A Thyroid Cancer Epidemic – Tracking America’s Fastest Growing Cancer

A Thyroid Cancer Epidemic – Tracking America’s Fastest Growing Cancer


It showed the fastest increase in terms of the incidence rates
compared to any other cancers. But of course, causes and their risk effect are which are responsible for those observed increasing occurance are largely unclear. So right now there are a couple different explanations for those. The first, is the increased medical attention to thyroid nodules has resulted in a large proportion of a small thyroid being diagnosed. But it cannot fully explain the all the observed increasing
trend. …Thyroid cancer incidence rates has increased to almost three times so from 1994 to 2009. For example, for women before it’s like a 6.6 per 100,000 people. Right now, it’s already 21.4 per hundred thousand people. So it’s becomes the fifth most
common — before a severe rare cancer. So now we try to study what’s the exact environmental risk factors could be responsible for those increasing trends. So currently, we are speculating two major environmental risk factors. One, is increased radiation exposure particular to diagnostic X-ray exposure. And another is environmental chemicals like a flame retardants which have been demonstrated in animal studies can change this thyroid hormone levels which is a major key point for developing thyroid cancer. So the flame retardants actually is existing almost everywhere. This kind of buyer regulation, all of their furniture or construction materials have to contain those flame
retardants to prevent fire. So the first study was funded by the American Cancer Society in 2010. It’s a population based case control study in Connecticut. We’re planning to recruit 450 cases, thyroid cancer cases, and 450 population-based healthy controls. We’re trying to investigate the radiation exposure during the repair capacity and a risk of thyroid cancer. So this, we’re using the questionnaire interview to collecting all those exposure
information. It is mandatory for U.S. military people to have HIV testing every two years. So the serum repository archives all those serums following the testing. So they almost are representing 100 percent of the personnel in the U.S.
military. So we’re using pre-diagnostic serum samples as we know the disease itself and its treatment might affect the serum concentrations of those environmental chemicals levels. So we are using those pre-diagnostic serum sample will not bias the results, and there will be a great
opportunity for us to address the causal relationship between the
environmental chemicals and the thyroid cancer risk. There is just a recent report showed that in incidence rates of thyroid cancer in military people even higher than the general

Short scene from What’s Up Doc? – Bugs Bunny – English Subtitles

Short scene from What’s Up Doc? – Bugs Bunny – English Subtitles


Things were tough in that year. A lot of actors without a work. Hey felllas … Here comes “Elmer Fudd” that big runner of those big stars. He is looking for a pathner for his act. Mommy … mommy … Here’s your sonny boy! Nobody else’s Look at me mommy … Mommy! … Mommy! … [Solo Instrumental on Violin] [Singing “Ain’t We Got Fun”] ♪♪ Every morning, every evening. Ain’t we got fun? ♪♪ ♪♪ Not much money but, oh, honey. Ain’t we got fun? ♪♪ [Now singing “You Must Have Been A Beatiful Baby”] ♪♪ You Must Have Been A Beatiful Baby. ♪♪ [Humming] Bugs Bunny! Why are you hanging around with this guys?! They never amount to anything! You got too much talent! I need you in my act. I’ll give you equal billing. You’ll be a star! You’re great! You’re wonderful! I need you! What do you say Bugs? Subtitles by the Amara.org community

How To Make A Ginger Bug || Glen & Friends Cooking

How To Make A Ginger Bug || Glen & Friends Cooking


welcome friends so I know we’ve been on
a bit of a roll lately making syrups for pop for soda pop if we take a step back
probably five or six years ago we did a ginger syrup as part of a cocktail video
series that we were making at the time and since then we’ve also built
ourselves a little brewery in our basement and we brew beer all the time
and one of the things I like to throw into that sort of brewing process is
making naturally fermented ginger beer and so in order to start that natural
fermentation process you need natural organic ginger root like this and you
need to chop it up and start the process of allowing the yeast and the bacteria
and all of the biome that is growing on the outside of this ginger you need to
sort of coax that to life and get it really rocking and rolling and it’s a
process that takes somewhere between three to five days and it just starts
out with a little piece of ginger like this so I’ve got about 30 grams of
ginger here and when I say 30 grams you don’t need to be exact if you grab a
piece and it’s 25 you’re fine if you grab a piece and it’s 50 you’re fine but
if you can weigh it that’s great and you want to just chop it up you don’t have
to chop it up too fine you just need to chop it up to release some of the flavor
from the inside and also to increase the surface area just run a knife through it
is gonna get you there now you don’t want to peel it contrary to so many sort
of vanity blog posts that I read where they tell you to peel the ginger first
you don’t want to peel it and the reason you don’t want to peel it is what you’re
trying to encourage is all of the bacteria and yeast that lives on the
outside of the ginger you want to get that growing and if you peel off the
outside of the ginger you’re going to peel away most of the things that you
want so you have to leave the peel on so I put this into this is 500 mils of
water which is two cups generally and then to this I
want to add two tablespoons of white sugar
now the yeast and the bacteria are going to eat the sugar they’re going to feed
on this sugar so you want to put that in there and just give it a stir or give it
a shake you don’t have to be too crazy with the shake now I’ve got this lid on
and it’s just sort of on but you can see it’s wobbly you don’t want to tighten
the lid down because this is going to start producing carbon dioxide and you
want that carbon dioxide to escape if it can’t escape the pressure builds up and
you could have a bottle bomb on your hands the other thing is if the pressure
builds up to a certain point the yeast slow down and they stop working and you
don’t want that to happen either so this is going to sit on the counter back here
until tomorrow when we move on to the next step so on day two it’s looking
pretty cloudy which is excellent and it smells smells really gingery with just a
faint wisp of yeast so now we need to feed it again
so the same amount of sugar and yeast on days two three four and five that you
added on day one into the same amount of water you don’t add any more water at
this point and a lot of people are going to ask because I see the questions all
the time why not just put all of the ginger and all of the sugar in at the
beginning and just let it sit for five days which you know is a great question
the answer to that is we’re trying to build a yeast colony so there’s a very
little bit of yeast on the outside of the ginger but in order to build a
really vibrant community of yeast and other bacteria you need to slowly ramp
it up and as much as yeast eat sugar and they need sugar to live and to grow too
much sugar all at once at the very beginning will actually slow the whole
process down you’re not going to kill the yeast but
they’re not gonna be healthy it’s kind of like you’ve eaten Thanksgiving dinner
and you don’t want to get up off the couch to do the dishes
same sort of thing over feed the yeast they’re gonna get sluggish they’re not
going to multiply quite as quickly and the whole process is going to get slowed
down so you want to stir this really well I would suggest shaking it a couple
times between feedings even usually oh here’s my stir stick I use a stir plate
usually in this process you don’t want to add too much oxygen
but in these beginning stages oxygen is your friend so you want to get oxygen
into the liquid and you want to release the carbon dioxide you also want to keep
the yeast in suspension so stir it or shake it if you homebrew you’ll probably
have a magnetism mixer like I have or stir plate use the stir plate definitely
use the stir plate the stir plate is going to keep the eastern suspension
it’s going to release the carbon dioxide and it’s going to add oxygen to the
liquid and those three things will help you grow a yeast colony much faster so
just follow those instructions and I’ll see you in another three or four days
three or four days later what you have is ginger bug and as you can see there’s
bubbles working here there’s yeast it’s creating co2 it’s also creating alcohol
and you’ve got the perfect yeast starter culture for making naturally fermented
naturally carbonated ginger beer and it’s really easy to take care of this
stuff you’re probably going to use somewhere between 1/2 to 2/3 of this in
a batch of ginger beer and we’re also going to use it in a whole bunch of
other things as well a lot of different naturally fermented sodas so you’re
going to use half the two-thirds of this you’re going to top it back up to water
to about the same level throw in a tablespoon or two of sugar
maybe chop up a little bit more ginger and throw that in as well and then you
can keep it in the fridge and if you keep it in the fridge you only have to
feed it once a week and a feeding is that process of draining off the water
topping it back up putting in a little bit more sugar
giving the stir and putting it back in the fridge and what you use that liquid
for can vary a lot and we’re gonna use it in a lot of different places so yeah
Oh any of the beer brewers out there who have tasted their yeast starter and said
oh it’s awful exact same effect this is going to taste bad but the end result is
going to taste great you can really taste the sort of sourness there’s a lot
of alcohol in there so there’s the yeast which is mostly sacra myiasis probably
wild beer yeast there’s probably some lactobacillus in there adding to the
sourness but no one really knows until you give this to a microbiologist and
they test it and then they can tell you what’s inside and what’s inside mine is
going to be different than what’s inside yours and inside someone else’s all of
that comes down to what was on your ginger when you bought it what’s in the
air in your kitchen and what’s on your sugar that you put in all of those
things are going to change the makeup of the biome of this ginger beer so now
that we’ve got this come on back and we’ll make our first batch of ginger
beer with it and we’ll also see what other great things we can put this in
thanks for stopping by see you again soon you

Insects: White Pine Weevil, 4-H Forestry

Insects: White Pine Weevil, 4-H Forestry


– [Narrator] The next insect
is the White pine weevil. Again, another weevil. This one is distinguishable
from the pales weevil because of the two white blotches near the rear end of the insect. These are distinguishable. You can see these if you’re
using your magnifying glass. Also the snout, you can
see the snout there, is really skinny and it’s very long compared to the pales weevil. Those are your only two characteristics between the adults to tell them apart. It has a really skinny long snout and it has those two
white patches right next to each other on the
rear end of the insect. The damage for the white pine weevil occurs in the shoots and in the leaders. It may look similar to the
damage of the pales weevil. The pales weevil’s in the
stem of young seedlings and the white pine weevil
is gonna be in the shoots and in the leaders. You can see where they bore
in, there’ll be little holes and splits where the
larvae bore in and feed in these shoots and stems. And that’s the white pine weevil.

Infections and Birth Defects (NIH, 1966)

Infections and Birth Defects (NIH, 1966)


[A woman walks up to a medical clinic.] [Narrator:] Today in the United States, one pregnancy in five fails to produce a living, healthy child 126,000 mentally retarded children are born each year. Millions more suffer from various defects. Infections are among the preventable causes of abortions, stillbirths, and damaged infants. Research on the relationship between infections and birth defects is the major assignment of the Section on Infectious Diseases, Perinatal Research Branch, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness. The section works directly with other institutes, including Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Child Health and Human Development, all within the federal government’s Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. A number of infections can cause abnormal pregnancy outcomes. These include rubella, cytomegalic inclusion disease, rubeola, mumps, herpes simplex disease, western equine encephalitis, chicken pox, smallpox, gloxinia, polio, hepatitis, Coxsackie B virus, influenza, syphilis, tuberculosis, toxoplasmosis. The Perinatal Research Branch serves as research headquarters for 14 medical centers throughout the nation which participate with the Neurology Institute in the Collaborative Perinatal Research Project, a study of birth defect causes. This young woman, Mrs. Owens, represents one of 50,000 mothers who, with their infants, are taking part in this collaborative project. In addition to infections, genetic, obstetrical, and other perinatal factors will be considered in the study. Mrs. Owens will give blood at intervals to aid in the study of infections of pregnancy. Her child will contribute smaller amounts of sera at specified intervals. Each time Mrs. Owens’ blood is taken, 40 ml is collected in two 20 ml vacutainer tubes. The specimens provided by Mrs. Owens are allowed to clot at room temperature. Then, placed in a refrigerator overnight to provide maximal retraction of the clot. This procedure allows the technicians to obtain a maximal yield of serum, that fraction of the blood containing the reactive particles to be studied. Tubes are ringed to loosen the clot prior to separating clot from serum in the centrifuge. Specimens are spun for 15 minutes at 2,000 revolutions per minute in a refrigerated centrifuge. [Samples are removed from the centrifuge.] Next, a technician employs a 20 or 25 ml pipette to pull the serum from the two tubes into a single container. [The technician examines the solution inside the long glass tube.] The serum is then transferred to four 1 gram vials. The contents of each vial can be used several times for different tests. The blue line indicates a critical 3 ml mark. If filled beyond this mark, the vial might break during freezing or thawing. Packets of sera are stored at minus 15 to minus 20 degrees centigrade. Cartons are filled with the packets. Fifty pounds of dry ice will keep the specimens frozen for four days, even at summer temperatures. Shipments are made to the Serum Center, Section on Infectious Disease, Bethesda, Maryland. The specimens are logged in by coding clerks at the Serum Center. Each specimen is checked for quantity and quality. Good quality frozen serum is straw-colored. Records are prepared. The packets are placed in aluminum trays, then they are stored at minus 20 degrees Centigrade in one of the four Serum Center freezers. More than one million specimens are available for testing. Priorities for study are determined at staff conferences. For example, during the German measles epidemics, rubella virus was investigated extensively. As a result of the staff conference, statistical personnel using the records in the Serum Center, select the sera of patients to be tested. A tally sheet prepared after the selection enabled personnel to locate the sera. The vials to be tested are taken from their trays, placed in polystyrene blocks and transported to the laboratory. These lightweight polystyrene blocks, tailored to the needs of the section, each hold up to 200 vials. A micro-technique has been perfected to simplify, extend, and speed up the testing. It employs smaller tools, smaller test amounts, yet gives reliable results. With countless blood tests to perform, ordinary procedures would not be feasible. When the vials of sera have thawed, an automatic diluting machine mixes one part of thawed serum with three parts of saline. The dropper takes up the serum, then flushes it out with the saline. In preparation for the test, each cup in this disposable plastic plate receives a drop of saline solution. Long-handled loops calibrated to pick up .025 ml of solution are dipped into the various sera specimens. Several loops can be handled simultaneously. Each contains a different specimen. One of the loops holds the solution made from the sera contributed by Mrs. Owens. The stylus of each loop is rotated in the fingertips to ensure good mixing. The loops carry solution from one row to another for serial dilutions. Specific antigen is added by pipette. A drop measures .025 ml. Mumps antigen, for example, is added. By using different antigens derived from various microorganisms, the section is testing for more than 100 infections, which are of importance to man, to determine to what extent they may contribute to birth defects. The red line marks a serum control which receives no antigen. This will pick up false positive reactions. Few false-positive reactions occur. Next, complement is added to the antibody/antigen mixture. Complement is a substance that takes part in the reaction of antibody with antigen and provides an indirect measurement of the reaction. The plates are refrigerated at 4 degrees Centigrade for 16 to 18 hours. This gives time for the fixation of complement, if any, to take place. If Mrs. Owens’ sera has mumps antibodies, evidence that she has been exposed to this virus, the antibodies would react with the antigen. At the same time, complement is being fixed, or used up as part of the reaction. Next day, sensitized sheep red blood cells are added with a .05 ml dropper. They will provide a way to detect whether complement remains in the test solution or has been fixed. The plates are sealed with a press, taken to a 37 degrees centigrade walk-in incubator, and placed in the shaking machine for 15 minutes. After shaking, the plates remain in the incubator for an additional 30 minutes. A sedimentation period of four hours at room temperature is routine to allow any red cells that were not broken up, or lysed, by unfixed complement to settle. A centrifuge speeds up the process of concentrating intact cells. The test plates are ready to read. Infection is evident when the reaction between antibody and antigen fixes complement, then complement is not free to lyse the red cells. As a result, the positive test appears as a button of red cells. In a negative test, there is no such accumulation of intact red cells. They are broken up, and the liquid appears pink. The more diluted samples had less antibody and a less-apparent button of red cells. In a positive test, the button is decidedly visible. The data on infections is a vital part of the mother’s history. Other variables, such as age, number of previous pregnancies, manner of delivery, also are recorded. The IBM cards become masses of information to be fed into modern electronic computers. These can give answers in days that formerly would have taken months to acquire. The computers enable scientists to correlate millions of bits of information…to view related events from new perspectives. However, the judgment of highly trained investigators is essential in analyzing this data on birth abnormalities correctly. The section of infectious diseases conducts a number of related studies employing a variety of test methods. For example, the fluorescent antibody technique permits the viewer to see fluorescent-labeled antibody attached to specific antigen. Ultraviolet light excites the fluorescence. Literally, spotlighting the reaction. Tissue cultures of placenta and cord are studied to detect pathogenic effects of viruses. A characteristic pattern of cell destruction identifies certain viruses. Animals are studied, including ferrets, and monkeys. Pregnant Rhesus monkeys are injected with rubella virus or other agents to determine at what stage in development of the fetus effects might be observed. An infant monkey is delivered by cesarean to see whether virus can be recovered from organs or if defects are occurring. Mrs. Owens and other mothers participating in the study, the laboratory workers, hospital and clerical personnel, special testing procedures, all are a part of the research story on infections and birth defects. The accomplishments of this research and of the overall perinatal studies will become part of medical communications useful to family doctors, obstetricians, pediatricians, and other specialists throughout the world.

How To Treat Fungal Infection – 6 Easy Ways

How To Treat Fungal Infection – 6 Easy Ways


Natural ways to beat fungus. Do you have
questions about fungal infections like who gets them? Where do they happen? Is it
a toenail fungus, a chronic sinus infection, a respiratory disease and what
are the treatment options and how can you prevent it? So after watching this
video, you’ll know the four types of infections, how you can avoid fungus, you’ll
know the difference between yeast candida and fungus and what treatments
are available and the six solutions for treating fungal infections and as a
bonus, the four advanced therapies for candida, yeast and fungal infections. Hi,
this is Dr. Jason West in the West Clinic in four generations, a hundred
years of healing with me and now, before I go on, I need your help, I want to you
to help as many people as possible a cause to help people achieve and
maintain optimal health without going to doctors, without unnecessary drugs,
without unnecessary surgery, aggressive interventions and the value that I bring
to you is that the information and the report that goes with it,
and in return, would you please like and share the video? Thank you for doing that.
I was asked yesterday by a patient, “What can you do about infection?” I replied,
‘What type of infection?” because there are four types of infection, there’s bacteria,
there’s virus, there’s parasites and fungi and after the discovery of
antibiotics, it seemed like everyone assumed infections were bacterial and we
just hammered people with antibiotics, it was called the wonder drug. The
dictionary defines anti means fighting or posed or against and bios is the
Greek word for life, so it literally means life killing therapy. Now I’m not
anti-medicine but I feel you should use antibiotics cautiously because they can
be life-saving but they can also have some detrimental side effects to your
health and I need to talk about side effects. Drugs either have effects or
they don’t, there’s no such thing as a side effect. Okay, I have seen hundreds of
patients with the effects of antibiotics and often antibiotics are the cause or
the contributing factor the chronic yeast or Candida infections so let’s
talk about yeast and mold and mushrooms. I mean who really eats those? I mean we
need an MRI schedule your brain if you are a fungus or
mushroom eater. Now I say that jokingly because I don’t like the taste of
mushrooms but it’s a proven fact that people that eat mushrooms eventually die.
Okay, I’ll drop the comedy act, I just have an aversion to mushrooms. I mean, do
you know that they grow on? Seriously, it’s poop, okay, alright, nevermind
about the fecal living organisms, the video must go on. Really this is a good
place to talk about the definitions because mold, yeast, mildew, they’re all
fungus, the word gets used interchangeably and many times people
are talking about yeast, candida or candida fungus and to describe the same
thing, now yeast are unicellular fungi while fungus are made up of long tubes
of Heifetz like basically a bunch of them and Candida basically is the
precursor in yeast, it’s kind of like a butterfly so it’s just different life
cycles of the organism. Now there are different areas that the yeast or
candida fungus, the monster likes to go after, you can have skin problems like
athlete’s foot, jock itch, fingernail or toenail fungus and ringworm and why is
this such a problem? Because Americans unintentionally fertilize the yeast or
the Candida and who does that? It’s because the American diet is filled with
so much sugar and simple carbs, that’s one way to address the problem.. If you
starve the fungus, you’ll start feeling worse because it’s releasing toxins and
the natural thing to do is to start eating sugar and then the yeast laps up
and it’s sugar and then you feel better but your conditions stay the same so
yeast and Candida multiplies and it makes us crave sugar, that’s why it’s
such a difficult thing to take care of and how do you know if you have a yeast
problem? One clue is the symptoms, things like oral thrush, fingernail or toenail
fungus, vaginal yeast infections or even patches on your skin your, respiratory
system you can get into your lungs, there can also be systemic Candida which can
get into your muscles, your lungs and your brain. Now I believe Candida is a
huge contributing factor to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome or the new
name, systemic, exertion, tolerance disease. I mean, that sounds way better than
chronic disease. Now a lot of medical practitioners don’t believe in Candida
or systemic Candida like it’s some type of a religion or something and like Will
Rogers statement here, there’s two sides to every argument.
Lying and the wrong one, so a lot of medical practitioners, they just miss the
boat on yeast and Candida. Now the medical practitioners who do recognize
these problems may be treating them wrong,
many antifungals affect liver and kidney function especially if you mix the
antifungals with alcohol or another drug therapy and antifungals weaken the
heart’s ability to contract, this can lead to heart failure and the medicine
that the antifungals reactant are usually common prescriptions, or
over-the-counter medicines. Now fungus are microorganisms that are present
everywhere, indoors, outdoors. In fact, there’s over 50,000 types of fungi in
the environment, they can coexist or live on your skin for years without a problem
but sometimes, it change happens and then the infection occurs and it can be
ringworm on your head or nail beds or candidiasis, it can be in the mouth, a
vaginal tract or the urinary tract. Now it’s kind of a trick question at the
beginning of the video because it says, “How can we avoid fungus?” How can you
avoid mold? And the answer is that you can’t, the way that you don’t have those
infections is you’ve got to make sure that your immune system is healthy and
you don’t intentionally feed the candida, this can be brought on by a weakened
immune system side effects of antibiotics, diabetes, poor hygiene, warm
and moist environments, poor circulation or a traumatic skin injury. So let’s talk
about something that’s really important.. If you’re having fungal concerns or
problems, it’s a sign that your immune system isn’t working. Let me repeat that.
A fungal infection is a sign of a deeper problem and you can’t avoid fungus or
yeast or mold spores, they’re everywhere and the immune system takes care of it
when it’s healthy, if you have the immune system deficiencies or lifestyle
problems, where you’re unintentionally just feeding or fertilizing the yeast
and then this thing called stress. Now stress, too much sugar, not enough sleep
and empty calorie diet, what? That means you can get food space takers, now what
does that mean? It means that you can get food in your system, it’s of no well
substance. In my opinion, the only long-term viable solution for a chronic
yeast or Candida infection is to work on the person and not the
yeast, you must change the environment and make the person healthy, rely on a pill
or an antifungal medicine I believe is a recipe for disaster. So let’s talk about
solutions.. Here’s the best way to treat these types of infections. Number one,
remove the food source, stop eating food cocaine. Now I say that because it sounds
cool and everyone says sugar is more addictive than cocaine so avoid sugar.
Apple cider vinegar helps to kill fungus infections and the acidic properties
helps to kill the problem and you can use it externally and you can use it
internally and for systemic conditions, I really like plain yogurt not sugarfied
yogurt, I love garlic because it helps to kill the fungus, the bacteria and the
yeast and oils like tea tree oil, oregano oil, peppermint, and clove oil. Now my
favorite thing to do for anti-fungal Candida yeast is a natural Native
American remedy called Lomatium, it’s a wild crafted herb, originally
discovered by the Native Americans that bolsters the immune system and I believe
it’s the number one remedy for fungal infections, for yeast problems and for
systemic Candida. There are two ways to get this, you can get as a tincture, as a
capsule and this is particularly effective against fungal skin infections
because it literally burns up the fungus and it leaves your healthy tissue intact
and you rub this on your toenail or your fingernail and it really really helps
that type of fungus but I must urge you, its consistency, if you treat those
areas consistently with Lomatium, it will help, in my experience. Now you
have to figure out who is more determined you or the fungus, so you take
the Lomtium, you rub it on your toenails and fungus and you can order through
that, you can order that through the West Clinic online or Ntures NX. Now
for the people that are not responding to the home therapy, there’s some
advanced therapies that are important to help your immune system. Number one,
vitamin C, it strengthens the immune system, it’s my favorite overall vitamin, you may
want to couple that with ultraviolet bloody radiation therapy or UV RX
therapy and then dilute hydrochloric acid. A one to five hundred dilution has
some fantastic immune stimulating and some lymph node flushing therapy
and then neural therapy helps to reset the nervous system, I talked about this
on in most every video because it’s literally life-changing. So to summarize
the information, you can’t avoid fungus you got to be healthy. If you have a
fungal problem, it’s a sign that your immune system isn’t working that well
and antifungal medicines interact with common prescriptions and
over-the-counter medicines and they’re very hard on the liver and kidney, the
only way to win against and Candida our yeast problem is to make the body
healthy, it’s kind of like the Humpty Dumpty plan, you’re on a wall, you fall
off, you’re in pieces, you have to have someone help put the pieces back
together. To beat this, you need to follow the candida diet and by the way, as a
bonus, if you’ll message me, I’ll send you my favorite candida diet outline and
then Lomatium is the best treatment for Candida systemically in my opinion.
You can put Lomatium directly on the skin areas, your
fingernails and toenails, it works great as long as you’re consistent, based upon
my clinical experience and the feedback that my patients are giving me and then
some people with Candida, long-standing yeast and Candida infections, the only
way in my opinion to beat those is to do the IV vitamin C, some type of
ultraviolet therapy and possibly some dilute hydrochloric acid therapy. Thanks
for watching the video, this is Dr. Jason West in the West Clinic. There’s always
hope and our mission is to help as many people as possible
to achieve and maintain optimal health.

Officials: Wall of KinderCare had extensive termite damage

Officials: Wall of KinderCare had extensive termite damage


INFORMATION, WE’LL GET RIGHT BACK TO THIS BREAKING STORY. RIGHT NOW FIRST AT 4:00, NEW INFORMATION ABOUT PREVIOUS STRUCTURAL PROBLEMS AT THE SITE OF THE DEADLY DAYCARE CRASH. GOOD AFTERNOON. I’M JIM PAYNE. I’M MARTHA SUGALSKI. WESH 2 HAS LEARNED THE WALL WHERE THAT CAR PLOWED THROUGH ON GOLDENROD HAD EXTENSIVE TERMITE DAMAGE. AND THE HIGHWAY PATROL IS INVESTIGATING WHETHER THE CAR MALFUNCTIONED AND ACCELERATED INTO THE BUILDING. WESH 2’S GAIL PASCHALL-BROWN HAS BEEN DINGING THROUGH DOCUMENTS RELATED TO THIS INVESTIGATION. WHAT HAVE YOU UNCOVERED? WE CAN TELL YOU RIGHT NOW AS YOU CAN SEE RIGHT BEHIND ME THE FLORIDA HIGHWAY PATROL JUST PULLED UP A FEW MOMENTS AGO. NO DOUBT THEY’RE STILL INVESTIGATING THIS CRASH. THEY HAVE THE BLACK BOX FROM THAT TOYOTA THAT SLAMMED INTO THIS BUILDING BUT THEY STILL HAVE TO DOWNLOAD THE DATA. TERMITES IS ONE THING THAT IS BEING LOOKED AT IN THIS INVESTIGATION. WE DID SPEAK WITH THE BUILDING INSPECTOR ABOUT THAT TODAY. WHEN I ARRIVED ON THE SCENE, THE CAR WENT THROUGH THE FRONT WALL AND WENT TO THE BACK WALL. ORANGE COUNTY DEPUTY CHIEF BUILDING INSPECTOR SAYS THIS TOYOTA SOLARA TRAVELED ABOUT 60 FEET, THE LENGTH OF THE ROOM INSIDE THIS GOLDENROD KINDER CARE ON APRIL 9TH. THE DEADLY CRASH KILLED A FOUR-YEAR-OLD GIRL AND INJURED 11 OTHERS. HIS INSPECTION REPORT REVEALS THERE IS EXTENSIVE TERMITE DAMAGE ON THE FRONT WALL OF THE KINDER CARE. I DIDN’T SEE NO LIVE TERMITES BUT THERE WAS TERMITE DAMAGE AT ONE TIME. AND THERE WAS STILL STUDS THERE BUT TERMITES LIKE TO EAT THE STUDS FROM INSIDE OUT. UNLESS YOU WERE DOING REPAIRS OR RENOVATING YOU WOULDN’T REALLY KNOW UNLESS SOMETHING UNFOR SEEN HAPPENS. THE INSPECTOR SAYS THE FLORIDA LICENSE ARCHITECT OR ENGINEER NEEDS TO ASSESS THE DAMAGE FROM THE VEHICLE ENTERING THE BUILDING AND THE TERMITE DAMAGE FOR STRUCTURAL STABILITY. HE SAYS WHILE THE FRONT WALL OF THE 30-YEAR-OLD BUILDING HAS A WOOD FRAME IT DID HAVE BRICK ABOUT 30 INCHES UP. IT WOULD JUST SEEM LIKE THE BRICK WOULD STOP IT SOMEHOW. IF YOU HAVE ENOUGH IMPACT IT CAN GO THROUGH ANYTHING. SO I DON’T KNOW. I CAN’T DETERMINE HOW QUICK THE VEHICLE WAS GOING. THERE ARE NO PRIOR INSPECTION REPORTS OF THE KINDER CARE. THE FLORIDA HIGHWAY PATROL IS ALSO CHECKING OUT THE TOYOTA DRIVEN BY 61-YEAR-OLD ALBERT CAMPBELL. INVESTIGATORS SAY CAMPBELL WAS CLIPPED BY THE DRIVER OF THIS DODGE DURANGO AS THE TOYOTA WAS TURNING INTO THE PLAZA. THIS IS THE SAME TYPE OF TOYOTA INVOLVED IN A LAWSUIT LAST YEAR BECAUSE OF SUDDEN ACCELERATION COMPLAINTS. IT COULD BE HUMAN ERR. IT COULD BE MECHANICAL. COULD BE THE PHYSICS OF THE CRASH. THAT’S WHAT WE HAVE TO DETERMINE. ORANGE COUNTY MAYOR TERESA JACOBS HAS ALREADY ASKED THAT BALLARDS OR BARRIERS BE PLACED IN FRONT OF AREAS LIKE THIS, LIKE DAYCARES, SO THERE WOULD BE A PUSH BACK IN CASE SOMETHING LIKE THIS WERE TO HAPPEN. THAT IS NOT PART OF THE BUILDING CODE. THE KINDER CARE AS YOU CAN SEE HAS BEEN BOARDED UP. THERE’S SOME WORK THAT’S BEEN DONE. BUT, OF COURSE, IT WILL HAVE TO BE INSPECTED AGAIN BEFORE IT WILL BE ALLOWED FOR USE.

Battling the Childhood Obesity Epidemic

Battling the Childhood Obesity Epidemic


Newsweek:
Thank you so much. Thank you, Ms. Weymouth, for your hospitality, and thank you all for
coming. This is our cover subject. We tried to make the picture a little bigger. First Lady:
I know, right. (laughter) Newsweek:
But I will say Newsweek has been publishing for 77 years, and I believe this is the first
time within six weeks or so we’ve had both a husband and a wife write the cover story.
So — (laughter) — I know you’ll — First Lady:
So whose was better, though? (laughter) That’s ultimately how spouses operate, right? (laughter) Newsweek:
That’s a very good point, that’s a very good point. So with all this “first” stuff
and living in the White House, forget it. It’s the Newsweek — First Lady:
This is the one. Newsweek:
It’s the Newsweek cover. First Lady:
I agree. Newsweek:
Why this issue? Why childhood obesity, of all the things you could have picked? First Lady:
Well, first of all I think it’s absolutely relevant right now. The statistics are clear,
you know. We’re seeing rates of childhood obesity go up like never before. And I think
the country is also at a point where we’re ready. And I think that’s one of the reasons
why the “Let’s Move” initiative has been so well received by so many industries
and parents and teachers, is because I think we know there’s a problem, and we’re going
to have to come together to solve it. Now, personally, the issue for me is a personal
one. I’ve spoken about this often, how in my busy lifestyle, before coming into the
White House, I was living like most busy mothers — a husband traveled a lot, I had a full-time
job, I bought for convenience and cost. And I saw some changes — or my pediatrician saw
some changes in my children’s diet that caused him to say, “Hold on.” And I think
I was like most mothers — I thought I was doing absolutely everything that I was supposed
to be doing. And to me my kids looked fine. They were perfectly — hey, you know, they’re
my kids, they’re gorgeous. But I made some changes. And they were very simple changes
in our lifestyle, but it made significant differences — made a significant difference
in how the kids felt, how we felt as a family. And I started thinking, well, if I didn’t
know these things — and I’m educated, have resources, I have the support that I need
— what are other families doing? How are other mothers, people who live in communities
that don’t have grocery stores — how are they making these decisions? How are we teaching
kids how to eat? What’s happened to our habits? So even before coming to the White
House, this issue moved me in a way that made me think we need to explore this a little
bit more. And then we planted this beautiful garden, 1,100 square feet of pure joy. And
that gave us an opportunity in a very sort of non-confrontational way to begin exploring
the questions of how do kids respond to nutritious food and vegetables if they’re part of the
process of growing and getting involved. That’s one of the reasons why getting the kids in
the D.C. area involved in the work was critical. And their response really sent us the message
that we might be ready to begin this conversation in a more comprehensive way. So, you know,
the time is right. It’s also important in my husband’s administration, which is something
that I try to do with the issues that I take on. I mean, I say this a lot: I am here to
support the President of the United States, and health care is one of the most important
issues that this country is facing. We are spending $147 billion on obesity-related conditions
that are preventable. And if we can make ourselves healthier, that’s going to go a long way to
helping find some solutions to this problem. And these issues intersect in a
very important and compelling way. Newsweek:
How did we get here? What is the history of this? First Lady:
Well, you know, I don’t think there’s any one path to how we got there. I know I have
my theories. I think lifestyles have changed significantly. I reminisce with people about
what it was like for me growing up on the South Side of Chicago in a simple working-class
community. You went to the school around the corner from your house because all the schools
were solid enough that you just went to the school in your neighborhood. So you walked
to school, number one. And there was recess and gym. I was talking to one of my staff
members just about how lunchtime, it was an hour. And my mother was one of the mothers
that didn’t work, so me and all my friends, we’d come back to our house, we’d
watch soap operas, we’d eat lunch. (laughter) We’d complain about our teachers. Newsweek:
Which ones? First Lady:
“All My Children,” I have to say. (laughter) That was a big one. Newsweek:
We just made news, ma’am. (laughter) First Lady:
But that was a lunchtime treat, and it was a way — you know, I thought — so we ate,
we had time to eat our food, have a conversation with our parents, and then go back to school,
catch that last minute of play. So it was a lot of activity. We didn’t — we had seven
channels, not 107. Internet, video games were not a part of the culture. You had to go outside
to play. So I think kids were naturally more active than they are today. And now kids are
going to schools where they have to take a bus, a car ride. Some neighborhoods are not
safe. And no matter what you say, in some neighborhoods you can’t tell parents, “Just
let your kids go out and play,” because it isn’t safe. Some kids don’t even have
friends in their own neighborhood because they live in different communities. So things
have changed, and we are a busier culture. Parents — two parents working in the household,
so you’re coming home, you’re tired. We all do it, right? You know you shouldn’t
go to that drive-thru, but you’re just tired, and you know they’ll eat the food without
complaining. We’re also a culture and a society right now that snacks a lot more.
Just some of the statistics I talked about in my speech yesterday was that the average
snack amount when I was growing up was one snack a day, if you were lucky. And now it’s
averaging two to three. They say the average school-age kid is getting six snacks a day.
So we’re taking 200 more calories than we were 40 years ago, 30 years ago just from
snacks alone. So I think some of that convenience, you know, makes it very easy. You pick up
a little bag of chips, you throw it in, the kids are hungry, they’re grabbing this,
they’re grabbing that, and before you know it, they’ve snacked their way through the
day. So I think those are just some of the things. But there are many, many, many —
physical education, the level of activity. All of that is I think a part of it. Newsweek:
What’s an analogous public health campaign that you think has been successful that
could be a kind of model for this? First Lady:
Oh, that’s a — Newsweek:
Is it smoking? Is it seat belts? First Lady:
Well, you know, I think seat belts is one of those. And I actually was talking to Mike
Huckabee about this, because he actually made the analogy that this is one of those issues
where culturally folks have to be ready to make the shift, you know. You cannot mandate,
legislate seat belt wearing. You could, but does it really work? The same thing is true
for how we eat and how we live. You can’t tell people what to do in their own homes,
and nor should you. But there comes a point when we start seeing enough statistics, we
sort of get aware of the problems in our own homes, and we start — we get emotionally
ready to make some of those changes. So we’re at a point now where I think the society is
ready for more information. Parents are looking for the answers. They know that something
is off, and they just now want to figure out, well, what do I need to know? What am I doing
wrong? Had a conversation with a girlfriend at dinner last night, and we were talking
about, “Well, is apple juice okay? And what about chocolate milk?” I mean, and this
is an educated woman who is confused about what beverage is actually going to be okay,
outside of water, which we know is fine. But parents, societies, schools, we’re now ready
to figure that out so that we can make good choices. We all care about our kids — that
goes without saying, and that’s why this is not a “blame game” kind of issue. People
are just trying to figure out how to survive, how to make sure their kids are happy and
healthy. And sometimes we just don’t get the information that we need. And seat belt
laws are a similar — one of those similar challenges, that once we were ready, we were
ready to take in the information and make the changes. Newsweek:
It has worked. How much — you’ve talked about the cultural shift — how much of this
is regulatory? What is government’s role in these issues, which I suspect is both a
federal and a state, even local question too? First Lady:
Right, right, right. Well, as I said, there is no expert that will tell you that having
government tell people what to do is going to make a difference in this issue. So the
role of government is not to mandate. And I think the roles are different. I think at
the federal level, at this level, we can highlight and inform. There are things that we can do
at this level, with the FDA, for example, working with food manufacturers to have better
front-of-package labeling, things like that. We can finance and leverage money to try to
get more groceries into underserved communities. We can make sure that we pass legislation
that gets us a strong Nutrition Authorization Act so that we get better food in our schools
and that there are guidelines that the private sector and schools can follow. But I think
the real work happens on the ground. It’s our governors, our mayors, our schools, our
communities. And that’s one of the reasons why I’ve been traveling so much, is that
a lot of the answers are already out there, even in states like Mississippi who struggle
more with this issue than most. I did some visits with the governor and his wife, terrific
folks. They care about this issue; they know it’s a problem. And they’re doing some
great work to really ramp up physical education in the schools. You’ve got teachers who
are redesigning play spaces and they’re getting kids hula-hooping and jumping rope
and they’re making teachers do more work and having them think about their diets. They’ve
created requirements where teachers have to eat lunch with the kids, and they’ve seen
vegetable and fruit consumption go up because — not just with the kids but
with the teachers as well. (laughter) So you can go into many states and see some
wonderful examples of things that work in those communities, because there isn’t a
one-size-fits-all answer. What works in Mississippi may not work in Arizona, may not work in Connecticut.
So we really need to look to the governors and mayors who know their communities, who
understand their issues, their challenges, and that we work from there, and that we highlight
those things that work — like in Pennsylvania. They’ve done an amazing job to deal with
the issue of food deserts that I’ve talked about; you know, the 23.5 million Americans
that live in communities without access to a supermarket. And there were neighborhoods
like that when I was growing up. There’s one community in Philadelphia — we went to
visit a grocery store — that community hadn’t had a grocery store in a decade. So you think
about — you know, that’s a child’s life, right? Ten years of a child’s life where
their mother couldn’t walk down the street and buy some fruit and a head of broccoli.
So they’ve structured a financing initiative that leverages government dollars with private
sector dollars, and they’ve been able to incentivize getting grocery stores into underserved
communities, not just in urban areas but in some of the more rural areas in the state. So
we need to — we can highlight those successes and hopefully give other states an example
of what they might try, what might work. Newsweek:
On Tuesday, you spoke to the Grocery Manufacturers Association. They sell not only in those supermarkets,
those grocery stores, they sell vegetables and fruit; I hear that there’s
also some sugary stuff around — (laughter) First Lady:
A few things, a few things. Newsweek:
My five-year-old has briefed me on this. First Lady:
Yes, yes. (laughter) Newsweek:
And my question is, one logical extension, if the epidemic is as significant and widespread
as it seems to be, what would you think about a warning label on Twinkies
or Froot Loops that says — First Lady:
“Warning.” Newsweek:
— “This is known to cause obesity in the absence of other kinds of eating and exercise”? First Lady:
You know, that strikes me as extreme, because a Twinkie is not a cigarette, you know. And
what — what parents need is just information about what’s in the Twinkie and how much
of this can we eat. It’s not that we can’t have a Twinkie. And our kids would be pretty
upset. And I am not supporting that. (laughter) So all the kids out there — right? Newsweek:
It’s called triangulation, ma’am. (laughter) First Lady:
I’m all in favor of good snacks. We grew up with snacks and chips. We did. But we have
to exercise more, parents have to understand what’s in the Twinkie; again, how does it
fit into the overall diet. So we don’t need a warning, we need information. And we need
information that’s easy to understand. That’s something that I said yesterday in the speech.
You read labels now and it’s like the small print and it’s all “oleosutomay” —
or I don’t — the chemicals, you can’t even pronounce them, and the portion sizes
compared to one and you’ve got a small one and a big one. And then, before you know it,
you don’t know what to buy and how much to give to your kids and in what amounts.
That’s the kind of information that families need. And I think that the Grocery Store Manufacturers
who are — they have been magnificent. And I know that there are those who say, well,
are they going to really make changes? Look, the people who run those companies are parents
and grandparents, too. They care about their kids. They’re trying to figure out how to
meet the demand and how to give information. And we know that they’re going to sit down
— you know, we know they’re going to sit down and help us figure this stuff out. You
know, what are the facts that parents need to know; how do we structure it in a way that
they can understand; and how do they meet the demands that we are now going to make
— because it’s really up to us, as the parents and the consumers, to change the demand.
They will make what we tell them we want to buy. And if we want healthier foods for our
kids, and that’s what we’re purchasing, our power will shift their market. We don’t
need much more than our own demands to change, and we need to work with our kids to also
get them to change their eating habits as well. So it’s going to require all of us
to do their parts, and then we don’t need the warning labels. We just need
common sense and good information. Newsweek:
Twinkies are safe in the Obama administration. (laughter) First Lady:
Yes, we are — (laughter) — yes, I think I’m — I
feel good going on record. (laughter) Newsweek:
Okay. We don’t have to pass a special rule. (laughter) First Lady:
No. Newsweek:
Where do you stand on a beverage
tax for sugary beverages? First Lady:
You know, the “Let’s Move” initiative doesn’t — we’re not — doesn’t involve
a tax. But there are communities that believe that taxing sodas and other things works for
them. And again, because, you know, we believe that those ideas and those approaches need
to come from the bottom up, there are going to be cities and states and towns who believe
that that’s what they need in their communities. And, again, there is no one-size-fits-all
answer. And I think that’s where mayors, governors, citizens, schools, you know, working in your
own states and communities — to figure out really what’s going to work and what’s
going to move the bar on this issue. Newsweek:
What’s your sense of posting calorie counts? It happens in New York — actually, where
I live, and it’s very depressing, actually. (laughter) The mayor of New York has made it
very hard to go to Dunkin’ Donuts. (laughter) But it works. Is that something else that
should be a weapon in the arsenal? First Lady:
I think the more information we can give to consumers, families, parents, the better.
There are examples outside of New York — in Somerville, Massachusetts, the mayor there
has been working with some of the local restaurant owners to get them to change their menus so
that there are healthier options and customers have more information about what’s in stuff.
I think that’s a good thing. But also in Somerville they’re going beyond just what we eat and
they’re also thinking more creatively about how in every aspect of what they do to run
that city, they’re thinking about the health and well-being of kids. So that comes down
to how many parks they have; and what their roads look like; and if they’re building
a new street, making sure there’s a sidewalk and a place for kids to ride their bikes.
I mean, again, this isn’t just about what we eat, this is about how we live. In some
of the towns in Mississippi they have to think creatively about where they don’t have places
to play — you know, maybe you take an old field and turn it into a soccer field and
let the city pay a dollar for it. And you find ways, creative ways, to make sure there
are spaces for families to live in a healthy way. Those are the kind of ideas that we want
to promote. Those are the kind of things that are working. We just need to do more
of it and we need to do it faster. Newsweek:
There’s also, both in rural areas and in urban areas, there’s an economic issue,
which is — you mentioned convenience, but often the fast food can be even less expensive
sometimes than getting healthy food. First Lady:
Absolutely. Newsweek:
Can you talk about that disparity and what we can do about it? First Lady:
That disparity is very real. I mean — no, I talked about it with the grocery manufacturers
as well. It’s not just making healthy food, but it’s making healthy food that’s affordable.
And that’s a challenge, as well, but we have to recognize that we need to move in that
direction. There are — you know, we can’t look families in the face and say, “You
fix this problem,” but then you can’t afford the food that they need to fix the problem;
they don’t have access to it. We have to figure this out. The school lunch program is a major
— is going to be a major player in the whole resource issue because many kids are getting
the majority of their meals at school. So that’s one of those areas where we have some
control over as a society because, you know, we’re going to feed these kids for two out
of three or four of their meals, depending upon how many they have. So we need to make
sure that we pass legislation that makes sense, that sets clear basic nutritional guidelines,
not just in the school lunch lines, but in the vending machines and a la carte lines;
that we have the resources to help schools bring their standards up. Things like —
in Mississippi, what Governor Barbour did with some of his stimulus money was to remove
fryers and put in ovens. I mean, it’s just something as simple — the school nutritionist
will tell you, we want to do better, but all we have is a fryer, which means when you
have a fryer then you have to fry stuff. (laughter) So we need to make sure that the schools have
the resources they need to make the changes to get healthier food into the schools. But
we also have to make sure that every single child that is eligible for free and reduced
lunch actually gets it, that we reduce the paperwork to make sure that — if you look
at some of the paperwork that families get to sign up, and then they have to re-sign
up and then they have to fill it out. You know, you look at that, you’re busy and, you
know, you just brush it under the rug, you don’t complete it. We have to make those processes
and procedures easier. And I think we can go a long way to helping underserved
families with the school lunch program. Newsweek:
How does obesity affect classroom learning? First Lady:
I think, you know, this week it opened this up, right, to the audience. I mean, we know
— in our own kids, in our own lives — how kids respond when they have a good meal,
they’ve eaten the right things. We know what happens to kids when they are hyped up
on sugar and they’re operating on too much sugar and not enough substance. We see it
in our own lives. So you just imagine if you send a kid to school with a sugary breakfast
and a sugary drink, and they have to learn for a few hours and they stop maybe for 10
minutes for lunch — maybe — and they haven’t had a chance to run and run off that energy.
And then they start dropping because they’re coming down from all that sugar. And they
don’t even know it. They don’t even know why they feel lethargic, why they get sleepy at
about eleven o’clock during the day — just like we all do when we don’t eat right.
I mean, we all experience it. So it definitely affects how kids feel throughout the day,
which is something that we have to remember. This issue is not about looks and appearance.
This is about how our kids feel and how they feel about themselves, because how you feel
inside affects the way you approach the day; even the way you tackle the challenge. If
you feel like, you know, you’re full and you’ve eaten some fruit and you’ve gotten some grains,
that affects the way you think. So this isn’t an image issue. This is truly an overall health
issue. And kids, in addition to needing to eat well, have to run. They have to run around
during the day. They have to get the energy out, you know? I mean, you’ve got kids. You
imagine trying to teach your child sitting still for hours — Newsweek:
Oh, in our house (inaudible) the time. (laughter) First Lady:
Right. All right, okay, Jon. (laughter) Newsweek:
We read “Newsweek” aloud. (laughter) They love the Obama collection. First Lady:
Oh, good. It’s very good. (laughter) Newsweek:
No, you’re right, absolutely. But why isn’t — I mean, we’re lucky in that our kids
— where our kids go to school, they run around. That’s not true in a lot of places.
Physical education is often the first thing to go. Recess has been cut back. From a policy
perspective, is that simply a financial issue? Is it because the standards, classroom standards
have been set at a point where they can’t afford a single moment of classroom time?
What’s your analysis of the end of recess? First Lady:
I think that educators, administrators, parents would say it’s all of it. Some of it feels
like a resource issue. And some of it is when you’re testing so much and you’re meeting
requirements, you feel like the first thing that goes — if your money is tied to a test
score and not to recess, you know, and whether your kids can run around, then the choice
is already made for you, some administrators feel. But there are also examples where schools
are figuring out how even in this current climate of testing and lack of resources,
how to put that stuff back into the curriculum. The Department of Agriculture has the U.S.
Healthier School Challenge, which is an initiative that we’re promoting as part of the “Let’s
Move” initiative. We’re going to — we want to double the number of schools in this
country that qualify as U.S. Healthier Schools. There are currently about 600 of them around
the country. Our goal under “Let’s Move” is to double that, because these are schools
that are the models for what we’d like to see happening with nutrition and physical
education, because without any additional resources, they figured out how to restructure
their curriculum, how to use nutrition education as part of math and science; they found ways
to mandate and reincorporate recess and gym back into their classrooms. I mean, there
are schools — wonderful, public schools — all over the country that are figuring
how to restructure the day. But what I’ve found when I’ve talked to principals, administrators
who’ve made that choice, they have decided as a school community that exercise and nutrition
isn’t an extra; that it is an essential part of what a good curriculum has to look
like. So in one school that I visited in Virginia, they don’t allow teachers to take recess
or gym away as a punishment because their feeling is that’s counter-productive. So
now you’ve got a problem, so you’ve taken away the one thing that may help the kid wind
out of the problem. So they’ve — you know, they’ve said you can’t take that away,
because that’s part of the curriculum. That’s like telling the kid, well, you didn’t do
well in spelling, so you’re not going to be able to do math today. Newsweek:
In addition to the Twinkie thing, that might be a very good political move —
(laughter) — pull them out of math. First Lady:
Right, right. (laughter) But I am not — now, I did not say that. (laughter) Newsweek:
No, ma’am, just me. (laughter) It was me. First Lady:
That’s your idea. Newsweek:
Yes, ma’am. First Lady:
But there are schools that are figuring out how to make this happen. Our job is to give
them the resources they need, hold them up, celebrate those successes and help other school
districts figure out how do they do the same thing. How have they managed in the current
climate? What’s the difference? Why does one school manage to do it and another can’t? Is
it at the regional level? Is it the superintendent support? I mean, we could probably talk to
educators in this room right now who are — just they know the answer to this, and
they’re ready to jump on it. But there are schools that are doing it. And we need to
make sure that more are doing it. This should be the standard of how our kids
get an education in this country. Newsweek:
Last question, ma’am. How will you measure success, as you look at the lifetime of the
administration, of your own ongoing work, presumably? First Lady:
Well, the goal for “Let’s Move,” the whole goal of this initiative, is to end the
problem of childhood obesity in a generation. So this is a generational issue. And our view
is that we want kids born today to grow up at a healthy weight. And it will take a generation
to see how that’s going. But one of the things that the administration is doing now
— the President signed an executive order creating the first ever Council on Childhood
Obesity. They are now reviewing every single program and policy, not just in the government
but in the country, that focuses on education and nutrition. And we need to figure out how
to use the resources we have more smartly. But we’re going to get that report in May.
We’re looking forward to that. And part of that — the interesting thing about that
approach is that we’re saying we need real, measurable outcomes. And the foundation that
was set up as part of this initiative — and we’ve got some wonderful foundations
who have been researching and investing in this issue for decades — RJW, Kellogg —
I don’t want to begin to name all of them, because I’ll miss some — but they are going
to be sort of the future arm of this, so that when I’m gone, when the President is gone
and the next administration comes in, you’ve got an independent group that’s going to
continue to look at these goals and help us figure out whether we’re reaching the goals,
and keep our feet to the fire, because, again, this isn’t something that’s going to happen
in this administration. This is — we are looking at this as a forever proposition,
because fundamentally, as I said in my speech to the food manufacturers, we have to change
the way we view food and health forever. And we can start with kids, because they haven’t
— their habits haven’t been ingrained. We can shift the way they think, even the
way they taste food. We can do that. Us, you know, grownups — (laughter) — not so much.
We’re a little stuck in our ways. But we can still guide our children. I still think
of my mother, who said — you know, she had no problem doing things that
she told me I couldn’t do. (laughter) So even though we, as parents, haven’t conquered
it and maybe we don’t — we’re not doing it, we can still help our kids get to a different
place. And it’s going to take time. And it’s going to take patience. And we’re
going to need everyone involved. But I think about where we started a year ago with the
planting of this little garden. And now, we have this wonderful initiative that has the
food industry coming together; and bipartisan support all over the country; parents feeling
excited and support it; kids — (laughter) — you know, they’re coming. (laughter) We’ve got the professional sports community
standing by. This is an issue that can unite the country. And it can unite us with the
rest of the world, because the truth is there isn’t a single head of state or spouse of
a head of state who I have met who has not been fascinated by our garden and our conversations
around nutrition, because so many other countries are beginning to see some of the effects as
they develop. They’re seeing their rates go up. So this is an issue for the world.
And we can truly be a leader, but we have to be patient. And we also have to be clear
that we need to work really hard and stretch. So when we talk to the food industry, we say,
you have to do more. When we talk to ourselves as parents, we have to push ourselves. We
have to talk to Congress. And we have to say, you have to push to ensure that we’re getting
the kind of regulations and support so that our school meals are healthy. We all have
to stretch on this one. And if we do, I think we can — we will see a change in
our kids that we can be proud of. Newsweek:
Well, thank you so much for your work, for your piece this week — First Lady:
Thank you. Thank you for
investing in this conversation. Newsweek:
— and for this remarkable presentation. Thank you very much. (applause)