Katelyn Kesheimer – Insects of Industrial Hemp: Year One

Katelyn Kesheimer – Insects of Industrial Hemp: Year One


– [Katelyn] Hi everyone, my
name’s Katelyn Kesheimer, and I’m an Extension entomologist
with Auburn University and Alabama Cooperative Extension Service. Today I’ll be giving a brief overview of insects that attack industrial hemp. Many of you are aware that
this is the first year that industrial hemp can
legally be grown in Alabama thanks to the 2018 farm bill that classifies it as an
ordinary agricultural commodity. And a few states outside Alabama have been growing hemp since 2015 or so with the passage of the 2014 farm bill. But prior to that, hemp
has not really been grown in any major capacity since World War II. However, lots has changed
in the past 70 years, and now that we’re back to
growing industrial hemp again, there is much to be learned. So today I’m gonna give a
quick background on hemp, and so far what we learned this first year about pest management in Alabama. So when I talk about industrial hemp, I’m talking about the
plant Cannabis sativa. The genus Cannabis
includes multiple species that produce these unique
compounds that are not found in any other plants
that we know of so far. And cannabis can be broadly separated into two distinct groups, and these include marijuana
and industrial hemp. Now, we all know that marijuana is illegal to grow in Alabama, but while these two groups,
marijuana and industrial hemp are used for two very different purposes, they are impossible to distinguish
from each other visually, and they will interbreed out in the wild. So talking about marijuana that is bred and grown
for its THC content, which is a psychoactive compound. These plants are almost exclusively grown indoors in greenhouses and cultivated for that THC content. On the other hand, we
have industrial hemp, and the major difference
here is the low THC content, is less than .3% THC. And industrial hemp can be grown indoors similar to marijuana, but
it’s also grown outdoors like when you think of a typical row crop shown in this picture here. And it’s bred and grown
for a variety of end uses including fiber, seed and cannabidiol which is used as medicinal
compounds, also known as CBD. So I mentioned there’s a
lot of different end uses, it’s a very versatile plant, and it can be grown for
seed and fiber production, seed can be used for human consumption, and it’s similar to growing
small grains in the field. Hemp grown for fiber can be
used for a variety of things such as clothing, paper,
rope, or building materials. And that’s one of the
reasons it was so popular about 100 years ago. And then hemp grown for fiber and seed are usually grown from seed in the field and have a much higher plant density in the field than those grown for CBD. And so plants grown for CBD is really the majority of the plants grown in Alabama right now. These are much lower density
plantings in the field, and are typically started as transplants, shown here in the greenhouse, and then moved into the field. And these are primary female plants which are the desirable plants as opposed to the male
plants that are also created. And there’s also a lot of variation just in the way that hemp is grown, it’s a very new crop, there’s no real kind of standard protocol for growing it as we’re still kind of
figuring things out. It’s grown outdoors in
the field, on plastic, pots, high tunnels, greenhouses, so there’s lots of variation with it. And with that variation
of growing methods, indoors and outdoors,
comes a lot of pests. These weeds and diseases and insects aren’t really gonna wait
for us to figure out the agronomics of the
crops before they show up, so here we are, and we have to kind of figure it out as we go along. For the next few minutes, I’m gonna focus primarily on insects, but I do just wanna mention
that as you’re growing, it’s really important to have a solid integrated pest
management program, that should be in place
for any type of pest. Especially with hemp because
we know very little about it and you’re gonna get inundated with weeds and diseases and insects. Any of these can hinder the
production of your crop. A lot of the questions this year have focused on pesticide usage and what can we spray to kill the weeds to stop this disease from
spreading, to kill this insect, but there are several other
things that are part of a good IPM strategy that you can do before you wanna even think about spraying that will really help your crop. And so when it comes to pest management, there’s all these different strategies. People usually think about
pesticides or chemical control as their first line of defense, but really, as shown
in this triangle here, it should be your last resort, it should be the last thing you consider. Because there’s a variety of strategies, and if you employ all these strategies and create a healthy crop,
if you have a healthy plant, it is more resistant to
these pests and diseases, it’s able to fight off
more of these problems and can maybe sustain some damage that isn’t going to be economical. And so starting with
cultural and sanitation, cultural control and sanitation, keeping your plants healthy, starting with good, clean seed, starting with a good
clean soil, clean field, making that environment
less hospitable for pests, making sure you’re not going into a field that’s already filled with
weeds or filled with pests that have overwintered and have
just a leg up on your crop. Another often overlooked
method is mechanical control. Just getting out there,
scouting for your pests and hand removing those insects,
creating physical barriers. Sticky traps are really good if you’re growing indoors
in the greenhouse. And then thinking about what are our free options for biological control? What are our natural enemies
that are gonna be out there that can help reduce some
of the pest populations? And so I mentioned pesticides
should be your last resort. If you end up spraying your hemp, it should be used as a
sensible control option. And most importantly, in
accordance with label directions. The label is the law, and so you have to make
sure to follow that label. And so I realized as
we’re in this first year, there’s a lot of confusion, a lot of misinformation
about what we can use in terms of chemicals on hemp. And so just a few things to think about before you put any chemical on your hemp. The number one thing to know is all pesticides used on
hemp have to be registered with the Alabama Department
of Agriculture and Industries. It’s the responsibility of the producer to make sure that the
pesticide can be used legally. And so this goes back to reading the label because that label is the law. And additionally, we have these rules that are put in place
by the state of Alabama, but then if you’re gonna take your hemp to a processor or a buyer, they may have a separate
set of regulations. And so I implore you before
applying any chemical to give your processor
or your buyer a call to make sure that they will still accept the product after the
chemical has been applied. Having this information
beforehand is crucial to ensure that you will pass, because a lot of these
processors have lists of chemicals that they
will and will not accept. They’ll also do residue tests for a lot of different substances and give the product a pass or fail, and so you wanna make sure
that if you put all this time and money into growing the
crop, that it’s going to pass. And finally, be very cautious of any lists that are not released by
the Alabama Department of Ag or Alabama Cooperative Extension. These have not been approved by the Department of Ag
in the state of Alabama. There’s some other lists going around that are approved by other states. And if you apply a product
that is on another state’s list but is not registered with the
Department of Ag in Alabama, it will result in your
crop being destroyed. If you have any questions
or are confused about this, feel free to give me a call, my contact information
will be at the end of this, or call the Alabama Department of Ag to verify the acceptability
of this chemical. Okay, now I’m just
gonna briefly go through what we have seen as some of
the major economical pests so far that are likely going to be major problems moving
forward with industrial hemp. This is not a comprehensive
list and it will likely change. I mentioned this is the first year, and so things may be very
different a year from now, but I imagine that these will
continue to be a problem. And so the first one is fire ants. These have been a major pest of hemp across the entire state of Alabama. Whether it’s grown in
open field conditions, in plastic, in pots, in
high tunnels, et cetera. What they’ll do is they’ll build mounds near the base of the plant underneath the pots,
underneath the plastic, and then they’ll tunnel into the stem as you can see in some
of the pictures here. Chewing and killing the seedlings, especially really young
plants are very vulnerable, and then after they kill a plant, they will quickly move to nearby plants. And then in many cases, it’s been so dry that you don’t see those stereotypical fire ant mounds that
you’re used to seeing, ’cause the ants get so
deep into the ground because it’s so hot. And so the picture on the bottom left here shows the yellowing and wilting
of a plant from ant damage, and you can see some of the tunneling and stripping of the bark that they’ve been doing
in fields this year. So recently we put out a pest alert about some of the products
that were approved through the Department of
Ag for fire ant control. These are all contact insecticides, which means they have to
find the fire ant mound and apply the chemical on
the mound to kill the ants. There is one bait in there, and that’s Extinguish Professional. And the bait means you put out the food, the ants go get it, and they
bring it back to the nest and feed it to all the
workers and the queen. The bait will obviously
be the most effective for long term control. But before applying, again,
check with your processor before to make sure that
they allow it even though this one has been approved
by the Department of Ag. And just one thing, when
using these products, especially the oils and the pyrethrins, these are all natural products and they’ll break down with UV exposure. And so you want to make sure you’re not applying them in full sun. Also, fire ants, they don’t wanna be out in the heat of the day,
they’re not gonna be foraging, they’re not gonna be at
the top of their mounds, they’re gonna be deep down in the deep part of the ground when it’s really hot in their tunnels. And so the best time to
apply these mound treatments is first thing in the morning
before it gets too hot or late in the day when it cools off. The other thing to think about is, these do need a lot of water to get into their
extensive tunneling system, so don’t cut back on water when you’re applying
some of these products. Our fire ant pest alert can be found at the URL at the bottom of this slide. The next major pest
that’s gonna be causing economic damage both indoors and outdoors are the hemp russet mites. These are a special type of
mites that’s very, very small. And what we know so far, these are a specialist on cannabis plants, and so they’re only gonna be
found on hemp or marijuana. When you’re getting plants
or scouting for them, I would highly recommend
investing in a hand lens or a magnifying glass if you have one, because you won’t see these mites without magnification
because they are so tiny on the plant unless
you’re looking for them, but you will see their
characteristic damage. So these pictures show characteristic hemp russet mite damage
with this upward curling of the leaves, yellowing, brittle leaves that can break off. And you can tell these are
different from spider mites if you’re familiar with
spider mite damage, because hemp mites do not produce the characteristic webbing
that spider mites do. However, they are similar to other mites in that
they are very prolific and they can explode in
populations if left unchecked. So you can see in this picture, it’s really bad mite damage, there’s thousands if not millions
of mites on these plants, and the bud’s already
starting to turn brown. So hemp mites can also
infest the flower tops and feed on the pistils, which will render the
female flower sterile. In the picture on the left, you can see the pistil is
healthy and white or green and hasn’t been damaged by mites. To contrast, the pistil on the right is turning brown from a
severe mite infestation. Unfortunately, we don’t
have a lot of information on the life history of hemp mites. Since they’re a specialist
on cannabis like I mentioned, there just hasn’t been a lot
of research done on them. For plants grown outdoors, they may overwinter on infested seeds. For indoor plants, they can
remain on plants year round. Anyone who’s grown plants
in a greenhouse or inside knows just how difficult it is and how much a pain in the butt mites are. And as the mite population increases and starts to kill the plant, they will crawl to the top of the plant to be dispersed naturally
by wind or water. And this is why early control and sanitation are so important. If you are receiving
transplants from a greenhouse, this is where you need
to get out your hand lens and inspect your plants very carefully. This is likely one of the main sources of hemp mites as they’re moving
around through the state. In terms of control, we don’t know a lot about biological control agents yet. That isn’t to say some
generalist predators won’t work, we just don’t know what they are yet. We have some data on what won’t work, but this is a very specific,
unique type of mite, and it behaves differently
than other mites that we have more experience with. And so it’s gonna take a
lot of time and research just to figure out what are the best
biological control agents. And there is some information about using oils like horticultural oils, and they are effective
against some russet mites like tomato russet mites, but they may or may not be effective against the hemp russet mites. Again, we just don’t have this research, and so the best option is to
scout your plants regularly and inspect anything coming from an indoor growing situation, because that’s really where you can have year-round mite infestations. Okay, and finally, there’s a whole host of caterpillars that are known to infest hemp and that we’ve already started to see around the state of Alabama. Historically, European corn
borer was the most destructive, but that really hasn’t materialized yet. But that’s not to say it isn’t a problem or won’t be in the future. There are defoliating caterpillars that we don’t think is gonna
cause a lot of problems, a lot of economical damage
as they chew the leaves. There’s also a hemp borer that hasn’t shown up yet in Alabama. It may be here, I just
haven’t found it personally. One of the main problems
we’re dealing with right now at the end of the season, it’s mid-September right
now, are the bud feeders. And these are feeding on the buds of the more mature hemp plants, both causing economic yield loss and then opening that bud up to infection which can cause bud rot, which will also lead to more yield loss. One of the other more abundant
caterpillars we’ve seen is the yellow-striped armyworm. Corn earworm is also really common. In a lot of instances,
proximity to other crops has determined both the abundance and severity of damage
by some of these pests, and so kind of look at your landscape and see what’s around you, is
there a lot of corn nearby, and use that to gauge
what the threat might be in terms of the caterpillar pests. But the point of this
slide is just to show that there’s a lot of different
species of caterpillars that may feed on hemp at
any given growth stage, and so it’s vulnerable to attack, and we’re still trying to figure out what is gonna be the most damaging, but right now it looks
like these bud feeders are having the biggest impact in terms of economic yield loss. So what can you do? The best thing really is just to be out there scouting your crops to control the caterpillars early. You’ll likely see the feeding damage or frass, which is insect poop, before you see the worms
because they’re really small, they can be cryptic, they
might hide under the leaves in the heat of the day. And sometimes even giving the lack of chemical control options
that we have right now, hand removal may be your best option. But keep in mind that as we get into these later growth stages of these caterpillars, they become increasingly difficult to kill. Bigger caterpillars do more damage, they feed more, and
they’re harder to kill, even if we had all the
chemical options available, a lot of them don’t even
touch these late instar fourth, fifth instar caterpillars. And so the best thing you can do is find them when they’re really young, when they’re only 1/4
inch or smaller at most. And so you really need to be
out there inspecting your crop to make sure that you don’t
have these caterpillars. And so I mentioned it a minute ago, but one of the biggest
problems we’re seeing right now is with corn earworm. They’re still around, the corn
either has been harvested, or even some of the late planted corn is past that silking stage, and so the corn eraworm moths do not want to lay eggs
in the more mature corn, and so the most attractive
crop to them right now is all the hemp that’s around. The hemp has these beautiful flowers and it’s just really attractive
for these moths to lay eggs, for them to hatch and have these nice buds for them to feed on. And once that bud gets a wound
from caterpillar feeding, it now becomes vulnerable
to infection from pathogens, and so this is where we’re
seeing a lot of bud rot in the last couple weeks
with this more mature hemp. So looking ahead, we are seeing some pests that are
causing economic damage, fire ants, mites, caterpillars,
namely yellow-stripe armyworm and corn earworm. But there’s a lot of information gaps. We don’t know what the
relationship between these insects and yield loss is quite yet, and as a result, we haven’t
developed economic thresholds. Just because we have
some insects on the plant doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a problem, it doesn’t mean it’s gonna
lead to economic yield loss. But hopefully some of these questions we can answer moving forward. We expect very much so in 2020, and in coming years
there will be an increase in the acreage of hemp grown
in Alabama and other states, and this will likely lead to an increase in the number and diversity of insects, weeds, and diseases that
can move into the crop. And so it’s important
just to stay vigilant. In 2019, we had approximately 10,000 acres approved for
growing hemp in Alabama, and I imagine that will
go much higher in 2020. And so just stay on top of your scouting and proper identification of
any pest we see in the field. And I understand that we have a lot of legal uncertainties
regarding pesticide usage between the state and federal government, the USDA is hopefully getting ready to release some rules in the coming weeks, and so hopefully that’ll add some clarity to this issue with pesticide usage. But if you have any questions or are confused about what product to use, if you can use it, please
get in touch with me. Please get in touch with someone from the Alabama Cooperative
Extension Hemp Action Team. We are happy to answer your questions. We’d much rather answer your questions than you apply something you can’t then have to deal with
your crop being destroyed. But right now we just have more questions than we do answers, and so as
a researcher, this is great, but there’s just a lot of information gaps that we need to fill moving forward. I hope this was helpful,
here’s my contact information. Please don’t hesitate
to get in touch with me. And hopefully we can get your questions on industrial hemp answered
moving forward, thanks.

The Insect Song for Preschoolers I Bug Songs I Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs I The Teolets

The Insect Song for Preschoolers I Bug Songs I Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs I The Teolets


Learning Objectives: Animal Kingdom-Bugs and Insects Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! The ants go marching, marching for food One by one in the grass The ants go marching, marching for food All day long! Busy bees around the flowers buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Busy bees around the flowers buzz All around the flowers! Crawling spiders spin their web Spin their web Crawling spiders spin their web Crawling and spinning their web! Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves Chomp on the leaves Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves On the yummy leaves! The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink Blink, Blink, Blink The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink All around the trees! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! The ants go marching, marching for food One by one in the grass The ants go marching, marching for food All day long! Busy bees around the flowers buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Busy bees around the flowers buzz All around the flowers! Crawling spiders spin their web Spin their web Crawling spiders spin their web Crawling and spinning their web! Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves Chomp on the leaves Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves On the yummy leaves! The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink Blink, Blink, Blink The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink All around the trees! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere!

10 Pets Who Killed Their Owners

10 Pets Who Killed Their Owners


When you decide to keep pets, you should understand
the risks you’re taking. Here we present to you ten deadly pets that
killed their owners. Number 10: Pit Bull Dog
In August 2016, a 60 year old woman by the name of Susan Shawl was viciously mauled by
her two pit bulls at her home in Conifer, Colorado. Her adult son Richard who tried stepping in
also got injured, and had to call 911 for help. When rescuers arrived, the dogs were no longer
aggressive, but the elderly woman was already drawing her final breaths. Richard who survived the attack, had no idea
what prompted the pit bulls to attack his mother. However, the mother and son pair who lived
together had been issued warnings before, as their two dogs were known by neighbors
to be overly aggressive and loose. The animals were rounded up and taken into
custody, and later euthanized. The whole incident was deemed an extremely
rare and tragic case by officials. Number 9: Black Widow Spider
In 2004, local police in Dortmund, Germany had to respond to complaints of a horrendous
smell coming from an apartment. When they entered the place, they found the
corpse of Mark Voegel, the home owner, covered in cob webs, with hundreds of spiders crawling
all over his body and in and out of his mouth, ears, and nose. In addition to the creepy crawlies, Mark’s
body was being snacked on by hungry snakes, termites, and a gecko. He was estimated to have died at between a
week or two before the discovery of his corpse. Officials described the apartment as a cross
between a botanical garden and the butterfly breeding ground in the film “The Silence of
the Lambs”. The creatures had been kept in terrible conditions,
a form of animal cruelty itself. It is assumed that Mark’s black widow spider
Bettina, had ended her owner’s life with a venomous bite. Number 8: Red Deer
Gerald Rushton had been raising a European red stag since it was a faun, along with other
exotic animals in his property in Harrison County, Texas. He had been ignoring the advice of wildlife
officials to get rid of the stag as it was an exotic animal unsuitable for domestication. In November 2010, as Gerald entered the stag’s
pen to feed it, the 550 pound animal suddenly became aggressive, charging him, and pinning
him against the fence. It went on to trample the 67 year old man,
and gorged him several times with its antlers on the chest, abdomen, and back. The red stag had to be shot so rescuers could
get to Gerald, however, the poor man had died on the scene. Experts commented that since it was fall,
the deer had entered mating season, causing it to become highly aggressive and dangerous
during that time. Number 7: Domestic Hog
In September 2012, Terry Vance Garner, an elderly farmer went to feed his herd of hogs
on his Oregon Ranch. The man never returned. When family members went looking for him,
they were shocked to find bits and pieces of his body scattered throughout the hog enclosure. Due to Terry’s old age – he was 69 at the
time of his death – and no signs of criminal activity, it is believed that Terry had suffered
an accident, possibly a medical emergency such as a heart attack. The helpless man would have then been knocked
down by the 700 pound animals, before being killed and devoured. Not much was left of him, apart from his dentures
and an undisclosed body part. It was confirmed that at least one of the
hogs had been aggressive towards its now deceased owner in the past, having bitten him at least
once. Although domestic hogs are not known to be
as violent as wild hogs, there seems to always be exceptions. Number 6: Hippopotamus
Years ago, a baby hippo was saved from a flood in South Africa. Marius Els, an army major, then bought the
hippo at the age of five months after it grew too big for the people who first took it in. Named Humphrey, the creature would grow into
a 1 ton adult hippo on Marius’ 400 acre farm in Free State province. Marius was repeatedly warned to let go of
Humphrey, as it was considered a wild untamable animal. With their enormous teeth and incredible speed
despite their weight, hippos kill more humans than any other wild beasts in Africa every
year. Despite this, Marius insisted he had a special
relationship with Humphrey, and took pride in owning what was considered one of the world’s
most dangerous animals. But as nature intended, the wild instincts
of the beast took hold. Humphrey frequently escaped its enclosure,
killed other farm animals, and chased humans it encountered. Humphrey would eventually attack his owner
one night in 2011, biting him repeatedly. Marius’ body was found submerged in the river
that ran through his farm, mutilated beyond measure. Number 5: Black Bear
Michael Walz was a dealer of exotic pets who had been keeping wild animals in his home
without a valid permit. His wide collection included a lion, jaguar,
tiger, and a black bear, all looked after by Michael himself and his wife Kelly. In October 2009, Kelly Walz entered the black
bear’s steel cage. She distracted the 350 pound creature with
some food she tossed at one end, and went to clean the other end. But at one point the bear turned around and
brutally mauled his owner. The horrific incident happened in front of
the eyes of her children and some neighborhood children, who quickly went to get help. The neighbor came running, armed, and shot
the bear while it was on top of Kelly. Kelly was pronounced dead at the scene. The attack was in part the owners’ own fault,
as they failed to have a two section cage which would allow the animal to be isolated
at one side while the other is being cleaned. According to that neighbor, Kelly had carelessly
been cleaning the cage her way a thousand times without getting harmed. However, all it took was the 1001th time to
get her killed. Number 4: Burmese Python Snake
In 1996, two Bronx teenage brothers named Grant and Lamar Williams bought a Burmese
python for 300 dollars at a local pet store, thinking to make a career in herpetology – or
the study and care of reptiles. They kept it caged in their bedroom, often
showing it off to friends. One day the 19 year old Grant Williams prepared
to feed his 44 pound snake with live chicken he just bought. But the reptile instead quickly coiled itself
around the young man’s body, preferring him as food. Grant was later found by his neighbors in
a pool of his own blood, lying in the apartment building’s hallway with the 13 foot long snake
still coiled around him. They called 911, and rescuers managed to free
him from the strong python’s grip, but he died over an hour later while on the way to
the hospital. The snake was transferred to Bronx Zoo. The species is one of the largest in the world,
and although can be handled quite well as pets, also readily feeds on whatever prey
it finds. Unlike professional reptile keepers, the young
brothers were careless, and had no idea about the precautions necessary in feeding the large
snakes. Number 3: Camel
This case itself is unusually disturbing for this list. Unlike the other murderous animals mentioned,
this animal killed his owner by trying to have sex with her. Pam Weaver, an exotic pet lover from Australia
was given a camel by her husband for her 60th birthday. The ten month old camel showed signs of erratic
behavior early on, having tried to mate with other animal species in the family’s sheep
and cattle ranch near Brisbane. One evening in August 2007, Pam’s husband
Noel came home to discover his wife’s dead body lying on the ground, with a camel footprint
on one side of her face, and another on her arm. Investigators concluded that the 330 pound
pet had knocked down his owner, lay on top of her, and humped her to death. A camel expert commented that the behavior
was no doubt amorous in behavior, although its sexual aggressiveness was unusual for
its young age. Number 2: Siberian Tiger
As chairman of the Canadian Exotic Animal Owner’s Association, Norman Buwalda was a
big advocate for keeping wild animals as pets. The man had 5 wild cats he kept on his property
in Ontario, including a tiger, lion, and a cougar. In June 2004, a ten year old boy came to his
property to take photos of the exotic creatures on Norman’s property, only to get mauled by
the Siberian tiger held there. The 350 pound cat was on a leash held by Norman. However, it managed to leap forward and attack
the boy, inflicting serious head and neck wounds on him. Norman was never legally implicated as he
had legal possession of the animals. However, the incident caused the neighboring
community to campaign to have the animals banned and removed, which Norman fought hard
against and won. However, Norman would soon fall victim to
one of his own cats he fought so hard for. One day in 2010, as he entered the cage of
one of his tigers alone to feed it, the beast brutally attacked his 66 year old owner. A family member found his mutilated body shortly
afterwards, lying in the tiger’s cage. Number 1: African lion
Al Abell and his wife Kathie had established an exotic animal exhibition farm tucked in
southern Illinois. The private zoo was something the couple had
dreamt of for years, and were finally able to establish in their retirement age. The couple would go on to manage the place
together, but fate took a turn for the worst in February 2004 when Al was left to tidy
the animal pens on his own as his wife left to run errands. The 52 year old man entered the pen of Simba,
a 5 year old African Barbary lion to change its bedding. It was the first time for him to do the task
alone, and his inexperience led him to forget to lock the gate which separated him from
the 380 pound beast that was sitting in a smaller pen while he had the area cleaned. When Kathie returned home late afternoon,
not only did she find her husband missing, but Simba was roaming around freely in the
area outside its enclosure. She had to call the sheriff’s office to put
the lion down, and they eventually found Al’s body lying nearby. Kathie admitted her husband was growing forgetful,
and was careless as he had grown too comfortable around the almost full grown lion they had
raised since it was a cub. Unfortunately, the lion’s natural beastly
instincts were not something that could’ve been tamed by
the couple.

Code Phat Gaya : A Software Engineer’s frustration over production bugs | BC Sutta Parody

Code Phat Gaya : A Software Engineer’s frustration over production bugs | BC Sutta Parody


Ek Software Engineer ko kya chahiye hota hai, zindagi me? Ki wo weekend pe apni drink enjoy kr sake. Aur usko sabse jyada darr kis cheez ka rehta hai? Production Bug ka. The worst thing that can happen to him is – Agar weekend pe koi production bug aa jaye. To yeh gaana maine usi ke uper likha hai.
I hope you enjoy it 🙂 Doston me baitha, main gaming kar raha… Agle long weekend ki planning kar raha… Call mujh ko aayi, main jhat se darr gaya… Baithe baithe lag gayi, mujhe pata bhi na chala Null check bhi lagaya Are Null check bhi lagaya, unit testing bhi kiya… Doston sambhalo mera code phat gaya… Pehli hi release me, exception aa gaya! Doston sambhalo, mera code phat gaya… Pehli hi release me, exception aa gaya! Khabar aisi sun ke, mere tote ud gaye.. Plan long weekend ke mitti me mile logs me bhi dekha, debugging bhi kiya… 8 ghante lag gaye, bug repro na hua! UAT pe sahi tha Are UAT pe sahi tha, jane kaise phat gaya… Doston sambhalo mera code phat gaya…
Pehli hi release me, exception aa gaya! Architect bola – Ye galti hai teri Mujh ko to hai lagta farzi degree hai teri Business wale bole – “Are ye kya ho gaya” “Tool ka revenue itna low kyu ho gaya!!” Itne sare email! Itne sare email, mera BP badh gaya… Doston sambhalo mera code phat gaya…
Pehli hi release me, exception aa gaya! 18 ghante ke liye, main desk se na hila… raat bhar khoja 😉 main thak ke gir gaya! DB Admin bola – koi issue nahi mila… 5 minute ke ander, wo offline ho liya Zimmedari ka danda Zimmedari ka danda mere sar pe aa pada Doston sambhalo mera code phat gaya…
Pehli hi release me, exception aa gaya! Bug fixing ki khatir mera weekend chhin gaya… Doston sambhalo mera code phat gaya…
Pehli hi release me, exception aa gaya! Exception aa gaya Exception aa gaya Written & Performed by: Gaurav Madaan
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18. Swahili 101 – Swahili Vocabulary – Part 2 – Insects & Amphibians

18. Swahili 101 – Swahili Vocabulary – Part 2 – Insects & Amphibians


Hello and welcome back to learning kiswahili
with Kulmansam. In todays lesson, we are going to learn or
add to our vocabulary, continuing from where we left last time talking about fruits.
Today we’re gonna talk about insects and maybe a couple of amphibians.
Actually I have notes that I’ve put on my website where you can go and refer www.kulmansam.com,
umm and I might just add a couple of things as they come along.
Ahh so we’re gonna start with insects. Insects uuhh in Swahili are generally already
referred to in plural form. So you gonna find that alot of stuff is already in plural form
except for one or two things. So lets start with insects!
Insect or insects is “wadudu” Insects=”wadudu”
A single insect is “mdudu” Let’s start with smaller insects like ants
Ant’s in English, in Swahili is “siafu”, [pause and repeats] “siafu”
And a very tiny version of ants is the sugar ants because they always go for suger. But
I believe in the west in America they call them ‘piss ants’, the little black ants, they
don’t actually bite humans per say. Those we call “mdudu chungu” that singular
and in plural we call “wadudu chungu” Uuhh bees, bees is “nyuki”, singular and plural
=”nyuki” Bees=”nyuki” thats for ‘honey bees’
Butterfly, butterfly is “kipepeo”. Butterfly =”kipepeo”. Plural is (Butterflies)=”vipepeo”
Cockroach or cockroaches, singular and plural is both “mende”, “mende”, cockroach is “mebnde”
Dragon fly, I like this one. We used to chase these when we were little.
Dragon fly is called “kerengede”, “kerengede” As kids we also called them ‘helicopters’.
Uhmm fly, flies, the house flies, common house flies is “nzi”, both plural and singular “nzi”.
Grass hopper is “panzi”, grass hopper is “panzi” and the locust is “senene”. Locust is “senene”.
Mosquito or mosquitoes is “mbu”. Singular and plural of mosquitoes is “mbu”
Praying mentis is called “mvunja jungu”. “mvunja jungu” really means “mvunja”=the breaker
of, “jungu” is a clay pot that we used to cook with. I do not know why it’s called that.
But it’s called “mvunja jungu”. Scorpion is “nge”, scorpion is “nge”.
Spider is “buibui” which is both singular and plural. Same as the case with scorpions,
“nge” is singular and plural. The spider =”buibui” is also singular and plural.
Termites is “mchwa”, termites=”mchwa” And a couple of amphibians, frog is “chura”,
frog is “chura”. Any kind of lizard is called “mjusi”.
“mjusi” singular, plural is “wajusi”=lizards. Let me go back to frog (“chura”).
Frog singular is “chura”, plural is “vyura” =frogs. “vyura”=frogs.
Most of the time, just say “chura” you’ll be fine.
And.uuuhhh, like I was saying uuhhh, any type of lizard is “mjusi”, plural is “wajusi”.
You say “mjusi” and then you specify what type of “mjusi”.
So garden lizard for example… we don’t actually have something like that we would still call
it “mjusi” we don’t really specify, people do other things.
uuhh Snake, mmm sanke is “nyoka”, it’s both plural and singular. “Nyoka”=snake.
I think I’m getting away from from insects and amphibians, so we’re gonna stop right
now. With that said, I’ll see you next time in
another lesson. “kwaheri (bye), tutaonana baadae (we will
meet later)

How Do You Get Rid Of A Yeast Infection Under Your Breast?

How Do You Get Rid Of A Yeast Infection Under Your Breast?


How do I get rid of a yeast infection under
my breast? This is a question I’ve been asked a couple of times. Not so much as many of
the other ones, but it’s an important one to answer. First thing to determine is whether it is
a yeast infection or not, and sometimes a swab will do this. Sometimes a good visual
inspection will give you that idea, but generally in areas like the folds of the skin around
the belly or under the breast or between the buttocks or even around the thigh area, if
a person’s quite large, of course, this is going to be a perfect breeding ground for
Candida. You’ve got the darkness, the moisture, perspiration, all that in that area and Candida
is going to like to grow in that area. The most obvious thing to do is to if it’s
possible is to look at some kind of breast reduction or how we can stop this skin from
sort of like hanging together there creating that. Maybe a bra or some kind of a device,
but you’re going to spend regular attention to that area to help overcome it. This condition
needs to be treated both locally as well as systemically.
I’ve had many women from Australia, New Zealand; I’ve treated with this condition over the
past many years, and generally I find my satisfactory long-term resolution is weight loss. Weight
loss will help because it’s going to help the body generally strengthen the immune system,
increase digestive function, we can get the bowel back in order again, reduce the ability
of the body to grow Candida internally, and also help it, therefore, externally. And externally,
we apply things like calendula cream or tea tree oil. We have showers twice per day. We
can get a natural kind of a powder and put dry powder under the breast area there to
keep the moisture away from the region that’s causing it. I wouldn’t use fungal creams if
I were you. I’d probably use a tea tree oil cream, as you can get these kind of products
at a good health food shop, a good cream with tea tree oil.
So dryness, sunshine, these are enemies of Candida. Allowing sun exposure to that area.
Keeping the area dry. Maybe some form of barrier for a while. Weight loss. Local application.
Internal treatment. Internal treatment follow my Candida Crusher program. Go to yeastinfection.org.
Do my quiz on CandidaCrusher.com to determine if you’re mild, moderate or severe and then
definitely treat the outcome based on the quiz. The quiz is amazing. We spent a lot
of time and money on that quiz to get it perfect. It’s the best quiz online. So you’ll be able
to determine with a high degree of accuracy how bad this is affecting you internally as
well as around the breast region. So give those suggestions a go. Thanks for
tuning in.

THE LEGEND OF THE TERMITE (ALAMAT NG ANAY) BOOK WITH ENGLISH/TAGALOG SUBTITLES

THE LEGEND OF THE TERMITE (ALAMAT NG ANAY) BOOK WITH ENGLISH/TAGALOG SUBTITLES


The Legend of the Termite
Story by Mikhail Jamisola Illustrated by Rowin Agarao (MUSIC) A very long time ago, every kingdom in Luzon
was successfully engaged in trade. Each kingdom had its own special product. One kingdom which has a vast mountain range
was ruled by Queen Ana. She was an excellent leader, and so her
subjects were dutiful followers as well. Queen Ana had only one desire. That was to make her
kingdom larger and more prosperous. “I shall become the happiest of queens if I can fulfill my dream,” she said to herself. Nature had blessed the mountain range ruled
by Queen Ana. Its forests were thick with large and towering
trees. Because the trees were in plenty, it became the commodity they traded with the other kingdoms. They exchanged the logs they obtained for
rice, vegetables, fruits, and fish from the neighboring kingdoms. “Let us try to do even better at cutting down
trees so that our kingdom will quickly prosper,” Queen Ana persuaded her subjects. Time flew by. The kingdoms of Luzon were beginning to
flourish. Trade prospered alongside it. The kingdoms near the sea needed plenty of
wood to build ships and other seafaring vessels. The kingdoms in the plains also needed wood
to build storehouses for their products. Queen Ana saw this was her chance to realize
her dream. Queen Ana’s kingdom prospered. All of the kingdoms depended on her because she was the only one who possessed mountains and forests. Though already prosperous, Queen Ana still
was not satisfied. She gave orders to all of her subjects. “Cut down every tree in the forest. We shall use them to trade with the other
kingdoms,” she said. Queen Ana had become too ambitious. She was very eager to enlarge
and extend her kingdom. “When all the trees in the forest are cut
down, I shall be the most prosperous of all!” she
said. Contrary to what she believed, the other kingdoms
did not need any wood. “Queen Ana, we have bartered for too many
logs already. We do not need them anymore,” one king said. Every tree in Queen Ana’s kingdom had already
been cut down. They were likewise unable to trade them with
the other kingdoms. Because her kingdom was so large, all of the
fish, rice, and vegetables that had been bartered in exchange for their
logs had already been consumed. A famine fell upon the kingdom of Queen Ana. The people had nothing to eat. Eventually, they just chose to eat the chopped-up
logs rather than die of hunger. Meanwhile, Mother Nature was angered when
she saw that the mountains had been denuded of its trees. “Who did this?” she asked. When MOther Nature learned that Queen Ana
and her followers had cut down the trees, she punished them. She shrank Queen Ana’s kingdom and turned
them into insects resembling ants. She restored the denuded mountains in order
to prevent any tragedies that could arise from the disappearance of the trees. Time went by, and the wood-eating ants came
to be called “anay” (termite). Just like Queen Ana, they keep extending their
territory, which sometimes even reached our homes.

Getting the Most Out of Termite Inspection Reports 📑 Using Termite Reports to Scope & Plan Repairs

Getting the Most Out of Termite Inspection Reports 📑 Using Termite Reports to Scope & Plan Repairs


Industry best practices dictate that HOAs
undergo yearly termite inspections and treatments to protect buildings from termites and prevent
costly damages caused by termites and other wood destroying organisms. (see termite control in HOAs) Each year your termite control expert would
provide an inspection report for each building, at the very least, in the HOA. The report would detail findings of wood destroying
organisms that include drywood and subterranean termites as well as any damage that has been
caused by the infestations. Annual termite inspection and treatment services
are most valuable to HOAs when they include inspections and treatments of the majority
of unit interiors. (see best participation in TCPs) Savvy HOA community managers and HOA board
members will have usually prearranged a price for necessary termite treatments before the
project begins. This ensures there are no surprise expenses
related to the inspections and local treatments in the community. (See termite treatment types) Upon completion
of the entire inspection and treatment project, the only remaining issue to address would
be the structural damage found at the time of inspection. Proper planning and prioritizing is key to
maximizing productivity and ROI when the time comes to perform major wood repairs in your
HOA. Don’t treat the termite inspection reports
you received merely as a receipt of inspections done and infestations treated. Your inspection reports act like an MRI of
the buildings in your HOA. Provided by the right vendor, termite inspection
reports can give enough detail to be the roadmap you need to adequately prepare for performing
repairs in your community. Your termite control professional should provide
you with termite inspection reports promptly and with enough details that the reports themselves
can be converted into a scope of work from which you can acquire competitive bids. Details of the damage found should include:
Where the Damage is Located Lumber Type Damaged
Measurements and Dimensions of Damage Specific Recommended Action (Repairing Existing
Wood or Replacing with new Wood) Cost to Perform Recommended Work Know before you hire a termite control company
how much detail they will provide in their reports. You are entitled to receive as much information
as possible from inspections performed in the community. Would you be OK with a doctor that refuses
to share x-ray and MRI information that can help prevent major problems in the future? Here are examples of differing levels of detail
that may be provided to an HOA by their termite control company. Very Poor: “Finding: Structural Damage Caused
By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Poor:”Finding: Fascia and Belly-band Damage
Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Average: “Finding: Fascia 10 ft and Belly-band
18 ft Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Better: “Finding: Fascia 10 ft and Belly-band
18 ft Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Repair and Replace Fascia. Patch Belly-band” Best: “Finding: Fascia above Unit 3 (10 ft)
and Belly-band adjacent Unit 5 (18 ft) Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Repair and Replace Fascia
($X). Patch Belly-band ($Y)” Notice the difference in detail at each level. As a manager or volunteer community leader,
it is imperative that purchasing decisions be made based on complete and total information
and zero ambiguity. Notice that the average vendor provides no
information about what their recommended course of action is. Hiring someone with the vague promise that
they will “just fix it” is not enough to meet fiduciary duty. Accurate Termite and Pest Control provides
top-level details in their inspection reports and findings. For years, Accurate Termite and Pest Control
has been a leader in the level of detail provided to HOAs. Accurate remains one of the few companies
who provides an already prepared and detailed scope of work from which a community can acquire
apples-to-apples bids for wood repairs ( see apples to apples bid comparisons). Termite inspection reports are an essential
asset that come as part of the purchase of a yearly termite control program. Be sure to set your community up to maximize
ROI of your annual termite control program by optimizing the usability of the termite
inspection reports you will receive. We are committed to being the number one provider
of convenient and dependable pest control services, so you can Enjoy Home. Call or click for a free consultation. You can reach us at 1 (844) GOT-ANTS.