco sized verdict against Purdue Pharma and those who are also culpable
in this conspiracy and this corruption. Purdue Pharma continues to deny any responsibility,
accusing critics of exaggeration, blaming users and drug dealers for the crisis. The company’s considering declaring bankruptcy
to head off the looming avalanche of lawsuits. 130 Americans now die of opioid overdoses
every day. Time is not on the side of those at the bottom
of the opioid spiral – they may not live to see a settlement. You know when you’re involved in an addiction
like this, it’s hard. And it’s sad, you know? Because you feel so lost and alone. You feel like you have nobody.

What if all Insects Disappeared? | #aumsum

What if all Insects Disappeared? | #aumsum


It’s AumSum Time. What if all insects disappeared? No worries. I have their photographs. You might think insects are inconsequential,
but the reality is. Without them, there probably would be no life
on earth. The first life to get affected, would be plant
life. Most plants in the world are angiosperms,
that is, flowering plants. Without insects pollinating them, plant life
would gradually disappear. Gradually, birds and mammals feeding on plants
would also disappear. Further, insects are food for many birds,
frogs, reptiles, etc. Without insects, they would also start dying. Then, animals eating those animals would also
start dying. This would ultimately lead to a domino effect. Finally wiping out the top of the food chain,
that is, human beings. Also, don’t be surprised, if you suddenly
see a lot of dead things everywhere. This is because insects are decomposers. Without insects, decomposition process would
take much longer. What if earth lost oxygen for 5 seconds? We would need to organize a search party. No. If it was just 5 seconds. We wouldn’t notice changes in our breathing. But do you know what would happen around us? Earth’s crust contains 45% oxygen. Without oxygen, crust would crumble. Causing the ground to crumble and we would
be in freefall. Buildings, bridges and concrete structures
would crumble into dust. As oxygen is the binding agent for concrete. Cars would stop. And planes would fall from sky as their combustion
engines wouldn’t work without oxygen. Also, losing oxygen means losing almost 21%
air pressure. This would cause our inner ear to explode,
causing hearing loss. It would also become darker suddenly. Why? For sunlight to reach us, it needs to bounce
off air particles like oxygen, dust etc. No oxygen means much fewer particles to bounce
off, thus much darker. What if the sun disappeared? We would need a lot of flashlights. No. The sun’s enormous mass and gravitational
power locks the planets in their orbits. If the sun disappeared, the earth would fly
off in a straight line into space. Earth would collapse into darkness only after
8 minutes. As sunlight takes about 8 minutes to reach
earth. Moon would disappear as it doesn’t produce
light of its own. Plants would die, as no sunlight means no
photosynthesis. Within a week, earth’s temperature would drop
below 0 degrees Fahrenheit. Dropping to negative 100 degrees Fahrenheit
within a year. Making it impossible for us to survive. Ocean surfaces would freeze. However, water in the interior would stay
liquid, due to heat from the Earth’s core. Only microorganisms who don’t require photosynthesis. Would survive by converting core’s heat into
the energy they need. Thus, without the sun, humans wouldn’t exist. What if everyone went vegetarian? Then I will turn Pizzaterian. No. Meat industry requires a lot of land to feed
and maintain livestock. This leads to deforestation and an increase
in greenhouse gases. Turning vegetarian would free up that land. Restoring at least 70% of it to natural forests. Thus cooling the planet. Also, today there are around 1 billion cows. Who excrete large amounts of methane. Methane is a deadly poisonous gas, 20 times
more harmful than other greenhouse gases. Cutting out meat would decrease methane in
the atmosphere. Human deaths would also go down. Chronic illnesses, cancers, strokes, etc. Would drastically reduce, leading to reduced
medical costs as well. However, the meat industry generates a lot
of employment. We would need to think of alternative employment
measures if everybody goes vegetarian. But the overall positive impact on the climate,
our health and the planet cannot be ignored.

Mycobacterium chimaera infection

Mycobacterium chimaera infection


Hello. My name’s Andrew Chukwuemeka and I’m
a consultant cardiac surgeon. Heater-cooler units are used in open-heart
surgery to raise and to lower a patient’s temperature when they’re connected to the
heart-lung machine. They are a very important piece of equipment which we use in heart surgery.
Unfortunately though, it’s the case that these units have recently been linked to a potential
risk of serious infection. Mycobacterium chimaera infection has recently
been identified as a potential problem worldwide. In the United Kingdom we estimate that those
patients that have had heart valve surgery have a risk of about 1 in 5000 of having acquired
this infection at the time of surgery. For other open-heart operations the risk is even
lower. If you’re in the ‘at risk’ group – that is,
you’ve had open-heart surgery or a heart transplant or a lung transplant – but you’re feeling
well then there is nothing that you need to do now. What you should do is when you next
see your GP, you should make them aware that you have had heart surgery and make sure that’s documented in your medical records. There’s no test that can predict whether or not you’re going to get this infection, so there is nothing you need to do now if you’re feeling
well. The symptoms of Mycobacterium chimaera infection
are unfortunately not specific and they can take a long time to develop – up to five years,
we believe. If you’re not feeling well, our advice is that you should see your GP in the
usual way and if you are found to have this infection then a specialist heart and infection
team will come together to decide what the best treatment would be for you. The risk of infection with Mycobacterium chimaera
at the time of surgery is low, and we put in extra measures to reduce that risk even
further but it can’t be eliminated entirely. If you’re about to have heart surgery then
your doctor should discuss this in detail with you. It is important to remember, though,
that the risk of getting this infection is very much lower than the risk of not going
ahead with your heart surgery in most cases. The NHS is working very hard to reduce the
risk of Mycobacterium chimaera infection after heart surgery. Detailed guidance was issued
to all hospitals where heart surgery is carried out in November 2015. No cases of infection
have been identified in patients who have had surgery since November 2015. If you’ve had heart valve surgery since January
2013, the hospital where you had the surgery will be in touch with you and your GP to provide
you with more information about the risks of this infection. But it’s important again
to realise that if you re feeling well there is nothing that you need to do now.

How long do termite treatments last?

How long do termite treatments last?


Hey, everyone it’s Isaac from Accurate Termite
and Pest Control. How long do termite treatments work?
There are many options available to homeowners as far as termite control
methods and products, and they all will differ a little bit for
residual and how long they work. I will focus, for the purpose of this
video, on the two most popular termite control methods number one being
fumigation. Fumigation refers to covering an entire house under a tarp or a tent.
Today in California the fumigants used during fumigation have no binding or no
residual properties. That means that in the three-day process of fumigation
once the product is completely aerated it, does not leave
anything behind that produces provides long-term termite control. It only works
during the fumigation itself. If you wanted to prevent a reinfestation of termites, you would have to have some sort of ongoing maintenance. Which
leads me to the second most popular termite control method and that is local
treatment with the use of a product called Termidor(r). UC Berkeley did an
independent study where they tested many of the local treatment products
available and found that Termidor(r) was the best as far as effectiveness and
residual. Termidor(r) does have a residual and the residual for Termidor(r) is right
around six months. So, Termidor(r) does continue to work roughly for six months after its been
applied. So if a termite re-infested an area that had been treated by Termidor(r),
it would continue to work on that new swarm or that new infestation. So there you have it. Thanks for watching.
If you’d like more information on what UC Berkeley found including what they
found regarding orange oil, you can click on the ( I ) we have a video about that [YouTube only]. If you’d like to know how often you should do termite maintenance in order to prevent
re-infestation and keep your property in good shape, again you can click on the
( I ) right here and find the video on YouTube or just browse through our video
library [on Facebook]. Thanks for watching let us know if you
have any other questions and we’re happy to be of service. 1(844)GOT-ANTS 1(844)GOT-ANTS