How to Use Dominion 2L Termiticide for a Termite Treatment

How to Use Dominion 2L Termiticide for a Termite Treatment


Hey I’m Chris the Bug Guy from domyownpestcontrol.com
and today we’re going to show you how to get rid of termites with Dominion 2L. Dominion
is a liquid non-repellent termiticide/insecticide that comes in a 27.5 oz bottle with the active
ingredient Imidicloprid. This one bottle can make 50 gallons and treat up to 120 lineal
feet, and it usually takes 2 bottles per home. Once Dominion 2L has been used, it usually
lasts up to 5-7 years before you have to re-treat. Let’s go outside and show you how to Dominion
in the trenches around your house. Step 1 is digging the trench. The trench against
your house should be 6″ wide and 6″ deep. You can use a shovel or a pick axe, and the
trench will be directly against the foundation. Once you have dug the trench, it is 4 gallons
per 10 feet, 10 lineal feet, along the house. So you are going to mix in the termiticide,
make a line on the bucket if you need to for 4 gallons, and once it’s mixed we’re going
to evenly distribute it over the trench. So we have a 10′ section over here. You are going
to evenly distribute those 4 gallons over the 10′, and then move on to the next section.
By the time you get back around this should have dissipated into the soil. Now once you
have finished trenching and filling the trench with the termiticide, and it’s had time to
dissipate into the soil you need to put the back fill back into the trench. Now the dirt
right now is untreated. This is the dirt we took out of the trench, but you want to make
sure that you treat it before you put it back in because you don’t want a layer of untreated
soil on top of the treated soil. If termites happen to go right near the surface, they
are going to skip the termiticide you placed in the trench. So this is a lot easier with
two people. You want to mix some termiticide in a 1 gallon pump sprayer, and then you want
to have a shovel or a rake to push the dirt back in the trench. The person with the sprayer
is going to go ahead and start just wetting the dirt down, not so much that it is muddy,
but just start wetting the dirt down, and as you are pushing it back in with the shovel
or rake, the other person is going to wet it down. Just move on down the line. Let him
wet it down a little bit. As you shovel it back in they’re just going to wet down that
back fill and get it mixed well with the termiticide. Now your house is completely protected by
the professional termiticide. I hope you found this video useful. For more information click
here.

How often should you treat for termites?

How often should you treat for termites?


Hey, everyone. It’s Isaac here from Accurate
Termite and Pest Control. Got another question that I’d like to answer for you guys–as it
relates to termite and pest control services. I get this question fairly often, I figured
it would be a good one. Yesterday, the question came from Kim in Long Beach. Essentially, the question I am going to answer
is “How often do you need to do termite control?” Whether we are talking about a house or an
apartment building or whatever the case might be. I hear a lot of times people confuse their
regular service for general pest control and their termite control treatment. So what we are talking about when we say “general
pest control” or a regular service, You might have a service that comes, once
a month, every other month or a quarterly service Where your technician is coming around, he’s
treating around the base of the house He’s treating around door jambs, de-webbing
under eaves, etc. Whether that’s monthly, quarterly, bi-monthly
whatever that might be–that is for general pest control. In general pest control, we are talking about
ants, spiders, crickets, roaches things like that. That service is NOT for termite control, at
least not in the state of California. In the state of California you don’t do a
general blanket spraying for termites. So, when they are coming once a month, once
every other month, they are not spraying for termites. So, termite control in California is done
directly to areas that are infested with termites. That means that if we go to a house and see
termites on fascia, or rafters, or on siding, or on window trims, or on door jambs we drill
into that wood member and we inject the termite control product–know as a termiticide–directly
into that wood member. That is how local treatments for termites
are done in the state of California. It is not a blanket spray like the ones you
see them doing for ants or spiders etc. So with that said, sometimes people think
that because they have a regular service that their regular service is covering them for
termites. Not at all. Now, you don’t actually need to do termite
control that often in California. You don’t need termite control every month, you don’t
need termite control every other month. Termite control, a good best-practice, is
to do it once a year. Once a year is plenty. You should be doing termite control once a
year. And what that means is that you are doing inspections, you’re doing a nice thorough
inspection of all of the building and then you are doing treatments by way of local treatments
like I described before where you are drilling and injecting directly into the wood. Then you are in good shape. Again, that is once a year. That is all you
need for termite control. So when I come across a customer who says
they have monthly termite service, there is a misunderstanding somewhere. They perhaps don’t understand the scope of
work of their general pest control service, or something is wrong there, but you are not
getting termite control every month–more than likely. Nor do you need it, you don’t need termite
control that often. So there is the answer to the question. Termite control should be done about once
a year. It is done either by way of local treatment
like I described in this video, or there is another method that I can touch on probably
in the future and that is whole structure approaches that include fumigation, also known
as tenting, or heat treatment of an entire house. I can cover more details on what that means, But again, once a year termite control is
plenty. Thanks for watching. If we can be of service in any way, please
do reach out to us. You can reach us at (310)TERMITE in Los Angeles,
(949)TERMITE in Orange County, and 1(844)GOT.ANTS in San Diego. Thanks again.

The Mysterious Encephalitis Lethargica Epidemic

The Mysterious Encephalitis Lethargica Epidemic


What if we told you that around 90 years ago
an epidemic swept across the world that killed over a million people while affecting numerous
others, before disappearing, leaving the finest scientific minds of the age absolutely stumped
. Then what if we told you that when it didn’t kill you, this illness could instead potentially
trap you inside your body, stopping you from having the will to move or speak. You’d
say we’d have to be lying because no disease that terrifying could stalk the Earth and
have resulted in such an epidemic without being front-page news and remembered in the
history books. Well, it did exist and cases continue to be
brought forward even today; it remained one of the biggest medical mysteries for nearly
a century, with scientists only very recently getting an inkling of what causes the disease,
though none of the leading theories have been definitively proven yet. As you might expect
from this, there is still no cure. Ladies and gentlemen, today we’d like to talk about
von Economo disease. As you’ve probably guessed if you’re fantastically
well read, von Economo disease is named after someone named von Economo- Constantin von
Economo- a psychiatrist, neurologist, and one-time owner of a magnificent moustache,
who is widely credited as the first person to thoroughly document the disease in question. Economo published his findings on the disease
in April of 1917, just a few short years before it became an epidemic, but several years after
it had first come to the attention of academics and medical professionals. In his paper, aptly named “Die Encephalitis
lethargica“, Economo christened this new disease, Encephalitis lethargica, which means
something along the lines of “brain illness that makes you sleepy”. Today, the disease
is mostly known as von Economo disease, in Economo’s honor, and Sleepy Sickness when
someone doesn’t wish to pay homage to Economo’s glorious facial hair. As a neurologist, the disease was of particular
interest to Economo and he discovered variations on how the disease manifests including, among
other presentations, • Hyperkinetic form: characterised by rapid
motor movements, uncontrollable twitching, anxiousness, insominia and general restlessness.
• Amyostatic-akinetic form: leading to symptoms remarkably similar to that of Parkinsons disease
and was characterised by dramatic reduction in muscle strength and difficulty moving.
• Somnolent-ophthalmoplegic form: by far the most lethal and involved the patient suddenly
falling asleep at random times, even while walking. In some, this would progress into
the individual slipping into an often fatal comatose state. However, those who didn’t
die quickly could be left with an arguably worse fate, potentially in a state of akinetic
mutism, lacking the will to move or express themselves in any way for the rest of their
lives. A few years after Economo’s discovery and
paper, the disease was part of an epidemic that swept across the world trapping many
thousands in their own bodies and killing about a million total. In the end, approximately
40% of those affected died, 20% survived but were invalids, 26% mostly recovered but with
long term issues, and the remaining 14% made full recoveries. So with it affecting so many,
why have you never heard of it? Well, the disease had amazing timing in that it spread
across the world around the same time as the Spanish Flu pandemic. For those of you who aren’t familiar with
it, the Spanish flu killed between 50-100 million (yes, million) people and infected
around a half a billion around the globe (roughly 1 in 4 humans at the time and possibly killing
as many as 1 in 20); it even reached places as remote as the Arctic in-between 1918 and
1920. So, even though Encephalitis Lethargica killed
its fair share of people and was hugely terrifying in its own right, because it took place just
after a disease that affected a reasonably large percentage of the world’s population,
it just wasn’t as noteworthy compared to the super-disease that had just punched humanity
in our collective nether regions. Due to their close proximity to each other,
the Spanish flu was initially linked to the Encephalitis Lethargica outbreak, a theory
modern medical science thinks isn’t likely though there are still some who think there
may have been a connection, via an autoimmune response killing certain neurons in the brain.
However, given the lack of similarities between the two in terms of systems effected, with
the only solid connection being they appeared around the same time, most still think the
Spanish flu was not related. That said, it does appear to be an immune
system response causing the problem. In 2004, virologist John Oxford et al published a paper
on the results of their studying over 20 current patients with the disease and found a similarity.
55% of them were known to have had sore throats before the disease started more strongly presenting.
They then discovered that the sore throat in every case had been caused by a rare form
of streptococcus (for you hypochondriacs out there, try not to dwell on that one next time
you get strep-throat ;-)). This rare form of streptococcus resulted in
a particularly strong immune system reaction, which in turn resulted in the patient’s
immune system attacking certain parts of the their brains, with the result being von Economo
disease. Once the researchers discovered this, the
Holmes-like doctors checked and, sure enough, the records indicated that during the early
20th century epidemic many of the patients also reported sore throats before the disease
presented. The eureka moment, though, came when they found a reference that diplococcus
microbes had been documented among some of the patients- a form of streptococcus. So
while it still hasn’t been definitively proven, evidence strongly suggests that this
is the cause of the disease. As mentioned, there was (and still is) no
actual cure or very effective treatment for the disease, so after its reign of terror
was largely over around 1926, the world was left with a far more pressing problem- the
thousands of living paper-weights the disease hadn’t killed, still alive across the globe
and in a catatonic state. That said, in patients suffering from the
hyper-kinectic form of the disease, certain steroids have proven partially effective in
small studies and have been put forward as a suggested course of treatment. However,
the fate of those trapped in their own bodies is a lot less treatable, though since the
disease is similar in some ways to Parkinsons, treatments for it have proven somewhat effective
in the past. For example, in the 1960s, patients from the
original outbreak were granted small movement for the first time in decades upon taking
the drug Levodopa; however, as a cruel twist of fate, after only a few weeks of “waking
up,” the patients treated with the drug developed a tolerance to it and slowly slipped
back into their paper-weight states. If that sounds like a familiar plot-line,
it’s because the event was turned into a book and later a movie called “Awakenings”
which was remarkably similar to the actual events that occurred all those years ago with
these von Economo patients. In the end, the disease is still around and
an outbreak of 1920s-like proportions is fully possible today- and us still without a cure.

The Epidemic of Intellectual Arrogance

The Epidemic of Intellectual Arrogance


It’s great to be joined today by Michael Lynch,
who’s the director of the humanities institute, a professor philosophy at the University of Connecticut. Also author of the new book. No at all society, truth and arrogance in
political culture. Uh, Michael, so great to talk to you. Thanks so much for having me. This is such an interesting topic, a to me,
the idea of the sort of combination of a much longer period of pseudo and anti intellectual
realism, which has sort of combined with or crashed with this intellectual arrogance trend
that we’re seeing partially because of the Internet and social media. Can you first just talk a little bit about
what are some of the ways that Internet and social media have made people intellectually
arrogant? Well, when we talk about, first of all, just,
you know, when we talk about intellectual arrogance, what I mean is the idea of being
resistant to improving your worldview by appeal to evidence or to the experience of other
people. Uh, it’s the idea that, you know, you know,
it all and that your, your, your worldview is at least with some respects unimprovable
and I think there are pretty obvious ways that all of us are, are really intimately
familiar with, uh, in which the Internet and the ways in which we use the Internet can
reinforce and encourage this attitude. I mean, for one thing, you know, no matter
what your opinion you may have on, on any topic, you can Google and get some confirmation
for that opinion from some corner of the internet or not. Uh, and in a way, you know, right now, uh,
it used to be that scene was believing we’d say, but now googling is believing and therefore,
and you know, getting information, uh, in that way, the, the sort of weird, paradoxical
fact is that our ability to get information in the, in that way so easily, right at our
fingertips is also, uh, not, not just making us in a sense, feel more knowledgeable, but
feel that we, we are, uh, always right. Because of, uh, the ability to confirm my
biases. I mean, one add, one other element to that,
which is that the Internet is a personal personalized information seeking device. Uh, as it were, a set of devices and platforms. Uh, everything that we encounter on the Internet,
uh, from the news that comes down, uh, our Facebook feed to, uh, the ads that we see
on the pages we visit are all personalized. And of course that’s great when, uh, we’re
shopping for books or shoes or what have you. It’s not so great when we’re shopping for
facts because if you’re just getting the facts that confirm your preexisting prejudices,
that’s a, you know, short road to type of epistemic disaster. Yeah. There are some elements to the social media
platforms, the way you’re talking about algorithmically and otherwise, which sort of, um, encourage
or perpetuate a sort of reasoning from emotion and style rather than facts. But, but beyond that, is there something about
social media and the Internet that just beyond the algorithms does encourage people to be
arguing more from emotion rather than from fact? Yeah, I think there is. I think that one of the things that we, uh,
besides the sort of algorithms and the personalization, one of the things that I think is really motivating
this rise that we see in a type of arrogance and including what I would call as type of
tribal arrogance, is that we’re often unaware of how we’re communicating on social media. Um, we’re sort of in a sense a blind to, to
the real nature of our communicative acts. Here’s an example. When you share, when we all share something
online that’s a news story, whether it’s fake or otherwise, when we share some piece of
news content, uh, you know, from the Guardian or, or from this show or what have you, you
think of yourself, uh, as at least I do as like sharing some piece of, you know, factual
information or at least saying, you know, here’s some interesting opinion that you should
probably pay attention to. And I’m saying that to my, my friends or followers. Yeah. So it looks like I’m engaging in sort of the
game of, you know, giving reasons and so forth. But really it seems like we might be doing
something else. So one reason to think that is because a lot
of data’s coming out right now, uh, that show that something that we probably all intuitively
know, which is that almost no one that shares things online reads what they share and what,
you know, what that, that so just something, it’s just that we’re really not, we’re doing
something else. We’re communicating in some other way. And what I think we’re often doing is what,
what we’re doing is signaling that, well, we’re a member of a particular tribe or group. We’re saying we’re on this team and we’re
so we’re, and we’re communicating. In other words, I sort of emotional feeling
and, or perhaps we’re communicating in a sense of outrage. And of course the platforms are hardwired
to encourage this sort of thing. The sorts of, uh, you know, the treats, again,
things that most of the people listening here are going to know is that the more sort of
emotional language you include in your tweet or your post, uh, the more sort of at language
of outrage who include the higher the likelihood that that will be reposted, reshare, reshared
or retweet it. And that fact alone suggests that the whole
economy of social media is, uh, encouraging us to engage in this, uh, sort of expression
of sentiment. I was David Hume, the philosopher would call
it a door emotion. And the fact that we’re not aware that we’re
actually doing that makes us really easy marks. Yeah. Well, this, this starts being dovetail with,
um, findings from such, you know, varied academic disciplines as what Jonathan Height has written
about in moral psychology. What Daniel economen has written about in
behavioral economics that in many times we simply, we believe that we have come to our
conclusions based on the evidence. When in reality, we’ve often come to our conclusions
for other reasons. Hight would say it relates to our moral values
that, that resonate more with us. Uh, Daniel condiment would have more of a
logistical, practical behavioral economics approach, but that we are first coming to
our conclusions then finding information to justify them. And that’s where I think social media has
really scaled up this mechanism. Yeah, it’s a, it’s, it’s definitely a, a device,
a mechanism as you just said, uh, to fuel confirmation bias. I mean there’s been a lot of research as,
as most of the listeners will probably know, uh, about this sort of bubbles, the uh, information
and epistemic bubbles that we live in that is, uh, fueled by the personalization we talked
about and also, uh, encouraged by the, the, the, the hard wiring of the platforms as I
was talking about, uh, them to encourage the emotional exchange over informational exchange. I mean, I think what we’re finding is that
both the economy of social media and our, our, our psychology, our human psychology,
our PR, our just to working together and formed me to sort of toxic mix that’s include increasing
this type of arrogance that we’re talking about. And of course you have to add to that politics
ideology. Right now in our country, there is an increasing,
there are ideologies that are starting to celebrate the idea that fat, uh, facts and
unreason and the experts and science celebrate that those things should not be listened to
and that you should trust your gut and that you should trust your child and that it’s
the tribe that gives power and it’s not, and we’re not answerable to the facts that, that
ideology together with the psychology that we’ve already, we were just talking about. And, uh, the, the technology that’s a real
toxic mix and it’s really leading to what I’m calling the know-it-alls society. So that’s what I wanted to talk about next,
which is what do we know empirically, uh, or, or a quantitatively about the partisan
divide on some of these phenomena. Because, for example, there are many reports
which say if you look back at the 2016 election, the amount of actual fake news, not using
the definition of the current president but actual just straight rate fake news that was
shared was significantly higher by conservatives than by liberals as one example of showing
that this phenomenon is not sort of taking root equally across partisanship. What can you add to our understanding of the
partisan element to this, uh, sort of cultural element that you’ve identified? The no, it all society. Okay. Well, you know, when we think about polarization,
so let’s step back a little bit and think about, uh, what, you know, common topic of
conversation conversations like this, which is that, uh, you know, were polarized. W recent data for example, from Pew, suggest
that on a broad range of issues, uh, uh, on, on actual issues, if you pull people, uh,
who are both conservative leaning, conservative, liberal, leaning and liberal, you find, surprisingly,
while of course Americans are, you know, strongly divided on a whole number of issues, there’s
actually much more agreement than you might Annecy Lee think. Yes. At the same time, at the same time, there
is increasingly a dramatic increase in polarization of what we might call effective polarization
polarization or, uh, group polarization. That is, we are more and more prone to describe
the people on the other side of the aisle as distrustful, as, as, as untrustworthy,
as a moral, as ignorant. Uh, and we increasingly know that the other
side describes us. Whoever the up us is in the same way, and
we resent them for it. That, so the first thing I think to keep in
mind is that there’s a sort of, hi, there’s a growing awareness that we, uh, that we are
sort of, uh, polarized in this way and there’s, I’ve strong resentment antagonism that’s fueling
being fueled precisely from that awareness. Now, to get back to your question about, uh,
how these different ideologies both on the left or the right, respond or, or react to
that I think in, in very different ways. There’s no doubt right now, at least in my
mind, that, uh, many of the ideologies on the y on the right, particularly ideologies
that are driven by nationalism, uh, and, uh, white nationalism in particular are ideologies
that are self-consciously celebrating, uh, a, uh, rejection of, um, what we might have
called rational authority authority. Uh, that’s part of what’s fueling, uh, some
of the enthusiasm I think that we see from, from particular advocates of that ideology
online. The thought is, uh, and we, we see it, I think
an indeed by the inhabitant of the White House. I mean, if you want to talk about arrogance,
it seems like, uh, exhibit number one of course is Donald Trump, a man who after all has been
known to say that he’s the humblest person that he knows. Uh, look, I think it’s not, so it’s not, I
think it has surprised most of the, your listeners that, uh, that white nationalism is a view
as a view according to which, you know, uh, whites are superior. Uh, they, uh, the, uh, whites intrinsically
know more, are better people. That sort of, uh, nonsense. That’s clearly an attitude that is symbolized
by or in, in embodies as type of arrogance that I had been discussing. And I think that the degree to which that’s
continues to be propagated, uh, is the degree to which we’re going to see an increase, uh,
increase in sort of effective polarization that we were talking about before. On the other hand, I also want to point out
that, look, it’s, uh, if you want to look up intellectually arrogant in the dictionary,
you’re probably gonna find a picture of a face very much like mine. I mean, I’m out. I’m a white male, liberal, Progressive College
professor, uh, to do a lot of people in the country. You know, I, I embody intellectual arrogance
and I imagine some of the people listening have probably been thinking that. Fair enough. I think it’s important that progressors realize
that we are not immune to implicit bias. We are not immune to the sort of problems
that are inherent in human psychology that afflict the rest of mankind, so to speak. Uh, progressive’s I think we, and I am, I
have been guilty of this and some of your listeners might think I’ve been guilty of
this already and this is that you can fall into thinking that, uh, well, uh, conservatives,
you know, they’re all like, uh, they all, they all fall into the same buckets. Uh, they all are the ones that have prejudice
and bias and we are the, we are the tribe of reason and rationale and we are free of
those things. That’s a mistake. It is falling into the same type of tribal
arrogance that were there. You know, I, for 1:00 AM trying to combat, so I will, um, frequently, somewhat frequently
get phone calls from viewers who will say, Hey, David, you know, a couple years ago I
fell into an alt-right sort of echo chamber. I was watching some gaming thing on youtube,
which led me to Stefan Molyneux and then Ben Shapiro. And then, Whoa, okay. What they, they described the path in and
they say they, I bought into it completely. And then the algorithm showed me, uh, a left
wing Gamer, which brought me to you and to, you know, they’ll name other people that do
what I do. And now I’m out. I’m out. I’ve, I’ve sort of been deprogrammed from
that. Uh, and of course my initial reaction is,
okay, that’s the outcome is a good one as far as I see it. But is there not a bigger problem here that
merely by clicking around on youtube, you were first pulled to the extreme, right? And then merely by chance you became pushed
to the extreme left too. I hear the, uh, way too malleable nature of
so many people’s thinking and I’m curious what your reaction is to those stories of
radicalization and de Radicalization, which even if we like the way that the outcome went
to me signal a sort of problem plot, problematic, deeper problem. That’s a really interesting point. Uh, like you, of course I celebrate people
becoming de radicalized. Yes, entirely from violent nationalist ideology
is, but I also agree that what that sort of anecdote or story illustrates is the passiveness
by which most of you know the pass away in which most of us seem to know nowadays. Much of what we know we Google now is right. I was talking about earlier, that’s how most
people today receive most of their social, their information. And while again, that’s, that can be really
super useful. I Google know all day every day. Um, it’s also I think changing the way we
interface with information and how we critically evaluate it. I think that one of the things that, one of
the things that I, I talk about in the book is some lessons from some very ancient, uh,
philosophical figures, including going back all the way to Socrates. Socrates. One of the things that’s really interesting
about the license you can get gleaned from the end of his life is that he was somebody
who was interested in questioning, uh, both authority and, and himself. He said, well, you know, one of the things
that I really, the only thing I really can say I know is that I don’t know very much. And he was keen of course, to sort of bring
down the people who claim that they know, uh, quite a bit about things. And he was like that he some a pleasure clearly. And in, in getting them to admit that they
didn’t know as much as I did and that’s great. But he also wanted us to focus on our own
attitudes. And he thought that in order to do that you
needed to get outside on the street literally and start talking to people to start having
conversations. I think there’s something to be said with
that attitude. Not so much as that you can’t talk people
to people online like we’re doing right now. That’s perfectly, I think Socratic what, uh,
Socrates I think was really pushing us there was to think of ourselves not as passive,
just shockers of information, but as, uh, active inquirers people who get out and try
to, you know, read, engage, talk to one another and question, question assumptions. And as I said, continue to question your in
yourself and your own, your own biases and prejudices that you might not have been aware
that you actually have a very, very good advice for sure. And if only I was taking place, if only it
was easier to make that the reality based on how a lot of these online platforms are,
are deliberately configured to, to really generate the opposite. Um, we’ve been speaking with Michael Lynch
who’s author of the new book. No, it all society, truth and arrogance in political culture. Michael, really a pleasure having you on today. Thanks so much. It was great.

Why eating insects makes sense | The Economist

Why eating insects makes sense | The Economist


The world’s population is projected to reach
11 billion by the end of the century. Feeding that many people will be a challenge, and
it is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture. That is why
some people advocate an unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably:
by eating less meat, and more insects. About 2 billion people already eat bugs. Mexicans
enjoy chili-toasted grasshoppers. Thais tuck into cricket stir-fries and Ghanians snack
on termites. Insects are slowly creeping onto Western menus as novelty items, but most people
remain squeamish. Yet there are three reasons why eating insects makes sense. First, they are healthier than meat. There
are nearly 2,000 kinds of edible insects, many of them packed with protein, calcium,
fibre, iron and zinc. A small serving of crickets can contain the same or more protein as a
similar sized serving of beef, but have half the fat and far fewer calories. Second, raising insects is cheap, or free.
Little technology or investment is needed to produce them. Harvesting insects could
provide livelihoods to some of the world’s poorest people. Finally, insects are a far more sustainable
source of food than livestock. Livestock production accounts for nearly a fifth of all greenhouse-gas
emissions – that’s more than transport. By contrast, insects produce relatively few
greenhouse gases, and raising them requires much less land and water. And they’ll eat
almost anything. Despite all this, most Westerners find insects
hard to swallow. One solution is to use protein extracted from bugs in other products, such
as ready meals and pasta sauces. Not having to look at the bugs, and emphasising the environmental
benefits, might make the idea of eating insects a bit more palatable.

The Age of Giant Insects

The Age of Giant Insects


This episode is supported by The Great Courses Plus Even though we often refer to this time in
history as the Age of Mammals, we should probably be calling it the Age of Insects. Because, just looking at the numbers, there
are way more of them than there are of us. Humans alone number more than 7 billion at
this point, which is … a lot. But insects? Try 10 quintillion! We may like to think we’re in charge because
we make the rules and, well, we’re bigger than they are. But insects, and other arthropods, weren’t
always so small. About 315 million years ago, they were not
only abundant. They were … enormous. To meet the biggest invertebrates to ever
crawl across the Earth, we have to go back to the Carboniferous Period, from 298 million
to 358 million years ago. That’s when you’d find the likes of Meganeura. It was a griffinfly, a giant relative of today’s
dragonflies, that had a wingspan of about 70 centimeters. That’s about the size of a pigeon — more
than three times larger than the biggest living dragonfly. Meager by comparison was Stephanotypus, another
griffinfly that was still some 40 centimeters across, about as big as a robin. And this greatness in size wasn’t limited
to insects! You see out-sized arthropods all over the
world during this period… like Arthropleura. You know those cute little millipedes you
find curled up under rotting logs in the woods? Now imagine one of those about two meters
long and a half meter wide, shuffling like a living carpet over the undergrowth. It was probably the largest arthropod that
ever walked on land. So. What allowed these invertebrates to get so
big? The answer … is oxygen. Take a deep breath. Right now, the amount of oxygen in atmosphere
is about 21 percent. But back in the Carboniferous, it was nearly
35 percent! That’s because the Carboniferous was a time
of incredible, runaway plant growth. Huge forests full of ferns, mosses, and some
of the earliest vascular plants had taken over much of the planet. They sucked in carbon dioxide and pumped out
oxygen in enormous amounts. Now, you might be thinking: Earth has lots
of trees now. So what’s the difference? Well, today, that big log you find in the
woods with all of those bugs under it? That log is being decomposed by bacteria,
among other things, that take in oxygen, and release CO2. But in the Carboniferous, those wood-eating
bacteria didn’t exist yet. So Earth’s giant, primordial forests were
taking in lots of carbon dioxide and pumping out lots of oxygen. That’s what plants do. But since the trees weren’t decomposing,
the CO2 wasn’t being released back into the atmosphere. The result was an all-time high in the world’s
levels of atmospheric oxygen. And that’s what made giant arthropods possible. Because, arthropods don’t breathe the way
we do. They have a system of external openings called
spiracles, that lead to a branching network of tubes called tracheae, that diffuse oxygen
through their bodies. And this puts a limit on their body size. Arthropods can only get so big before they
can no longer draw enough oxygen from the air. But in the Carboniferous, the abundance of
oxygen in the atmosphere made it easier for arthropods to get the O2 that they needed,
which allowed them to reach record-breaking sizes. In fact, paleontologists have managed to make
this happen today in the lab, by experimenting with modern insects. By raising dragonflies, beetles, and other
insects in controlled, oxygen-rich enclosures, scientists at Arizona State found that successive
generations of arthropods can grow faster and larger. But, of course, it’s possible to get too
much of a good thing. So, some scientists have proposed another
theory — that arthropods got huge not because they could, but because they had to. Lots of oxygen might have been a beneficial
for grown-up arthropods, but it also could’ve posed a threat to their larvae. Young invertebrates can’t control their
intake of air like adults can, and too much oxygen can be deadly. So researchers at Michigan State have suggested
that ancient arthropods began producing bigger larvae, so they’d take in less oxygen relative
to their body size. And those bigger larvae resulted in bigger
adults. But, you know enough about natural history
at this point to know that even the biggest creatures don’t stay on top forever. About 275 million years ago, during the Permian
Period, the world changed, yet again. The levels of atmospheric oxygen started to
plummet — why, we’re not sure. Ancient climate shifts might’ve had something
to do with it. But as oxygen levels fell, the interiors of
the world’s continents got warmer. This shrunk the big swamps that were acting
as natural carbon sinks. So, swamps weren’t pumping out as much oxygen
as they used to, and, on top of that, decomposers finally appeared that were able to start breaking
down all of the dead wood. As these microbes took in oxygen and released
carbon dioxide, global levels of O2 dropped even more. And with less oxygen available, it became
increasingly hard for the giant arthropods to survive. By about 305 million years ago, the two-meter-long
Arthropleura could no longer be found on the forest floor. By 299 million years ago, the last of the
Meganeura had flapped its wings. The arthropods that followed never got quite
as spine-tinglingly large as their ancestors were. But, of course, everything turned out fine
for them! Today, we’re totally outnumbered, both in
biomass and in diversity, by insects, arachnids, and other land-based arthropods. But if there ever was a time that was a true
Age of Insects, it was probably the Carboniferous Period, when arthropods of all kinds were
living large. Thanks to the The Great Courses Plus for sponsoring this episode. The Great Courses Plus is a digital learning service that allows you to learn about a range of topics from educators including Ivy league professors and other educators from around the world. Go to TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/Eons and get access to a library of different video lectures about science, math, history, literature, or even how to cook, play chess, or become a photographer. New subjects, lectures, and professors are added every month, like the Introduction to Paleontology series taught by Professor Stuart Sutherland. You can learn about everything from Earth’s shifting crust to Taxonomy and more! With The Great Courses Plus, you can watch as many different lectures as you want – anytime, anywhere without any tests or exams. Help support the series and start your free one month trial by clicking the link below or going to TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/Eons What do you want to know about the story of
life on Earth? Let us know in the comments. And don’t forget to go to youtube.com/eons
and subscribe! If you think dragonflies are fearsome, wait till you see their babies. Our friends at Deep Look filmed them shooting out their super-fast mouthpart to catch a meal. Check it out here.

What is chlamydia? | Infectious diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy

What is chlamydia? | Infectious diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy


– [Voiceover] Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted
infection in the world. Sexually transmitted infection. And you might recall from our conversation about gonorrhea,
chlamydia often co-infects with gonorrhea, or they tend to occur together. Now there are several species of chlamydia that exist, but when we talk about the most common STI that’s responsible for the disease chlamydia, we’re talking about chlamydia
trachomotuis, trachomotuis. And the way it gets this name, trachoma is the term for the eye infection that occurs with chlamydia, as we’ll talk about in a minute. Now with any sexually
transmitted infection we have to consider the mechanism by which the infection spreads from one person to another. And that process is called transmission, and there are several ways that chlamydia is transmitted from one person to another. Sex is the most common way and that can include oral sex, vaginal sex and anal sex. Childbirth is another important mechanism for transmission, as we’ll talk about in a few minutes. And finally one of the unique ways that we can transmit chlamydia that we can’t with many other sexually transmitted infections is with direct contact. Now I want to throw a
big asterisks over here. Because chlamydia can only live outside of a human host for about a few seconds to a minute. So direct contact means something like scratching an infected organ of the body, say part of the genitalia, and then directly touching another part of the body like the eye. This doesn’t count for one person touching another person directly and spreading the infection. That’s very rare and unlikely to occur. Direct contact means to spread from a person to another part of that same person’s body. And we’ll talk about that in the case of conjunctivitis or an eye infection of chlamydia. So now let’s move this
list off to the side, and focus on my poor friend right here, who’s going to have
all the different signs and symptoms you can get with chlamydia. Now as I mentioned already, chlamydia is mainly spread through sex. So why don’t we start by focusing on the sexual organs right here, which I’ve drawn out already. And I want to label
this side as the female. So right here is the urethra, right here is the entrance to the vagina, the vagina, which leads up
here to the cervix, the cervix. And I won’t label it
here but this is the anus and this leads up to the rectum and the rest of your lower
gastrointestinal tract. And on this side we have the male that starts with the penis,
the testicle, the prostate, the bladder, the urethra, and I’ll label the rest
of this in a minute. But let’s focus here on the female. Now let’s say for instance that this female is infected by a male, and so here’s a chlamydia
trachomotuis bacterium that’s making its way into the vagina. And I’ll just label
this as our key up here, that’s what I’m going to
draw chlamydia to look that. And from here the chlamydia will multiply and spread further up the genital tract on it’s way to the cervix. And the same thing can occur
with the urethra nearby. Perhaps we can have
chlamydia spread up this way and into the urethra. And the interesting thing about chlamydia is that it’s predominantly an intracellular organism, or
an intracellular bacterium, which just means that it
likes to live within a cell. Which in this case means,
the human host cell or the epithelial cells
that line the vagina, or the epithelial cells
that line the urethra. Now the symptoms that we have that are associated with chlamydia are due to the white blood cells that come and attack the bacterium. What they do is that they’ll notice that there are chlamydia inside of these epithelial cells, and
they will target the cells that are infected to cause a process that’s called apoptosis, apoptosis; which is the very neat
and organized killing of a specifically selected cell. So I’ll write here cell death. So it’s cell death that is programmed by the white blood cell. Now as I’ve drawn here, we usually don’t have a
single chlamydia bacterium that comes to infect the genital tract or the urinary tract. You’re going to have many of these guys that are inoculated or
spread into the tract. So there’s going to be, as a result, a lot of white blood cells that come from the blood stream to the genital or the urinary tract to attack the infected epithelial cells or any chlamydia they can eat up that’s outside of the cells at the time. And when all these white blood cells show up from the blood stream and go to the genital or the urinary tract where they’re not suppose to usually be, we get this process of inflammation. Inflammation, and that’s what causes us the swelling, the burning, and the general pain that’s associated with a chlamydia infection. That means that at the urethra when it gets infected, you have urethritis, urethritis. And the burning sensation you have when you pee is called
is dysuria, dysuria, which just means uria
referring to the urinary tract and dys meaning some complication or something that’s out of whack, or has a disorder, dysuria. The same can be said for an infection of the epithelial cells
that line the vagina, resulting in vaginitis or
if they go further up here to the cervix, you get
cervicitis, cervicitis. And just like there’s a
term for painful urination, there’s a term for painful
sex or intercourse. And that’s called dys,
which means disorder again pareunia, dyspareunia. Where pareunia just means the
act of intercourse or sex. Now there are a lot of similarities that you can draw here
in the case of the male. So say if we have some
of the chlamydia bacteria spreading up the urethra, the urethra. That’ll cause urethritis. Or if it spreads up here to the prostate, this pink guy over here
that’s the prostate, you can get prostatitis, prostatitis. Now the one thing I should mention that’s different in the case of the female versus the male is that there’s an opening from the uterus into the abdominal cavity through the fallopian tubes. And so if the chlamydia spreads so far up through the
cervix in to the uterus and out the fallopian tubes, they can actually seed or spread into the abdominal cavity. And this happens as well with gonorrhea and the term we use for
this type of infection is called pelvic inflammatory,
pelvic inflammatory disease. Pelvic inflammatory disease or PID. And there are several other complications that can occur because of having PID, and we’ll talk about
that in a separate video. And I’ve run out of space to show it here but another very telltale sign of a sexually transmitted infection, especially when white blood cells are coming from the blood stream to attack the infected epithelial cells and the bacteria, you’re going to have that apoptosis or that cell death that
occurs along the way. And so, the dead epithelial cells, the dead white blood cells and even the bacteria will come out of the tip of the penis from the urethra or from the urethra in the female. And what you’ll actually see is pus. So you’re going to have, what can also be referred to as a creamy, purulent
discharge or just pus that represents the
dead white blood cells, epithelial cells and
bacteria that are being essentially peed away. Now from the genitals, chlamydia can spread into the blood stream to go elsewhere in the body. And there are a couple
of very classic places it shows up. One place it can spread
from the blood stream, right here is the eye. So I’ve drawn this gentleman’s eye down over here and he’s looking downward. And remember, as I mentioned just now, in addition to spreading
from the blood stream, chlamydia can also spread
from direct contact into the eye. Let’s say if there’s some
pus that’s discharged and a person is confused about why that’s coming out and they touch it with their finger and then rub their eye, you can directly spread
chlamydia into the eye. And it starts by affecting this
reddish portion right here, and that’s called the
conjunctiva, the conjunctiva; which is just a fancy name
for the inside of the eyelid. Now if the chlamydia spreads here, what you’re going to
start seeing are these bumps that occur on the conjunctiva, on the inside of the eyelid. And these bumps will accumulate and start scratching on the eye. And when they scratch on the eye they’re going to start causing
irritation here as well. And so, the conjunctiva which is infected can be referred to as conjunctivitis. But once you start irritating
the white of the eye over here you may actually even spread the infection over the pupil here,
to cause what’s called an opacity. Which just means this
whitening over the pupil that makes it difficult for you to see. And this is what is referred
to as trachoma, trachoma; which is the most common
cause of blindness in the developing world. Another site that can be
affected from the blood stream are your joints. So this knee right here can be infected. So we refer to this specifically
as infective arthritis, infective arthritis. I’ll write arthritis here a
little more in the middle, infective arthritis. Which is exactly what you would imagine the chlamydia spreads
from the blood stream into your joint capsule right here. This white layer is bone,
here’s bone as well. And this grey portion is
the articular cartilage, or the cartilage that separates
the bones from each other. And in between in the joint capsule or this synovial cavity is this fluid, it’s referred to as synovial fluid, that sort of helps the bones move on top of each other smoothly. So remember as chlamydia makes it into any part of the body,
not just in the joint, but also the urethra, you’re going to have white blood cells that come right after it. And these guys are chasing
it with a vengeance. and so you’re going to
have those telltale signs of inflammation occurring
here in the joint as well. And I’m sure you can imagine that having a ton of
white blood cells here within the joint makes it very difficult for you to have smooth movement if, in addition to the fluid, you’ve got these white blood cells and now you’ve got some
chlamydia that’s here. You’re going to have a lot of pain and difficulty moving. And the term for painful joints
is dysarthria, dysarthria; which dys again means
some type of disorder and arthria refers to
the joint, dysarthria. Now a unique thing about chlamydia is that in addition to
infective arthritis, you can also have something that’s referred to as reactive arthritis, reactive arthritis. And this is a very distinct beast from infective arthritis, in that reactive arthritis is the result of the antibodies that you make. So I’ll just write AB for antibodies. The antibodies that you’re suppose to make against the chlamydia; which for some reason in this case will attack both the
chlamydia trachomotuis as well as the joint for some reason. So reactive arthritis is the result of antibodies that are suppose to attack the chlamydia, for some reason mistaking
proteins in the joint for the same proteins
that are on the chlamydia and traveling to the joint to attack it as well. And when antibodies flow into some space, the similar thing happens as what we saw here with
infective arthritis. White blood cells will
also rush to the site to help the antibodies attack whatever it is they’re attacking. And unfortunately in this case, those include proteins
that are naturally found in the joint capsule. This is a really unusual
phenomenon that occurs and it’s sometimes
associated with chlamydia. And in fact has its own name or syndrome, this is called Reiter’s
Syndrome, Reiter’s Syndrome. And it can be best remembered by this popular mnemonic, where if you have Reiter’s Syndrome, you can’t see because you’ve got trachoma like you do here. You can’t pee, because
you have urethritis. And then on top of that you
can’t even climb a tree, because you’ve got reactive arthritis. Now in addition to Reiter’s Syndrome if you have an infected mother, she can spread chlamydia to her newborn child. And have something like this occur, and this is referred to
as neonatal chlamydia, neonatal chlamydia. And first off you might notice here the crusting of the eye; which is similar to something we already talked about, this is conjunctivitis. But you can also see pneumonia in an infected newborn. And depending on how much the chlamydia will multiply and spread to the baby in the uterus, you may also have premature labor. So the baby will be delivered earlier than they should be, or even death. Which is why it’s important for pregnant women to be checked for chlamydia. Because this disorder can
be completely preventable.

EAR WAX REMOVAL COMPILATION WITH FUNGAL INFECTION – EP193

EAR WAX REMOVAL COMPILATION WITH FUNGAL INFECTION – EP193


hi everybody my name is Rhys Barber I’m the audiologist here at audiology associates we upload new ear wax removal videos every Monday Wednesday and Friday At 9 p.m. UK time so please consider subscribing hi everybody this is Rhys barber from audiology associates thank you very much for watching our ear wax removal compilation video today so we’ve got three patients in this video first patients come through with reduced hearing on one side I’ve been using a lot of olive oil in here just to try and clear this blockage but as you can see it’s really deep so sitting just in front of the eardrum so what we’re doing here is just clearing the outer part of the ear canal first just taking some of this soft and loose debris away here you can see a pool of olive oil they’re just sitting at the base of that block of ear wax so we’re just gonna try and grab this bit in a second and take this off the drum he’s actually stuck to the drum here we are it’s got wedged eight it’s a little bit harder on the outside edges there we go lovely and you can see the ear drum there looking nice and healthy so this is what we removed you can see it’s quite a large piece considering the ear drums only about a centimetre across it’s just under a centimetre there so quite a bit quite a bit of an issue as far as the hearing was concerned for that patient so this is the second patient in our compilation so you can see we’ve got some very dry very dry ear wax here so we’ve got the standard size on the tube in here just trying to break some of this ear wax down patients we are having a little bit of irritation in their ears and some reduced hearing as well you can see you got very soft kind of tacky ear wax here this patient does have quite a substantial tremor affecting one side of their body so if you see the camera moving quite a bit is because the patient was actually tremor in quite a lot and the tremor got worse obviously with the more noise in the ear canal so you’ll have to bear with this when it’s worth watching this one to the end so at the moment we’re just trying to manoeuvre the ear wax away from the ear canal walls we’ve got to be a little obviously a little bit more careful than we normally would be just because of that tremor we don’t really want to be kind of digging around too much in here I don’t to work too close to the ear canal walls either because it’s you know with it with the kind of involuntary tremor that we’ve got going on it can dig into the ear canal wall if you’re using tools very close to it so I’m trying to do as little of that as possible you can see we just try and stick it as much as I possibly can here just to remove this outer section there we are we’ve managed to pull it into a nice central piece so it means I can work on the centre of this ear wax you can just see we’re just starting to get a little bit of movement there we go is on its way you can see it’s gs kind of sticking the tremor again a little bit worse there’s obviously where I’ve moved this ear wax now the patient can hear the sound of the microsuction a little bit more which is just causing that tremor just to just a kick in just a little bit more so anyway I just put in the top section don’t know so we’ve got the you can see the darker coloured ear wax behind it now we’re going up and down the ere we go now we’ve got the movement to it so we took it away you can see that piece a what I look in here now though we can actually see spores from a fungal infection in here so you can see lots of little yellow dots so these are all the spores there now if the patient didn’t have the tremor then I would go in and try and remove some of these but because of the quite substantial tremor the patient has it means it’s very difficult to have been very dangerous for me to do that so we’ve sent the patient away to get some anti-fungal drops to pop into those ears and we’re going to check him over again then in a bit of weeks time just to just to make sure everything’s ok for him from that point so just removing some of the harder pieces of ear wax here and there in the second ear canal here we aren’t all staying together quite nicely quite dried up bits of ear wax and a little bit of dry skin in here as well just working our way very slowly we’ve got to be very careful at this point because obviously we don’t want to get too close to this here drum with the tremor there as well so we’re gonna stay away from the ear wax and draw it to us there we are that got it away from the ear drum now so we can then take it out more safely a little bit of dry ear wax there in the Attic the top portion of the ear canal this will just take that away then we don’t stay together quite nicely and a little tiny bit to the right side so we’re gonna stay just above it so don’t touch that ear canal wall or there’s one last piece I’m gonna put the very fine end on here and just stay away from this we very gently we are luckily the tremor wasn’t too bad at that point so we could get it out so this is what we removed you can actually see the spores there to the right-hand side of the larger chunk at the base end there so hopefully the patient comes back for a follow-up we’ll take a look at his is the economic sure everything’s all cleared up this is the last patient now in the compilation gent must come through more of an irritation and a hearing loss there in the ear canal we can see we’ve got some quite large chunks of dry ear wax there some standard sized donor to bone him first as always we try and clear what’s on the ear canal walls as much as we can you’ll see just how tough this ear wax is really hardened up there on the pole quite hard to take this away from the ear canal wall they just manage to get a grip there we go just taking that section away and then we’ll work on the next section at the base of the ear canal here we go if you are enjoying the videos guys and you don’t mind liking if you can share it if you do and if you haven’t checked our Facebook channel page oh I’m sorry already have a look over there are some videos you don’t see on YouTube as well so we can get this larger piece now off the left hand ear canal wall this is actually quite a long piece of ear wax so I’m going to use the crocodile forceps just to grab I the side of this angular section at the front it’s difficult sometimes to get the angle you need with a crocodile for sets because you imagine we’ve got the endoscope which is like a long thin tube just inside the ear and you’re trying to work around that with the tool so sometimes we can’t always get the angle we require we can most other times sometimes we just can’t quite get the angle we need so managed to get the ear wax move to the outer part of the ear canal so we’ve got a gap at the top we can get behind it now with the Jobson horn just manoeuvring this last piece of ear wax out here there it is it’s completely just a tough and hardened up and dried up this last piece of ear wax is just getting trying to get fight it through those hairs on the other part the ear canal yeah you can see we got a little bit of dry ear wax the right side there so we’re just gonna take that away and you go especially a layer of dry skin so break that off there we are I’m just going to Hoover up any debris there we go all looking nice and healthy so this is the other yeah you can we can see the eardrums through the gap here lots of dry pieces overlapping one another here so let’s just grab one of these and take the other way you can see where this is hardened it’s hardened quite solidly onto the onto the actual ear canal walls so microsuction is struggling to get a good enough grip because it’s so hard the microsuction doesn’t always grip quite as well to the heart of ear wax you want a slightly soft edge to it so it can almost bite in just ever so slightly so this is the Jobson horn so we’re just rolling this now down the ear canal you can see a poll quite hot there we go quite hard on it to get it out we’ve got some dry ear waxing skin at the base of the ear canal now so we’ll just get behind some of this there we are I apologise well for not being able to comment as much as I normally do on the videos I know I said in a few videos earlier we’re still looking for somebody to come and join us here at audiology associates so it just means I don’t have a great deal of time so I’m concentrating more on getting the videos out I will comment when I can guys I promise that I do read every single one because I get a little time you comment on my phone so I get to see every time but if you can keep the comments up I do enjoy reading them and as always guys do and just thank you so much for sticking with the channel at this time I know it’s I don’t get to talk to you as much as I’d like to but we just cost rating other videos at the moment and then we are looking nice and healthy so this is what we removed you can see quite large dry pieces there and some dry skin and the same there in inches you very much more snow veneer today if you did enjoy the video then please like if you’d not subscribe to idea you’d like to do so you can click the subscribe button here if you’d like to check out some more videos there also up there now if you want to follow us you can do on Facebook Twitter Instagram and also check our website if you want to know a little bit more about us as always guys until the next time take care

Termites vs Ants – How to Tell the Difference Between Ants & Termites

Termites vs Ants – How to Tell the Difference Between Ants & Termites


Hey I’m Chris, the Bug Guy, from Domyownpestcontrol.com.
Today I’m going to help you determine yourself what is the difference between an ant and
a termite. There’s three distinct ways to determine between a termite and an ant. You
have body segment, you have wings, and then you have antennae. With ants you focus on
the body segments. The body segments are clearly separated between the head and the back region,
also known as the head, thorax, and abdomen. The wings in the front are bigger than the
wings in the back, also called the forewings and the hindwings. The antennae have an elbow
bend like this. Termite’s body segment has a head and tail region and there is no clear
distinct separation between those two. So you kind of have a head and a really large
body. Both wings are large and both are the same size. And then when you go to the antennae
they are very tiny and beaded and they point strait out. And that’s how you tell the difference
between ants and termites. Did you know? Termites are only found in sub-tropical and tropical
regions all over the world. Ants are found on any inhabitable continent. And did you
know there are over 2300 different types of termites worldwide, but there are over 12000
different types of ants worldwide. Whoa! Now that you know what pest you are dealing with,
you can click here to get rid of ants or click here to get rid of termites. For more videos
from Domyownpestcontrol.com subscribe here for more videos.

Home Remedies Of Termites  || Termites pesticide

Home Remedies Of Termites || Termites pesticide


welcome to Homegarden This is the world’s most dangerous insect termite in this video i will tell you how to control termite in over garden organic way Termites outrage in the garden after the rainy season When there is lack of water in the soil, timber in the soil etc., the plant gets very quick in the termites When your plant’s leaves start to dry out suddenly, you understand that the termite has come If you have not treated the termite in time, then your plant will dry up The termite first catches the root of your plant and then eats your whole plant Today we will tell you a home remedy for termites You have to take a dining ash and break it in about 1 liter of water. Take home medicines for your termite Use this solution of asafetida with 50 ml in your plants